Hot Best Seller

WE HEREBY REFUSE: Japanese American Resistance to Wartime Incarceration

Availability: Ready to download

Three voices. Three acts of defiance. One mass injustice. The story of camp as you’ve never seen it before. Japanese Americans complied when evicted from their homes in World War II -- but many refused to submit to imprisonment in American concentration camps without a fight. In this groundbreaking graphic novel, meet: -- JIM AKUTSU, the inspiration for John Okada’s No-No Boy Three voices. Three acts of defiance. One mass injustice. The story of camp as you’ve never seen it before. Japanese Americans complied when evicted from their homes in World War II -- but many refused to submit to imprisonment in American concentration camps without a fight. In this groundbreaking graphic novel, meet: -- JIM AKUTSU, the inspiration for John Okada’s No-No Boy, who refuses to be drafted from the camp at Minidoka when classified as a non-citizen, an enemy alien; -- HIROSHI KASHIWAGI, who resists government pressure to sign a loyalty oath at Tule Lake, but yields to family pressure to renounce his U.S. citizenship; and -- MITSUYE ENDO, a reluctant recruit to a lawsuit contesting her imprisonment, who refuses a chance to leave the camp at Topaz so that her case could reach the U.S. Supreme Court. Based upon painstaking research, We Hereby Refuse presents an original vision of America’s past with disturbing links to the American present.


Compare

Three voices. Three acts of defiance. One mass injustice. The story of camp as you’ve never seen it before. Japanese Americans complied when evicted from their homes in World War II -- but many refused to submit to imprisonment in American concentration camps without a fight. In this groundbreaking graphic novel, meet: -- JIM AKUTSU, the inspiration for John Okada’s No-No Boy Three voices. Three acts of defiance. One mass injustice. The story of camp as you’ve never seen it before. Japanese Americans complied when evicted from their homes in World War II -- but many refused to submit to imprisonment in American concentration camps without a fight. In this groundbreaking graphic novel, meet: -- JIM AKUTSU, the inspiration for John Okada’s No-No Boy, who refuses to be drafted from the camp at Minidoka when classified as a non-citizen, an enemy alien; -- HIROSHI KASHIWAGI, who resists government pressure to sign a loyalty oath at Tule Lake, but yields to family pressure to renounce his U.S. citizenship; and -- MITSUYE ENDO, a reluctant recruit to a lawsuit contesting her imprisonment, who refuses a chance to leave the camp at Topaz so that her case could reach the U.S. Supreme Court. Based upon painstaking research, We Hereby Refuse presents an original vision of America’s past with disturbing links to the American present.

30 review for WE HEREBY REFUSE: Japanese American Resistance to Wartime Incarceration

  1. 5 out of 5

    Garpu

    Both brutal and moving.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Frank Abe

    A new graphic novel set for publication on May 18, 2021. Three voices. Three acts of defiance. One mass injustice. As the nation comes to a reckoning with a spate of anti-Asian violence that is rooted in a history of systemic exclusion and racism, the Wing Luke Museum and Chin Music Press are publishing a graphic novel that sheds new light on a major part of that history – the WW2 exclusion and incarceration of Japanese Americans. This is the story of camp as you’ve never seen it before. Whil A new graphic novel set for publication on May 18, 2021. Three voices. Three acts of defiance. One mass injustice. As the nation comes to a reckoning with a spate of anti-Asian violence that is rooted in a history of systemic exclusion and racism, the Wing Luke Museum and Chin Music Press are publishing a graphic novel that sheds new light on a major part of that history – the WW2 exclusion and incarceration of Japanese Americans. This is the story of camp as you’ve never seen it before. While Japanese Americans complied when evicted from their homes in 1942, many refused to submit to imprisonment in American concentration camps without a fight. Based upon painstaking research, We Hereby Refuse presents an original vision of America’s past with disturbing links to the American present. In this groundbreaking graphic novel, we meet: -- JIM AKUTSU, the inspiration for John Okada’s celebrated novel No-No Boy, who refuses to be drafted from the camp at Minidoka after the Selective Service classifes him not as a citizen but as an enemy alien; -- HIROSHI KASHIWAGI, who resists government pressure to sign a loyalty oath at Tule Lake, but yields to family pressure to renounce his U.S. citizenship, putting himself at risk of deportation; and -- MITSUYE ENDO, a reluctant recruit to a lawsuit contesting her imprisonment, who refuses a chance to leave the camp at Topaz so that her case could reach the U.S. Supreme Court. For the first time, we see Mitzi Endo as a person and not just a name on a legal brief. Through these characters, we see the devastating impacts of mass incarceration based solely on race, reveal the depth and breadth of the long-suppressed story of camp resistance, and locate government actions in the continuum of systemic exclusion of Asian Americans.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    I appreciate that these stories are being told, but found the interconnected stories a little difficult to follow. It also didn't help that there were different art styles, which made the book feel more jarring than cohesive. I appreciate that these stories are being told, but found the interconnected stories a little difficult to follow. It also didn't help that there were different art styles, which made the book feel more jarring than cohesive.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alec Jensen 75

