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Suburban Dicks

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From the co-creator of 'Deadpool' comes a hilariously entertaining debut featuring two unlikely and unforgettable amateur sleuths. An engrossing and entertaining murder mystery full of skewering social commentary, 'SUBURBAN DICKS' examines the racial tensions exposed in a New Jersey suburb after the murder of a gas station attendant. Andie Stern thought she’d solved her fin From the co-creator of 'Deadpool' comes a hilariously entertaining debut featuring two unlikely and unforgettable amateur sleuths. An engrossing and entertaining murder mystery full of skewering social commentary, 'SUBURBAN DICKS' examines the racial tensions exposed in a New Jersey suburb after the murder of a gas station attendant. Andie Stern thought she’d solved her final homicide. Once a budding FBI profiler, she gave up her career to raise her four (soon to be five) children in West Windsor, New Jersey. But one day, between soccer games, recitals, and trips to the local pool, a very pregnant Andie pulls into a gas station - and stumbles across a murder scene. An attendant has been killed, and the bumbling local cops are in way over their heads. Suddenly, Andie is obsessed with the case, and back on the trail of a killer, this time with kids in tow. She soon crosses paths with disgraced local journalist Kenneth Lee, who also has everything to prove in solving the case. A string of unusual occurrences - and eventually, body parts - surface around town, and Andie and Kenneth uncover simmering racial tensions and a decades-old conspiracy. Hilarious, insightful, and a killer whodunit, 'SUBURBAN DICKS' is the one-of-a-kind mystery that readers will not be able to stop talking about.


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From the co-creator of 'Deadpool' comes a hilariously entertaining debut featuring two unlikely and unforgettable amateur sleuths. An engrossing and entertaining murder mystery full of skewering social commentary, 'SUBURBAN DICKS' examines the racial tensions exposed in a New Jersey suburb after the murder of a gas station attendant. Andie Stern thought she’d solved her fin From the co-creator of 'Deadpool' comes a hilariously entertaining debut featuring two unlikely and unforgettable amateur sleuths. An engrossing and entertaining murder mystery full of skewering social commentary, 'SUBURBAN DICKS' examines the racial tensions exposed in a New Jersey suburb after the murder of a gas station attendant. Andie Stern thought she’d solved her final homicide. Once a budding FBI profiler, she gave up her career to raise her four (soon to be five) children in West Windsor, New Jersey. But one day, between soccer games, recitals, and trips to the local pool, a very pregnant Andie pulls into a gas station - and stumbles across a murder scene. An attendant has been killed, and the bumbling local cops are in way over their heads. Suddenly, Andie is obsessed with the case, and back on the trail of a killer, this time with kids in tow. She soon crosses paths with disgraced local journalist Kenneth Lee, who also has everything to prove in solving the case. A string of unusual occurrences - and eventually, body parts - surface around town, and Andie and Kenneth uncover simmering racial tensions and a decades-old conspiracy. Hilarious, insightful, and a killer whodunit, 'SUBURBAN DICKS' is the one-of-a-kind mystery that readers will not be able to stop talking about.

30 review for Suburban Dicks

  1. 5 out of 5

    Michael David

    HAPPY PUBLICATION DAY! “Time changed our prejudices, but it didn’t change the fact that we were prejudiced.” Pretty profound and introspective quote from a character in a book called Suburban Dicks that is written by the co-creator of Deadpool. This is a book that will have you laughing out loud one minute and angry at the injustices of minorities the next. Andrea Stern is a wife and mother of four young children, and about “47 months” pregnant with her 5th child, judging by the size of her belly. HAPPY PUBLICATION DAY! “Time changed our prejudices, but it didn’t change the fact that we were prejudiced.” Pretty profound and introspective quote from a character in a book called Suburban Dicks that is written by the co-creator of Deadpool. This is a book that will have you laughing out loud one minute and angry at the injustices of minorities the next. Andrea Stern is a wife and mother of four young children, and about “47 months” pregnant with her 5th child, judging by the size of her belly. She happens upon a crime scene at a gas station, which is hardly contained by the two officers in attendance. A young Indian man who worked at the station has been found gunned down. Andrea, who was once studying to become an FBI Profiler, has solved many mysteries in her day. Although her days are now filled with screaming children, she wants in on trying to solve this murder whether that’s her job or not. Disgraced journalist Kenny Lee wants to solve this case as bad as Andrea, but for different reasons. His career took a major tumble, and he needs to write a really great story to get his life back on track. After running into Andrea while both of them are doing research, they decide to work together to solve the murder. After some unusual and suspicious events take place that Andrea feels might be the result of racism, she and Kenny uncover part of a skeleton from years ago that might have ties to the fresh murder of the gas attendant...and they might uncover a decades long conspiracy and cover up that delves into racial tensions of the past and present. As mentioned earlier, this book is at times hilarious, but with depth and suspense as the mystery plays out. It dives into the always relevant topic of systemic racism and doesn’t shy away at all. I would feel anger and sadness, and a minute later I was laughing again. That takes skill, and author Fabian Nicieza expertly balances it all with an intriguing mystery that is both heinous and compelling. There are definitely parts of the novel that defy logic. For one, I don’t think cops or FBI agents would let Andrea and her children be present for arrests or suspect questioning. However, it’s so much F-ing fun (There’s A LOT of F-bombs...most of which are hilariously said by Andrea. There is also more derogatory and offensive language, so reader beware)! Andrea and Kenny are amazingly paired, and their interaction with each other was extremely entertaining. I loved both of them at the end of the day, and would love to read more about them in a sequel. The buildup to the conclusion is definitely intense at times, and the ending is extremely satisfying...with the very last sentence cracking me up again. This one exceeded my expectations. 4.5 stars. Thank you to G.P. Putnam’s Sons and NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. This book will be published on: 6/22/21. Review also posted at: https://bonkersforthebooks.wordpress.com

