Hot Best Seller

Prison of Sleep

Availability: Ready to download

After escaping the ruthless Lector, Zax Delatree has a new enemy to fight in the sequel to Doors of Sleep. Every time Zaxony Delatree falls asleep he wakes up on a new world. His life has turned into an endless series of brief encounters. But at least he and Minna, the one companion who has found a way of travelling with him, are no longer pursued by the psychotic and venge After escaping the ruthless Lector, Zax Delatree has a new enemy to fight in the sequel to Doors of Sleep. Every time Zaxony Delatree falls asleep he wakes up on a new world. His life has turned into an endless series of brief encounters. But at least he and Minna, the one companion who has found a way of travelling with him, are no longer pursued by the psychotic and vengeful Lector. But now Zax has been joined once again by Ana, a companion he thought left behind long ago. Ana is one of the Sleepers, a group of fellow travellers between worlds. Ana tells Zax that he is unknowingly host to a parasitic alien that exists partly in his blood and partly between dimensions. The chemical that the alien secretes is what allows Zax to travel. Every time he does, however, the parasite grows, damaging the fabric of the Universes. Anas is desperate to recruit Zax to her cause and stop the alien. But there are others who are using the parasite, such as the cult who serve the Prisoner - an entity trapped in the dimension between universes. Every world is like a bar in its prison. The cult want to collapse all the bars of the worlds and free their god. Can Zax, Minna, Ana and the other Sleepers band together and stop them?


Compare

After escaping the ruthless Lector, Zax Delatree has a new enemy to fight in the sequel to Doors of Sleep. Every time Zaxony Delatree falls asleep he wakes up on a new world. His life has turned into an endless series of brief encounters. But at least he and Minna, the one companion who has found a way of travelling with him, are no longer pursued by the psychotic and venge After escaping the ruthless Lector, Zax Delatree has a new enemy to fight in the sequel to Doors of Sleep. Every time Zaxony Delatree falls asleep he wakes up on a new world. His life has turned into an endless series of brief encounters. But at least he and Minna, the one companion who has found a way of travelling with him, are no longer pursued by the psychotic and vengeful Lector. But now Zax has been joined once again by Ana, a companion he thought left behind long ago. Ana is one of the Sleepers, a group of fellow travellers between worlds. Ana tells Zax that he is unknowingly host to a parasitic alien that exists partly in his blood and partly between dimensions. The chemical that the alien secretes is what allows Zax to travel. Every time he does, however, the parasite grows, damaging the fabric of the Universes. Anas is desperate to recruit Zax to her cause and stop the alien. But there are others who are using the parasite, such as the cult who serve the Prisoner - an entity trapped in the dimension between universes. Every world is like a bar in its prison. The cult want to collapse all the bars of the worlds and free their god. Can Zax, Minna, Ana and the other Sleepers band together and stop them?

30 review for Prison of Sleep

  1. 4 out of 5

    Rachel (TheShadesofOrange)

    3.5 Stars If you love multiverse fiction, then you'll likely want to check out this series. This is the second book in an entertaining science fiction series where the protagonist wakes up in a new world every time he falls asleep. Instead of a fast paced thriller, this is more a character driven series with relationships at the centre of the story. Knowing what to expect, I enjoyed this sequel. The stakes felt higher and the plot had a stronger narrative drive. If you are interested in this series 3.5 Stars If you love multiverse fiction, then you'll likely want to check out this series. This is the second book in an entertaining science fiction series where the protagonist wakes up in a new world every time he falls asleep. Instead of a fast paced thriller, this is more a character driven series with relationships at the centre of the story. Knowing what to expect, I enjoyed this sequel. The stakes felt higher and the plot had a stronger narrative drive. If you are interested in this series, you will want to start back at the beginning with the first book, Doors of Sleep. Disclaimer: I received a copy of this book from the publisher.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Lata

    Book two begins with a catastrophe, with the Sleeperhold destroyed, several Sleeper agents murdered, and Zax again travelling the multiverse. Except this time, he's on the trail of Cult of the Worm agents, whose wormtrails he follows, with the intent of following one back to the Worm base. Zax fortuitously makes a friend along the way, a fierce woman, Zaveta, whose clan was harmed by Worm agents. Author Tim Pratt also gives us Ana's perspective, as she and a Sleeper agent are also on the trail o Book two begins with a catastrophe, with the Sleeperhold destroyed, several Sleeper agents murdered, and Zax again travelling the multiverse. Except this time, he's on the trail of Cult of the Worm agents, whose wormtrails he follows, with the intent of following one back to the Worm base. Zax fortuitously makes a friend along the way, a fierce woman, Zaveta, whose clan was harmed by Worm agents. Author Tim Pratt also gives us Ana's perspective, as she and a Sleeper agent are also on the trail of the Worm base. Along the way, we get to hear about how Ana met Zax, and her many hard weeks to reunite with him prior to the end of book one. Zax's appeal lies in his compassion and kindness, which is again what helps him connect with Zaveta. Those traits, along with the few untainted gifts he received from the Lector, like his linguistic virus, demonstrate why Zax has been one of the few successful Sleepers, travelling to more worlds than any other Sleeper, and surviving as long as he has. Though we don't get as much Minna as I would have liked in this book, she's still awesome when she appears. Pratt also gives us some measure of conflict within the Sleepers, as they wrestle with their goals of tracking the Worm agents, and figuring out what to do about them if they ever catch up with them. I liked the balance of exploration, ethics, and occasional humour in this book, which all kept me reading to the satisfying end. Thank you to Netgalley and to Angry Robot for this ARC in exchange for my review.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tammy

