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Level Zero: A Nightmare in Riverton Novel

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The Oak Hollow Hotel stands eight stories above Riverton, Texas. Despite not operating as such for years, a haphazard acquisition of the facility leads Chris Wilkerson down a dark path to uncover its mysteries as he forms a call-center specializing in horror stories. A sinister character lurks in an abandoned tunnel just beneath, manipulating Chris as he struggles to walk a The Oak Hollow Hotel stands eight stories above Riverton, Texas. Despite not operating as such for years, a haphazard acquisition of the facility leads Chris Wilkerson down a dark path to uncover its mysteries as he forms a call-center specializing in horror stories. A sinister character lurks in an abandoned tunnel just beneath, manipulating Chris as he struggles to walk a fine line between his love for the dark and the macabre and a collapsing marriage. Todd Adams, a manic depressive financial advisor, awakens from a coma along with 53 others, fighting to understand unexplained phantom memories that plague them. As each work to unravel their meaning, they begin to disappear into a labyrinth beneath the hotel at the torment of a bizarre captor. Discovering mutual commonality in an unresolved past, Todd works to lead them out. Will they find the key to freedom?


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The Oak Hollow Hotel stands eight stories above Riverton, Texas. Despite not operating as such for years, a haphazard acquisition of the facility leads Chris Wilkerson down a dark path to uncover its mysteries as he forms a call-center specializing in horror stories. A sinister character lurks in an abandoned tunnel just beneath, manipulating Chris as he struggles to walk a The Oak Hollow Hotel stands eight stories above Riverton, Texas. Despite not operating as such for years, a haphazard acquisition of the facility leads Chris Wilkerson down a dark path to uncover its mysteries as he forms a call-center specializing in horror stories. A sinister character lurks in an abandoned tunnel just beneath, manipulating Chris as he struggles to walk a fine line between his love for the dark and the macabre and a collapsing marriage. Todd Adams, a manic depressive financial advisor, awakens from a coma along with 53 others, fighting to understand unexplained phantom memories that plague them. As each work to unravel their meaning, they begin to disappear into a labyrinth beneath the hotel at the torment of a bizarre captor. Discovering mutual commonality in an unresolved past, Todd works to lead them out. Will they find the key to freedom?

46 review for Level Zero: A Nightmare in Riverton Novel

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bandit

    I’m the first person to review this book and I wish I’d have more positive things to say about it, but since I don’t, guess I’ll just try to be diplomatic about it instead. I do get it, this is someone’s baby sitting around unloved and unread or at least unread by those who write reviews), but honestly I’d totally throw this baby out with the bathwater. Ok, no, nope, already screwing up the diplomatic mode…ok, let’s try again… There is an interesting original concept here, buried somewhere benea I’m the first person to review this book and I wish I’d have more positive things to say about it, but since I don’t, guess I’ll just try to be diplomatic about it instead. I do get it, this is someone’s baby sitting around unloved and unread or at least unread by those who write reviews), but honestly I’d totally throw this baby out with the bathwater. Ok, no, nope, already screwing up the diplomatic mode…ok, let’s try again… There is an interesting original concept here, buried somewhere beneath, much like level zero itself. The idea of an abandoned (mostly) haunted (kinda) building turned a scary story call center is novel. It has many levels for different kinds of frights and come level zero…it’s a real nightmare. But…all of this is fairly thoroughly buried under a pile of unlikeable characters doing…well, doing way too much. So what’s the polite way of saying this book is a mess? Don’t know, not sure. But it did read messy, though at least had the decency not to drag on and read pretty quickly for the page count. For me it was a one sitting read past midnight, which you’d think would be optimal for a scary story, but all the while the main thought was more along the lines of wtf am I reading here? Is being vaguely intrigued enough to warrant all this attention? And maybe because of the lateness of my reading time, but it sort of read like a dream…and not as in oh, wow, this printer/robot/toaster oven works like a dream, but more along the lines of the really random weird nightmarish dreams I normally have. It probably needed at least one good, interesting, likeable, developed character or two to sort of level out this production. Because technically it’s competently done as far as the writing, editing, etc. goes. But then again, much like the things that scare people in real life, in books it’s also all highly personal. And so, this one didn’t quite work for me, but who knows, it might for you. Are you into hallucinogenic trippy tales of strange buildings with dark past? Or maybe you just like to check out random new genre authors? It’s possible this book might scare you just right. For me, it’s already fading from memory. Thanks Netgalley.