    One of the most important books I’ve read in a long time. With impactful and under reported stories of the unjust incarceration of Japanese Americans during WWII, brilliant art work, and an impactful message, I would recommend this book to young adults and anyone who needs a reminder of the atrocities that aren’t taught in school. My praise to Nimura, Abe, Ishikawa, and Sasaki.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Carl Anderson

    Most Americans know about the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Many of us know the heroics of the 442nd regiment and their accomplishments, all while their parents were in "relocation camps" in isolated areas throughout the western states. Did anyone protest their imprisonment? Actually quite a few. Japanese American writers Frank Abe and Tamiko Nimura bring this story to live in their graphic novel, "WE HEREBY REFUSE: Japanese American Resistance To Wartime Incarceration." T Most Americans know about the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Many of us know the heroics of the 442nd regiment and their accomplishments, all while their parents were in "relocation camps" in isolated areas throughout the western states. Did anyone protest their imprisonment? Actually quite a few. Japanese American writers Frank Abe and Tamiko Nimura bring this story to live in their graphic novel, "WE HEREBY REFUSE: Japanese American Resistance To Wartime Incarceration." The carefully researched book focuses on three people with very different stories to tell the larger story of their resistance. Do we know the full story of the "No-No Boys?" Do we know the story of mass trials that seemed more like a kangaroo courts than getting their day before a jury of their peers? I had never read a graphic novel before but it turns out to be the perfect format for bringing the stories to light. The artists help de-mystify a very complex situation and one of the greatest denials of constitutional rights in American history. And it still very relevant today.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lizzy

    “I will be the friend we didn’t have when we needed one the most.” “It happened to us. We refuse to let it happen again.”

  7. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    This book, along with No-No Boy, made me feel some of the depth of the emotional, mental, family, community, indeed--all-encompassing-- trauma experienced by the people forced into the U.S. 1942-1945 race-based concentration camps.

  8. 4 out of 5

    JT

    Essential reading. A fresh take on “familiar” scenes with a deft use of archival materials. I will be thinking about this one for a long time.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kristine Ohkubo

    Having authored a book about the Pacific War, I am rather knowledgeable about the Japanese American internment during World War II. During my research I poured through countless books, interviews, and films to reconstruct the story of how the United States turned against its own citizens due to baseless fears generated by war-time hysteria. I asked myself why wasn’t this important historical event included in our education? Why did our history books neglect to discuss how the Constitution, the i Having authored a book about the Pacific War, I am rather knowledgeable about the Japanese American internment during World War II. During my research I poured through countless books, interviews, and films to reconstruct the story of how the United States turned against its own citizens due to baseless fears generated by war-time hysteria. I asked myself why wasn’t this important historical event included in our education? Why did our history books neglect to discuss how the Constitution, the instrument designed to protect every American man, woman, and child, was rendered practically useless in this case? The answer is simple, history books are often written from the perspective of the victor and events which present the winners of wars in a negative light are usually left out. It is the job of authors committed to revealing the truth to bring these facts to the forefront of discussion. However, most of the authors who take on such monumental tasks produce scholarly works that do not appeal to the general public. This is not the case with “We Hereby Refuse,” a graphic novel co-authored by Frank Abe and Tamiko Nimura. Although it is a graphic novel, do not misunderstand and think that it is any less scholarly than the works previously published about the Pacific War or the Japanese American experience during World War II. “We Hereby Refuse,” is a well-researched and historically accurate work which presents a sobering look at the experiences of the first and second generation Japanese who were living in the United States following the attack on Pearl Harbor by Imperial Japanese forces. The various events are related to the reader by three young Japanese Americans, Jim Akutsu, Hiroshi Kashiwagi, and Mitsue Endo, key figures in the resistance to wartime incarceration and the struggle to prove the unconstitutionality of the internment. I found it to be a refreshing approach to retelling the story. The reader is made aware of key historical facts, peoples’ experiences, their inner thoughts and feelings through conversational exchanges between various individuals. Finally! A work that has the potential to appeal to the masses and serve as an important educational tool! As Edmund Burke once said, “Those who don't know history are doomed to repeat it.” I sincerely hope that this book will help educate the masses for this is one segment of history I do not wish to see repeated.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Crawford