    The nitty-gritty: A unique multiverse tale with high stakes and engaging characters, Prison of Sleep is a satisfying series wrap-up. Tim Pratt concludes his high energy sci-fi multiverse duology with Prison of Sleep, and just like Doors of Sleep, it was a ton of fun! This is a series that needs to be read in order, though, so do be aware that this review contains minor spoilers for the first book in the series. In Doors of Sleep, we followed Zaxony Dyad Euphony Delatree—or Zax for short—on his adv The nitty-gritty: A unique multiverse tale with high stakes and engaging characters, Prison of Sleep is a satisfying series wrap-up. Tim Pratt concludes his high energy sci-fi multiverse duology with Prison of Sleep, and just like Doors of Sleep, it was a ton of fun! This is a series that needs to be read in order, though, so do be aware that this review contains minor spoilers for the first book in the series. In Doors of Sleep, we followed Zaxony Dyad Euphony Delatree—or Zax for short—on his adventures through the multiverse. Zax discovers one day that whenever he falls asleep, he wakes up in another world. He doesn’t know why this is happening, only that he wants to figure out a way to stop it and find his way back to his home world, the Realm of Spheres and Harmonies. When the story ends, Zax is finally reunited with a woman named Ana who he lost for quite a long time, and Ana has important information about the multiverse.  In Prison of Sleep, we get to hear Ana’s story and what happened to her after she and Zax were separated. In alternating chapters, Ana recounts her own adventures of meeting a Sleeper named Toros who agrees to help her find Zax. Ana is welcomed to Sleeperhold, where other sleepers and their companions have set up base and are able to safely travel to other worlds—both forwards and backwards—in a conveyance called a sleepercar. However, trouble is brewing in the multiverse. A group of cultists called the Cult of the Worm, the individuals responsible for Zax’s condition, are trying to destroy all the worlds, including everyone who isn’t a cultist. A horrifying creature who calls himself the Prisoner lives in the spaces between the worlds, and he desperately wants to find Minna, who is the key to his diabolical plan. Now Zax must find Minna first and warn her, and try to keep the multiverse from imploding. If only he could figure out how to do that... Prison of Sleep was a bit different from the first book in terms of construction, because instead of following one character, the chapters alternate between Zax and Ana. What confused me at first was that Ana’s timeline actually follows (more or less) Zax’s timeline from the first book, while Zax is always several steps ahead of Ana in this book. But once I figured out what was going on, the story took on a frenetic urgency, with the clock ticking down to the cultists’ terrible plans, Ana frantically searching for Zax, and Zax finding out about the Prisoner and trying to stop the cultists. The tension kept me flying through the pages, because I was so worried about the characters. It didn’t help that they kept getting separated from each other— jumping to a new world without the other by accident—and because of the way the multiverse works, it’s almost impossible to find each other again. Pratt set the stakes extremely high for this story, and I loved it! We meet a few new characters in this book. Zax meets a warrior named Zaveta who ends up sticking with him. In fact, it’s Zaveta who first learns about the Prisoner and is able to warn Zax. Ana was technically a new character, even though she appears briefly in Doors of Sleep. I absolutely loved her chapters, and the love story between her and Zax was very well done. They had a few romantic and steamy days together, but tragically lost each other. There is an urgency to Ana’s quest to find Zax again, not only because of the impending end of the multiverse, but because she loves him and she’s desperate to be with him again. I was a little disappointed that my two favorite characters from the first book, Minna and Vicki, didn’t make an appearance until the very end. Both were such delights in Doors of Sleep, and even though they are mentioned throughout this book, it just wasn’t the same. For those who haven’t had the pleasure of meeting Minna, she comes from a world where the people are part plant. She can regrow parts of her body among other things, and she’s smart and kind and an all around fantastic character. But I will say that Ana and Zaveta helped make up for her absence! The author resolves everything by the end of the book, which is a good thing when you’re writing a duology, but not so good when the ending leaves the reader wanting more. I’ve grown to love these characters so much, that I certainly wouldn’t say no to more adventures with Zax and his friends. Big thanks to the publisher for providing a review copy.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Athena (OneReadingNurse)

    Once again thank you so much to Angry Robot for introducing me to another great author and allowing me to participate in their online book tours!! Prison of Sleep is Tim Pratt’s followup to Doors of Sleep. While I didn’t enjoy it as much as the first book, I think it’s a solid duology and would definitely recommend reading them for fans of the genre! ... I believe it is hard to talk about sequels without hinting at spoilers, so I will keep this review very broad and not spoil anything! The Plot & S Once again thank you so much to Angry Robot for introducing me to another great author and allowing me to participate in their online book tours!! Prison of Sleep is Tim Pratt’s followup to Doors of Sleep. While I didn’t enjoy it as much as the first book, I think it’s a solid duology and would definitely recommend reading them for fans of the genre! ... I believe it is hard to talk about sequels without hinting at spoilers, so I will keep this review very broad and not spoil anything! The Plot & Story: I definitely think that idea wise, Prison of Sleep was the more interesting of the two books.  We get the history of both the Cult of the Worm and of The Sleepers. While Zax’s storyline was equally interesting and engaging, Ana’s ended up being more of an info dump that unfortunately slowed the story down and also confused me relentlessly regarding the timelines. (I mentally confused Zax’s battle with the attack on Sleeperhold at first and contextually it was hard to s I won’t spend a ton of time on world building, but as far as history goes and my understanding of the book’s multiverse – A+ by the end. This is one of the more interesting creation stories I have read – I just can’t discuss it for spoilers. The Characters: Ana is the most prominent new character.  Her point of view is introduced and used to fill in our knowledge gaps as she tells of her travels, training, and experiences with the Sleepers.  That said, I just wasn’t as interested in her and her voice sounded a lot like Zax’s at times. Zaveta was Zax’s new travelling partner and I liked her! She was funny without meaning to be, and occasionally when she meant to be.  Her warrior attributes were a good counterbalance to Zax’s unaggressive approach. One thing was that Zax didn’t really get to be the hero in this one – I think I expected him to be the hero.  Don’t we always expect the MC’s to be the hero? ((Food for thought)). It didn’t affect my rating but struck me that he was more of the passive observer this time while dear, dear Minna and Vicki came back in a big way this time. I also continued to like the chapter headlines as a summary of coming events! Overall: This duology is good for fans of the multiverse, sci-fi adventures, and unconventional heroes.  There is plenty of recap incase anyone forgot important parts of book one, but this is not going to read as a standalone.  My main issue came with Ana’s POV and how she inadvertently confused my timelines – 100% on me. The book is out now for everyone interested!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Roberta R. (Offbeat YA)

