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All the Queen's Men

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Amateur detective Queen Elizabeth II is back in this hugely entertaining follow-up to The Windsor Knot, in which Her Majesty must determine how a missing painting is connected to the shocking death of a staff member inside Buckingham Palace. It's the height of summer 2016, and the Queen has pressing duties to attend to, such as meeting with the new prime minister, keeping a Amateur detective Queen Elizabeth II is back in this hugely entertaining follow-up to The Windsor Knot, in which Her Majesty must determine how a missing painting is connected to the shocking death of a staff member inside Buckingham Palace. It's the height of summer 2016, and the Queen has pressing duties to attend to, such as meeting with the new prime minister, keeping an eye on a tumultuous election in the States, and the smaller but perhaps more frustrating matter of recovering a beloved painting that has unexpectedly turned up in the wrong place. She relies on her Assistant Private Secretary, Rozie Oshodi, to make sure she's fully apprised of the goings on in the palace and to help solve any issues that arise. Rozie holds Her Majesty in the highest esteem and does everything in her power not to disappoint "the Boss." But she has recently become aware of a spate of disturbing letters some staff have received, and though her first instinct is to inform the Queen, more senior members of the household assure her they have everything in hand. When one of the targets of the letters is found dead in the pool house at Buckingham Palace, however, Rozie decides it's time to alert the Queen. After all, though the rest of the staff and public may not realize it, Elizabeth is the keenest sleuth among them. Sometimes, it takes a Queen's eye to see connections where no one else can.


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Amateur detective Queen Elizabeth II is back in this hugely entertaining follow-up to The Windsor Knot, in which Her Majesty must determine how a missing painting is connected to the shocking death of a staff member inside Buckingham Palace. It's the height of summer 2016, and the Queen has pressing duties to attend to, such as meeting with the new prime minister, keeping a Amateur detective Queen Elizabeth II is back in this hugely entertaining follow-up to The Windsor Knot, in which Her Majesty must determine how a missing painting is connected to the shocking death of a staff member inside Buckingham Palace. It's the height of summer 2016, and the Queen has pressing duties to attend to, such as meeting with the new prime minister, keeping an eye on a tumultuous election in the States, and the smaller but perhaps more frustrating matter of recovering a beloved painting that has unexpectedly turned up in the wrong place. She relies on her Assistant Private Secretary, Rozie Oshodi, to make sure she's fully apprised of the goings on in the palace and to help solve any issues that arise. Rozie holds Her Majesty in the highest esteem and does everything in her power not to disappoint "the Boss." But she has recently become aware of a spate of disturbing letters some staff have received, and though her first instinct is to inform the Queen, more senior members of the household assure her they have everything in hand. When one of the targets of the letters is found dead in the pool house at Buckingham Palace, however, Rozie decides it's time to alert the Queen. After all, though the rest of the staff and public may not realize it, Elizabeth is the keenest sleuth among them. Sometimes, it takes a Queen's eye to see connections where no one else can.

30 review for All the Queen's Men

  1. 5 out of 5

    Paromjit

    This is the follow up to SJ Bennett's The Windsor Knot, the start of this series which is based on the premise that Queen Elizabeth II is a sleuth to be reckoned with, she has been solving mysteries for years, all below the radar. I listened to this light and entertaining mystery on audio, once again beautifully narrated by the terrific Samantha Bond, of 9 hours duration. It is 2016, in the wake of a troubling Brexit referendum which has divided the nation, the Queen is having to meet PM Teresa This is the follow up to SJ Bennett's The Windsor Knot, the start of this series which is based on the premise that Queen Elizabeth II is a sleuth to be reckoned with, she has been solving mysteries for years, all below the radar. I listened to this light and entertaining mystery on audio, once again beautifully narrated by the terrific Samantha Bond, of 9 hours duration. It is 2016, in the wake of a troubling Brexit referendum which has divided the nation, the Queen is having to meet PM Teresa May with her kitten heels, and following the American elections in which Donald Trump becomes President. The last thing the Queen needs is any more problems to worry about, but when an oil painting gifted by an Aussie artist of the Royal Yacht Britannia, given to the Queen in the 1960s and hung outside her bedroom, shows up unexpectedly in a Royal Navy exhibition in Portsmouth, she tasks her able and discreet assistant private secretary, Rozie Oshodi, to investigate. However, when Rozie struggles to get anywhere, the Queen, 'the Boss', knows something is terribly wrong. Matters are exacerbated when the dead body of an unpopular housekeeper, Cynthia Harris, is found in the Buckingham Palace swimming pool by a shocked Simon, the Queen's Private Secretary. Whilst the death is deemed to be an unfortunate accident, the Queen is not so convinced as she finds herself once again in the middle of an investigation which has more twists and turns than she could ever have possibly imagined. With her reliable secretary Rozie by her side, the Queen is confronted by more murder, the existence of a criminal breakages system that continues to operate in the present right under her nose, art fraud, and vicious poison pen letters. It is the 3 male advisors and a police officer who are drip fed the relevant information to make it appear as if it is they who solve the crimes, and we learn at the end just why that painting was so important to the Queen and Rozie inherits a painting that makes her joyously happy if slightly guilty. This is a fun and engaging listen, I really appreciated how the Queen's character continues to be fleshed out, although there were occasions when I felt that perhaps the narrative was at times more complicated than it needed to be. To conclude, I can see many crime and mystery readers enjoying this addition to a wonderful series.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Terrie Robinson

    "All the Queen's Men" by S.J. Bennett is the second book in the series 'Her Majesty the Queen Investigates'! It's 2016 in Britain and there's fallout from Brexit, a new female Prime Minister, and a newly elected POTUS to contend with. Her Majesty The Queen certainly has her hands full. On top of all that, things at Buckingham Palace are quickly become dire! A staff member has been found dead beside the palace swimming pool. A favorite painting that hung outside QEII's bedroom door is missing. And "All the Queen's Men" by S.J. Bennett is the second book in the series 'Her Majesty the Queen Investigates'! It's 2016 in Britain and there's fallout from Brexit, a new female Prime Minister, and a newly elected POTUS to contend with. Her Majesty The Queen certainly has her hands full. On top of all that, things at Buckingham Palace are quickly become dire! A staff member has been found dead beside the palace swimming pool. A favorite painting that hung outside QEII's bedroom door is missing. And now anonymous and threatening letters are mysteriously being distributed in the palace. Those closest to QEII tell her all is under control. Her Majesty knows better! The second book in this series, once again, features Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II secretly solving crimes with the assistance of her Assistant Private Secretary Rozie Oshodi. What I like best about this series is how it builds through the layering of characters, how it uses Buckingham Palace as another character, and how the Queen is so central to the story. She's “The Boss” after all! 👑 I listened to the audiobook narrated, once again, by Jane Copland and her familiar British accent added to my listening experience. Another mystery solved by the two female-super-sleuth's from Buckingham Palace. I just love this Cozy Mystery series with the added touch of royal flair and I'm keeping my fingers crossed for a third book!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Darla