  2. 5 out of 5

    BooksCoffee

    McDowell builds a world of betrayal, dark intrigue, decay, and uncanny in this tightly constructed horror. An unfortunate accident forces Chris Wilkerson to accept the ownership of The Oak Hollow Hotel, a run-down, abandoned facility. Trying to make the best of the deal, Chris begins a call-center specializing in horror stories. But there is someone lurking in the abandoned tunnel just beneath the hotel, and they mean business. When Todd Adams, a manic-depressive financial advisor, finds himself McDowell builds a world of betrayal, dark intrigue, decay, and uncanny in this tightly constructed horror. An unfortunate accident forces Chris Wilkerson to accept the ownership of The Oak Hollow Hotel, a run-down, abandoned facility. Trying to make the best of the deal, Chris begins a call-center specializing in horror stories. But there is someone lurking in the abandoned tunnel just beneath the hotel, and they mean business. When Todd Adams, a manic-depressive financial advisor, finds himself captive in the tunnel, he knows he must battle his malevolent captor to save not only himself but the fifty-three others as well. The world McDowell depicts is both deeply engrossing and unsettling, and the novel offers plenty for horror lovers who enjoy their stories with a hefty dose of savagery and harrowing imagery. The characters: the defeated, troubled Chris; the determined Todd; and the demonic Joe remain original and memorable. The narrative rocks, with intense violence and genuine scares, and McDowell’s intelligent worldbuilding is a plus. Dark and often bone-chilling, the novel generates both chills and thrills.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Bailey

    Level Zero is destined to be a cult-classic. The business idea was to open a call center, Creepy Nights, specializing in the telling of scary stories. The center grew beyond all expectations so the owner-entrepreneur, Chris Wilkerson, moved it into a spooky, old hotel. Everything went well in the six stories of the call center and on the seventh floor, level seven, where the management offices were located. It was in the basement, level zero, where Creepy Joe was creating havoc. Don’t go into th Level Zero is destined to be a cult-classic. The business idea was to open a call center, Creepy Nights, specializing in the telling of scary stories. The center grew beyond all expectations so the owner-entrepreneur, Chris Wilkerson, moved it into a spooky, old hotel. Everything went well in the six stories of the call center and on the seventh floor, level seven, where the management offices were located. It was in the basement, level zero, where Creepy Joe was creating havoc. Don’t go into the basement. Dan McDowell did a superb job writing the scenes and dialog for Level Zero from mind and point of view of a crazy, tunnel dwelling hermit. The read is challenging, at times, but I like a challenge. The story was worth it. Like I said, a cult-classic. Cudo’s Dan, well done. I highly recommend Level Zero. Jeff Bailey, author of Not On My Watch.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brian Jeffreys

    Welcome to the Hotel California, or rather the old Oak Hollow Hotel and it’s sinister new caretaker. Dan McDowell spins a monstrous yarn about how easy it can be to corrupt someone just from their chosen vices. Chris, Todd, and Katrina live “life in the fast lane” as their reckless choices turn the small town of Riverton Texas upside down, dragging its comatose hospital residents to hell and madness. The characters were all relatable, alongside their particular sins. What’s more, the caretaker of Welcome to the Hotel California, or rather the old Oak Hollow Hotel and it’s sinister new caretaker. Dan McDowell spins a monstrous yarn about how easy it can be to corrupt someone just from their chosen vices. Chris, Todd, and Katrina live “life in the fast lane” as their reckless choices turn the small town of Riverton Texas upside down, dragging its comatose hospital residents to hell and madness. The characters were all relatable, alongside their particular sins. What’s more, the caretaker of Level Zero was so maniacally convincing, so much so I can’t help but wonder what I would do in their position. But what gives this story teeth is how you relate to the very hopeless web of sins the characters are trapped in. It’s the craving for revenge, long in coming from that fateful 1928 October, and the utter loss of reason and humanity. Each character suffers violent and almost glitchy shifts in their reality as they try to survive their own nightmarish interactions with the Level Zero caretaker. Readers may find themselves immersed in the helplessness of intense horror that can mirror the descent into darkness we all can face if we hold too tightly to our own secret vices. “Good night, said the watchman, but you may never leave, heh heh.”