    Excerpt from my review - originally published at Offbeat YA. Pros: Inventive (and adventurous) take on the multiverse genre. Interesting, resourceful side characters. Cons: Partly due to the very nature of the book, there's more telling (or recounting) than showing. Will appeal to: Partly due to the very nature of the book, there's more telling (or recounting) than showing. First off...DISCLAIMER: I requested this title on NetGalley. Thanks to Angry Robot for providing an ecopy. This didn't influen Excerpt from my review - originally published at Offbeat YA. Pros: Inventive (and adventurous) take on the multiverse genre. Interesting, resourceful side characters. Cons: Partly due to the very nature of the book, there's more telling (or recounting) than showing. Will appeal to: Partly due to the very nature of the book, there's more telling (or recounting) than showing. First off...DISCLAIMER: I requested this title on NetGalley. Thanks to Angry Robot for providing an ecopy. This didn't influence my review in any way. SEEING DOUBLE The second and last book in the Journals of Zaxony Delatree is richer in adventures and characters than its predecessor, and provides a satisfactory (if wild) explanation for Zax's ability to travel the multiverse every time he falls asleep/unconscious. Told in diary form from two alternating points of view - Zax's and his long-lost girlfriend Ana's, with whom he got reunited at the end of Book 1, only to lose her again - it's an ambitious tour de force weaving together events past and recent (since for a good part of the book Ana recounts her adventures who took place in the same timeline as the first installment's, while Zax records what happened next) that not always succeeds in keeping the confusion at bay, but most certainly entertains. [...] Whole review here.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This is the sequel to last year’s Doors of Sleep, a super-original science fiction book about a man named Zax who inadvertently travels to a different universe every time he falls asleep. This book picks up a bit after that one ends, and this time is told from both Zax and Ana’s perspectives in two separate times. Both encounter more interesting characters from there, and we learn more about the causes of the multi-verse hopping, with everything wrapping up nicely at the end since this is a duol This is the sequel to last year’s Doors of Sleep, a super-original science fiction book about a man named Zax who inadvertently travels to a different universe every time he falls asleep. This book picks up a bit after that one ends, and this time is told from both Zax and Ana’s perspectives in two separate times. Both encounter more interesting characters from there, and we learn more about the causes of the multi-verse hopping, with everything wrapping up nicely at the end since this is a duology - though I can’t say I’d be adverse to revisiting these characters in the future! My only complaint was not enough Minna and Vicky, two of my favorites from the first book, though I did love new character Zaveta. Tim Pratt is becoming one of my new favorite science fiction writers - loved his Axiom trilogy in addition to this totally separate duology. He is great at world building and creating unique and memorable characters, and infusing his books with both adventure and fun. Can’t wait to see what he writes next! Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for a free copy in exchange for an honest review; this just came out last week.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Bryan

    Lacks a little of the wonder and novelty of the previous instalment, but the opportunity to revisit and explain everything made this overall a satisfying read.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Will

    8.0 / 10 ✪ https://arefugefromlife.wordpress.com... I was kindly granted an advance copy in exchange for an honest review. Many thanks to Angry Robot (#AngryRobot #AngryRobotBooks) for the ARC! All opinions are my own. — “They invented multidimensional travel but they haven’t figured out how to make guns?” — At one time, Zaxony Delatree worked as a harmonizer in the Realm of Spheres and Harmonies. Then, following the death of a patient—who died in his arms, covering him in her blood—Zax fell asleep, 8.0 / 10 ✪ https://arefugefromlife.wordpress.com... I was kindly granted an advance copy in exchange for an honest review. Many thanks to Angry Robot (#AngryRobot #AngryRobotBooks) for the ARC! All opinions are my own. — “They invented multidimensional travel but they haven’t figured out how to make guns?” — At one time, Zaxony Delatree worked as a harmonizer in the Realm of Spheres and Harmonies. Then, following the death of a patient—who died in his arms, covering him in her blood—Zax fell asleep, only to awaken on another world. About one month later, on his twentieth world, Zax met Ana. Less than a day later, he knew he never wanted to leave. Something that… could never be. So he fell asleep with Ana in his arms. And she travelled with him, through the place between, awake. Her mind couldn’t handle whatever she saw, and fled Zax immediately upon his waking. Though he searched for her, eventually Zax grew tired, and fell asleep—never to see her again. On his 20th world Zax found love, only to lose it on the 21st. Thirteen hundred worlds later, Zax found something impossible. He’d reunited with Vicki and Minna following the events of Doors of Sleep. The closest thing he’d ever had to a family was back together, even though he feared he’d never see them again. Shortly after, Zax found Ana. Prison of Sleep skips forward a time from this meeting, so you’ll have to wait a bit to see how it went down. There are a pair of POVs within: Zax, who looks forward; and Ana, who looks back. We find Zax alone once more, traveling into the unknown. Only this time, while he may not have any idea where he’s going, Zax is following a specific path—a trail left by the Cult of the Worm. The Cult worships the Prisoner: a god imprisoned in the place between worlds that can only whisper to its subjects as they traverse the place between. These followers it has gifted with the ability to Travel—done via a parasite injected into their bloodstream. It wants only two things from them: to Travel to new worlds and recruit further devotees who will do the same. The more Travelers, the more Wormholes in the ether. The more Wormholes, the weaker the stability of the Multiverse. Only when the Multiverse destabilizes completely can the Prisoner ever hope to escape. When Ana found Zax she recruited him into a secret war against the Cult, one that he was only too willing to join. But now that he has, Zax is having second thoughts. Once more he’s lost Ana, Minna, and Vicki. He’s lost his new friends, his new home. But he has a plan—and while it may not reunite him with his friends, it may well save them all. — Prison of Sleep explores one the biggest unanswered questions left by Doors of Sleep before it: what happened to Ana? Ana, as it is known from the first few chapters of the first book, was Zax’s long lost love, first companion, and lost her mind after traversing the void while awake. When Zax and Ana are reunited at the end of Doors, we are promised the continuation of their story—but who would’ve guessed just how far the rabbit hole went? While Doors was more of an adventure driven via exploration of its sole POV, Zax, Prison is more of a mystery, slow-paced thriller, and character driven title about the relationship between its two main protagonists: Zax and Ana. Now Doors does feature the same style of slow-paced thrill later on, so it shouldn’t be an entirely foreign concept. And… while I say it’s a “slow-paced” thriller, I guess it really isn’t. Both Doors and Prison are rather short books—running between two and three hundred pages—so once things start happening, they don’t have too long to lounge around before the story winds down. It’s more that these two stories feel more leisurely in their approach to telling. The stories were both good, immersive, interesting, highly entertaining, and no trouble to read whatsoever. It’s just that there… there aren’t a ton of heart-pounding thrills, pulse-racing action, or the like that you’d find in most good thrillers. Instead, it’s narrative driven; a tense, atmospheric adventure through the multiverse—on a mission to save the multiverse. Prison of Sleep features a back-and-forth, alternating POV structure that I’ve seen before in books like the Boy With the Porcelain Blade, where the first perspective takes place in the present and the second takes place in the past—1, 2, 1, 2, in that order, until the end. Now, I have some qualms about this approach—as I’m not sure I’ve really read anything that deploys it very successfully. At a certain point what has happened in the past becomes clear in the present long before it’s time for the big reveal. Prison can’t escape this particular issue, as long before the end I had figured out what happened when Ana finally caught up to Zax, along with the aftermath. What I had NOT figured out, however, was that while I’d assumed this to be the big reveal, it um wasn’t. Instead, there’s a twist come Ana’s final chapter—one that caught me completely by surprise. Otherwise, it’s more of the same exciting adventure from Doors of Sleep. Only Zax knows he’s not alone anymore. And instead of wandering aimlessly, he’s a man on a mission. While the mission itself feels a little forced, a little cliché—it’s still a great read. I really can’t object to anything too strongly or find much of a problem with any of this. If you enjoyed the first book, I’m fairly certain you’ll enjoy the second. If you were bothered by cliff-hangers, or empty threads in Book #1—well, #2 ties everything up quite nicely. No major issues, no problems getting through it, or getting immersed in the tale. I’d certainly recommend checking it out!

