Hot Best Seller

Celestial Persuasion

Availability: Ready to download

Abigail Isaacs fears ever again falling under the power of love and dedicates her life to studying the heavens. However, upon her father’s demise she finds herself in reduced circumstances and must write to her brother, who has long been away at sea. When instead Captain Wentworth of the HMS Laconia sends a tragic reply, Abigail is asked to set aside her own ambitions and Abigail Isaacs fears ever again falling under the power of love and dedicates her life to studying the heavens. However, upon her father’s demise she finds herself in reduced circumstances and must write to her brother, who has long been away at sea. When instead Captain Wentworth of the HMS Laconia sends a tragic reply, Abigail is asked to set aside her own ambitions and fulfill her brother’s dreams in the Viceroyalty of Río de la Plata. In his relentless pursuit for justice, Lieutenant Raphael Gabay lends his sword to the Spanish American cause. But as he prepares to set sail with the others, he is entrusted with the care of a young woman. She is quite unlike anyone he has ever known, and Raphael begins to wonder whether the brilliant astronomer will see beyond his frivolous façade and recognize his true nature. Their destinies have been plotted beyond the celestial veil; their charts foretell of adventure. Can these two troubled souls be persuaded to heed the stars and find love—and their purpose—in this fledgling nation?


Compare

Abigail Isaacs fears ever again falling under the power of love and dedicates her life to studying the heavens. However, upon her father’s demise she finds herself in reduced circumstances and must write to her brother, who has long been away at sea. When instead Captain Wentworth of the HMS Laconia sends a tragic reply, Abigail is asked to set aside her own ambitions and Abigail Isaacs fears ever again falling under the power of love and dedicates her life to studying the heavens. However, upon her father’s demise she finds herself in reduced circumstances and must write to her brother, who has long been away at sea. When instead Captain Wentworth of the HMS Laconia sends a tragic reply, Abigail is asked to set aside her own ambitions and fulfill her brother’s dreams in the Viceroyalty of Río de la Plata. In his relentless pursuit for justice, Lieutenant Raphael Gabay lends his sword to the Spanish American cause. But as he prepares to set sail with the others, he is entrusted with the care of a young woman. She is quite unlike anyone he has ever known, and Raphael begins to wonder whether the brilliant astronomer will see beyond his frivolous façade and recognize his true nature. Their destinies have been plotted beyond the celestial veil; their charts foretell of adventure. Can these two troubled souls be persuaded to heed the stars and find love—and their purpose—in this fledgling nation?