    She's back! There is a suspicious death at the palace pool. Queen Elizabeth once again expertly guides her APS Rozie to investigate with the skills of a lifelong diplomat. Wrapped up in the mystery is a missing painting of the beloved Britannia and a rash of poison pen letters. How will a poolside death, missing art, and nasty notes all intersect? S.J. Bennett does a great job bringing it all together, although it seems to meander a bit much at times. Possibly could have benefited from a bit mor She's back! There is a suspicious death at the palace pool. Queen Elizabeth once again expertly guides her APS Rozie to investigate with the skills of a lifelong diplomat. Wrapped up in the mystery is a missing painting of the beloved Britannia and a rash of poison pen letters. How will a poolside death, missing art, and nasty notes all intersect? S.J. Bennett does a great job bringing it all together, although it seems to meander a bit much at times. Possibly could have benefited from a bit more editing. Ultimately though, the Queen's men "solve" the case and proudly present Her Majesty with a report while the Queen and Rozie keep their secrets. My favorite part of this series is the glimpses into the relationship between Elizabeth and Philip. Since this book is set in 2016, we can enjoy the presence of the Duke of Edinburgh and the sweet ending of this book. Thank you to William Morrow and Edelweiss+ for a DRC in exchange for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    3.5 stars This review was first posted on Mystery and Suspense. Check it out for features, interviews, and reviews. https://www.mysteryandsuspense.com/al... In this sequel to The Windsor Knot, Queen Elizabeth is once again on the trail of a murderer. It's Fall 2016 and Queen Elizabeth has a lot on her mind. Great Britain has voted for Brexit, the United States is conducting a presidential election, Prince Harry has a new girlfriend, Prince Phillip is planning to retire from public service, and Buck 3.5 stars This review was first posted on Mystery and Suspense. Check it out for features, interviews, and reviews. https://www.mysteryandsuspense.com/al... In this sequel to The Windsor Knot, Queen Elizabeth is once again on the trail of a murderer. It's Fall 2016 and Queen Elizabeth has a lot on her mind. Great Britain has voted for Brexit, the United States is conducting a presidential election, Prince Harry has a new girlfriend, Prince Phillip is planning to retire from public service, and Buckingham Palace - which is falling apart - is in the midst of an extensive and costly renovation program. On top of all that, the Queen has seen her personal painting of the royal yacht Britannia, given to her by the artist in 1963, in an exhibit of maritime art in Portsmouth. Prior to Portsmouth, Her Majesty had last seen the painting decades ago, hanging outside her bedroom door, and she has no idea how or when it left her possession. The Queen wants her painting back, and she asks her Assistant Private Secretary Rozie Oshodi - an attractive, ex-army, Anglo-Nigerian woman who's clever and discreet - to find out how the artwork came to be in the hands of the Royal Navy. Rozie examines palace records, consults with past and present royal art curators, speaks to palace staff, and calls a Royal Navy vice admiral, but has trouble tracing the peregrinations of the Britannia painting. At the same time, Rozie learns that her friend Mary van Renen, secretary to one of the Queen's advisors, is quitting her job because of nasty poison pen letters. Other women have also received vicious missives, including a royal housekeeper named Cynthia Harris and Rozie herself. Worse yet, the day after the Queen returns from a visit to Balmoral Palace in Scotland, housekeeper Cynthia Harris is found dead beside the Buckingham Palace swimming pool. The police think Cynthia's demise is an accident, but Her Majesty isn't so sure, especially when she learns Cynthia was a spiteful shrew who'd been receiving menacing notes. Unknown to most people, Queen Elizabeth is an amateur sleuth who's been solving mysteries since her father was on the throne. Because Her Majesty is unable to run around looking for evidence, she makes Rozie Oshodi her deputy detective, and the duo investigate both Cynthia's death and the source of the poison pen letters. When the Queen and Rozie find clues, Queen Elizabeth subtly points the police and her inner circle of male advisors in the right direction. Thus the men think they're resolving cases, when it's really the Queen and Rozie. During her inquiries, Rozie ventures into an underground tunnel system that connects royal palaces and learns of a 1980s scheme called the Breakages Business, which was carried out by some members of the Queen's staff. The Breakages Business was about spiriting away and selling royal belongings that wouldn't be missed, like small gifts, plates, rugs, old draperies, half-used candles, tins of food, and so on - small things whose absence wouldn't be noticed. Some gifts given to Queen Elizabeth Since the 1980s, the royal accounting system has been tightened up, but Rozie and the Queen still fear theft may be connected with current crimes in Buckingham Palace. In behind the scenes views of the royals we learn that Prince Phillip calls his wife Cabbage; Prince Charles will trim 'the Firm' when he takes the throne; Duchess Camilla works with domestic violence charities; Princess Anne is a stickler for punctuality; and the Queen is a very busy woman. In addition to dealing with red boxes full of paperwork every day, Her Majesty sits for portraits and sculptures, has garment fittings, walks her dogs, visits friends and relatives, and binge watches Murder She Wrote. Furthermore, the royal family entertains nearly a hundred thousand people each year, and every event is a major undertaking. For a banquet honoring the president of Colombia, for example, the dinner tables sport golden dessert stands and branching candelabras from the Grand Service, flowers from Colombia and Great Britain, and place settings that are measured with a ruler, to make sure the knives and forks are the correct distance from the edge of the table. Moreover the Queen wears the Victorian Suite diamonds and sapphires with matching tiara, to spread a little extra dazzle. Queen Elizabeth's courtiers think she needs to be shielded from the real world, but Her Majesty shows her mettle again and again. I look forward to reading the further adventures of Rozie and the Queen. You can follow my reviews at https://reviewsbybarbsaffer.blogspot.com