  9. 5 out of 5

    S.J. Higbee

    This book is the second in a duology set in a fast-paced multiverse adventure tale, so my firm recommendation is to head for Doors of Sleep, the first book in the series, before getting stuck into Prison of Sleep. The first book features Zaxony’s adventures as he is catapulted into travelling to another world every time he falls asleep. Early in his journey, he meets and falls for Ana – and inadvertently yanks her along with him as they sleep together. The catch is that she hasn’t been infected w This book is the second in a duology set in a fast-paced multiverse adventure tale, so my firm recommendation is to head for Doors of Sleep, the first book in the series, before getting stuck into Prison of Sleep. The first book features Zaxony’s adventures as he is catapulted into travelling to another world every time he falls asleep. Early in his journey, he meets and falls for Ana – and inadvertently yanks her along with him as they sleep together. The catch is that she hasn’t been infected with the parasite that allows him to hop from one world to another and she suffers a terrible mental breakdown travelling through the Void without that protection and runs off. Guilt-ridden and grieving, Zaxony has tried to find her. So I really appreciated that in this second book, I got to discover what has become of Ana and get to know her better. I loved this romantic thread that added to the emotional tenor of the story without in any way clogging up the pace or distracting from the main narrative. This means that this book isn’t just from one viewpoint, which I enjoyed. Especially as I got to see what other characters think of Zaxony. As I’ve already mentioned, this story moves along at a brisk clip. Indeed, major events pile upon one another as we shuffle between the two main characters and I had to stay sharp to keep the narrative timelines straight. As with Doors of Sleep, the concept works really well. There is plenty of tension as Pratt isn’t afraid of killing off characters who have featured heavily in the storyline. So I was genuinely concerned for our plucky band of protagonists, throughout – and near the end of the story, I was more than a bit winded when one of the protagonists ended up being on the wrong side. I could appreciate all too well what powers his decision, even if it is a terrible one… Pratt is very good at provided interesting, well-developed characters while mayhem continues to rain down upon them – which is technically far harder to achieve than he makes it look. But… I do have a frustration. A huge amount happens in this book and as I reached the end, I felt this series would have been improved if the events had unspooled over three books, instead of two. This particularly applies to the storyline featuring Lector, the primary antagonist in the first book. While the menace he poses is suitably sorted out – it did rather take back seat to the storyline featuring the Prisoner. And I would also have preferred seeing Pilgrim’s journey develop over a longer time, as it is another strand that feels a bit rushed. This is a wonderful bit of worldbuilding – and like other reviewers, I would appreciate reading other books in this series. Recommended for fans of multiverse adventures with strong protagonists and lots of action. While I obtained an arc of Prison of Sleep from the publishers via Netgalley, the opinions I have expressed are unbiased and my own. 8/10

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    "Prison of Sleep" continues Zax's journey through multiple worlds as he tries to stop the Sleeper cult from propagating and destroying space-time. Told from the points-of-view of Zax, and his former traveling partner and lover, Ana, we get insights (and, admittedly, info-dumps) about the cult and the people from various worlds who are working to defeat it. But, can a god who can traverse anywhere be killed? Tim Pratt is a writer who's work is always a joy for me. I became a fan with his Marla Mas "Prison of Sleep" continues Zax's journey through multiple worlds as he tries to stop the Sleeper cult from propagating and destroying space-time. Told from the points-of-view of Zax, and his former traveling partner and lover, Ana, we get insights (and, admittedly, info-dumps) about the cult and the people from various worlds who are working to defeat it. But, can a god who can traverse anywhere be killed? Tim Pratt is a writer who's work is always a joy for me. I became a fan with his Marla Mason series, and have liked everything since. I read "The Twilight Empire" at the same time I was reading "Prison of Sleep," and was intrigued by how effortlessly he builds worlds and characters. Zax has traveled over 1000 worlds, and he has lost several companions along the way. The cult are looking for him, either to convert or to kill him, and it's becoming harder to stay ahead of them. Ana has also become a traveler, after surviving near-madness due to exposure of the space between the worlds. She's a bit more pessimistic than Zax, but also less idealistic. They balance each other well, and readers will hope for their eventual reunion. We also meet back up with some characters I thought might be lost for good after the first book. No spoilers, but they've joined the fight as well, and are working their way to Zax. Despite the large blocks of info, the plot moves well and makes sense. I think possibly it could have been improved by having two parts Zax to one part Ana in the chapters, but then too, Ana's sections give us lots of the backstory of the cult and the group working against them. This is a good, solid sci-fi series that will appeal to readers who like to imagine alternate times and places. 4 out of 5 stars I received an advance copy from Angry Robot via NetGalley in exchange for my honest review. This, and other reviews, may also be found on my book blog, redhatcatreviews.com.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    4.5/5 stars 𝘞𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘢𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘥 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘦𝘴 𝘢𝘭𝘭 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘵𝘪𝘮𝘦, 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘧𝘪𝘯𝘥 𝘴𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘤𝘰𝘯𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘵 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯 𝘺𝘰𝘶𝘳𝘴𝘦𝘭𝘧 𝘵𝘰 𝘩𝘰𝘭𝘥 𝘰𝘯 𝘵𝘰. Prison of Sleep is the sequel to Doors of Sleep and the concluding volume in Tim Pratt’s Journals of Zaxony Delatree duology. Contrasting with the more personal and introspective story in Doors of Sleep, this sequel is faster paced and more story driven. Prison of Sleep again follows our favorite involuntary multiverse traveller Zax a few weeks after the events of Doors, and ad 4.5/5 stars 𝘞𝘩𝘦𝘯 𝘦𝘷𝘦𝘳𝘺𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯𝘨 𝘢𝘳𝘰𝘶𝘯𝘥 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘤𝘩𝘢𝘯𝘨𝘦𝘴 𝘢𝘭𝘭 𝘵𝘩𝘦 𝘵𝘪𝘮𝘦, 𝘺𝘰𝘶 𝘩𝘢𝘷𝘦 𝘵𝘰 𝘧𝘪𝘯𝘥 𝘴𝘰𝘮𝘦 𝘤𝘰𝘯𝘴𝘵𝘢𝘯𝘵 𝘸𝘪𝘵𝘩𝘪𝘯 𝘺𝘰𝘶𝘳𝘴𝘦𝘭𝘧 𝘵𝘰 𝘩𝘰𝘭𝘥 𝘰𝘯 𝘵𝘰. Prison of Sleep is the sequel to Doors of Sleep and the concluding volume in Tim Pratt’s Journals of Zaxony Delatree duology. Contrasting with the more personal and introspective story in Doors of Sleep, this sequel is faster paced and more story driven. Prison of Sleep again follows our favorite involuntary multiverse traveller Zax a few weeks after the events of Doors, and adds a new voice in Ana, his long lost first love. Told in alternating perspectives, Zax’s is moving ahead while Ana’s reaches back to the very beginning and races forward to intersect with his. This new format allows for a more steady pacing and a more well-defined story. We finally get answers as to how Zax got his unfortunate talent and the larger meanings behind it. There are less philosophical and ethical debates in favor of more action and suspense. The nature of the story though meant that we get less Minna and Vicki, but I did like the addition of Zaveta. Prison of Sleep delivers a satisfying conclusion the Zaxony Delatree’s story, but I would definitely read on if there were more. *I was given a copy of this book by Angry Robot Books as part of its book tour.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Irene