  2. 5 out of 5

    ScrappyMags

    (The fact I keep having to change autocorrect from Suburban DUCKS is driving me a little bonkers. This is not a wildlife book.) ⏰ 𝐒𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐒𝐮𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐄𝐯𝐞𝐫: Andi Stern traded in her life as an up-and-coming FBI profiler for one of SAHM. Except she stumbles on a murder scene and realizes the cops are bungling the scene. Tenaciously, she pursues this case she can NOT let go. She eventually teams up with a former Pulitzer winning journalist, now local ignominious news reporter Ken Lee in order to bring (The fact I keep having to change autocorrect from Suburban DUCKS is driving me a little bonkers. This is not a wildlife book.) ⏰ 𝐒𝐡𝐨𝐫𝐭𝐞𝐬𝐭 𝐒𝐮𝐦𝐦𝐚𝐫𝐲 𝐄𝐯𝐞𝐫: Andi Stern traded in her life as an up-and-coming FBI profiler for one of SAHM. Except she stumbles on a murder scene and realizes the cops are bungling the scene. Tenaciously, she pursues this case she can NOT let go. She eventually teams up with a former Pulitzer winning journalist, now local ignominious news reporter Ken Lee in order to bring the culprits to justice. Body parts are found. Racism is rampant, and the suburb of New Window, NJ is spun into a tizzy. 💡𝐓𝐡𝐨𝐮𝐠𝐡𝐭𝐬💡: I love books that are MORE than mysteries… more in a sense of a lesson learned or a historical angle, social issues, etc and this one fits. The “tongue-in-cheek” title is apropos. Having humor (done well) interlaced with a pretty dang capable mystery is a tough accomplishment and here Nicieza deftly weaves the two. Andrea is a mother bear - feisty and feral (though in all honesty she COULD eat one of her cubs, I think, if they annoy her too much). Ken is a bit of a prat and doesn’t care for much except himself and his tarnished reputation. I enjoyed the ride mostly due to Andrea - her perseverance and pride and refusal to be anything other than what she wanted was admirable. The honesty in her character is downright lovable - that she is in an unhappy marriage because her husband doesn’t support her goals and her desire to be a mom but maintain her intelligence outlet is a battle to which many women will relate. Andrea realizes how she misses her career and mostly that she shouldn’t HAVE to choose. Lots of issues to discuss about the cliche of “having it all” and what that means. On the flip side I also don’t understand what Andrea is thinking, how she becomes a baby-making machine and then 10 years later wants to flip her life upside down. From that angle, I feel for her husband. Perhaps he never really knew her - these loose ends demand a second novel. The race/ethnicity social issues in the book were superbly written - realistic to my personal experiences, and I love the moment when Andrea breaks the barrier. It was a pivotal moment and lesson - sometimes simply talking to someone unlike you reveals truths neglected, haven’t experienced, or were completely unaware of. A lesson for everyone I think. 𝗔𝗹𝗹 𝗺𝘆 𝗿𝗲𝘃𝗶𝗲𝘄𝘀 𝗮𝘃𝗮𝗶𝗹𝗮𝗯𝗹𝗲 𝗮𝘁 𝗦𝗰𝗿𝗮𝗽𝗽𝘆𝗠𝗮𝗴𝘀.𝗰𝗼𝗺 𝗮𝗿𝗼𝘂𝗻𝗱 𝘁𝗶𝗺𝗲 𝗼𝗳 𝗽𝘂𝗯𝗹𝗶𝗰𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻. 🅶🅴🅽🆁🅴: Mystery 😍𝐑𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨: It’s a classically well-written mystery so all the peeps in that dept need to holla. 🙅‍♀️ 𝐍𝐨𝐭 𝐫𝐞𝐜𝐨𝐦𝐦𝐞𝐧𝐝𝐞𝐝 𝐭𝐨: I suppose if you’re not into the social issues aspect. ᴛʜᴀɴᴋ ʏᴏᴜ ᴛᴏ ᴛʜᴇ ᴀᴜᴛʜᴏʀ, ɴᴇᴛɢᴀʟʟᴇʏ ᴀɴᴅ ɢ.ᴘ. ᴘᴜᴛɴᴀᴍ’ꜱ ꜱᴏɴꜱ ʙᴏᴏᴋꜱ ꜰᴏʀ ᴍʏ ᴀᴅᴠᴀɴᴄᴇᴅ ᴄᴏᴘʏ ɪɴ ᴇxᴄʜᴀɴɢᴇ ꜰᴏʀ ᴍʏ ᴀʟᴡᴀʏꜱ-ʜᴏɴᴇꜱᴛ ʀᴇᴠɪᴇᴡ ᴀɴᴅ ꜰᴏʀ ᴍᴀᴋɪɴɢ ᴍᴇ ʟᴏᴏᴋ ᴏᴜᴛ ᴀᴛ ᴍʏ ʟᴀᴡɴ ᴅɪꜰꜰᴇʀᴇɴᴛʟʏ.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    So, I just am not a fan of the humor. I like Deadpool, but it gets annoying real fast. Much as Suburban Dicks has! It's funny at times, but it gets tiresome. My son and my partner would love it! Bodily function comedy just never gets tiresome to them. It's what I classify as male humor. Obvious, humor! Not for me. I prefer dry with very, very dry sarcasm. Oh, the story? Yeah, I couldn't read it. Again, it was a nuisance! No recommendations from me. So, I just am not a fan of the humor. I like Deadpool, but it gets annoying real fast. Much as Suburban Dicks has! It's funny at times, but it gets tiresome. My son and my partner would love it! Bodily function comedy just never gets tiresome to them. It's what I classify as male humor. Obvious, humor! Not for me. I prefer dry with very, very dry sarcasm. Oh, the story? Yeah, I couldn't read it. Again, it was a nuisance! No recommendations from me.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    True confession time: I've never seen a Deadpool or X-Men movie. So when I picked up this book, I had no idea what to expect. And maybe that's the key to reading happiness because I really enjoyed it. Part of that was down to a layered murder mystery that kept me on my toes. But a lot of it was due to spending time with Andie, one of the 2 MC's. That would be Andrea Stern, former FBI profiler & current mother of 4. Yup, she gave up the job she loved for the glamorous life of a New Jersey housewif True confession time: I've never seen a Deadpool or X-Men movie. So when I picked up this book, I had no idea what to expect. And maybe that's the key to reading happiness because I really enjoyed it. Part of that was down to a layered murder mystery that kept me on my toes. But a lot of it was due to spending time with Andie, one of the 2 MC's. That would be Andrea Stern, former FBI profiler & current mother of 4. Yup, she gave up the job she loved for the glamorous life of a New Jersey housewife. She's also about 17 months pregnant with #5. Her days are spent dropping off her husband & running their brood to a plethora of school recitals, appointments & soccer games. Which is how she ended up pulling into a gas station moments after a dead body was found there by local police. Andie immediately realized 2 things. The cops have no clue what they're doing. And there's something very wrong with the crime scene. Oh well, not her problem, right? Except her analytical brain leaps at the chance to chew on something other than what to make for supper. She can't help picking away at the case in her "spare" time but her investigation really kicks into gear after she runs into old school mate, Kenny Lee. Kenny used to be a high flying Pulitzer winning investigative journalist. That was before one of his stories turned out to be more fiction than fact. Now he's back in West Windsor NJ, lucky to have a job at the local paper. A murder in town is big news but the police chief is oddly eager to close the case. When Kenny runs into Andie, they can't help but compare notes & agree to join forces on their own private investigation. That's right....they're suburban dicks. Prepare to be entertained. Andie's big brain & prior experience provides direction while Kenny does the leg work (let's face it....it's easier to get around without 4 wee varmints in tow). But it's amazing what Andie uncovers during casual chats with other soccer moms & neighbours & the pair soon realize they've stumbled across something far more complex than the "simple" murder of one gas station attendant. I'll be honest....some of the plot twists seemed a bit out there & in less assured hands, I'm don't know that I could have suspended my disbelief that far. But I was enjoying some of the characters so much I found it easy to just go with the flow & enjoy the ride (plus a couple I seriously wanted to see get body slammed by karma). Andie's thoughts on suburbia & motherhood in general are sharply observed & delivered with just enough snark. There's no doubt she loves her kids but she also mourns the woman/life that came before & craves the mental stimulation you just can't get from listening to the Minions sing "You Really Got Me" for the 4000th time ( even if it is a killer version IMHO 👍 ). There's an interesting dynamic between the 2 MC's. Neither is living the the life they envisioned & this contributes to their mutual desire to crack the case, perhaps relive their "glory days". Kenny sees it as a chance for redemption, a last attempt to regain some credibility & self respect. Andie is motivated by the sheer pleasure of having an intricate puzzle to solve & her unshakeable belief that scumbag criminals must go down. So there you have it...a smart, entertaining story enhanced by sharp dialogue & a wide range of characters. If you have a long plane/train/car/bus trip in your future, it's the perfect book to pack along with your snacks, Advil & duct tape.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pat (not getting friend updates currently)