37 review for Celestial Persuasion

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie DeMoss

    This is such a brilliant combination of historical and women's fiction, as well as a tribute to Jane Austen's Persuasion It begins in England in the Regency era and travels to Buenos Aires, in the beginnings of a fight for the South American colonies' independence from Spain. Brilliant, but unable to go to college because she is a woman, Abigail Isaacs has few choices other than to study astronomy in her comfortable English home. However, upon the death of her father, Abigail writes to her broth This is such a brilliant combination of historical and women's fiction, as well as a tribute to Jane Austen's Persuasion It begins in England in the Regency era and travels to Buenos Aires, in the beginnings of a fight for the South American colonies' independence from Spain. Brilliant, but unable to go to college because she is a woman, Abigail Isaacs has few choices other than to study astronomy in her comfortable English home. However, upon the death of her father, Abigail writes to her brother Jonathan, who is serving on a ship called The Argo. Unfortunately she is told by none other than Austen character Captain Wentworth that her brother, a friend of Wentworth's, has just passed away under violent circumstances because he was Jewish. Abigail is surprised to find out that her late father and brother had invested in property in South America, and that they were part of a secret society that wants to free Buenos Aires from Spanish rule. She eventually decides to travel to Buenos Aires on the frigate George Canning, along with her loyal companion, Mrs. Frankel. They are also accompanied by her brother's associates, José Francisco de San Martín and Raphael Gabay de Montoya. They are part of a Freemason-affiliated secret society interested in freeing Buenos Aires from Spanish rule. I was immediately transported to the Regency era in Britain, and then to South America at the time of Spanish rule. The characters all came to life and the places were described in such vivid detail that I felt as if I were there. The descriptions of the ship voyage were especially real and fascinating. The customs, rules, and prejudices of the era were described in sometimes painful detail, especially the racism against Jews, which was evident in circumstances that occurred early in the book. Jewish traditions, terms, and customs are explained throughout this captivating novel. The bow to Jane Austen comes not only in the inclusion of Wentworth, but also in the language and tone of the book. There is also a surprise in the book that nobody will see coming. I was blown away by the author's remarkable ability to write a prequel to Persuasion , add in Jewish traditions and history, expertly combine historical, literary, and fictional characters, and eloquently surround it all with the South American independence movement. I would highly recommend this to fans of Jewish and South American historical fiction, as well as to readers who love strong female characters. I received a free copy of this book from the author. My review is voluntary and my opinions are my own.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    Jane Austen's influence is apparent throughout this lovely Regency story about a twenty-seven-year-old Jewish woman, Abigail Isaacs. Having received a bluestocking-type education from her father, a doctor, Abigail has been content to continue studying astrology in her rural English village. Sadly, Dr. Isaacs dies, followed soon after by news of the death of Abigail's brother, Jonathan, a naval doctor who served for years under his good friend, Captain Wentworth. The captain's letter urges Abigai Jane Austen's influence is apparent throughout this lovely Regency story about a twenty-seven-year-old Jewish woman, Abigail Isaacs. Having received a bluestocking-type education from her father, a doctor, Abigail has been content to continue studying astrology in her rural English village. Sadly, Dr. Isaacs dies, followed soon after by news of the death of Abigail's brother, Jonathan, a naval doctor who served for years under his good friend, Captain Wentworth. The captain's letter urges Abigail to come to London and meet with Lord Fife, which was Jonathan's fervent request upon his deathbed. Lord Fife presents Abigail with startling information regarding plans her father and brother had made without her knowledge. She finds herself at a crossroads - she can stay in England, where there are few opportunities for an impoverished single woman, or she can board a ship and sail to Argentina for the future her family members had intended for her. Abigail makes the difficult decision to pull up roots, leave her synagogue and lifelong friends, and follow the stars to the unknown. She's accompanied by her loyal companion, Mrs. Frankel, and makes many new acquaintances along the way to her final destination. There are so many wonderful elements interwoven into this story, I hardly know where to start. The first pages describe a shocking example of anti-Jewish bigotry, which is subsequently a strong thread throughout the book and generally is presented in a stoic, matter-of-fact manner. The few options available to Regency era women, regardless of their intelligence and capability, is another theme. Readers of historical literature are certainly accustomed to British history; this story does begin in Exeter and London but soon moves on. Abigail and Mrs. Frankel spend weeks aboard an ocean frigate, experiencing the wonders and perils of sea travel during the Napoleonic war. They land in Buenos Aires to find an entirely different culture than they're accustomed to. Argentina is a new land that's a melting pot of various ethnicities and indigenous groups. There's a fight for the country's independence going on, which also affects the story. Things move on to Rosario, Argentina, bringing another change of scenery and culture. But this book is much more than a historical travelogue. From a literary perspective, I love the way Jane Austen's characters are sewn into the book. Abigail and Captain Wentworth continue to correspond, and the evidence of this being a prequel to Persuasion becomes obvious. The plot itself shows some faint parallels to Persuasion as well. Abigail is a strong, believable lead character. Her journey covers miles and miles, both the physical kind and the self-discovery kind. She's passionate about her study of the stars, which sometimes gets her in trouble, and she's determined to fulfill the mission her brother set out for her even though she doesn't feel qualified to handle it. With so much to do, she won't allow herself to fall in love, but love finds her anyway. It's not a romance that sizzles, but the connection between her and Raphael Gabay is developed convincingly. All the supporting characters (both imagined and actual historical figures) have interesting, three-dimensional personalities. While Abigail's Jewishness is certainly a central focus, I must commend the respect offered to several other faiths throughout the story, emphasizing that which we have in common rather than that which separates us. I loved this book! I received an ARC from the author with no promise of a review, favorable or otherwise.