    What an intricate and beautiful blend of sci-fi and fantasy elements. I really enjoyed how the endless moral conundrums of being at war with a religious cult intersect with the characters' individual ethical beliefs and moral codes. The foreshadowing of the characters' actions was well written, so when a plot twist came up, it was entirely consistent with their thought process. This book is action packed but not frantic. There are built-in slow moments that come naturally into the plot because of What an intricate and beautiful blend of sci-fi and fantasy elements. I really enjoyed how the endless moral conundrums of being at war with a religious cult intersect with the characters' individual ethical beliefs and moral codes. The foreshadowing of the characters' actions was well written, so when a plot twist came up, it was entirely consistent with their thought process. This book is action packed but not frantic. There are built-in slow moments that come naturally into the plot because of the way this world works, which is extremely clever. It reminds me of Kristine Kathryn Rusch's series Diving into the Wreck. Alas, I missed Minna (recently added to my favourite characters list) fiercely when she wasn't there, which is most of the book. I would love to formally petition Pratt for a novella from Minna's POV, and this would be entirely possible if I could afford to join the highest tier of his Patreon, but unfortunately for me I can't grow useful things (like money) from my body like Minna can.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Reid Edwards

    Tim Pratt's Prison of Sleep capped off his Zax duology with all the fantastic uniqueness and mind-bending world-building that made the first book a must read. The movement between different time-lines in the storytelling lends itself to Pratt's plot and protagonists; you're aware that the other players are making moves but being able to experience them from multiple viewpoints helps deepen this story. Pratt is a master of writing the "other" - his aliens and other lifeforms feel true to their se Tim Pratt's Prison of Sleep capped off his Zax duology with all the fantastic uniqueness and mind-bending world-building that made the first book a must read. The movement between different time-lines in the storytelling lends itself to Pratt's plot and protagonists; you're aware that the other players are making moves but being able to experience them from multiple viewpoints helps deepen this story. Pratt is a master of writing the "other" - his aliens and other lifeforms feel true to their settings and development rather than just being shoehorned into a specific narrative role. While not action heavy, the combat scenes and events feel heavy, as Pratt has shown he isn't afraid to put his characters into life-or-death situations that may not end in their favor. I highly recommend Prison of Sleep, but definitely read the first book - you won't be disappointed by the duology.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    I was very excited to return to Zax and his adventures in the multiverse and this book definitely didn't disappoint. We start with a handy little recap. I know not everyone likes this but I find this so helpful and thoughtful when authors do this as it has usually been a little while since I had read the previous book/s. Prison of Sleep is written from two alternating points of view - Zax and Ana. Personally I enjoyed Zax's chapters much more as he's a much more developed and interesting charact I was very excited to return to Zax and his adventures in the multiverse and this book definitely didn't disappoint. We start with a handy little recap. I know not everyone likes this but I find this so helpful and thoughtful when authors do this as it has usually been a little while since I had read the previous book/s. Prison of Sleep is written from two alternating points of view - Zax and Ana. Personally I enjoyed Zax's chapters much more as he's a much more developed and interesting character. Ana's chapters take place almost entirely along the timeline of the first book. It is basically the first book again but from her point of view. The problem with this approach is that we know how it ends. There's no real sense of peril as we already know how it turns out. This really takes away from the impact of events happening in these parts of the book. I almost feel like Ana's chapters would have been better if they were published as their own novella. A "#1.5" in the series while Prison of Sleep concentrated in the present story, especially as the end just felt a bit rushed and maybe deserved to be developed a little more. Overall this was a fun story and a real pleasure to return to some great characters and brilliantly inventive worlds. Thank you very much to Netgalley and the publisher for providing me with an e-arc in exchange for an honest review

  15. 5 out of 5

    The Escapist

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. **Spoilers for book one Doors of Sleep included in this review** Picking up after the events of book one, Zaxony Delatree finds himself alone, with a pen and paper diary tracking his travels through the wormholes of the multiverse trying to get back to his friends. This time the tale is told through two separate timelines and POV’s. Ana, Zax’s love interest who comes in right at the end of book one and Zax. We find out through their diary accounts that they found sanctuary for a time, but were u **Spoilers for book one Doors of Sleep included in this review** Picking up after the events of book one, Zaxony Delatree finds himself alone, with a pen and paper diary tracking his travels through the wormholes of the multiverse trying to get back to his friends. This time the tale is told through two separate timelines and POV’s. Ana, Zax’s love interest who comes in right at the end of book one and Zax. We find out through their diary accounts that they found sanctuary for a time, but were unfortunately separated due to an attack on the “Sleeperhold” and must once again find their way to one another through the multiverse while also battling and finding the source of the “Cult of the Worm”. A cult hellbent on the destruction of the entire multiverse. Once again we are thrown into the thick of the world or worlds without a whole lot of explanation, but through the diary entries we are told that each time people travel through the worlds they create small pin prick holes in the multiverse, threatening the world with collapse. It has been discovered that some sort of wormy parasite is ingested by those who travel and there is a cult of people infecting others with these little worms with the intention of destroying the world. Luckily there are those who wish to stop the bleeding (so to speak) and seek to repair the holes, take down the cult and restore peace. Following a similar quirky tone, Pratt invites the reader to let their imagination run wild. The imagery and humour shine throughout the pages but there is a hint at a more serious undertone from the first instalment. Again, we have some serious conversations subtly introduced such as the importance of seeing another person’s point of view before casting judgement, friendship and once again to seize the day and live as happily as we can for however many days we have left. I will say I enjoyed book one more overall, but I really liked the structure of this book told between the two POV’s. This one gets a 3.25 from me 😊

