Hot Best Seller

True Love Cast Out All Evil: The Songwriting Legacy of Roky Erickson

Availability: Ready to download

“Transcendence came with a price,” Brian T. Atkinson writes in his introduction to this collection of reflections by and about pioneer psychedelic rocker Roky Erickson (1947–2019). The singer and songwriter who fronted the 13th Floor Elevators burst onto the Texas music scene in 1966 with the release of “You’re Gonna Miss Me,” the band’s only charting single, which feature “Transcendence came with a price,” Brian T. Atkinson writes in his introduction to this collection of reflections by and about pioneer psychedelic rocker Roky Erickson (1947–2019). The singer and songwriter who fronted the 13th Floor Elevators burst onto the Texas music scene in 1966 with the release of “You’re Gonna Miss Me,” the band’s only charting single, which featured Erickson’s primal vocal stylings. The band attracted considerable regional attention, including interest from a young Janis Joplin, who considered joining the group before opting to go to San Francisco instead. Through his interviews with those who were there and presentation of Erickson’s own words, Atkinson chronicles how Erickson was haunted for most of his life by mental illness, likely compounded by his liberal usage of hallucinogenic and other drugs. Despite that, however, his influence on Texas musicians of various genres is vast. As Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top attests in his foreword, “He stands alone to this day and is revered as an artist because he had the gift of a wonderful voice.” As with his previous books on Townes Van Zandt, Ray Wylie Hubbard, and Mickey Newbury, Atkinson has recorded hours of interviews with veteran and upcoming musicians who were impacted by Roky Erickson. Along with the insights of long-time music journalists like Joe Nick Patoski and the bittersweet recollections of friends and family members like Mikel Erickson, brother of the singer, this work includes poetry and lyrics written by Erickson during his confinement at Rusk State Hospital in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The picture that emerges is that of a brilliant, troubled mind and an artist whose influence extended far beyond the period of his greatest notoriety, continuing even beyond his death.


Compare

“Transcendence came with a price,” Brian T. Atkinson writes in his introduction to this collection of reflections by and about pioneer psychedelic rocker Roky Erickson (1947–2019). The singer and songwriter who fronted the 13th Floor Elevators burst onto the Texas music scene in 1966 with the release of “You’re Gonna Miss Me,” the band’s only charting single, which feature “Transcendence came with a price,” Brian T. Atkinson writes in his introduction to this collection of reflections by and about pioneer psychedelic rocker Roky Erickson (1947–2019). The singer and songwriter who fronted the 13th Floor Elevators burst onto the Texas music scene in 1966 with the release of “You’re Gonna Miss Me,” the band’s only charting single, which featured Erickson’s primal vocal stylings. The band attracted considerable regional attention, including interest from a young Janis Joplin, who considered joining the group before opting to go to San Francisco instead. Through his interviews with those who were there and presentation of Erickson’s own words, Atkinson chronicles how Erickson was haunted for most of his life by mental illness, likely compounded by his liberal usage of hallucinogenic and other drugs. Despite that, however, his influence on Texas musicians of various genres is vast. As Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top attests in his foreword, “He stands alone to this day and is revered as an artist because he had the gift of a wonderful voice.” As with his previous books on Townes Van Zandt, Ray Wylie Hubbard, and Mickey Newbury, Atkinson has recorded hours of interviews with veteran and upcoming musicians who were impacted by Roky Erickson. Along with the insights of long-time music journalists like Joe Nick Patoski and the bittersweet recollections of friends and family members like Mikel Erickson, brother of the singer, this work includes poetry and lyrics written by Erickson during his confinement at Rusk State Hospital in the late 1960s and early 1970s. The picture that emerges is that of a brilliant, troubled mind and an artist whose influence extended far beyond the period of his greatest notoriety, continuing even beyond his death.

11 review for True Love Cast Out All Evil: The Songwriting Legacy of Roky Erickson

  1. 5 out of 5

    John Spiller

    If you are reading this review, you presumably have passing familiarity with Roky Erickson, or at least the legend of Roky Erickson. Even among aficionados, Roky is two-dimensional: an acid casualty whose horror movie obsession manifests in songs like "Creature With The Atom Brain," "Two Headed Dog," "Bloody Hammer," etc. With "True Love Casts Out All Evil," Brian Atkinson offers a nuanced portrayal that endeavors to present Roky through the reflections of those who worked with him. At the outse If you are reading this review, you presumably have passing familiarity with Roky Erickson, or at least the legend of Roky Erickson. Even among aficionados, Roky is two-dimensional: an acid casualty whose horror movie obsession manifests in songs like "Creature With The Atom Brain," "Two Headed Dog," "Bloody Hammer," etc. With "True Love Casts Out All Evil," Brian Atkinson offers a nuanced portrayal that endeavors to present Roky through the reflections of those who worked with him. At the outset, Atkinson says that this is not a biography in the conventional sense. He largely glosses over Roky's time in the 13th Floor Elevators because that has been covered in more detail in other books. In fact, he does not spend much time on "The Songwriting Legacy" either because Roky was sui generis in that regard. Perhaps a more accurate title might be "Why Roky Erickson Matters". In a nutshell, he is nothing less than the musical bridge spanning from Buddy Holly in the 1950's to the Butthole Surfers in the the 1980's and continuing today in the sensibilities of any number of bands that try to channel his verve.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jason Mellard

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chip Christian

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tom

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pedro Petrosino

  6. 4 out of 5

    Michele Hutcheson

  7. 4 out of 5

    Thatkellyboy

  8. 5 out of 5

    Marc Robins

  9. 4 out of 5

    Gary

  10. 5 out of 5

    Brent

  11. 4 out of 5

    Marco Østrem Runic

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.