  5. 4 out of 5

    Angela

    A Three Dog Problem (Her Majesty the Queen Investigates #2) by S.J. Bennett Synopsis / In the wake of a referendum which has divided the nation, the last thing the Queen needs is any more problems to worry about. But when an oil painting of the Royal Yacht Britannia - first given to the Queen in the 1960s - shows up unexpectedly in a Royal Navy exhibition, she begins to realise that something is up. When a body is found in the Palace swimming pool, she finds herself once again in the middle of an i A Three Dog Problem (Her Majesty the Queen Investigates #2) by S.J. Bennett Synopsis / In the wake of a referendum which has divided the nation, the last thing the Queen needs is any more problems to worry about. But when an oil painting of the Royal Yacht Britannia - first given to the Queen in the 1960s - shows up unexpectedly in a Royal Navy exhibition, she begins to realise that something is up. When a body is found in the Palace swimming pool, she finds herself once again in the middle of an investigation which has more twists and turns than she could ever have suspected. With her trusted secretary Rozie by her side, the Queen is determined to solve the case. But will she be able to do it before the murderer strikes again? My Thoughts / Step aside Nancy Drew, 'cause QEII is in da house! In this, the second book in the series, A Three Dog Problem, Her Majesty investigates the disappearance of a painting of the Royal Yacht Britannia which was gifted to her some decades earlier by Australian artist Vernon Hooker. And, soon after the paintings disappearance has been discovered, the body of a staff member is found beside the Palace swimming pool. And so begins this delightfully charming double plotted mystery. With her nation seemingly divided over the result of the Brexit referendum, Her Majesty is now awaiting the outcome of the long and drawn-out US Presidential election result. And, as if all this post-Brexit referendum \ presidential election turmoil wasn’t enough for a Queen to concern herself with; it turns out there are more immediate concerns closer to home. Buckingham Palace requires major, expensive, upgrade works done. The wiring is substandard, pipes are leaking and problems are springing up everywhere!! (pun, a happy coincidence). But the Queen's woes don't end there, as she has just noticed that a painting that once hung outside her bedroom is now no longer there. The issue for the Queen is that she cannot remember giving any authorisations to move it. And yet, all of these things prove to be the least of her worries when, a staff member is found dead beside the palace swimming pool. The Queen tasks her Assistant Private Secretary, Rozie Oshodi, with finding out how the painting made its way out of the royal collection and into the hands of the Admiralty, where it now hangs on display in a Royal Navy exhibition in Portsmouth. Meanwhile, back at the pool….. In an effort to improve his overall fitness, Sir Simon decides on an early morning swim. Whilst he was prepared for the water to be cold, he wasn't prepared, at all, for finding the blood-soaked body of Cynthia Harris in the pool area. The long-time housekeeper, and a favourite of the Queen, Cynthia Harris was a rather unpopular member of the royal household amongst its staff. It appeared as though Mrs Harris slipped and fell; and during the fall punctured an artery near her ankle. Death occurred rather quickly afterwards. Talk about a Royal nightmare! The authorities are quick to determine that Mrs Harris' death was a tragic accident, but QEII is not so sure. She has had a feeling that something wasn’t quite right in the palace for a while now. Sometimes, it takes a Queen’s eye to see what no one else can. A Three Dog Problem is an admirable follow on from The Windsor Knot. It's a fast-paced plot which is liberally littered with red-herrings and a dash of palace conspiracy. Bennett does well to pull off this pretty outlandish double mystery, and as usual, QEII comes out on top. Whilst your initial impressions of a monarch might not include solving crimes; this reigning monarch has a wonderful array of sleuthing abilities! Best Supporting Female Role: Ex-Soldier, and the Queen's APS, Rozie Oshodi. Best Supporting Male Role: cheekily outspoken, tongue-in-cheek Prince Philip whose lines and parts are always scene-stealers. Best Supporting Four Legged Role: Candy, Vulcan. Woof. Woof. Let's all cheer 'Long Live the Queen!'

  6. 5 out of 5

    Wanda Pedersen

    I was taken with The Windsor Knot earlier this year and put a hold on this second book quite soon after finishing it. Others have obviously also been charmed by S.J. Bennett's version of HRH Queen Elizabeth II, as I had to wait quite a while to get my turn at it. Bennett has created a wonderful cast of characters of courtiers and palace employees around Her Maj, and of course using the built in people too, with Prince Philip and Princess Anne playing roles here. The star of course is Rozie Oshod I was taken with The Windsor Knot earlier this year and put a hold on this second book quite soon after finishing it. Others have obviously also been charmed by S.J. Bennett's version of HRH Queen Elizabeth II, as I had to wait quite a while to get my turn at it. Bennett has created a wonderful cast of characters of courtiers and palace employees around Her Maj, and of course using the built in people too, with Prince Philip and Princess Anne playing roles here. The star of course is Rozie Oshodi, who becomes a more fully rounded person in this second book. We get to see her in her natural habitat when she visits her family and also see her desire for nice things when she goes to the Cotswolds one weekend to interview a former palace functionary. There are three mysteries put forward: a painting of the Queen's that has gone missing and found in the Navy's offices; a nasty series of poison pen letters that are making work life in the palace tense and unhappy; and the death of a housekeeper which is deemed an accident. But is it? Bennett braids all three together to give the reader (and the Queen) a great deal to think about. Once again, the Queen involves Rozie in her investigative process, much to Rozie's delight. She genuinely likes her Boss and is even willing to help arrange things so that, once again, the senior men in the household are convinced that they figured it all out. That takes a generosity that I don't think I have, to let someone else take credit for your ideas and footwork. There is a third book coming out later in 2022 and I do hope my library will purchase it.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cathy

    A Three Dog Problem proved to be the perfect contrast to the run of rather serious books I’ve read lately. It’s a delightful, charming mystery in which Her Majesty proves herself to be just as astute and no-nonsense as we always imagined. As one of her staff observes, ‘She was a hell of a lot sharper than she looked. Mistakes were picked up on. Dry comments were made. Eyes were rolled.’ Ex-soldier Rozie, the Queen’s Assistant Private Secretary, is a great character and a force to be reckoned with A Three Dog Problem proved to be the perfect contrast to the run of rather serious books I’ve read lately. It’s a delightful, charming mystery in which Her Majesty proves herself to be just as astute and no-nonsense as we always imagined. As one of her staff observes, ‘She was a hell of a lot sharper than she looked. Mistakes were picked up on. Dry comments were made. Eyes were rolled.’ Ex-soldier Rozie, the Queen’s Assistant Private Secretary, is a great character and a force to be reckoned with. As she reminds herself, when the enquiries she has set in train take an unexpectedly risky turn, ‘her regimental specialism had been “find, strike, destroy, suppress”‘. I loved the humorous elements in the book such as Prince Philip’s petname for his wife being Cabbage, the idea of the Queen googling herself on her iPad to find out where she was on a particular date, and that she spent some of her time at Balmoral binge-watching Murder She Wrote. I also enjoyed the ‘behind the scenes’ look at life in a royal palace, an increasingly dilapidated one as it turns out in the case of Buckingham Palace. And, as Rozie observes, at night its character changes. ‘The majority of staff went home, the flood of tradesmen, craftsmen and daily visitors slowed to a trickle, and the place was reclaimed by those who lived there or habitually worked late. The buildings stopped trying to impress and their occupants got on with the task of working as efficiently as they could in a rabbit warren of corridors that ceased to make sense two hundred years ago.’ External events such as the fallout from the Brexit referendum and the US Presidential election provide a subtle backdrop to the main storyline. The Queen muses about women who have achieved things or may do so in the future, such as Hilary Clinton, whilst underplaying her own role in world affairs. And there is a moving scene in which the Queen attends the annual Remembrance Day ceremony at the Cenotaph; it’s especially poignant as ill-health meant she was unable to attend the ceremony for only the seventh time in her long reign this year. And, of course, at the heart of the book is an ingenious mystery involving amongst other things an unexplained death, poison pen letters, Renaissance art, and some murky goings-on in the bowels of Buckingham Palace.  Definitely a three dog problem. I know many readers have fallen in love with this series, which commenced with The Windsor Knot in 2020, and I can now understand why. The good news is the author promises there’s another book on the way next year.