  16. 4 out of 5

    Missy (myweereads)

    “This time I’m holding on, through whatever worlds may come.” Every time Zax Delatree falls asleep, he travels to a new reality. Zax has no control over his destination and never knows what he will see when he opens his eyes. Sometimes he wakes up in technological utopias, and other times in the bombed-out ruins of collapsed civilisations. In Doors of Sleep, someone unwelcome is on Zax's tail, and they are after something that Zax cannot spare, his blood. This is what allows Zax to travel through “This time I’m holding on, through whatever worlds may come.” Every time Zax Delatree falls asleep, he travels to a new reality. Zax has no control over his destination and never knows what he will see when he opens his eyes. Sometimes he wakes up in technological utopias, and other times in the bombed-out ruins of collapsed civilisations. In Doors of Sleep, someone unwelcome is on Zax's tail, and they are after something that Zax cannot spare, his blood. This is what allows Zax to travel through worlds. In  Prison of Sleep, everything is amped up. Zax comes to realise that he is in fact a host to a parasitic alien that exists partly in his blood and partly between dimensions. This means that every-time he travels it grows larger and more dangerous. With a crew of companions he meets between these worlds Zax has to figure out a way to maintain his power and to help those fallen victim to the darker worlds and its inhabitants. Tim Pratt creates this endless world within worlds of possibilities for Zax to explore. The Doors of Sleep give you an introduction to Zax and what he is experiencing through his journal entires. As you read on you become familiar with the characters he meets and I found my favourites quite quickly. In Prison of Sleep things take an even more dramatic turn. So many truths about why Zax travels the way he does and in the grand scheme of things where he actually fits in is revealed. A lot of unexpected strange encounters. In this book the reader is going through Zax’s journal however this time there are other characters giving their accounts too giving a wider persecutive to this insane scenario. Overall these books were entertaining. The reader is on this journey through worlds with Zax and the various beings he meets. The author paints a new picture of each world Zax visits and there are more than 1000 of these! I would definitely recommend these books to every sci-fi and fantasy reader. Many thanks to @angryrobots for copies of these books which are available now!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Sherron Wahrheit

    This book will absolutely appeal to YA and adult readers who like fantasy-flavored fiction involving quantum travel! I’m not in that demographic, so I can’t recommend this book to readers like me who want straight up science fiction. The world building here is imaginative, the writing flows easily, and characters are winsome. The main character is long-winded, self-deprecating, and unfailingly patient like some of my favorite British comedians. We learn he’s chasing some worm creatures who want t This book will absolutely appeal to YA and adult readers who like fantasy-flavored fiction involving quantum travel! I’m not in that demographic, so I can’t recommend this book to readers like me who want straight up science fiction. The world building here is imaginative, the writing flows easily, and characters are winsome. The main character is long-winded, self-deprecating, and unfailingly patient like some of my favorite British comedians. We learn he’s chasing some worm creatures who want to destroy the space-time continuum. The worms reminded me of a favorite STNG episode where Barkley, a high strung hypochondriac, sees worm creatures in the transporter—except notably minus any freaking out. Which strikes me as odd. No one is even close to freaking out or rushing around in this novel. In fact, during the parts I read, the ambiance is as slow and leisurely as a Hobbit four-course brunch. There’s even a character named Ephedra who does nothing to give this story the giddy up, which I thought was funny. I do like slow moving novels at times, but the pacing here felt like a misstep, even though I was charmed by the characters and dialogue—especially Zax. The only thing I still wouldn’t have liked even if I had been a fantasy reader is the use of the word “cultists” as applied to the followers of the villain(s). There was no indication that they actually fit the definition of cult followers; plus it’s a lost opportunity to give them a colorful label like “worm-rider” or some such thing relevant to this world. DNF Thank you NetGalley for providing an ARC in exchange for my feedback.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bookish Burnished Bee

    PRISON OF SLEEP – by Tim Pratt (book two) Thank heavens for Zaxony’s recap -- the details of the first book seem intricate but easy to understand (at least enough so to delve comfortably into book two). After reading this one, “Doors of Sleep” is on my TBR list. The world-building (multi-world building!) in this story is outstanding; Pratt shuffles us through ruined post-apocalyptic landscapes and bright bustling futuristic cities, and meeting an array of beings, without it feeling overwhelming. We PRISON OF SLEEP – by Tim Pratt (book two) Thank heavens for Zaxony’s recap -- the details of the first book seem intricate but easy to understand (at least enough so to delve comfortably into book two). After reading this one, “Doors of Sleep” is on my TBR list. The world-building (multi-world building!) in this story is outstanding; Pratt shuffles us through ruined post-apocalyptic landscapes and bright bustling futuristic cities, and meeting an array of beings, without it feeling overwhelming. We learn newly created terms as they are being introduced to the characters themselves, making it so very easy to follow along as the story becomes more elaborate. Offering up two different points of view delivers a neat intersection of Zax’s continuing adventures and Ana’s recollection of her side of events from the prior book’s timeline. My only minor complaint would be that Ana regularly ends her entries with a gloomy comment about things she’s yet to record. While these hints of her foreknowledge add a bit of drama, it’s unnecessary – there’s already PLENTY of drama and adventure! FAVORITE QUOTES: -- “We”. Such a beautiful word. I hope I get to be a “we” again, instead of just an “I”. -- …it’s also nice to know we were in the same places, months apart. We both ate fish in the world of pastel jellyfish-things floating in the wind. We both found the place with the flesh-and-bone lighthouse with the living eye at the top especially memorable… For fans of sci-fi / apocalyptic / hits of cosmic horror (I received a free copy of this through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review)