    The quest for “different” has been successful again with this amusing, and really down to earth story which is neither a thriller nor a cosy. But it is a very entertaining murder mystery. Andrea Stern, heavily pregnant with her fifth child, is the first witness (apart from her 4 other children) at the scene of a shooting death at a gas station. She has stopped there because her youngest needed the bathroom. Two patrol officers are at the scene doing everything wrong and Andrea has no hesitation i The quest for “different” has been successful again with this amusing, and really down to earth story which is neither a thriller nor a cosy. But it is a very entertaining murder mystery. Andrea Stern, heavily pregnant with her fifth child, is the first witness (apart from her 4 other children) at the scene of a shooting death at a gas station. She has stopped there because her youngest needed the bathroom. Two patrol officers are at the scene doing everything wrong and Andrea has no hesitation in telling them exactly that. Andrea is whip smart and, before falling pregnant with her first child (accidentally I would imagine), she was blitzing a criminology degree and was accepted as a cadet profiler with the FBI. She had also managed to identify the perpetrator of a series of brutal killings. Now she is a housewife and mother who is chaffing at the constraints on her life. Kenny Lee is a self confessed scumbag journalist whose career started with a bang and has gone downhill steadily since then. The police are peddling the drug deal or robbery gone wrong angle for the murder but Andrea knows that is rubbish. Kenny tries to verify the drug angle but comes up empty because there is nothing there. These two unlikely accomplices team up to work together to solve the murder. Along the way they get more than they bargained for. The dialogue in this book is very crisp and full of acerbic humour. Andrea herself is a wonderful character. She loves her children but kind of hates her life as it suppresses her keen intellect as a necessity of mothering four young children with a fifth on the way. She lumbers her way through a subversive investigation and plots out, with Kenny, the best way to force a chink in the armour of police and administrative solidarity. She also gets the Indian community on board and co-opts her friends for surveillance duty! She soon has a motive for the murder but that is only half the story. Along the way she and Kenny, along with her first love, Ramon from the FBI, uncover a decades old crime that is still being covered up today. It all comes down to that ugly old trait of racism and the entitlement of the white male ruling class. This was a very different take on the old murder mystery story and I really appreciated that and enjoyed the book immensely. While it was written in a comedic way it was no comedy as there were some very serious issues in play. I think this book would appeal to a wide variety of readers. You just have to accept a view of motherhood that is not very saintly to enjoy it. I could certainly relate. I love my children to bits but there were times.... I received an advance copy for free from Netgalley and I am leaving this review voluntarily.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    Oh, my, I enjoyed this book so much! What happens when you pair a disgraced journalist with a woman who once had a chance as a brilliant criminal profiler but now has four children and one on the way? Utter hilarity and hijinks! I knew this was going to be hysterical when at the start, very pregnant Andie Stern pulls up to the murder scene of a young Indian man at a gas station in her minivan with four screaming children in tow. She climbs out to take her youngest to the bathroom, and the female Oh, my, I enjoyed this book so much! What happens when you pair a disgraced journalist with a woman who once had a chance as a brilliant criminal profiler but now has four children and one on the way? Utter hilarity and hijinks! I knew this was going to be hysterical when at the start, very pregnant Andie Stern pulls up to the murder scene of a young Indian man at a gas station in her minivan with four screaming children in tow. She climbs out to take her youngest to the bathroom, and the female cop on the scene, Michelle Wu, describes Andie exiting the minivan as: “if the minivan was oozing an egg yolk.” Wu ,who is childless, also talks about the minivan and its screaming occupants, “the van door seemed like a portal into hell” and “the minivan was a rolling advertisement for Ortho.” I was already laughing hysterically and knew this ride was going to be fun! And it was. It was a crazy, up and down, roller-coaster ride of crazy proportions, but there were serious sides to the story as well. One being the over-the-top, offensive racist stereotyping. It was so bad that I soon realized that the author purposely did this to enlighten the reader on how horrible and outrageous systemic racism is and the damage it causes. Secondly, Andie’s sadness was palpable, and her knowledge that the possibility of doing what she loved was slim. Her husband’s indifference was disheartening and I disliked him immensely! But in the end, the combination of Andie and Kenny and their interactions were hilarious. Throw the kids in the mix, and it was a recipe for disaster! As they investigated the murder in the remarkably diverse community they lived in, they would discover something deeper and darker that existed. This book was well worth my time, for the laughter, the enlightenment, and the very last sentence, which made me laugh so loud my husband thought I was losing my mind. Well done. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher, G.P. Putnam’s Sons, for the opportunity to read it in exchange for an honest review. I gave it four stars.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Michael Hicks