  8. 5 out of 5

    DeAnn

    4 Art Mystery Stars I quite enjoyed the second book in this series and learning a bit more about Rozie, Assistant Private Secretary. This time Rozie has been tasked with figuring out what happened to a painting that used to hang outside the Queen’s bedroom. She’s sure she saw it at a recent exhibit, and she wants it back! Along the way, there are some tragic accidents and poison-pen letters keep turning up. Are the two things related? Are these more than accidents? What secrets has Rozie been stir 4 Art Mystery Stars I quite enjoyed the second book in this series and learning a bit more about Rozie, Assistant Private Secretary. This time Rozie has been tasked with figuring out what happened to a painting that used to hang outside the Queen’s bedroom. She’s sure she saw it at a recent exhibit, and she wants it back! Along the way, there are some tragic accidents and poison-pen letters keep turning up. Are the two things related? Are these more than accidents? What secrets has Rozie been stirring up? Things are quite tense in the household staff as a refurbishment campaign is coming up. I enjoyed learning more about the royal art collection and thinking about the work that goes into keeping track of everything. And how tempting it might be to have some small items disappear through the years. This was a fun mystery to solve, and I love this series, very British indeed! Thank you to Scene of the Crime/William Morrow for the copy of this one to read and honestly review. Set to publish on 3.1.2022.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Patcee

    When you read this entertaining, fictional story from the heart of Buckingham Palace, set yourself up in a shady spot outside with one of those sippy fruit cocktails & paper umbrella stuck in the glass and a dish of nuts on a side-table Mine was a pre-bedtime read when I was really tired and didn’t give the book the proper attention it deserves. Her Majesty the Queen surprises the reader with her sleuthing skills and logical, remarkable attention to detail. I enjoyed this gentle read, a perfect When you read this entertaining, fictional story from the heart of Buckingham Palace, set yourself up in a shady spot outside with one of those sippy fruit cocktails & paper umbrella stuck in the glass and a dish of nuts on a side-table Mine was a pre-bedtime read when I was really tired and didn’t give the book the proper attention it deserves. Her Majesty the Queen surprises the reader with her sleuthing skills and logical, remarkable attention to detail. I enjoyed this gentle read, a perfect contrast to my usual choice of fast-paced, tension-filled thrillers. SJ Bennett brings a polished writing style and a carefully plotted story to life over 50 chapters of cosy. The narrative unwinds with Her Majesty directing amateur investigations into a criminal trifecta: a supposedly accidental bloody death beside the palace swimming pool, a few nasty poison-pen notes dropped on some staff members, and the disappearance of a small painting of the royal yacht Britannia. This brings together a tentative whodunit of a misunderstood woman, the social issue of harassment, and malicious intrigue among the guardians of the Royal Art Collection. All the queen’s men of the title are males of assorted stature within the Firm, those from a variety of budgeting and accounting nerds, lax security-keepers, self-important royal aides, former soldiers, honourable Sirs and smart university graduates. What an eye-opener this is! The sash on the busby-hatted guard on the book cover cover bears the symbols of Britannia, the regal crest, picture-frame, tea-cup, duster and pen which cleverly mimic the plot action. The book is full of seemingly trivial points that subtly contribute to the mounting evidence. Of course, Her Majesty’s role is top priority but her assistant private secretary, Captain Rozie Oshodi , is a tall, well-dressed, former soldier and a perfect foil as her trusted sidekick and able detective. Rozie is caught right in the middle things as she, herself is a recipient of nasty hate notes. She laments: “You thought you fitted in. You got the grades, learned your manners, made your family proud.And yet whatever you did, wherever you went, there was always someone ready to shame you, dismiss you, erase you. The hurt burned. She wanted to punch something very hard. She wanted to tear this room apart and scream until she ran out of breath.” The Queen emerges as a strong character, while Rozie develops as a wise, quick-thinker and admirable woman of business ethics and social behaviour. I must return to the first book in the series, The Windsor Knot, and will be looking for more as the aging Queen cuts back on her duties within the Firm and has more time for intrigue.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    A follow-up, but not a sequel, to “The Windsor Knot”. A missing painting, a spate of poison-pen letters to palace staff and the dead body of the head housekeeper found beside the palace swimming pool. It is up to HRH Queen Elizabeth II and her APS Rozy to make sense of it all. This is light fun, a bit longer than “The Windsor Knot” and somewhat more convoluted but an enjoyable read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    Not as good as the first one,but delightful nonetheless. 8/10

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rachel (not currently receiving notifications) Hall

    A Three Dog Problem is the second novel to feature Queen Elizabeth II in an covert investigative capacity and picks up in the wake of the divisive Brexit referendum with a new Prime Minister in Theresa May and a contentious US election on the horizon. In common with the first book it is the Queen’s Assistant Private Secretary, Rozie Oshodi, who goes out and asks questions and discreetly reports back. Whilst I didn’t think the first book was hugely compelling I found it gently entertaining and fe A Three Dog Problem is the second novel to feature Queen Elizabeth II in an covert investigative capacity and picks up in the wake of the divisive Brexit referendum with a new Prime Minister in Theresa May and a contentious US election on the horizon. In common with the first book it is the Queen’s Assistant Private Secretary, Rozie Oshodi, who goes out and asks questions and discreetly reports back. Whilst I didn’t think the first book was hugely compelling I found it gently entertaining and felt Bennett did an excellent job with her characterisation of the Queen. However with the novelty factor of the first book absent and far fewer moments of wit and humour this second book struggled to hold my attention. This wasn’t helped by the fact that there are several threads to the mystery (a missing painting, a suspected murder, poison pen letters targeted at multiple people and the long-standing problem of Palace items being spirited away on the sly), making it difficult to do justice to any one of them. The Queen is disconcerted to spot one of her favourite paintings - and one that belongs to her - at an exhibition of maritime art in Portsmouth. The painting, which Phillip describes as “ghastly”, is of the retired Britannia yacht and once hung outside her bedroom. Positive it is the original she enlists Rozie to discover when it left her collection and why it has never been returned. This turns out to be anything but the simple task that it sounds but when the dead body of an unpopular elderly housekeeper is found beside the Palace swimming pool it slips down the priority list. With the jury out on whether the death of the housekeeper was an unfortunate accident or cold-blooded murder, rumours amongst the royal household staff go into overdrive. When the Queen asks Rozie about the victim and discovers that she was the target of a sustained campaign of poison pen letters it brings several concerning revelations to light, with the Queen discovering that there is a lot more going on below stairs than she could ever have imagined. Needless to say it gets extremely convoluted and I was no more invested in this string of crimes than those in the first book. Whilst I enjoyed meeting Rozie Oshodi again and this second book is well-paced and easily readable, I found it all a bit mundane from start to finish. There are far fewer highlights (topical jokes, humorous exchanges between the Queen and Prince Phillip) and as with most cosy crime, the mystery is really only an opportunity to showcase the cast and given one of the two main protagonists is royalty and the setting it Buckingham Palace, it limits the extent of plausible embellishment. Once again there is a large secondary cast of very dispensable and forgettable characters who make fleeting appearances and don’t make much of an impression. Readers who enjoyed the first book will no doubt enjoy this second book too, but sadly my journey with the Queen and Rozie stops here.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alan Teder