    I have read numerous books on the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II. This is one of the very few books that use a graphic novel-type format. It has a text size that is easy to read. The artwork quality is really up to whoever is looking at it. I like a lot of the artwork and some of the more what I would consider abstract forms I don't like. What is really important, though, is that the book covers the events leading up to the internment, the beginnings of the internment (being I have read numerous books on the internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II. This is one of the very few books that use a graphic novel-type format. It has a text size that is easy to read. The artwork quality is really up to whoever is looking at it. I like a lot of the artwork and some of the more what I would consider abstract forms I don't like. What is really important, though, is that the book covers the events leading up to the internment, the beginnings of the internment (being taken to the assembly centers), then being moved to the actual semi-permanent camps and on to the end of the internment. It also centers around a few particular characters and what they did and the effect of the interment upon them. It also covers the controversial questionnaire problem, violence in the camps, the troubles at Manzanar and the gradual release of some of the internees who were taking jobs somewhere else in the U.S. But not on the West Coast. Then it also includes the various court activities that tried to overturn the internment rulings. It also has a very strong anti-JACL emphasis. I think using the graphic novel format is good since it giving actual (drawn) faces to the people involved yet, at the same time, it is providing a lot of good information on the entire situation. I would definitely recommend this book to anyone wanting an overview of just what happened to these people (2/3rd of who were actual American citizens).

  11. 5 out of 5

    MARK FUNK

    A "Maus" for that terrible time in our nation's history when citizens were taken from their homes, forced from their farms and businesses and placed in concentration camps. "We Refuse: Japanese American Resistance to Wartime Incarceration," a graphic novel for young adults, is an important addition to the World War II canon. It focuses on a story that is not well known - the abuse of Japanese-American citizens' constitutional rights and their determined reaction to resist. It is part of the hist A "Maus" for that terrible time in our nation's history when citizens were taken from their homes, forced from their farms and businesses and placed in concentration camps. "We Refuse: Japanese American Resistance to Wartime Incarceration," a graphic novel for young adults, is an important addition to the World War II canon. It focuses on a story that is not well known - the abuse of Japanese-American citizens' constitutional rights and their determined reaction to resist. It is part of the history of those unfortunate times that their response - from Supreme Court cases, to draft resistance and protests both non-violent and violent - has been overshadowed. The storied wartime contribution of Japanese-American volunteers and such units as the 442nd Regimental Combat Team continue to dominate the narrative. We Hereby Refuse helps to balance that narrative and add context to what was happening in the concentration camps. The graphics, too, are haunting, right down to an illustration late in the book of the Wah Mee Club, presaging a tragedy of a later time. I'll close with the book's last line: We refuse to let it happen again . . .

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ross

    Excellent recounting of the incarceration of Japanese Americans in the western United States during WWII and their fight to retain and regain their rights as American citizens. The book centers on the lives of three who were taken from their homes, removed from their jobs and everyday life, and unfairly treated as enemies by their own country. The writing and the illustrations are superb!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Okano

    This graphic historical novel focuses on 3 real Nisei during World War II, two men and one woman, who resisted against the unconstitutional removal of Japanese Americans from the West Coast. It's a quick read and I learned some things about Tule Lake that I never knew before. It's a good introduction to the civil rights issues raised by the US Government's treatment of West Coast JAs. This graphic historical novel focuses on 3 real Nisei during World War II, two men and one woman, who resisted against the unconstitutional removal of Japanese Americans from the West Coast. It's a quick read and I learned some things about Tule Lake that I never knew before. It's a good introduction to the civil rights issues raised by the US Government's treatment of West Coast JAs.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joanne