    Suburban Dicks marks the debut novel for long-time comic book writer, and co-creator of the Marvel Comics character Deadpool, Fabian Nicieza. If you're at all familiar with the latter creation, either via comics or movies, you'll know one thing about this mystery book already -- Suburban Dicks is a freaking blast! After a gas station attendant is murdered, former would-be FBI profiler Andrea Stern teams up with local disgraced reporter Ken Lee to get to the bottom of things after it becomes clear Suburban Dicks marks the debut novel for long-time comic book writer, and co-creator of the Marvel Comics character Deadpool, Fabian Nicieza. If you're at all familiar with the latter creation, either via comics or movies, you'll know one thing about this mystery book already -- Suburban Dicks is a freaking blast! After a gas station attendant is murdered, former would-be FBI profiler Andrea Stern teams up with local disgraced reporter Ken Lee to get to the bottom of things after it becomes clear the police are either incompetent or corrupt... or maybe both. Suburban Dicks perfectly scratched that Veronica Mars-sized itch I seem to perpetually have thanks to its snappy, snarky humor and whip-smart lead. Andrea herself shares a lot in common with Mars, having been a teen sleuth herself, responsible for solving several high school cases involving missing phones and locating the keys to various parents' liquor cabinets, but her biggest claim to fame came in helping identify and capture a notorious serial killer before graduating college. Before she was able to join the FBI's Behavior Analysis Unit, though, she found herself pregnant and torn between work and starting a family. Now, Andrea perpetually kicks herself for being a fat broodmare as the mother of four and pregnant with the fifth. Her marriage sucks and while she loves her kids, she hates her life. It's not until the murder of Satku Sasmal that she begins to find purpose. For reporter Lee, it's a chance to make amends for sabotaging his own career, with an eye on fame and fortune via an eventual Netflix documentary unravelling the decades-long conspiracy he and Andrea have uncovered. Suburban Dicks is a consistently enjoyable page-turner, and I dug the hell out of the brash, ballsy humor on damn near every page here. Beyond that, it's also pretty damn smart, and Nicieza kept me on my toes with some intriguing, well-timed reveals and a rich, deeply layered mystery. Add in some pointed commentary on the prejudices and racism of white suburbia and corrupt police, and you've got yourself a terrific whodunnit. Highly recommended.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    Suburban Dicks is a compelling, satirical and insightful crime debut from the co-creator of Deadpool featuring two unlikely and unforgettable amateur sleuths. When gas station attendant Satkunananthan Sasmal is shot at point-blank range while pumping gas for motorists at a garage in the small town of West Windsor, New Jersey, Andrea "Andie" Stern, a mother of four currently pregnant with her fifth child who was once predicted to become a prominent FBI Criminal Profiler and once responsible for n Suburban Dicks is a compelling, satirical and insightful crime debut from the co-creator of Deadpool featuring two unlikely and unforgettable amateur sleuths. When gas station attendant Satkunananthan Sasmal is shot at point-blank range while pumping gas for motorists at a garage in the small town of West Windsor, New Jersey, Andrea "Andie" Stern, a mother of four currently pregnant with her fifth child who was once predicted to become a prominent FBI Criminal Profiler and once responsible for netting a vicious serial killer before unexpectedly conceiving and giving up her dreams to become an attentive full-time mum is the first on the scene. She had stopped to find a bathroom for her kids to relieve themselves when she discovered the body. Local police believe it's a botched armed robbery but Andie needs only one glance at the crime scene to see that it was clearly a cold-blooded execution. The inconsistencies are glaringly obvious in the police work, but you can be willingly blind to them if you're a copper just looking to close a case. For Andie, though, it's more about justice so she decides to begin an investigation herself and vows to find the killer using her expert analytical skills and acute perceptiveness. Meanwhile, disgraced newspaper investigative reporter Kenneth Lee is in the process of trying to resurrect his stalled career with a story uncovering the three-decades-old murder that occurred in the West Windsor–Plainsboro area and the perpetrator responsible for it. Kenny and Andrea soon team up and they discover that the 30-year-old case seemingly has connections to the recent racially motivated shooting. Can they solve it? This is a compulsive and richly entertaining crime thriller and an investigation uncovering the creeping darkness of American suburbia. Full of wicked black humour, but razor-sharp beneath the laughs, Suburban Dicks casts a scathing eye over modern-day America. It’s a one-of-a-kind mystery that will charm, harrow and grip the reader to the final pages, is predicated on a thematic foundation and is actually about the fears we have of changing cultures in our towns: fear of immigrants and the fear of loss of control and power. A quirky, raucously entertaining and topical thriller touching on cultural and racial diversity, institutional racism, the culture of white supremacy, toxic masculinity and the self-aggrandizing role of the media. Highly recommended.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Suburban Dicks by Fabian Nicieza is an excellent murder/mystery procedural that kept me glued to my chair, forgetting all else until I could finish this gem in less then 2 days. I have read my fair share of detective novels, but this one just fit the bill for me. It checked off every box I need in order to have a great experience, and then some: 1. Interesting and intricate (but not too complicated) murder/mystery plot. 2. Fantastic cast of characters, especially the main duo: Andie Stern- mother Suburban Dicks by Fabian Nicieza is an excellent murder/mystery procedural that kept me glued to my chair, forgetting all else until I could finish this gem in less then 2 days. I have read my fair share of detective novels, but this one just fit the bill for me. It checked off every box I need in order to have a great experience, and then some: 1. Interesting and intricate (but not too complicated) murder/mystery plot. 2. Fantastic cast of characters, especially the main duo: Andie Stern- mother to a full minivan (soon to add one more) of children that she has ended up choosing over her history in the FBI-though secretly missing that facet of her life, and Kenneth Lee-a now diagraced and bottomed out newspaper journalist that is hoping to find his “it can only go up from here” moment from within the bottom of the current barrel that is suburban NJ. 3. A beyond awesome narrative, banter, one-liners, sarcasm, dark, sassy, fiesty, and literally laugh out loud moments that could have only been written by the author himself What the reader then gets to experience is a witty, fast-paced, but yet perfectly timed, dark yet humorous story that kept that perfect balance throughout. It almost makes you feel guilty to laugh at some of the gritty, dark, and mildly inappropriate thoughts, actions, and verbiage...almost. It most certainly did not stop me. Ha. Beyond excellent. I highly recommend this, and am so glad there is a follow up, because there has to be after that hilarious ending. And there better be more then just one...this could be an epic series in the making. 5/5 stars Thank you EW and G.P. Putnam’s Sons for this awesome ARC and in return I am submitting my unbiased and voluntary review and opinion. I am posting this review to my GR, Instagram, and Bookbub accounts immediately and will post it to my Amazon, Instagram, and B&N accounts upon publication on 6/22/21.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Gail C.

    The plot for this book is creative and moves at a good pace. The author has inserted lots of sarcastic humor and where it hit the mark with me it was laugh out loud funny. Some of it went wide of me, and that left me with mixed feelings. There are great twists and turns throughout which keeps the book fresh and the characters are well developed with both good and not so good traits. It also feels very contemporary as it deals in part with racial injustice and divisiveness within the community as The plot for this book is creative and moves at a good pace. The author has inserted lots of sarcastic humor and where it hit the mark with me it was laugh out loud funny. Some of it went wide of me, and that left me with mixed feelings. There are great twists and turns throughout which keeps the book fresh and the characters are well developed with both good and not so good traits. It also feels very contemporary as it deals in part with racial injustice and divisiveness within the community as well as the police and government who are supposed to be working for all the citizens of the area. . There are lots of references to jokes and body parts/functions, some of which were a bit too graphic for my tastes. It was difficult to get through the first few pages of the book which focus on Andie, the lead protagonist of the story who is a frazzled, heavily pregnant mother of four. She doesn’t like parenting, and would prefer the children be more “free range”. There is a graphic recounting of when Andie arrives at the crime scene, in search of a bathroom for her youngest. I could have done with less details about the toddler’s solution. In the midst of this, Andie is also viewing the scene, making mental notes, and drawing conclusions as to what took place. The murder is eventually tied to events of nearly sixty years ago and Andie, along with Kenny, a reporter who is working to solve the crime, write up the story, and redeem himself, exposes the ways in which two crimes, separated by sixty years, are connected. In both time periods, racism is at the heart of the crime, but now a New York Jew and an Asian-American reporter are working to uncover the murderer of a young middle eastern Indian man which in some ways indicates how society has changed. At the book’s close, a press conference is held. As Andie steps up to the microphone, the author returns to his pattern of graphically detailing some bodily functions, in this case Andie’s water breaking. In effect, this “bookends” the telling of the mystery with two short stories designed to be funny, however for me they fell flat. I would have enjoyed the story more without the more graphic depictions both at the start and end of the book. My thanks to Penguin Group’s G P Putnam and Sons and NetGalley for providing me with an advanced copy for this review. The opinions expressed here are entirely my own.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jeanette