    Quite a Three Dog Problem Review of the William Morrow (North America) paperback edition (March 1, 2022) retitled from the original Zaffre (UK) hardcover A Three Dog Problem: The Queen Investigates a Murder at Buckingham Palace (November 11, 2021) I was disappointed to see that the North American editions of the 2nd book in S.J. Bennett's Her Majesty the Queen Investigates series retitled it from its quirky original*. Admittedly, the corgis and the dorgis are not actually helping to solve the crim Quite a Three Dog Problem Review of the William Morrow (North America) paperback edition (March 1, 2022) retitled from the original Zaffre (UK) hardcover A Three Dog Problem: The Queen Investigates a Murder at Buckingham Palace (November 11, 2021) I was disappointed to see that the North American editions of the 2nd book in S.J. Bennett's Her Majesty the Queen Investigates series retitled it from its quirky original*. Admittedly, the corgis and the dorgis are not actually helping to solve the crime, but it is just charming to picture the Queen taking a walk with her dogs in order to ponder about the solution to the current mystery. The current case is set in November 2016 with a few references to the then current American election being made. What starts out with the Queen identifying a favourite sentimental painting which has been missing for 50 years from her personal collection leads into murders and the uncovering of a long-running fraud and theft ring at Buckingham Palace. Her current Assistant Private Secretary Rozie Oshodi is again her eyes and ears around the palace and elsewhere to help her seek out the culprits. All the Queen's Men doesn't have the revelations of the origin story in The Windsor Knot (2020) which had the extra charm of revealing the REAL Her Majesty's Secret Service, but I can't begrudge that. If anything, S.J. Bennett crafted an even more elaborate story here and again manages to fashion an ending where the Queen maneuvers her somewhat slower witted Palace staff chiefs, managers and police into thinking that they solved the crime on her behalf, when it was actually her hints and prodding that got them there. Trivia and Link * The original title is a nod to Sherlock Holmes in The Red-Headed League - a Sherlock Holmes Short Story (1891) where Holmes remarks to Watson that: “It is quite a three pipe problem, and I beg that you won't speak to me for fifty minutes.” The reference was also later borrowed by Julian Symons for the title of his book A Three-Pipe Problem (1975).

  14. 4 out of 5

    DeB

    Good follow-up to the first in the series. Roz continues to be the Queen’s intrepid sidekick in this murder mystery featuring missing paintings, gobs of red herrings, Corgis and dorgis (dachshund/Corgi crosses) and bodies piling up as clues mystify.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Taylor Walworth

    ALL THE QUEEN’S MEN was an absolute marvel of moving parts. The mystery at play here was much more involved and multi-faceted than that of THE WINDSOR KNOT (so, potentially a smidge more confusing and seemed to take a bit longer to wrap up), but HM and Rozie were so perfectly on point that I didn’t even mind. The evolution of their partnership—while combatting life-shattering challenges like gender discrimination, racism, and the spectre of mortality—was so cleverly, perfectly paced, that I can’ ALL THE QUEEN’S MEN was an absolute marvel of moving parts. The mystery at play here was much more involved and multi-faceted than that of THE WINDSOR KNOT (so, potentially a smidge more confusing and seemed to take a bit longer to wrap up), but HM and Rozie were so perfectly on point that I didn’t even mind. The evolution of their partnership—while combatting life-shattering challenges like gender discrimination, racism, and the spectre of mortality—was so cleverly, perfectly paced, that I can’t wait to see where a third book in the series might take them. Long live the fucking Queen. (Also, I fucking love when writers remind the world that Artemisia Gentileschi not only exists, but is absolutely fucking amazing.)

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kirsty

    I loved every page. I loved being back at the palace solving mysteries with the Queen and Rozie. It was nice to see the character progression from book one and I’m left wanting even more. A brilliant series that I really love.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bridget

    This series is shaping up to be a lot of fun. If you like the idea of a behind the scenes Queen solving mysteries then get into this. The recurring characters are gradually being fleshed out, especially Rozie who was a great help in the first one. This has quite a lot going on at the start. A stolen painting, a creepy bully on the staff, and a murder in the swimming pool. Saddle up, it is all happening here. The perfect cozy, but with pointy bits book for a miserable winter weekend!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Maureen Grigsby

    This is the second delightful mystery where Queen Elizabeth digs around behind the scenes and solves a murder. Not a cozy, exactly, but charming.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shauna

    I received an Advance Reader's Edition as a winner in a GoodRead's giveaway. This is the second installment in a growing series. I enjoyed it. I think the characters are the biggest draw for me. I love the queen. I am not an Anglophile, and know little to nothing of the real queen. If she is anything like her character in the book she is intelligent, quick thinking, compassionate, determined, and just lovely. During this particular read, I found the possible suspects difficult to track. I believe I received an Advance Reader's Edition as a winner in a GoodRead's giveaway. This is the second installment in a growing series. I enjoyed it. I think the characters are the biggest draw for me. I love the queen. I am not an Anglophile, and know little to nothing of the real queen. If she is anything like her character in the book she is intelligent, quick thinking, compassionate, determined, and just lovely. During this particular read, I found the possible suspects difficult to track. I believe this was intentional as the queen makes a statement to the effect that there is a suspect(s) and there is a motive(s), but they are difficult to match up. If that was the intention, well done I say! All in all a good read and I will definitely look to read the next one.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Kathy