    Learned new information regarding the Japanese Internment. Wasn't as personal or easy to read as George Takei's graphic novel, They Called Us the Enemy. No matter these U.S. citizens were treated unfairly and wrongly. Will we ever learn? Learned new information regarding the Japanese Internment. Wasn't as personal or easy to read as George Takei's graphic novel, They Called Us the Enemy. No matter these U.S. citizens were treated unfairly and wrongly. Will we ever learn?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marleen

    This book dispels the myth that all JapaneseAmericas quietly cooperated with the government's unjust policy of removal and incarceration. These people were silenced because Japanese American leaders felt that the only way to prove our loyalty to America was to follow the government orders. This created a huge rift In the community which has traumatized a whole generation of people. It is time we understand each other and heal the wounds of the past. This situation was imposed upon us by our unjus This book dispels the myth that all JapaneseAmericas quietly cooperated with the government's unjust policy of removal and incarceration. These people were silenced because Japanese American leaders felt that the only way to prove our loyalty to America was to follow the government orders. This created a huge rift In the community which has traumatized a whole generation of people. It is time we understand each other and heal the wounds of the past. This situation was imposed upon us by our unjust treatment by the government at the behest of its citizens. Each member of the community responded in a different way and this graphic novel highlights the stories of the resisters and the pain and vilification they had to endure.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Susan Johnson

    Well-crafted, compelling, layered. Highly recommend. It is as well-researched and informative as any academic publication but way more intimate and visceral. The graphic novel medium is well-suited to the material. I vote for more history books to be done in this manner. Also, this book feels particularly timely in 2021 – history is never dead, it just repeats itself.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cappy

    Just a stunning and thorough account of the experience of Japanese-Americans put into internment camps in the 1940’s. I think most Americans can appreciate the top line injustice of the forced relocation, but this book takes it one step further into the tangled legal maw the camp residents were made to navigate while interned. There’s a lot to learn and appreciate in the telling of that story.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Susanne

    A gripping historical graphic novel that deftly weaves together the true stories of three Japanese American citizens who resisted in different ways the mass internment of Japanese Americans during WWII. Well drawn and clearly and succinctly told. Appropriate for ages 4th grade and up, especially those who are learning about this period in our country’s history.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Peggy

    This powerful, informative, and deeply moving graphic novel tells the true stories of three Japanese Americans who resisted the US government’s monstrous race-based mass incarceration during WWII. The book itself, published by a small press in collaboration with the Wing Luke Museum, is a work of art. Highly recommended.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sonya

    Every American citizen should read this book about the chapter in history where our country freely took away constitutional rights and turned our backs on the law. I knew a little about the internment camps, but I didn’t know about the resistance movement. The combination of research, using authentic voice and the creativity of a graphic novel is truly a powerful experience.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cymiki

    Another graphic formatted title describing a different aspect of internment - what happened at Tule Lake. This camp housed those who were deemed troublemakers and follows three people and their journeys during WWII.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Erin 紫垣

    A beautifully written and drawn account of resistance during the WWII mass incarceration of Japanese Americans. The emotional complexity of these stories is explored in a completely new way. A must read for American history buffs, graphic novel fans, and liberation movement activists alike.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Marta Wright

    Wow, awesome! Such an eye-opener. Stories of resistance to Japanese American internment during WWII. Would be a fantastic resource for a high school history unit. Loved the artwork in the book too.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

    You'll learn a lot and feel a lot. Read this book. You'll learn a lot and feel a lot. Read this book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Angie Pomeroy

    Heartbreaking. A must read for everyone

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lydia

    Important topic, but not my favorite book on the subject. Felt a bit disjointed. I do think that everyone should read at least a book or two on Japanese internment in WWII.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Keuss

    It is important to hear this story from the point of view of resistance. Could see it as a valuable high school or college resource.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    This books offers an important layer to the previous narratives of camp life for Japanese Americans during World War II. The portrayal of three historical figures who resisted the limited and cruel options presented to them by the US government offers both witness to historic truths and guidance in our political present. A powerful and deeply moving narrative.

  29. 4 out of 5

    ihtzely

    i’m not really a huge fan of the comic book style, to be completely honest, but this was something else. something else, and i loved it so much. i learned so many things that i didn’t know before and i’m so glad i was able to read it as soon as it came out. definitely recommend to anyone.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kara

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.