    For me the first 3rd was 4 stars, the middle 3rd 3 stars and the last third 2 to 2.5 stars tops. The humor makes you laugh until it doesn't. Sarcasm coupled with body function humor can only go so far with me. Too much becomes slapstick juvenile overflow dressing. Like a great salad with one gloating and dense thick ingredient drowning the whole until one next mouthful becomes sickening. Loved the N.J. mixes of groups designated and the suburban mores flows. But not so much of the inherent stereot For me the first 3rd was 4 stars, the middle 3rd 3 stars and the last third 2 to 2.5 stars tops. The humor makes you laugh until it doesn't. Sarcasm coupled with body function humor can only go so far with me. Too much becomes slapstick juvenile overflow dressing. Like a great salad with one gloating and dense thick ingredient drowning the whole until one next mouthful becomes sickening. Loved the N.J. mixes of groups designated and the suburban mores flows. But not so much of the inherent stereotyping of judgments parsed in some of the ways that were nuance inferred or implied. But that is author's choice and didn't really effect rating. Some were funny. Some not so much. For instance, in my suburbia- every single racial or ethnic group is at the gun range. Not a one hates the gun club entity either. Black and Asian ethnic predominate actually there. Too much of that type of continual bottom lining to reality of the present to "all"=real or reality here. Certainly vast stereotyping predominates. Generalizing became disgusting at points. What really centered making this less than a fun read for me was both the plotting curve and the heavy language spoken to Jeff in front of their kids. Ugh! All my laughs stopped. Flawed both but that role modeling is destructive. What a self-described dichotomy too. No one of such hubris about their own smartness and superior intellect gets pregnant by "accident" more than 3 times. Let alone 5. And there is not a path to Andrea's assurances re the evidence finds several times too. Many other avenues could have had play. Like land contamination knowledge or other past liabilities of use to title. To tell more would be spoilers. The plot also held some flaws. That many people (any group over 3) can never hold tight mouths for 50 years. It's impossible. That has been studied too. Doesn't occur unless 4 or 5 are dead within 5 years. Regardless there was some extremely specific and memorable scenes in this entertaining tale. At least two or three of them. The picture posited of that pee/ urination hold being one. This will be VERY popular as it plays full boat with blame game times too. And the toilet and lowlife humor fans, as well. Most likely that I will not be drawn to another of his. Too many arrogant. Too many rude, selfish. And almost entirely soulless. And funny that becomes not in short order. Very quickly. Too glib. Absolutely hated the last page and double that for the last paragraph too. Cheap trick technique to end a longbook! For me it becomes gross cartoon when writers do that kind of thing.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    I loved this snarky, funny mystery. Although it was funny - the author was a writer for the movie Deadpool - this book at it’s heart was a study of human character and racial profiling. Andrea Stern comes across a crime scene at a Valero gas station because her daughter really has to pee. She ignores the two bumbling officers and proceeds to have her daughter pee all over an active crime scene where an Indian boy was shot and murdered in the center island. She ends up schooling two rookie cops a I loved this snarky, funny mystery. Although it was funny - the author was a writer for the movie Deadpool - this book at it’s heart was a study of human character and racial profiling. Andrea Stern comes across a crime scene at a Valero gas station because her daughter really has to pee. She ignores the two bumbling officers and proceeds to have her daughter pee all over an active crime scene where an Indian boy was shot and murdered in the center island. She ends up schooling two rookie cops and becomes involved in the murder investigation due to her background as an almost FBI Profiler. Andrea is a snarky, smart, kinda crazy, about to burst pregnant - with her 5th child - hell on wheels! She becomes somewhat of a crime fighting duo with an old friend, an Asian guy, Kenny Lee, a disgraced reporter. The investigation unravels and Andrea realizes that the murder of this boy has something to do with the large Indian community being discriminated against for years by the largely white town officials and police department who have been covering up another murder of a black man from 50 years ago. We meet a big cast of characters: Andrea’s white friends deemed The Cellulitists who are pretty ignorant to the racial injustices, the murder victim, Satkunananthan’s extended Indian family and community, some who become Andrea’s friends, and a bunch of racist police and politicians. Kenny Lee’s POV: “he was angry, but more, scared. It could of been him. They would have killed the gook for flirting with one of their daughters. Because he was Asian/African American/Hispanic/Plaid. It didn’t matter what he was, he just wasn’t one of them.” Andrea figures out the crimes with lots of help along the way all while carting around 4 kids, a huge belly, and an asshole for a husband. At first I thought no way, ridiculous, but it turned out believable and satisfying. This is a murder mystery, but it’s really a book about the very real issues going on today: racial profiling and hate. I can’t believe in our times these still exist even though there are those of us out there who want to bitch slap those who are racist pricks! Grow up people and be Human! Bravo to this eye opening funny debut. To those discriminated against I can only hope that someday it’s in the rear view mirror and in the meantime we can get one of Andrea’s kids to pee all over their narrow minded faces.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joe Kucharski

    Fabian Nicieza! Dig it. He was all Stan the Man for Marvel during the nineties and early aughts with a resume stronger than Colossus: X-Men; X-Force; New Warriors; Thunderbolts! And oh yeah, co-created some wiseass Ryan Reynolds played in a movie or three. Now the big Fabe has gone and wrote up a genuine crime novel and it sizzles hotter than the pork-fried rice at Benihana’s. Suburban Dicks is set in the sarcastic wilds of West Windsor, New Jersey. For those who might only be hip on Manco & Man Fabian Nicieza! Dig it. He was all Stan the Man for Marvel during the nineties and early aughts with a resume stronger than Colossus: X-Men; X-Force; New Warriors; Thunderbolts! And oh yeah, co-created some wiseass Ryan Reynolds played in a movie or three. Now the big Fabe has gone and wrote up a genuine crime novel and it sizzles hotter than the pork-fried rice at Benihana’s. Suburban Dicks is set in the sarcastic wilds of West Windsor, New Jersey. For those who might only be hip on Manco & Manco Pizza in Ocean City or the Devils’ home of Newark, the scene of crime in this fun novel lies dead on north east from Trenton and less than hour from the much more serious environs of Philadelphia cheesesteaks. An Indian gas attendant is murdered and while the WWPD stumble around, former profiler and now severely-pregnant mom Andrea Stern – and four times over at that – sets her hormone-driven anxiety to solving the crime. Along for the ride is former glory-hound reporter Ken Lee who is looking for his next big break in order to sell the rights to Netflix. What they uncover is another murder, an older one. After all, nothing is ever easy in Jersey, especially where everything is legal. Unless you’re caught. Nicieza combines dry humor with pulp fiction like he was writing for Reese’s. And brother, is it yummy. Yet goofy accounting and situational humor aside, Nicieza has created a fantastically-entertaining crime novel loaded with personal angst for all main characters. More importantly? He analyzes the abject, deep-rooted seriousness of racism and imparts his commentary on the subject showing that everyone is equal. That skin color provides no barrier in the ways of family, love, community, dreams. And oh yes, murder. Even in Jersey. Suburban Dicks is more than a wry reference to detective work in the ‘burbs. This is epitomizing that Jersey swagger in a fun, filthy crime novel. And there needs to be more. Thanks to Netgalley and GP Putnam’s Sons for the quick trip up I-295. And be sure to read even more reviews over @ Joe's