    I read this book completely for pleasure, and that is such a lovely way to experience a book. Not that I’m adverse to books that impart important messages. I just sometimes need a read that entertains me and that’s it. A Three Dog Problem (All the Queen’s Men in the U.S.) is the essence of an entertaining read. Oh, there’s crime and murder and evil going on, but we know that the Queen, in her calm and methodical manner, will get to the bottom of it with her discreet, capable Assistant Private Se I read this book completely for pleasure, and that is such a lovely way to experience a book. Not that I’m adverse to books that impart important messages. I just sometimes need a read that entertains me and that’s it. A Three Dog Problem (All the Queen’s Men in the U.S.) is the essence of an entertaining read. Oh, there’s crime and murder and evil going on, but we know that the Queen, in her calm and methodical manner, will get to the bottom of it with her discreet, capable Assistant Private Secretary Rozie Oshodi. There’s lots of drama, and the twists and turns are more complex than in The Windsor Knott, but I found the multiple threads in A Three Dog Problem easy to follow and well brought together by the end. There are quite a few names to keep up with, but I didn’t find it disrupting to my reading. And, knowing that a case will be solved in no way takes away from the thrill of events leading up to that solution. We travel back a few years to 2016 in the second Her Majesty the Queen Investigates book, A Three Dog Problem, by S.J. Bennett. Politics have gone off the rails in both Great Britain and the United States. The Queen is concerned about Brexit, while across the pond, the election of the President of the United States is taking a surprise turn. Of course, she is carrying on her duties as she always does, no matter what else is going on, and so she attends a Royal Navy art exhibition where she discovers an oil painting of the Royal Yacht Britannia given to her in the 1960s. It is definitely not where it should be, as it is her personal property, and she didn’t realize it was missing until she sees it displayed at the Ministry of Defence. This little painting has significant personal meaning to the Queen, and tracing its path to the Royal Navy exhibition turns into a major investigation for the Queen and her sleuthing confidante, her assistant private secretary Rozie Oshodi. It will involve poison pen letters, underground tunnels, and a secret racket called the Breakages Business. Of course, no secret racket is perfect, and this one has begun to leak buckets. The death of a head housekeeper who is found dead by the Buckingham Palace indoor swimming pool combined with the poison pen letters is enough for the Queen to call in help from the Metropolitan Police in the form of DCI David Strong. The detective has worked with the Queen before in the Windsor Castle murder (Book One). He is valued for his thoroughness and his discreet approach to palace investigations. Not only does the Queen have to deal with the unrest in her country due to Brexit, but the reservicing plan for Buckingham Palace, a major undertaking to fix the aging infrastructure, is about to be presented with its final budget estimate, and that has discrepancies, too. It seems that there are those working in several departments of the Royal employment who are profiteers and not loyal employees. And, this condition has existed for some time, at least as far back as the 1980s. So, the physical repairs needed and the inner workings of the Queen’s royal employ mirror each other in their disarray, and each has its important place in the plot. Cynthia Harris, the murder victim, had received some of the poison pen letters, along with the high-ranking Keeper of the Privy Purse’s secretary and at least one other. Rozie starts receiving the letters, too, ones that are racist and sexist, trying to get her to leave her job. The Keeper’s secretary does leave her job and leaves London. Mrs. Harris is murdered. Rozie doesn’t desire to leave her job or be murdered, so she must persevere in the face of these scare tactics and keep investigating for the Queen to find out who is behind them. The letters, the Queen’s painting, and the nefarious profiteering scheme appear to be connected, but proof is needed. There are suspects, but without the proof, the evidence, of their wrongdoings, it is unwise to approach them and tip the Queen’s hand. The Queen and Rozie make a good team. They’re both intelligent, persistent, and resourceful. Another player on their team is retired Detective Billy MacLachlan, who is privy to much of the gossip that swirls around the palace through his connections to other retired Royal personnel. Rozie and Billy do the legwork of the investigation for the Queen, but the Queen is always in control of it. These three are often underestimated, the Queen for her assumed naivety about what is going on in her palace, Rozie for her being female and not “one of the boys,” and Billy for being a retiree and aging grandfather. S.J. Bennett has created these marvelous characters who always exceed expectations. Those who underestimate them often end up paying the price of their prejudices. Bennett has created a Queen character who while duty bound, is as indefatigable in her pursuit of justice as she is in her dedication to the throne. And, the character of Prince Philip shows just how much the Queen relies on his steadfast support and his quick assessment of matters. They have a comfortable communication between them, borne of years of being the only ones who understand what they deal with. And, that they can make the other laugh is a lovely touch. I’m charmed by the Prince addressing the Queen as “cabbage.” We get a brief look at Princess Anne and Prince Charles, as well as a mention of Princesses Beatrice and Eugenie. The top “Queen’s Men” characters are from the main departments of the Royal Household. The Queen’s Private Secretary, Sir Simon Holcroft; The Keeper of the Privy Purse, Sir James Ellington; and Master of the Household, Mike Green. The other department of the Royal Household (there are five main ones) featured is the Royal Collection Trust, which is responsible for the care and cataloguing of all the Royal artwork. In this story, we encounter several interesting players from the Royal Collection department, past and present. Of course, they’re fictitious representatives of the real office holders, but looking in on the inner workings of Buckingham Palace is fascinating. With the reader knowing just how astute and informed the Queen is, it’s amusing how these department heads think they are in charge. It’s to the Queen’s advantage to let them, plus DCI Strong, take credit for connecting the dots of the investigation. The reader understands the Queen and Rozie and Billy have done much of the investigation in the background. The Queen, as always, must appear to be uninvolved in the messiness of these cases. I am so pleased that this second book is continuing the success of the first. After an auspicious beginning to a series, the fate of that series is in a precarious position with the publication of book two. The series has that delightful wit that infuses just the right kind of humor and entertainment. And, I have to retract or clarify part of my statement made in the beginning of the review, as I indicated that this book and this series was pure pleasure reading for me and not one of imparting important messages. That is misleading. Although the book was a pleasure read for me, there is lots of learning to be had here and beyond. From the Royal operations and Royal offices of the Palace to the Queen’s daily schedules to the Baroque art of Artemisia Geniteschi, an Italian 17th century painter. And, if you’re like myself and many other readers I know, you will go down all the rabbit holes of those subjects, some of which I’ve provided links below. Also, the poison pen notes bring up racism and misogyny, as does the choice of the artist Artemisia Geniteschi whose paintings are featured. And, as the Queen is the main character, there is the overriding issue of how older or “old” people are dismissed in their contributions to or understandings of situations. The Queen certainly puts the falsehood of old meaning useless to rest. A Three Dog Problem is certain to be one of my favorite reads this year. I highly recommend it to all mystery/crime readers, with a special encouragement to those who are enjoying the Thursday Murder Club series by Richard Osmand. In Addition, Some Links: Author S.J. Bennett’s web site where includes two interactive maps, one of Windsor Castle (for The Windsor Knot, book one) and one of Buckingham Palace (for All the Queen’s Men, book two). You can find them halfway down the Home page. Click on which map you want and then click on the different rooms for a short bit of information about that room and its use in the books. For we book map lovers, this is so a much-appreciated bonus. https://www.sjbennettbooks.com/ Also, I wanted to include a link to The Royal Collection Trust, which is such a big part of A Three Dog Problem/All the Queen’s Men. Prince Phillip mentions in the book that there are over 7,000 paintings in the royal collection, and as you explore this link, you can see how much more there is besides that. https://www.rct.uk/ The UK title of A Three Dog Problem is much preferred by me to its U.S. title, All the Queen’s Men. The reason I prefer it is because I love titles that connect beyond their own story, and A Three Dog Problem connects to a Sherlock Holmes story, “The Red-Headed League,” in which Homes notes, “It is quite a three pipe problem, and I beg that you won’t speak to me for fifty minutes.” Holmes had his three pipe problems and the Queen has her three dog problems, wherein she walks the grounds of the Palace with three of her dogs to think about what’s bothering her, and in A Three Dog Problem, there is quite a bit that is troubling her. (The chapter where this walk occurs is one of my favorite in the book, with its description of the grounds, the dogs, her reminiscences of Philip, and her thought process about the problems at hand.) https://www.pagebypagebooks.com/Arthu... Artemisia Geniteschi is the 17th century artist whose paintings are featured in one of the mysteries of A Three Dog Problem. In a book where the two main characters are strong, resourceful women I don’t think the choice of this artist was in any way random. She was certainly ahead of her time in what women were allowed to accomplish, and her story is as exceptional as her paintings. https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-e...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Carla