  3. 4 out of 5

    J. W. Garrett

    “A sweet Regency Romance set against the backdrop of Argentina’s struggle for independence” per the author Rating: MA: PG-17: due to the violence of war. No graphic sex; however, there was one scene that could be a trigger for some. It was an attempted assault [unsuccessful]. Prologue + 20-chapters + Epilogue. Angst Level: medium, again this was a time of war as a country fought for its independence and a lone woman struggled for hers. We also had lovers’ angst. There were skirmishes and danger “A sweet Regency Romance set against the backdrop of Argentina’s struggle for independence” per the author Rating: MA: PG-17: due to the violence of war. No graphic sex; however, there was one scene that could be a trigger for some. It was an attempted assault [unsuccessful]. Prologue + 20-chapters + Epilogue. Angst Level: medium, again this was a time of war as a country fought for its independence and a lone woman struggled for hers. We also had lovers’ angst. There were skirmishes and danger that threatened characters. Source: [KU 6-30-21]. Religious Element: There was a religious thread woven throughout this story. We had references to the various religions as each group celebrated their holy days in the manner in which they worshiped. At no time did I feel that this was preachy. In fact, I was fascinated by the reverence in which our author presented her faith in conjunction with others. SPOILER ALERT: This review may contain *** Spoilers *** As the title states, this had references to Austen’s Persuasion. There were several Persuasion characters that we know all too well and through a series of letters were able to feel their presence. This was fun. However, Mirta Trupp did not stop there, such a sneaky author. Throughout this story, there were references to other Austen stories that made me giggle. I was impressed with how well the stories meshed together. I was constantly discovering nuggets from several stories that would spring up here and there. I had to giggle when I came across Mrs. Garrett, the housekeeper for Lord Fife. As they say ‘War is hell’ and it was no different here. This was straight-up history in the making. The research was amazing. I had no idea of the history just south of my own borders. I was shamed in one respect but was also excited as Trupp walked me through the establishment/birthing of a new country and a place for people of all religions but especially the displaced Jews. Thankfully we were told [not shown] about the violent clashes and their results but nothing graphic. There would always be conflicts… those who advocate for independence vs those who held to the Spanish Crown and the influence of the Catholic Church. “What sort of woman leaves her home and crosses an ocean to start anew? A brave woman. A strong woman!” quote from the book The middle of the story slowed down a bit for me. There was so much information to digest. Like our heroine, I struggled with the language, the societal rules, customs, mode of dress, comportment, expectations, and names. Oh-My-Gosh, the names were simply beautiful. Trupp crafted the atmosphere so the reader would have an affinity for what Abigail was experiencing as she journeyed toward her future and her happy-ever-after. That was brilliant. Abigail [Avileh (Avi)] Isaacs and Mrs. Frankel, her housekeeper/companion/friend, left everything they knew and journeyed 50-days aboard ship toward their destiny and the unknown. [if you count the days, remember 1812 was a leap year]. Yeah, I’ll admit, I counted the days. There were many surprises for our girl as she attempted to fulfill her brother’s dream. I can’t say too much as it would be a spoiler. Ah, heck. Who am I kidding? I missed the clues completely and they were as obvious as buttons on a shirt. As I read this for the second time, I wondered how I missed them in the first place. “Non est ad astra mollis e terris via” – “There is no easy way from the earth to the stars” –Seneca This story will leave the reader feeling many emotions. I was thrilled, mesmerized, shocked, stunned, awed, humbled, and excited. The writing was amazing. When Miss Isaacs described the galactic plane, I wanted to run outside and look up at the stars. Her love of reading, calculating, and watching the stars was fascinating. I also enjoyed the historical accounts of women professionals in her field. As she was about to cross the equator, she was preparing for a whole new set of constellations. It was intrigued. “Though my soul may set in darkness, it will rise in perfect light; I have loved the stars too fondly to be fearful of the night.” –Sarah Williams, Twilight House: A Legacy of Verse As the various holy days were described and explained, I was humbled by the dedication these two women held as they continued with their beliefs and traditions. Trupp was sensitive to the subject and displayed the various religions of the period. It was handled well and very respectful even when a character disparaged any religion that was different than their own. Our author demonstrated how such a character would act or react according to historical accounts. I didn’t care for it. It hurt my soul to read it but I know it happened. Trupp was authentic to the times. I appreciated how it was handled. There is no way to do justice to this story in a review. The scope is too broad. I loved it and highly recommend it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sherry