  14. 4 out of 5

    Leane

    Some critics have likened this debut novel from Nicieza to those mysteries from Carl Hiaasen, Janet Evanovich, and Lisa Lutz and I would agree. But I also think the author is skewering the humor subgenre of Mystery at the same time celebrating these authors' wisecracking voices. Nicieza much like Hiaasen uses humor to also highlight societal ills; and like Hiaasen does for FL and Evanovich for NJ, the cultural assumptions we have of suburbia and small towns. The daffy, slapstick scenes and witty Some critics have likened this debut novel from Nicieza to those mysteries from Carl Hiaasen, Janet Evanovich, and Lisa Lutz and I would agree. But I also think the author is skewering the humor subgenre of Mystery at the same time celebrating these authors' wisecracking voices. Nicieza much like Hiaasen uses humor to also highlight societal ills; and like Hiaasen does for FL and Evanovich for NJ, the cultural assumptions we have of suburbia and small towns. The daffy, slapstick scenes and witty asides, hilarious internal thoughts, and droll irony is so much like all three writers . The uncanny female voice for the very pregnant character Andie Stern is a rare triumph from a male writer. Suburban Dicks is an intelligent, entertaining, and at times, moving, look at two very different "detectives" while examining the racial tensions exposed in a New Jersey suburb after the murder of a gas station attendant. Its plotting is excellent, keeping me guessing to the end; and the supporting characters run the gamut from a suburban mom squad, local police, and realistic, messy, loud, and endearing children. Like the aforementioned, Andie, the other main character of Kenny Lee, a reporter (who has fallen from journalistic grace and hungers to redeem himself), and FBI agent Ramon have their own voices and Andie's husband Jeff is the only character I wanted more depth from (he is so hard to like...). Just enough suspense in the tone to drive the narrative while suburban NJ rings true, and as does the the diversity of the region and the diverse characters themselves. This is a well-constructed procedural that unites both the amateur detective, investigative journalism, and forensics.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    I loved this so much! Adrian is a strong female character who actually feel like a real woman. She both loves and hates her kids and her relationship isn't perfect, but it also isn't riddled with body descriptions or constantly trying to thrust her into triangle romances. I liked Kenny a lot too, another realistic feeling character with his own fleshed out story, which doesn't distract from the main plot and tends to add to it. The narration is very direct, but it keeps the plot moving and doesn' I loved this so much! Adrian is a strong female character who actually feel like a real woman. She both loves and hates her kids and her relationship isn't perfect, but it also isn't riddled with body descriptions or constantly trying to thrust her into triangle romances. I liked Kenny a lot too, another realistic feeling character with his own fleshed out story, which doesn't distract from the main plot and tends to add to it. The narration is very direct, but it keeps the plot moving and doesn't get lost in side trips. If something is there, it's there for a reason, and that's so refreshing in murder mysteries. I see someone calling this "men's humor." No idea what they're talking about, there is definitely some dry humor but I didn't think it was overly focused on bodily humor or anything like that. My biggest complaint is that the ending felt like it wandered a bit. I think it could have been tightened up for the same effect, but overall it is still pretty concise.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Howard

    A really cool mystery book that would particularly interest people that live in the West Windsor/Princeton area like I do. The unlikely heroine is seven months pregnant with four young children; she is a smart, wisecracking dogged crime fighter, reminding me a little of one of the author's other characters, from another medium, Deadpool. There is a bright light shone on the large Asian community in the West Windsor and surrounding wealthy suburbs and the covert and overt prejudice that they exper A really cool mystery book that would particularly interest people that live in the West Windsor/Princeton area like I do. The unlikely heroine is seven months pregnant with four young children; she is a smart, wisecracking dogged crime fighter, reminding me a little of one of the author's other characters, from another medium, Deadpool. There is a bright light shone on the large Asian community in the West Windsor and surrounding wealthy suburbs and the covert and overt prejudice that they experience. It is very real.

  17. 5 out of 5

    debra

    I so enjoyed this and all that went into the solving, the humor and the characters, most especially Andie. Despite the fact that the initial crime and the way it was immediately linked to another crime didn't really hold together, I was still thoroughly entertained. I so enjoyed this and all that went into the solving, the humor and the characters, most especially Andie. Despite the fact that the initial crime and the way it was immediately linked to another crime didn't really hold together, I was still thoroughly entertained.

  18. 4 out of 5

    John McKenna

    Suburban Dicks takes place in the suburban town of West Windsor, New Jersey. It begins with the discovery of a murdered gas station attendant named Satkunananthan Sasmal, whose Uncle, Tharani Sasmal, owns a number of gas stations in the area. The family is part of a large, and growing, Indian and Asian immigrant community that’s moved to the area, where housing developments and McMansions have displaced the dairies and vegetable farms that were there just a few decades earlier. From there, the sn Suburban Dicks takes place in the suburban town of West Windsor, New Jersey. It begins with the discovery of a murdered gas station attendant named Satkunananthan Sasmal, whose Uncle, Tharani Sasmal, owns a number of gas stations in the area. The family is part of a large, and growing, Indian and Asian immigrant community that’s moved to the area, where housing developments and McMansions have displaced the dairies and vegetable farms that were there just a few decades earlier. From there, the snark never stops as the author takes aim at everything and everyone many of our woke brethren find objectionable about the society whose largess they have enjoyed, albeit with no investment in the country from which such gifts are withdrawn. To sum it up in a few words: great plot with too many clichéd characters. Our advice, save your money. Better books are in the pipeline and coming soon.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Adeel

    Suburban Dicks focuses on the POV of two main characters in the setting of West Windsor, New Jersey. First we have Andrea Stern, having nabbed a prominent serial killer, Andrea was on the path to becoming a well renowned FBI profiler. However, she gave up this dream to raise her four (soon to be five) children. Andrea thought her crime solving days were behind her, but everything changes when she unintentionally pulls by into a crime scene at a gas station with her screaming kids . Police believ Suburban Dicks focuses on the POV of two main characters in the setting of West Windsor, New Jersey. First we have Andrea Stern, having nabbed a prominent serial killer, Andrea was on the path to becoming a well renowned FBI profiler. However, she gave up this dream to raise her four (soon to be five) children. Andrea thought her crime solving days were behind her, but everything changes when she unintentionally pulls by into a crime scene at a gas station with her screaming kids . Police believe the murder is a robbery gone wrong and may have ties to drug dealing. However, Andrea has a hunch that is far from what happened. The victim was killed at point blank range which could only have been done by a professionalHer curiosity kicks in setting off events that push her back on the trail of catching killers. Then we have Andrea’s childhood friend Kenny Lee. A writer, Pulitzer winner, and now a disgraced journalist who is also on the case to solve the murder. Kenny wants to prove himself as a capable journalist and that all his past achievements were not a fluke. Together with Kenny, her old colleagues, and also the south Asian community, Andrea looks to catch the killer while also uncovering that the case may be related to a racially motivated murder that occured in the 1960’s. Although a very serious premise, Suburban Dicks was full of laughs and hilarious dialogue. I knew from the opening scene when Andrea pulls into the gas station with her kids and one ends up peeing all over the crime scene that this book was going to be full of hysterical moments. There is a lot of dark humour which is expected since the author wrote Deadpool. But the author does really well in balancing humour with the serious undertones of the novel. The novel tackles racial prejudice against members of the community in particular the South Asian community as well as the African American community later on. Through this Andrea discovers that there is a lot of dark and shady shit that happened and is still occuring West Windsor, New Jersey. Institutionalized racism and aspects of white supremacy are examples of those issues. As someone who is South Asian, I definitely understand the forms of racism many characters went through. It’s absolutely awful and no one should go through such abuse. The cruel words that are used by racists and ignorant people really hit a nerve. When considering the characters, the story was full of really interesting characters. Both Andrea and Kenny are going through their own distinct redemption arc. For example, although Andrea loves her children, getting back into the world of crime brings back memories of her time on the force and also what could have been if she stayed in the force. You can tell she loves solving crimes and working on identifying clues. This is the same for Kenny who had the world in the palm of his hands but decided to crush his prospering career. Although he doesn’t do some things by the book he wants to make a difference and help solve the murder. Overall, a highly entertaining and funny novel. I’m very excited to see what Fabian Nicieza writes next and will be looking out for his next book🙇🏽‍♂️. The mystery elements are also great and you’re left guessing right till the end. The novel highlights issues such as institutionalized racism and how it can be passed down from one generation to another. Definitely recommend this novel🙌🏼 Thank you as always to the lovely people at Putnam especially Nishita for sending this to me. I’m really grateful for the opportunity to review these fantastic books 😊.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kay