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gojan

    There are certainly some unusual mind game acrobatics happening in this interesting and genre-stretching novel. The alternating and sometimes disturbing inner-dialog by the characters tells the story of an abandoned, mysterious hotel beneath which all manner of mad spookiness dwells, not only figuratively, but in the actual head of entrepreneur Chris Wilkerson, who decides to use the location as a call center for on-demand horror stories. It’s the 1980s and the calls are a deal at .99 per minute There are certainly some unusual mind game acrobatics happening in this interesting and genre-stretching novel. The alternating and sometimes disturbing inner-dialog by the characters tells the story of an abandoned, mysterious hotel beneath which all manner of mad spookiness dwells, not only figuratively, but in the actual head of entrepreneur Chris Wilkerson, who decides to use the location as a call center for on-demand horror stories. It’s the 1980s and the calls are a deal at .99 per minute. Add a dash of more unorthodox narrative in the form of Todd, a depression-prone financial advisor who unloads lithium capsules into his coffee to start the day, and you have a doozy of a strange and frightful psychological tale. In a time when many novels seem pigeon-holed with predictable tropes, this is neither a mystery or a horror story or a thriller with a convenient beginning, middle and end. For that reason alone it’s worth a read as you follow one of the the protagonist’s (Todd) trippy effort to rescue others who have been inexplicably trapped beneath this inn from hell that would make the motel in Psycho look like a Disneyland spa. Oh, and there are those suddenly awakened coma patients whose ghostly memories further color this shadowy subconscious world. Todd, who is also manic and can’t seem to balance his ying with his yang, gives added flavor to this unconventional story from an author who has decided to take a path that’s certainly not cookie-cutter in its approach. His upside down look into a fictional abyss is something I’d recommend, as when he begins Chapter 3 with a teasing description of a situation in which Todd’s unsuspecting girlfriend finds herself: “Lorrie Hatcher awoke duct-taped to the seat of a plane.” This book is creepy in a good way.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Greg Hoover

    Dan McDowell's novel, Level Zero, is an immersive journey into a terrifying world that lies just below the surface of a Texas town. Blending elements of mystery, horror, and intrigue, McDowell’s novel will keep you up at night turning pages, planning your own escape from the warped morality of Creeper Joe. Read it!! Dan McDowell's novel, Level Zero, is an immersive journey into a terrifying world that lies just below the surface of a Texas town. Blending elements of mystery, horror, and intrigue, McDowell’s novel will keep you up at night turning pages, planning your own escape from the warped morality of Creeper Joe. Read it!!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Darlene Farley

    This was an awesome thriller. It's about an old hotel that holds a lot of secrets. This was an awesome thriller. It's about an old hotel that holds a lot of secrets.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey Higgins

    In "Level Zero," Author Dan McDowell has debuted a dark and disturbed imagination. Protagonist Chris Wilkerson’s immersion into a hotel with a horrifying history is reminiscent of Jack Torrance in "The Shining." This story is a creepy supernatural journey. In "Level Zero," Author Dan McDowell has debuted a dark and disturbed imagination. Protagonist Chris Wilkerson’s immersion into a hotel with a horrifying history is reminiscent of Jack Torrance in "The Shining." This story is a creepy supernatural journey.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emily Jane