    Once again, Mirta Ines Trupp writes a lovely prequel to Jane Austen’s work. This time it's Persuasion. But as usual, Trupp includes a twist, in fact, many of them. The female protagonist is Jewish and she’s heading to Buenos Aires in the midst of a revolution. This allows Trupp to inform her readers about the history and the heroes of Argentina, the 19th century Jewish Argentinian community, and the contributions of the women at that time. Devotees of Austen’s work, who never wanted her stories Once again, Mirta Ines Trupp writes a lovely prequel to Jane Austen’s work. This time it's Persuasion. But as usual, Trupp includes a twist, in fact, many of them. The female protagonist is Jewish and she’s heading to Buenos Aires in the midst of a revolution. This allows Trupp to inform her readers about the history and the heroes of Argentina, the 19th century Jewish Argentinian community, and the contributions of the women at that time. Devotees of Austen’s work, who never wanted her stories to end, will enjoy Trupp’s writing, and those who have adored Persuasion, will not be disappointed in what could possibly come after. I received an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Judy Kleinman

    This author has done it again! Trupp has successfully married her two passions into an extremely satisfying novel. The storyline is unique, yet it will delight Janeites with its connections to "Persuasion" and nods to other of Austen’s work. And can we talk about those letters? They were brilliant! In fact, THE LETTER written in the narrative by Lieutenant Gabay rivals Captain Wentworth’s famous words, and combines the worlds of Regency Romance with Judaic fiction in a most clever and fulfilling This author has done it again! Trupp has successfully married her two passions into an extremely satisfying novel. The storyline is unique, yet it will delight Janeites with its connections to "Persuasion" and nods to other of Austen’s work. And can we talk about those letters? They were brilliant! In fact, THE LETTER written in the narrative by Lieutenant Gabay rivals Captain Wentworth’s famous words, and combines the worlds of Regency Romance with Judaic fiction in a most clever and fulfilling manner. Trupp met all my benchmarks with this story. This a sweet, inspirational romance with a strong, outspoken heroine. The author takes us out of England and introduces us to a new setting—one that experiences its own Regency era— filled with captivating characters, handsome officers and intriguing scenarios. The author cleverly weaves Captain Wentworth into the storyline, but this is much more than a prequel to Austen’s "Persuasion." Trupp doesn’t imitate or copy, as we see so often times in fan fiction. Her style is unique, and this story is certainly one that most readers have never come across. The Jewish element is delightful, but not overdone. The historical details are fascinating. And the ending…or rather, was it the beginning? I am certain that Jane Austen would approve.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Tammy Buchli

    If there is a valid criticism of Jane Austen it is that her books lack diversity. Many JAFF writers have attempted to redress that shortcoming, often with nearly unreadable results. Anyone who would like to write an Austenation with more diverse voices ought to read this book (and the author's previous Austenation) to see how it should be done. This isn't just good JAFF, it's darned good historical fiction. Well written, beautifully researched, and absolutely fascinating. The Austen cameos, as t If there is a valid criticism of Jane Austen it is that her books lack diversity. Many JAFF writers have attempted to redress that shortcoming, often with nearly unreadable results. Anyone who would like to write an Austenation with more diverse voices ought to read this book (and the author's previous Austenation) to see how it should be done. This isn't just good JAFF, it's darned good historical fiction. Well written, beautifully researched, and absolutely fascinating. The Austen cameos, as they appeared, were always both fun, true to their Austen origins, and organic to the story. I'm rather partial to Captain Wentworth so I tend to be particular about how he appears in JAFF -- he was wonderful in this novel. But enough from me -- everybody just run and get this book and read it! You won't be sorry.

  7. 4 out of 5

    wosedwew

    Give me nights perfectly quiet... and I looking up at the stars... ~ Walt Whitman “Celestial Persuasion” is an unusual book for me — a JAFF that is not based on Pride & Prejudice. Instead, this story intersects with characters from “Persuasion”. Captain Wentworth is a good friend to our heroine’s brother whose path crosses with one of the Musgrove sons. Abigail Isaacs, a young Jewish woman, is persuaded to emigrate from England to Argentina. She arrives at a critical point in the history of Argent Give me nights perfectly quiet... and I looking up at the stars... ~ Walt Whitman “Celestial Persuasion” is an unusual book for me — a JAFF that is not based on Pride & Prejudice. Instead, this story intersects with characters from “Persuasion”. Captain Wentworth is a good friend to our heroine’s brother whose path crosses with one of the Musgrove sons. Abigail Isaacs, a young Jewish woman, is persuaded to emigrate from England to Argentina. She arrives at a critical point in the history of Argentina. I am mad with the sight of stars, and frenzied with the beauty of the silver, wanton moon. ~ Muriel Strode Abigail, a scientist, is interested in the study of stars. She is based on an actual historical character. I loved this heroine and her story. I also learned some history of Argentina and the Jewish people who came to live there. Highest recommendations! To be glad of life, because it gives you the chance to love and to work and to play and to look up at the stars... and to spend as much time as you can, with body and with spirit, in God's out-of-doors — these are little guide-posts on the foot-path to peace. ~ Henry Van Dyke