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jim Andrew Clark

    PRISON OF SLEEP is a fun sequel to DOORS OF SLEEP. Here we get more of Zax’s inter-dimensional travel and adventures on other worlds. WHAT I LIKED: I enjoyed the back-and-forth narrative. The story is told from Zax’s perspective in the story’s present while Ana tells her perspective in the past. Each chapter alternates between these two narrators, and eventually their timelines catch up to one another. I also enjoyed the concept of the Prisoner and what's going on in the space in between the wo PRISON OF SLEEP is a fun sequel to DOORS OF SLEEP. Here we get more of Zax’s inter-dimensional travel and adventures on other worlds. WHAT I LIKED: I enjoyed the back-and-forth narrative. The story is told from Zax’s perspective in the story’s present while Ana tells her perspective in the past. Each chapter alternates between these two narrators, and eventually their timelines catch up to one another. I also enjoyed the concept of the Prisoner and what's going on in the space in between the worlds. WHAT I THINK COULD HAVE BEEN BETTER: There’s a lot of setup at the beginning to bring the reader up to speed on the events of the first book, which tends to feel like things are starting off slow, but after a while the tale moves along at a nice pace. We get a few new characters (including my new favorite, Zaveta), but I wish there had been more of Minna and Vicki; here they just feel like plot devices to solve particular situations without providing much character depth. And like the first book, things tend to wrap up a bit too neatly and conveniently every time something goes wrong. OVERALL THOUGHTS: It's good sci-fi and a unique take on the multiverse concept. I think this book could easily fit into the YA category. I enjoyed the story and had a lot of fun reading it. I hope a third book is in the works. 4/5 stars. This rating means: A very good book and I enjoyed it! Had some issues but saw moments of brilliance. Would absolutely re-read and and recommend. Thanks to NetGalley, the publisher Angry Robot, and author Tim Pratt for an advance reader copy in exchange for this honest review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    *I received an eARC via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.* 3.5 I thought this was very fun multiverse sci-fi. The story picks up right at the end of Doors of Sleep, only this time we have chapters from Ana's POV recounting her story during the events of the first book. There is also a quick recap of events at the start of the book, which I definitely appreciated! I still love Zax and his inherent goodness and liked the addition of Ana (especially after the realization she was alive and sa *I received an eARC via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.* 3.5 I thought this was very fun multiverse sci-fi. The story picks up right at the end of Doors of Sleep, only this time we have chapters from Ana's POV recounting her story during the events of the first book. There is also a quick recap of events at the start of the book, which I definitely appreciated! I still love Zax and his inherent goodness and liked the addition of Ana (especially after the realization she was alive and sane at the end of the first book) and there were some fun new companions as well as the return of some old faces. Overall, I think I liked this less than the first book, but still had a great time with the duology. I think some aspects of the dual POV/timeline just didn't quite add up for me, though I did appreciate the explanation of how/why Zax and the other Sleepers travel to new worlds when they fall asleep. I would highly recommend this to those who like Doctor Who-esque science fiction. While reading the duopoly, I couldn't help but make comparisons between the two in tone as well as concept. Like the Doctor, Zax is a lonely traveler who and saves the world and picks up companions along the way, etc. In this one, they even have special glasses that allow the wearer to follow the trails of travelers and I just kept picturing David Tennant with his 3D glasses talking about "Void Stuff".

  21. 4 out of 5

    jof | fictionbyhim

    Doors of Sleep and Prison of Sleep trails the immense amount of vivid dreams to essentially fulfill the ideas of multi-verse. Enter, Zax, the man who falls asleep and wakes up in a different universe and new reality. He has no control over his destinations but luckily, he can also take people with him, which made more the whole story a fun one and engaging. It such a nice work of art because of the different universe being introduced and yet very engrossing situation you could probably think. Th Doors of Sleep and Prison of Sleep trails the immense amount of vivid dreams to essentially fulfill the ideas of multi-verse. Enter, Zax, the man who falls asleep and wakes up in a different universe and new reality. He has no control over his destinations but luckily, he can also take people with him, which made more the whole story a fun one and engaging. It such a nice work of art because of the different universe being introduced and yet very engrossing situation you could probably think. They somewhat falls into an intricate position but other than that the story was well-executed.  The best strength of this book is the gist of its neutrality to settings, I can’t seem to comprehend at first but then I eventually murmured “ohhh, that makes sense” because I just realized those complex moments. The first installment (Doors of Sleep) was quite straightforward as they travel to dimensions to dimensions, and halfway of the first book, Zax realizes that The Lector is pursuing and threatens him through the scopes of the universe. I didn’t expect too much happenings on the twist and the ending because of it's relaxing feels. On it's sequel, a perspective to Ana (Zax long lost first love) were introduced. I easily observed the huge improvement of the adventures, it became richer to the cohesion of the characters. This means that this new format defines more steadiness to the story and it is much more driven than the first installment. As such, the sequel slowly give answers to the past questions. Thus, Prison of Sleep is a satisfying conclusion to the series.  Tim Pratt has this broad whimsical imagination and it shows that his writing to science fiction is a mastery of art. To conclude, this is an amazing duology and I really love its ups and downs. You have this realization that you felt this strange attachments to what just happened. (This is a combined review for this duology. I am part of the online book tour (runs on May to April 2022). All thanks to Angry Robot Books for sending a finished gifted copies and for giving me this amazing opportunity!)

  22. 4 out of 5

    MJ Barrette

    This was a good time. I do have to say it took me a lot longer to read it than I would have liked. I think that this would be EXCELLENT in audiobook form, and if I was on a really long drive, hell yes, this would be in my que of things to listen to. I think I did myself a disservice by reading the first book only a month ago. Because Ana's POV is from the timeline of the first book, none of the events were really a suprised me, since I just read them. But that is on me not the book. I do appreci This was a good time. I do have to say it took me a lot longer to read it than I would have liked. I think that this would be EXCELLENT in audiobook form, and if I was on a really long drive, hell yes, this would be in my que of things to listen to. I think I did myself a disservice by reading the first book only a month ago. Because Ana's POV is from the timeline of the first book, none of the events were really a suprised me, since I just read them. But that is on me not the book. I do appreciate that we got to the meat and potatoes of why Zaxony was having such a time in the first book. I will say that although Zax is a merciful person and that is just who he is, his Batman morailty clause did drive me nuts at times. But otherwise it was a good read. I appreciate that this was a nicely packaged duology that answered all the questions. Thank you to Netgalley and Angry Robot for a e-copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alejandra