    4.5/5 I requested this book because of the title and was more than grateful that I was granted a review copy. Because I really liked this book and can see it being a best-seller when it hits the bookstores. First let me say this, while the story involves a pregnant mom of 4+1 in the oven, and the title could suggest domestic drama, this book is not about that. It is still a great portrait of suburban life, with all its tension and mundane aspects. If you are a fan of Deadpool, either the comic or t 4.5/5 I requested this book because of the title and was more than grateful that I was granted a review copy. Because I really liked this book and can see it being a best-seller when it hits the bookstores. First let me say this, while the story involves a pregnant mom of 4+1 in the oven, and the title could suggest domestic drama, this book is not about that. It is still a great portrait of suburban life, with all its tension and mundane aspects. If you are a fan of Deadpool, either the comic or the movie (though I suspect more people would have only seen the movie), you would probably love this book. The humor is along the same line and quality, which is not surprising considering who the author is. To be honest, although I laughed at a lot of the humorous remarks in this story, I did find some of the jokes a bit hard to swallow. And I think that has to do with myself being part of the Asian community and those remarks were a bit too close to home. But there aren't many of those and I've never been a top fan for super sarcastic humor so it wasn't surprising. I guess what I'm trying to say is that I think many readers will really enjoy this book and appreciate the sarcasm within. I find the pacing of the book to be just right for me. It is not a story where we have one thing happen right after another and race our way to the conclusion, but I didn't find the story to be slow or dragging at any point either. Once I've got past the first couple of chapters, which really didn't do anything for me because I didn't like Andie in those early moments without knowing more about her, the book became a breeze. I kept on wanting to read the next chapter. Wanting to know how the story develops and how the characters develop. Speaking of characters, I didn't find myself particularly fond of either of the two main characters. Andie is a smart, very smart, woman. She loves her kids and is compassionate and likable, but to me, she's like a nice neighbor I'd like to be acquainted with but don't necessarily want to be close friends with. Kenny, on the other hand, is a known asshole and disliked by almost everyone in the book, including himself. But he's also good at his job and had his heart in the right place... most of the time... The thing about the characters in this book is not how likable they were but that they all felt like *real* human beings. All the characters in the book, from Andie and Kenny to Andie's friends who are only on-page for a small part, felt like they are real people who were lifted from a typical rich American suburb. The author is very good at conveying exactly who those people are in just a few paragraphs. Yes, he plays the stereotypes with some of those characters, but he's also able to include enough nuances to those characters to make them distinct enough that they won't be simple archetypes. I read the book and feel like I knew who those people are and what they are like. And that is what I really appreciate about this book. This book also talks about some pretty heavy topics. Race and racial tensions are an important part of the book and that's just what you get when you have a town with a community with a large Chinese community and a large Indian community and built on former farmlands. Generational pressure from a broken patriarch is another. Without giving anything away, all I can say is that the author handled those topics with a great amount of humanity, and left me thinking long after I’ve finished the story. In the end, I am not sure I’ve got a sense of “justice was restored” when reaching the end, but I did get a sense of closure, which is usually how thigs like this usually end in real life. Was that a bit disappointing? I’m not sure. But it did make me appreciate this book a lot more.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Steve

    So I had two books on reserve at my local library and, of course, both came available at the same time. One was “We Begin at the End,” which I’d seen a lot of hype for, and the other was “Suburban Dicks,” which I was interested in simply because of the great title. After 100 pages of “We Begin …,” I felt like I had read this story before. Some strong characters, especially a troubled teen named Duchess, but I put it down and picked up “Suburban Dicks,” and quickly realized the I hadn’t read this So I had two books on reserve at my local library and, of course, both came available at the same time. One was “We Begin at the End,” which I’d seen a lot of hype for, and the other was “Suburban Dicks,” which I was interested in simply because of the great title. After 100 pages of “We Begin …,” I felt like I had read this story before. Some strong characters, especially a troubled teen named Duchess, but I put it down and picked up “Suburban Dicks,” and quickly realized the I hadn’t read this story before. Terrific book. Funny, smart, irreverent, suspenseful, beautifully plotted and featuring two wonderfully realized central characters. Maybe not a surprise as it was written by the co-creator of “Deadpool.” Those two main characters are Kenny Lee, an Asian-American journalist who made a bad decision years ago that derailed his career, and Andrea Stern, who was once looking at a promising career as an FBI profiler until a pregnancy changed her trajectory. A murder of a young Indian man at a New Jersey convenience story brings these two together. The unforgettable Andrea, who has four kids and another due any time, stumbles on the crime scene in a very funny way. It kicks her long-suppressed Spidey-senses into overdrive. (You can’t help but flash on Fargo’s Marge Gunderson.) Kenny, now writing for a community weekly paper, sees the murder as his ticket back into the good graces of real journalism. The two, who have a past themselves, team up to solve the crime, and, in doing so, reveal a decades-old conspiracy. “Suburban Dicks” is about reclaiming lost opportunities, marriage, motherhood, family, race, toxic masculinity, smart women who give up careers, and so much more. I mentioned it was also funny, right? Apparently “We Begin …” has already been picked up for a screen adaptation. I want to see the adaptation of “Suburban Dicks” way more and I want the sequel now please.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rach

    Andie Stern was once a FBI Profiler who caught a serial killer but she gave up her career for her five children (she is pregnant with number five in the book) in West Windsor, New Jersey. Andie pulls up to a petrol/gas station one evening and witnesses a murder scene (the police are already at the scene). the attendant has been murdered. Andie doesn't think the police have secured the crime scene enough and gives opinion. Andie can't stop thinking about it and sets to find the killer with kids i Andie Stern was once a FBI Profiler who caught a serial killer but she gave up her career for her five children (she is pregnant with number five in the book) in West Windsor, New Jersey. Andie pulls up to a petrol/gas station one evening and witnesses a murder scene (the police are already at the scene). the attendant has been murdered. Andie doesn't think the police have secured the crime scene enough and gives opinion. Andie can't stop thinking about it and sets to find the killer with kids in tow. While investigating Andie teams up with disgraced local journalist Kenneth Lee, who she knows from childhood. Kennenth has everything prove to get his career back to what it once was. Andie and Kenneth find out that the murder is tied to events years ago. This book is written by co-creator of Deadpool, Fabian Nicieza. Both Andie and Kenneth aren't perfect characters but that is what makes them feel real. They both have their flaws and actually make a great partnership. There is plenty of humour in the book. The characters bring the book to life but also there are plenty of serious issues in the book which the author addresses. So don't just expect a book full of humour and chaos between are two main characters. Overall a book that has it's funny moments, well written characters and also addresses issues that are still going on in society today. I received a ARC from Netgalley and Titan Books for an objection review.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen Gray