  8. 4 out of 5

    Heidi Slowinski

    Abigail Issacs is a gifted astronomer. But the loss of her father places her in a perilous situation that requires help from her brother, who has been away at sea. When she receives a tragic reply, Abigail finds herself in the charge of Lieutenant Raphael Gabay and pursuing a different ambition altogether. Trupp has done it again! She artfully blends beloved characters from Jane Austen’s original writings with her own inspired storyline, creating something truly wonderful. Abigail Issacs is deve Abigail Issacs is a gifted astronomer. But the loss of her father places her in a perilous situation that requires help from her brother, who has been away at sea. When she receives a tragic reply, Abigail finds herself in the charge of Lieutenant Raphael Gabay and pursuing a different ambition altogether. Trupp has done it again! She artfully blends beloved characters from Jane Austen’s original writings with her own inspired storyline, creating something truly wonderful. Abigail Issacs is developed beautifully in this emotional story. Trupp brings a refreshing representation of a Jewish heroine to Regency-era literature. The imagery in her writing transports the reader into the story. I was engrossed from the first page and couldn’t put this book down. I would like to thank the author for an advanced copy in exchange for my honest review.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    Charming and instructive I enjoyed this book as much as the previous one by this author. And it had the added bonus of rich history of Argentina, and its populations. Romance and history make for a fine, Austen-inspired read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Mirta Trupp

    Early praise: “A wonderful and inventive novel that paints a compelling historical tale... Celestial Persuasion left me contemplating about how destiny is written in the stars.” ~ Don Jacobson, author of The Bennet Wardrobe series

  11. 5 out of 5

    Claudia Fabian

    I have just finished reading “Celestial Persuasion” by Mirta Ines Trupp. This book incorporates everything I look for in a historical romance. To steal the words of another: It is more drawing room, than bedroom. I can share this with my congregation’s Sisterhood and not be embarrassed by sexual content. The history of the Viceroyalty was completely new to me. The Jewish content was extraordinary and very well done. It was neither Orthodox or Reform. Abigail Isaacs, the protagonist, lives a uniq I have just finished reading “Celestial Persuasion” by Mirta Ines Trupp. This book incorporates everything I look for in a historical romance. To steal the words of another: It is more drawing room, than bedroom. I can share this with my congregation’s Sisterhood and not be embarrassed by sexual content. The history of the Viceroyalty was completely new to me. The Jewish content was extraordinary and very well done. It was neither Orthodox or Reform. Abigail Isaacs, the protagonist, lives a unique Judaism, cultivated by her parents who lived their faith in very different and personal ways. It felt believable. It felt approachable. And, as always, I applaud the author for including Jewish voices into historical fiction. There is something to be said about a Jewish storyline that is not biblical. I have shelves of books that speak to the horrors of the Holocaust and the Spanish Inquisition. Trupp brings us something different and I enjoy reading a light, entertaining novel with some angst and a HEA (happily ever after). I loved the epistolary format sprinkled throughout the book. The letters were touched by brilliance. Kol hakavod! Brava Ms. Trupp!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Gill M

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  14. 5 out of 5

    Wm A Openshaw

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sara

  16. 5 out of 5

    Donna

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mary B

  18. 4 out of 5

    Samantha

  19. 4 out of 5

    Janice

  20. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  21. 4 out of 5

    Dayna

  22. 4 out of 5

    wRb

  23. 5 out of 5

    Deb

  24. 4 out of 5

    Cathy Tilton

  25. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Hughes

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Lacroix

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kim Ellis

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rhiannon

  29. 4 out of 5

    Vikki Adkins

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Sanders

  31. 5 out of 5

    Tim Ryan

  32. 5 out of 5

    Matt Welch

  33. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Hemond

  34. 4 out of 5

    Emmy Wolfe

  35. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Schreiber

  36. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

  37. 4 out of 5

    Beth

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.