    I don't want to give anything away with this one, as most of the enjoyment comes from not knowing what you were going to into, so this will be a shorter review from me. This was a true GEM of a book! I honestly was obsessed when I started to read Level Zero, it had this hold over me as if I was in a trance like state reading it! As soon as I started reading this book I felt this sort of unsettling and creepy vibe come over me, not enough to frighten me but enough that you knew it was going to buil I don't want to give anything away with this one, as most of the enjoyment comes from not knowing what you were going to into, so this will be a shorter review from me. This was a true GEM of a book! I honestly was obsessed when I started to read Level Zero, it had this hold over me as if I was in a trance like state reading it! As soon as I started reading this book I felt this sort of unsettling and creepy vibe come over me, not enough to frighten me but enough that you knew it was going to build up into a great story. Which I'm pleased to say that Level Zero did. This was completely different to anything I'd read before, in a horror novel at least, and it really strived to be different, you could feel that from the way the suspense built up and how the fear factor started to creep in, but all the while it was intriguing, you needed to keep reading, it was as if you didn't have a choice. One small irritation of mine was the sheer number of characters, it made it quite difficult for me to keep track of who was who, and I feel we didn't get to see all of their true potential as some were more focused on than others. Which did, as we got closer to the end of the book begin to make the book a little confusing. I will admit I was disappointed with the ending, it didn't really make sense and I felt it didn't encompass the rest of the book, it wasn't fitting with the story and felt like it had been tagged on as an after thought. 𝗪𝗔𝗥𝗡𝗜𝗡𝗚 𝗠𝗜𝗡𝗢𝗥 𝗦𝗣𝗢𝗜𝗟𝗘𝗥 𝗜𝗡 𝗡𝗘𝗫𝗧 𝗣𝗔𝗥𝗔𝗚𝗥𝗔𝗣𝗛!!!!!!! My favourite part of this book though was the idea of being able to call a number and have a scary story told to you, and you could pick what theme you wanted, like someone should set that up! 𝗦𝗣𝗢𝗜𝗟𝗘𝗥 𝗪𝗔𝗥𝗡𝗜𝗡𝗚 𝗢𝗩𝗘𝗥. On the whole, Level Zero had all the makings of a really good horror story, something to get under your skin and creep you out but also not too scary that you couldn't sleep at night! Aside from the minor irritations I had with this story, it was a truly good read and I'm really happy I read it. It brought something new to the genre, and if you're looking for something scary but a bit different Level Zero is the one for you.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey (BookishKJ)

    1.5 stars. Listen. I’ll be the first one to say that I’m not always the sharpest tool in the shed. Often, things fly way over my head. And maybe Level Zero by Dan McDowell is one of those things. Or maybe there’s just very little sense to be made out of anything that happens in this book. To be honest, I’m leaning more in that direction. The synopsis tells me that Level Zero is about a guy named Chris who acquires a rundown hotel that he turns into a call center specializing in scary stories. The 1.5 stars. Listen. I’ll be the first one to say that I’m not always the sharpest tool in the shed. Often, things fly way over my head. And maybe Level Zero by Dan McDowell is one of those things. Or maybe there’s just very little sense to be made out of anything that happens in this book. To be honest, I’m leaning more in that direction. The synopsis tells me that Level Zero is about a guy named Chris who acquires a rundown hotel that he turns into a call center specializing in scary stories. Then spooky happenings involving people in comas and a labyrinth of tunnels under the hotel began to occur. Though I’m fairly certain that’s what happens, I can’t be 100% sure, because there’s so much that’s nonsensical that it’s hard to parse anything out. This book is very bizarre, and not in a good way. I feel like every other page I found myself asking “what in the heck is happening?” Let me just give you an example. Our main character, Chris, pulls open a grate behind this hotel that he’s randomly acquired and climbs down into parts unknown. Chris ends up in a system of tunnels underground, where he runs into a guy named Todd (who doesn’t bother to explain why he’s randomly lurking in these tunnels). Todd invites our friend Chris to dinner, and then starts grilling up some food – while still underground, mind you. Chris is seemingly pretty chill about the whole thing, even though this is some random, creepy guy living underground that he knows absolutely nothing about. I mean… what? Literally nothing makes any sense, which is so jarring and prevented me from really getting absorbed in the story. Also, not one character is likable. Not a single one. So, I couldn’t have cared less about what happened to them. And don’t get me started on how this book villainizes mental illness, with our antagonist being described using this antiquated term: manic depressive. I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again: mental illness is not a plot device. But especially not mental illness that is depicted so poorly. I think it’s safe to say this book was absolutely not for me. Honestly, I’m not too sure who it would be for. Though the premise sounded like a spooky, fun time, it feel quite short of that mark. Content warnings: death, hospitals, persistent sickness, mental illness. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher, Black Rose Writing, for sending me this book in exchange for an honest and fair review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jan Hallet