    * Thanks to Angry Robot and Netgalley for an advance copy for review purposes * Oops. I did not realize this was part 2 of a duology. The first chapter does a great job at recapping what is going on, such a good job I really did not notice I was thrown in the middle of something. The story moves at such a brisk pace it was so seamless. This is an incredibly imaginative book - Zax has a condition that makes him jump to a different world every time he falls asleep. Told from Zax's perspective, as w * Thanks to Angry Robot and Netgalley for an advance copy for review purposes * Oops. I did not realize this was part 2 of a duology. The first chapter does a great job at recapping what is going on, such a good job I really did not notice I was thrown in the middle of something. The story moves at such a brisk pace it was so seamless. This is an incredibly imaginative book - Zax has a condition that makes him jump to a different world every time he falls asleep. Told from Zax's perspective, as well as his beloved, Ana, we get to travel through a large variety of worlds while attempting to prevent the multiverse from collapsing. The two characters are quite different, I really liked Ana's quiet competence. She gets stuff done! I was going to write that I'd read an entire book on the adventures involving the Lecter, but that may already be covered by the first book. This is such a fun, colorful adventure, and I will be seeking out the first book next.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    This is a tidy sequel, and wraps things up. I liked the first book for it's existential pain and thoughtfulness. Comparatively, this is fairly straightforward action plot. It is fast paced and the concepts are interesting. I think it's more of a fantasy than a science fiction. Everything is technology based, but the technology is not grounded and kind of conforms to whatever the plot needs it to. The first book was Zax and Minna and this one is Zax and a different character, and in my opinion th This is a tidy sequel, and wraps things up. I liked the first book for it's existential pain and thoughtfulness. Comparatively, this is fairly straightforward action plot. It is fast paced and the concepts are interesting. I think it's more of a fantasy than a science fiction. Everything is technology based, but the technology is not grounded and kind of conforms to whatever the plot needs it to. The first book was Zax and Minna and this one is Zax and a different character, and in my opinion the new character was less interesting. I thought the motivation provided for the new character being so devoted to Zax was also a little thin. I would have liked more time for character stuff like in the first book. Even so, (no spoilers here) things are resolved in a nice satisfying way and it was enjoyable to read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Pimbblet

    A solid follow up to the first entry in the duology. Although some of the main characters from the first book are largely missing from this second one, it is understandable given their domineering powers. Instead, we are introduced to a barbarian with a handy mind-fortress technique as the primary new companion for Zax who is realized tremendously well, along with Ana who gets a lot more of the plot and chapters dedicated to her. The plot is good, although given that this is technically a war st A solid follow up to the first entry in the duology. Although some of the main characters from the first book are largely missing from this second one, it is understandable given their domineering powers. Instead, we are introduced to a barbarian with a handy mind-fortress technique as the primary new companion for Zax who is realized tremendously well, along with Ana who gets a lot more of the plot and chapters dedicated to her. The plot is good, although given that this is technically a war story, I did desire a bit more on this angle. That said the majesty and bewildering newness and otherness of the first book has been largely toned down here. The plot twists toward the end alternated between surprising and somewhat expected. Overall a great book, but one that I wanted to be significantly longer in order to better explore what was happening in more depth.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Not a bad book, but not, for me, as good as the first in the duology. While the dual timeline (from two different viewpoints) was well handled - I only got seriously lost once - and there were plenty of tense moments just prior to switching the POV, the resolution of those moments often turned out to be linear and perhaps too easy, occasionally facilitated by fortunate coincidence. One of the characters easily succeeds at something (view spoiler)[(neutralizing their enemies) (hide spoiler)] that Not a bad book, but not, for me, as good as the first in the duology. While the dual timeline (from two different viewpoints) was well handled - I only got seriously lost once - and there were plenty of tense moments just prior to switching the POV, the resolution of those moments often turned out to be linear and perhaps too easy, occasionally facilitated by fortunate coincidence. One of the characters easily succeeds at something (view spoiler)[(neutralizing their enemies) (hide spoiler)] that a much better equipped, more organized and larger group had not seemed capable of doing, for example. Still, it was an enjoyable ride, and the revelations of what was going on behind the scenes, and the provision of new antagonists, worked well after the resolution of the previous book. This is a highly capable author, but it's not his absolute best work. I received a copy via Netgalley for review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I enjoyed Doors of Sleep, the first book in the series, and the laid-back writing style is still great here. However, I enjoyed it less than the first, which was a lot of fascinating world-building and a little light on plot. Here, though, the pace is unrelenting as our hero and companions charge across the multiverse with a mission - and it's a little shallow for it, I think. Still fun, though, and nice to get both answers and a conclusion to the tale of the man who wakes up on a new world ever I enjoyed Doors of Sleep, the first book in the series, and the laid-back writing style is still great here. However, I enjoyed it less than the first, which was a lot of fascinating world-building and a little light on plot. Here, though, the pace is unrelenting as our hero and companions charge across the multiverse with a mission - and it's a little shallow for it, I think. Still fun, though, and nice to get both answers and a conclusion to the tale of the man who wakes up on a new world every time he falls asleep. You can read my full review on my blog, LittleFrogScribbles.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Annarella

    I fell in love with Doors of Sleep that I consider one of the most creative exercise in world building. Prison of Sleep is the follow up and it's another gripping, riveting, and compelling story. It's another book with a brilliant and excellent world building. Tim Pratt is a master storyteller and his characters are great. I was happy to catch with Zax, Ana, and the other characters. An excellent story that I strongly recommend. Highly recommended. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this I fell in love with Doors of Sleep that I consider one of the most creative exercise in world building. Prison of Sleep is the follow up and it's another gripping, riveting, and compelling story. It's another book with a brilliant and excellent world building. Tim Pratt is a master storyteller and his characters are great. I was happy to catch with Zax, Ana, and the other characters. An excellent story that I strongly recommend. Highly recommended. Many thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for this ARC, all opinions are mine

  29. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Whitehead

    Prison of Sleep by Tim Pratt is the second book in a multi-verse duology. Now I have to admit, I did not read the first book, but I genuinely feel like this second novel did a great job of recapping that I wasn't confused at all about what was going on. I love so much about this world. The general concept of planet-jumping if you fall asleep is genius, and Pratt did an excellent job of developing it. I loved how we got to explore the parasites that cause travelers to become sleepers, the fight b Prison of Sleep by Tim Pratt is the second book in a multi-verse duology. Now I have to admit, I did not read the first book, but I genuinely feel like this second novel did a great job of recapping that I wasn't confused at all about what was going on. I love so much about this world. The general concept of planet-jumping if you fall asleep is genius, and Pratt did an excellent job of developing it. I loved how we got to explore the parasites that cause travelers to become sleepers, the fight between cultist and sleepers, and the mystery presence of a god. The story was essentially told through journal entries written by our two main characters, Zax and Ana, and we recount their adventure of trying to find each other and save the worlds. I will say, I was a little confused at times trying to figure out who was speaking or where we were in the story, but that's honestly just a downfall of writing a multiverse story with a lot of time jumps. The only real issue I had with this book is I got a little bored in the middle, but the ending picked back up for me again. The ending was satisfying, the science wasn't overwhelming, and I just love Sorlyn (iykyk). Overall, I definitely recommend this duology to anyone who's interested! 3/5 stars. Thanks to NetGalley and the Publisher for sending me an advanced e-copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    Got to read this early through NetGalley, much to my delight. Pleasantly surprised when this was announced, as I was under the impression that the first book was a one and done. Nice to return to those universe(s) to learn more about how it all came to be.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.