    All the Queen's Men is set in 2016, just after the Brexit Referendum, so there were references to Brexit, Theresa May being the new Prime Minster, and the election in the US with issues between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. This is the least of the Queen's worries. She has her assistant private secretary, Rozie Oshodi on the trail of a favorite painting that once hung outside the queen’s bedroom that seems to have been misappropriated by the Royal Navy, as well as a series of disturbing anon All the Queen's Men is set in 2016, just after the Brexit Referendum, so there were references to Brexit, Theresa May being the new Prime Minster, and the election in the US with issues between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. This is the least of the Queen's worries. She has her assistant private secretary, Rozie Oshodi on the trail of a favorite painting that once hung outside the queen’s bedroom that seems to have been misappropriated by the Royal Navy, as well as a series of disturbing anonymous letters have begun circulating in the palace. When a staff member is found murdered by the pool, things heat up as she was the recipient of some of the letters. Although the Queen’s courtiers think they have it all "under control", the Queen is not so sure and with her skills at observation and putting clues together, she has Rozie continue to work the cases under her direction. This book has some threads that seem to be unconnected, but she does a great job bringing all the crimes together. I enjoy how Rozie acts as the Queen's legs as she can't galivant around. There are a lot of different people from different departments that need to be investigated. I did find that there seemed to be some extraneous information that could have shortened the story somewhat, but it all ends well. I love how the Queen and Rozie solve the situation but feeds it to the Queen's Men so they can solve the case and give the Queen a full report of what happened. As the story is set in 2016, we see the Queen and Prince Phillip together, which was a nice way to honour him. I didn't quite enjoy this story as much as the first in the series, but it was still a fun and entertaining cozy mystery. I listened to the audiobook narrated by Jane Copeland. She does a nice job with the voices, pace and story. I enjoyed her performance.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    RTC. I'm in two minds over whether to give this 3 stars or round up to 4. I preferred The Windsor Knot more, if I am being completely honest, as there were elements to this story that I didn't warm to at all. Probably doesn't help that I'm audiobooking The Man Who Died Twice at the same time as reading this, as these both tackled the cozy crime sub-genre in different ways. I think I will continue with this series, but we shall see.... ***eProof gifted by UK publisher, Zaffre/Bonnier Books UK, via RTC. I'm in two minds over whether to give this 3 stars or round up to 4. I preferred The Windsor Knot more, if I am being completely honest, as there were elements to this story that I didn't warm to at all. Probably doesn't help that I'm audiobooking The Man Who Died Twice at the same time as reading this, as these both tackled the cozy crime sub-genre in different ways. I think I will continue with this series, but we shall see.... ***eProof gifted by UK publisher, Zaffre/Bonnier Books UK, via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review/reaction*** In the wake of the Brexit referendum that has divided a country and the US election between Hilary Clinton and Donald Trump, the Queen just wants some peace and quiet. But, it looks like she's not going to get it as, when on a Royal visit to a Navy exhibitition, she sees a painting of the Royal Yacht Britannia on display. Her painting. And she gave no permission for its display. In fact, she thought it was misplaced in the mid-1980s. As she begins to look into this, a body of a disliked housekeeper is found at the Palace's swimming pool, her ankle deeply cut, causing her to bleed to death. An accident, surely? But it's strange that her death happens as the Queen begins to look into the painting's disappearance and several of the female staff, including her trusted secretary, Rosie, receive nasty poison pen letters... Something is going on in Buckingham Palace, and Her Majesty is determined to get to the bottom of it. Am going to honest with you, dear reader: I am not entirely sure where I sit on this. I like this, but up to a point. There's several things that make me stop from enjoying this as much as I did with Windsor Knot, and the worst part is that I can't exactly put my finger on what the problem is. It's annoying as I can't figure it out and I think I am going to continue with this series. I have plans to read book 3 when it comes out next year, so why do I feel the way I do with Three Dog Problem? The only thing I can think of is that this wasn't as fun as the first. The fun didn't exactly hit home for me. I like some of the issues and the characters that this book had (I love Rozie and I did like the Queen, but I like them the most when they were together and that wasn't enough for me in this book), but the fun and wonder of Windsor Knot wasn't here. I wonder if it's because it was trying to do too many things - poison pen letters, murder, stolen paintings. Maybe if one of these elements was removed and the story focused on characters a tad more, maybe it would have worked for me...? Maybe it's because I was, at the same time of reading this, audiobooking another cosy murder mystery - The Man Who Died Twice by Richard Osman. Now, both of these are cosy mysteries and both tackle this subgenre in very different ways. Like I said, I am going to read book 3 when that comes out. I am very intrigued to see where this series is going to. But this mystery didn't exactly work for me so I might not rush out to get my hands on the Queen's next mystery as fast as I would have...

  23. 4 out of 5

    eyes.2c

    Couldn’t put Humpty together again! Something is broken in the palace and it’s up to the Queen and her private secretary, Rozie Oshodi to fix it. Its 2016, a women is found dead in the Palace swimming pool, other women are being left threatening sexual notes. What is going on? The Queen is missing a personal painting, “Britannia. [It] used to hang outside [her] bedroom.” As Philip puts it, “What, the ghastly little one by the Australian who couldn’t do boats? That.” The Queen asks Rozie to invest Couldn’t put Humpty together again! Something is broken in the palace and it’s up to the Queen and her private secretary, Rozie Oshodi to fix it. Its 2016, a women is found dead in the Palace swimming pool, other women are being left threatening sexual notes. What is going on? The Queen is missing a personal painting, “Britannia. [It] used to hang outside [her] bedroom.” As Philip puts it, “What, the ghastly little one by the Australian who couldn’t do boats? That.” The Queen asks Rozie to investigate. It seems for some reason the Queen is fond of that small work. The investigation leads Rozie back in time to a rash of missing items in Palace in the 1980’s dubbed the Breakages Business. She has her hands full Asher investigations deepen. Once again the Queen directs procedures from afar without letting on her involvement. All the while having to disguise from her various Secretaries what is happening. The prodding from behind the scenes, a word dropped here, a participle left hanging there. I began to find some of it quite annoying. All to placate the Queen’s Men, who occasionally needed to be jollied along, to have their egos soothed, even as their unfailing efforts to protect the Queen seemed to sometimes devolve into obstruction by default, to the point of rendering a situation unworkable. I felt sympathy for the Queen and liked the often whimsical reflections that Bennett has us being party to. I felt sad for the Queen having fewer companions left to reminisce about old times with. (I love the interplay between the Queen and Prince Philip BTW). The problems besetting the Palace, both architecturally and on the personal level appear steeped in believability. There’s much to hang onto in this cozy mystery with a twist of regalit, on the who dunnit level. The intricacies of Palace life, the Queen and her relationship with her dogs, particularly when pondering a situation is a Three Dog problem. I enjoyed the throwaway a lines about real people (Camilla’s charitable work with abused women and her being hysterical in a good way!) Chronologically the story is reasonably up to date makes me wonder where to next for the series. Yet despite all the wonderful, gossipy insights, I found this second in the series not quite as strong as the first. A William Morrow ARC via NetGalley Please note: Quotes taken from an advanced reading copy maybe subject to change