    Chris Wilkerson is a conflicted protagonist from page one and I’ve got to say, that seemed to be what kept me hooked. Todd Adams will not be loved, but he’s a person we can identify with and that’s what makes this story stand out. Supporting characters in Level Zero have depth, emotion, and relatability all throughout as McDowell weaves a complex tale of supernatural proportion. It’s a book that stretched me a bit, but I couldn’t put it down. What’s that say exactly? This book was very original a Chris Wilkerson is a conflicted protagonist from page one and I’ve got to say, that seemed to be what kept me hooked. Todd Adams will not be loved, but he’s a person we can identify with and that’s what makes this story stand out. Supporting characters in Level Zero have depth, emotion, and relatability all throughout as McDowell weaves a complex tale of supernatural proportion. It’s a book that stretched me a bit, but I couldn’t put it down. What’s that say exactly? This book was very original and enjoyable despite its challenging and at times terrifying content. Horror fans, stick it out to the end. You won’t be disappointed. I received an ARC from the author.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hal Hunt

    I like a book that's brave enough to push the envelope and break with tradition. Level Zero did that for me. A little horror, a little terror, and a lot of fun. What struck me as most interesting was Dan McDowell's willingness to show emotional vulnerability in the characters and different points of view, playing out more like cut-scenes from a film or television show. This approach kept me more connected to this book as it went. It was a page turner in a different sort of way. Landscape is every I like a book that's brave enough to push the envelope and break with tradition. Level Zero did that for me. A little horror, a little terror, and a lot of fun. What struck me as most interesting was Dan McDowell's willingness to show emotional vulnerability in the characters and different points of view, playing out more like cut-scenes from a film or television show. This approach kept me more connected to this book as it went. It was a page turner in a different sort of way. Landscape is everything. Intrigue, mystery, and mystique partnered with the frailty and depravity of the human condition. Looking forward to what's next from this author. New Net Galley Reviewer.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Audrey (Warped Shelves)

    1.5 stars This review is based on an ARC of Level Zero: A Nightmare in Riverton Novel, which I received courtesy of NetGalley and the publisher (Black Rose Writing). Excuse me, but I think I was sent a first draft copy by mistake. The get-it-all-down-before-the-thought-slips-away jumbled rush of a first draft. I sort of understand what the author was going for, but the execution fell way short of the mark and the final result, I don't think, is what the author intended. The effort at a powerful h 1.5 stars This review is based on an ARC of Level Zero: A Nightmare in Riverton Novel, which I received courtesy of NetGalley and the publisher (Black Rose Writing). Excuse me, but I think I was sent a first draft copy by mistake. The get-it-all-down-before-the-thought-slips-away jumbled rush of a first draft. I sort of understand what the author was going for, but the execution fell way short of the mark and the final result, I don't think, is what the author intended. The effort at a powerful horror story is certainly noticeable, but with way too many ideas pulling in too many different directions I was left stranded, tangled up in the confused, incoherent middle of the storm. Unfortunately, I can't even justify the disjointed storyline and clunky pacing by calling the craftsmanship good--it's not. The plot, again, is all over the place, messy; the pacing, too, is all over the place, both too fast and too slow in select parts; the dialogue is unrealistic and monotonous, coming across as false and, well, fictional. A good horror thrill is scary because you can imagine it happening to you, no matter how unbelievable the circumstances (See: Pet Sematary ). An unconvincing horror story is just eye-roll-inducing, not nightmare-inducing; I rolled my eyes a lot while reading Level Zero. I really liked the character of Creeper Joe--he saved this read from being merely one-star. Despite the frankly bad book, this character shows true inspiration, true potential, with his almost fae-like mischief and terrorizing. Though by no means a good or well-produced story, Level Zero hosts a potential and a creep factor that kept me curious through to the end. For the passion, if not the craft, I can say that I would give this author another chance.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    ARC Review: As a reader, I'm not hyper-critical when it comes to plot lines or believability of science, magic or whatever else the author has injected into their stories. Fantasy, sci-fi and fiction are stories and I can suspend belief at the door. I do, however, expect characters to react in a believable way when they encounter other characters and situations within the story. Dialog, whether internal or external, should flow in natural way. While I can excuse the premise of this book (a man c ARC Review: As a reader, I'm not hyper-critical when it comes to plot lines or believability of science, magic or whatever else the author has injected into their stories. Fantasy, sci-fi and fiction are stories and I can suspend belief at the door. I do, however, expect characters to react in a believable way when they encounter other characters and situations within the story. Dialog, whether internal or external, should flow in natural way. While I can excuse the premise of this book (a man creates a 1-900 phone line for scary stories and employs copious amounts of homeless and societal degenerates to relay these stories at 99 cents a minute all while trying to collect souls for the mysterious force in the basement), what I kept stumbling on was the dialog and how the characters acted towards each other or towards other situations within the story. Too many times I would shake my head at how a character responded, thought, or just plain acted weirdly in scenes. A character that would think to themselves how they feel like their in danger or want to get out of a situation and then on the next page they would be wandering the corridors of a deserted basement with the psycho that scared them. There was actually a scene in which a character thought to themselves that they needed to change the subject OF THEIR OWN THOUGHTS. Characters loved, hated, became indifferent, ignored or yelled for seemingly no reason other then to do so. The lack of flow of conversation, dialog, thoughts and how characters reacted to each other was just too unbelievable and unnatural to keep up my interest in the book. I know a plot needs to progress, but it should feel like a natural flow instead of forcing characters to act in unnatural ways just to move the story along. A good effort, but character development, interaction and believability need a lot of work.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Chris Wilkerson has an accident. He decides to buy the Oak Hollow Hotel. The hotel is in bad condition. It needs a lot of work to get it back to the way it was in the past. The hotel has a bad history of bad things happening. In the past and present. What did happen? When Chris decides to make it a call-center for horror stories and call it Creepy Nights, Chris meets Creepy Joe who lives in the basement where administration offices will be. Chris will live on the top floor (8th floor) and the fl Chris Wilkerson has an accident. He decides to buy the Oak Hollow Hotel. The hotel is in bad condition. It needs a lot of work to get it back to the way it was in the past. The hotel has a bad history of bad things happening. In the past and present. What did happen? When Chris decides to make it a call-center for horror stories and call it Creepy Nights, Chris meets Creepy Joe who lives in the basement where administration offices will be. Chris will live on the top floor (8th floor) and the floors below will be where the story tellers will tell their stories on the phone. On the first floor there is a receptionist fort all who come to the hotel. Meanwhile, Creepy Joe is creating chaos and causing people to be tortured and more in the tunnels. When Todd Adams finds himself in the tunnels, he knows he must fight Creepy Joe not to just save himself but the other fifty-three people who are also the prisoners of Creepy Joe. Will he survive? Will he get out? I found this novel engrossing and disturbing. This is a story of with intense violence and distressing images throughout it. The characters are original and well written. I found the book to be dark and chilling. I liked it as I am a horror lover. Horror lovers will enjoy the chills and thrills the author has written.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra

    I feel like there is... something here. The concept of the novel itself is intriguing, which is why I wanted to read it in the first place. But something about the writing just feels off, and all the characters seem very, very similar. Just full of people acting oddly and doing bizarre things, and unfortunately not in a good way. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing a free copy in exchange for an honest review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Pattyh

    Thank you Netgalley for the opportunity to preview Level Zero by Dan McDowell. This is a fast paced horror novel that I read in one sitting. Quick read and at times gave me goose bumps. Atomospheric and dark - scary read. 3 stars.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Salibr

  19. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

  20. 4 out of 5

    Baheda

  21. 4 out of 5

    Vapaem

  22. 5 out of 5

    B. Higgins

  23. 5 out of 5

    BiggieJohnny

  24. 5 out of 5

    Landon Cidor

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kellie Meadows

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rosemary

  28. 5 out of 5

    Becks

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ron

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

  31. 5 out of 5

    Marnie Ward

  32. 5 out of 5

    Jenette

  33. 4 out of 5

    Kye Cantey

  34. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Gerhart

  35. 4 out of 5

    Melissa ahmed

  36. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Wallace

  37. 4 out of 5

    AC

  38. 5 out of 5

    Robert Fontenot

  39. 5 out of 5

    Carly

  40. 4 out of 5

    Travis Ralston

  41. 4 out of 5

    Videoclimber(AKA)MTsLilSis

  42. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Maki

  43. 5 out of 5

    Steff

  44. 5 out of 5

    Connie Wilson

  45. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Saar

  46. 4 out of 5

    James Cozzarelli

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