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dee

    ⭐️ 3.5 ⭐️ I’m quite partial to a comfortable, cosy crime, so I couldn’t wait to get my canines (sorry!) stuck into A Three Dog Problem. It took me a few chapters to get to grips with the fact that the main character was the present queen, but when I did I was hooked (I could even hear her voice in my head narrating the story!). S.J. Bennett has done a fabulous job of characterising Queen Elizabeth II; Her Majesty is portrayed just as I imagine her to be in real life. With quite a large cast of char ⭐️ 3.5 ⭐️ I’m quite partial to a comfortable, cosy crime, so I couldn’t wait to get my canines (sorry!) stuck into A Three Dog Problem. It took me a few chapters to get to grips with the fact that the main character was the present queen, but when I did I was hooked (I could even hear her voice in my head narrating the story!). S.J. Bennett has done a fabulous job of characterising Queen Elizabeth II; Her Majesty is portrayed just as I imagine her to be in real life. With quite a large cast of characters I did have to take notes and recap on who was who, this slightly spoilt the flow of the story for me. A Three Dog Problem is a good, old fashioned whodunnit, with twists, turns and the odd fishy red herring thrown in for good measure. I was left guessing right until the end. If you’re a fan of cosy crime, this is the book for you. Many thanks to Tandem Collective, S.J Bennett and Zaffre Books for my gifted copy, in exchange for an honest, unbiased review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Julie

    Another excellent offering by Ms Bennett. This one makes a foray into the world of art forgery, whilst again it’s chock full of scenes which give us glimpses of the Queen’s daily life. Again we see her as incisive and capable, and there’s another delightful scene in which members of her household - who frustrate her by forever having everything ‘under control,’ even when it patently isn’t - explain the outcome of the investigation to her, making sure they go slow enough for her to absorb the rev Another excellent offering by Ms Bennett. This one makes a foray into the world of art forgery, whilst again it’s chock full of scenes which give us glimpses of the Queen’s daily life. Again we see her as incisive and capable, and there’s another delightful scene in which members of her household - who frustrate her by forever having everything ‘under control,’ even when it patently isn’t - explain the outcome of the investigation to her, making sure they go slow enough for her to absorb the revelations which, unbeknown to them, have all resulted from subtle hints she had supplied to them in the first place! Once again, her compassion is front and centre. She’s the only one able to see beyond the faults which make the housekeeper - the murder victim - universally disliked, although perhaps this is because she’s the only one who has the whole picture. One thing bugged me. I did wonder why (view spoiler)[the man responsible gave Rozie a clue which ultimately helped the Queen piece everything together. I can’t see why Sholto needed to mention the breakages business (hide spoiler)] . The ending, which finally explains why the ‘ghastly’ little painting which started the whole business was important to Her Majesty, is absolutely lovely. It brought a tear to my eye. I’ll definitely look forward to reading the next one in the series.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Barbara

    Absolutely smashing series!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Victoria

    I really loved this one! Having the Queen as a main character is a very interesting idea and her POV is great. The murder in this book is a still very twisty but a little easier to keep track of than the first one. It was fun to try and guess what happened and who did what, although I didn't guess any of it right I really loved this one! Having the Queen as a main character is a very interesting idea and her POV is great. The murder in this book is a still very twisty but a little easier to keep track of than the first one. It was fun to try and guess what happened and who did what, although I didn't guess any of it right

  28. 4 out of 5

    Julia

    Another cosy whodunnit in this series which I really enjoyed. There were quite a few characters to get your head around but once I got it all, the story flowed well.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Chloe (libraryofchlo)

    The body of a disliked housekeeper is found at the Palace's swimming pool shortly after the Queen sees her painting of the Royal Yacht Britannia on display at a Navy exhibition, without her consent. While this is happening, members of her staff including her trusted secretary, Rozie, are receiving messages from an anonymous source, and the content is less than kind. Tasked with a menagerie of issues, the Queen is determined to get to the bottom of what is afoot. A Three Dog Problem is essentiall The body of a disliked housekeeper is found at the Palace's swimming pool shortly after the Queen sees her painting of the Royal Yacht Britannia on display at a Navy exhibition, without her consent. While this is happening, members of her staff including her trusted secretary, Rozie, are receiving messages from an anonymous source, and the content is less than kind. Tasked with a menagerie of issues, the Queen is determined to get to the bottom of what is afoot. A Three Dog Problem is essentially a whodunnit set on palace grounds, with the British royal family making cameos and a host of red herrings to keep you guessing. Queen Elizabeth II acts in an investigative capacity, but is the most discreet of sleuths of course. The characterisation of the Queen is charming and insightful, and there are humorous moments akin to the kind you'd read about in Richard Osman's The Thursday Murder Club series. While I hadn't read the first book in this series, I was still able to grasp that this wasn't Her Majesty's first rodeo, and that she'd put her grey matter to use to investigate matters before. This cosy crime novel does feature fun quips showing the Queen's relationship with Philip, and some gorgeous scenic description of the palace setting. I did however find the plot a bit muddled in places - the problems that the Queen is trying to find an answer to are plentiful - there's a missing painting, a suspected murder, and anonymous letters that target multiple people at the place - which means at times there are too many threads to keep track of. These problems are also combined with a wider theme of a covert gang taking items from the Palace under the radar, so at times it can feel like there is too much going on. I think the plot would've benefitted from less going on, and also maybe an index of the characters especially as some are known by nicknames or multiple terms - I often found myself going, wait a sec, which one is he? Since I write about the royals for my job as a journalist, this was an enjoyable more light-hearted way to get a royal fix, and despite my issues with the plot it was still an amusing and far-fetched piece of escapism to get into on my days off. *My copy was gifted by publisher, Zaffre/Bonnier Books UK for a Tandem Readalong on Instagram

  30. 5 out of 5

    Woolfardis

    The second installment in the Her Majesty the Queen Investigates, A Three Dog Problem is a unique take on the mystery and crime genre. The title is a play on the three pipe problem that Sherlock Holmes often encountered in Conan Doyle's stories. Having never read the first, I was intrigued to find out more on this royal crime caper. The cover mis-lead me slightly: the drawing looks like Queen Victoria and I was expecting a mysterious romp through the streets of Victorian London. The book has sever The second installment in the Her Majesty the Queen Investigates, A Three Dog Problem is a unique take on the mystery and crime genre. The title is a play on the three pipe problem that Sherlock Holmes often encountered in Conan Doyle's stories. Having never read the first, I was intrigued to find out more on this royal crime caper. The cover mis-lead me slightly: the drawing looks like Queen Victoria and I was expecting a mysterious romp through the streets of Victorian London. The book has several narrative threads running through it which, at first, is a little off-putting and confusing. There are missing paintings, murdered bodies and every-day occurances like stolen Palace items which make it a little difficult to really follow the true crime of the murder. After a while, however, the flow of the book does settle in to a steady rhythm and the Queen seems to rise above it all, as one would expect. I am no Royalist but the Queen is a sterling example, and I have read only one other book that features her as the protagonist (Alan Bennett's 'The Uncommon Reader') and I didn't feel the same kind of warmth and joy toward the Queen as I did there. The mystery plods along and I didn't find it all too consuming, but I found it to be gentle but intriguing. From reading other reviews it seems the first book had a better depth of wit and humour about it, which I found to be lacking in this one. It seems a fun little caper that is cosy, warm and not at all like the usual grim and dark realistic crime thrillers I tend to read. I wouldn't say the Queen is particularly fleshed out here, but it's a decent and quick read full of joy albeit coupled with murder.

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