    This is clever and funny and twisty enough to keep you guessing. Andie and Kenny both peaked early in their careers and now, in their early thirties, have found themselves sidelined. She's pregnant with her fifth child and he's trying to claw his way back in journalism after a scandal. When Andie pulls into a gas station where the young Indian attendant has been murdered, she can't help herself- she must investigate. She helped catch a serial killer when she was in college so surely she must be This is clever and funny and twisty enough to keep you guessing. Andie and Kenny both peaked early in their careers and now, in their early thirties, have found themselves sidelined. She's pregnant with her fifth child and he's trying to claw his way back in journalism after a scandal. When Andie pulls into a gas station where the young Indian attendant has been murdered, she can't help herself- she must investigate. She helped catch a serial killer when she was in college so surely she must be able to identify a murderer in West Windsor, New Jersey. And Kenny wants a story. Once Andie figures out there's something fishy about the fact that permits to build pools have been rejected all over town- mostly for Indian families- she's off to the races. Nicieza has captured suburbia, a retirement community, the clash between old and new as well as created terrific characters. Andie's kids, Kenny's mom, the mayor, the cops, the Indian communiry- all of them leap off the page. It's a hoot with a dark underbelly. Thanks to Edelweiss for the ARC. I thoroughly enjoyed this (I even laugher out loud) and highly recommend.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    Andie Stern is just your typical suburban housewife/mom. She has four (nearly five) children and she spends her day doing mom things. Until one day she stumbles over a murder case when she stops for gas. Andie really isn’t a typical New Jersey mom. She’s also a former FBI profiler and when she realizes that the local cops are in well over their heads, her instincts kick in. Now Andie is back in the game – this time with her kids in tow and a disgraced, local, journalist as her trusty backup. Subu Andie Stern is just your typical suburban housewife/mom. She has four (nearly five) children and she spends her day doing mom things. Until one day she stumbles over a murder case when she stops for gas. Andie really isn’t a typical New Jersey mom. She’s also a former FBI profiler and when she realizes that the local cops are in well over their heads, her instincts kick in. Now Andie is back in the game – this time with her kids in tow and a disgraced, local, journalist as her trusty backup. Suburban Dicks is author Fabian Nicieza’s debut novel and I hope it’s not his last! This is simply a great book that is clever, entertaining and funny, while it also addresses the much more serious subject of racism. This multi-layer mystery is well-conceived, the dialogue is rich, and the story is fast-paced. So far, this is this best book I’ve read this year. It is a winner in every sense of the word. Many thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for providing a copy of this book for review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tad

    Suburban Dicks opens with a scene that had me laughing out loud. It immediately sucked me in with one of the best and most colorful detectives I’ve come across. Andie Stern is observant and insightful. She is also carting around four kids and is incredibly pregnant with a fifth. Stumbling onto a crime scene at a gas station where the murdered body of young Satkunananthan Sasmal lies on the ground, the fire that had once made Andie an up-and-coming FBI profiler is rekindled. She ends up bumping i Suburban Dicks opens with a scene that had me laughing out loud. It immediately sucked me in with one of the best and most colorful detectives I’ve come across. Andie Stern is observant and insightful. She is also carting around four kids and is incredibly pregnant with a fifth. Stumbling onto a crime scene at a gas station where the murdered body of young Satkunananthan Sasmal lies on the ground, the fire that had once made Andie an up-and-coming FBI profiler is rekindled. She ends up bumping into a disgraced local journalist Kenny Lee, who is pursuing the story and smells an opportunity to restore some of the reputation he once had. Fabian Nicieza, cocreator of Deadpool, has written a story of suburban New Jersey life complete with humor, real character depth and an intriguing mystery. The baffling murder leads to the discovery of body parts around town and a long-concealed conspiracy. I was equal parts amused and amazed at Nicieza’s depiction of life in the suburbs and his insightful social commentary. Along with the humor, he creates characters with real depth. They are complicated, imperfect and often filled with regret. No character stands out more than Andie Stern, who I hope to see again. Suburban Dicks is a great book with a fascinating mystery and a lot of humor. Mystery fans are going to love this! I was provided a copy of this book by the publisher.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Victoria

    The co-creator and comic book writer of Deadpool makes this debut novel stand out among other detective stories with his special brand of humor and style. Andrea, A mother of 4 with one on the way, has a penchant for solving mysteries. Kenny, money hungry disgraced journalist, sees a good story and future Netflix documentary. Lumbering her way into the investigation, Andrea calls on her mom group called the cellulitists and the Indian/Asian community to uncover a long dead secret that the town le The co-creator and comic book writer of Deadpool makes this debut novel stand out among other detective stories with his special brand of humor and style. Andrea, A mother of 4 with one on the way, has a penchant for solving mysteries. Kenny, money hungry disgraced journalist, sees a good story and future Netflix documentary. Lumbering her way into the investigation, Andrea calls on her mom group called the cellulitists and the Indian/Asian community to uncover a long dead secret that the town leaders have been keeping for generations. Kenny takes down notes, talks about how poor he is and causes hilarious scenes. Being a Deadpool fan, I was excited to see this book pop up on my Goodreads and thankful to Edelweiss for letting me read an early copy. I came for the Deadpool humor and shenanigans and was not disappointed. https://piratetwinkiereadsblog.wordpr...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC of Suburban Dicks. I won't lie. I requested this because of the title. Yes, the blurb sounded interesting, especially since the author is a co-creator of Deadpool so I knew this was going to be funny, at least. ** Minor spoilers ahead ** Andie Stern, a mother of five, stumbles into a murder by accident when one of her children needs to use the potty at a gas station. Sadly, the gas station attendant was just gunned down and the first responders are incompeten Thank you to NetGalley for an ARC of Suburban Dicks. I won't lie. I requested this because of the title. Yes, the blurb sounded interesting, especially since the author is a co-creator of Deadpool so I knew this was going to be funny, at least. ** Minor spoilers ahead ** Andie Stern, a mother of five, stumbles into a murder by accident when one of her children needs to use the potty at a gas station. Sadly, the gas station attendant was just gunned down and the first responders are incompetent, to put it nicely. Andie is not your typical suburban mom; she's wily, resourceful and smart. And, when she teams up with Kenneth Lee, a former star journalist, now disgraced and working at a local rag, the unlikely duo uncover a murder conspiracy spanning five decades, based on systemic racism, social class and status. Andie is a likable character; intelligent, wise-cracking, and a good mom. The author offers brief glimpses into Andie's Oliver Twist-like childhood, keeping it vague and mysterious, making you want more. She's smart, way smarter than her husband; she's resourceful, capable and living a cliche life of motherhood and wife, leaving behind a promising career in the FBI once she got pregnant. It was also refreshing to read about Kenneth Lee, a person of color as a main character is not something I see or read often in novels. He plays off Andie's self-sufficient personality, offering help in areas she needs assistance in and she does the same. The story is engaging; it's funny, serious, darkly comedic and offers a diverse supporting cast, including an Asian mayor. The only caveat is near the end where the narrative began to drag; it took too long for loose ends to be tied up and the rest of the suspects rounded up. The ending is satisfying and funny, exactly what I expected from the author. I hope this means there will be a sequel.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I hope the two protagonists of this murder mystery are saying to each other, "I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship," as Humphrey Bogart’s and Claude Rains’ characters said at the end of "Casablanca." I want to read more about Andrea Stern and Kenny Lee's adventures. The other thing I love about this book is that it takes place in my backyard in Central New Jersey. I live one town north on US Route 1 from Plainsboro and two towns north of West Windsor. I either know where many I hope the two protagonists of this murder mystery are saying to each other, "I think this is the beginning of a beautiful friendship," as Humphrey Bogart’s and Claude Rains’ characters said at the end of "Casablanca." I want to read more about Andrea Stern and Kenny Lee's adventures. The other thing I love about this book is that it takes place in my backyard in Central New Jersey. I live one town north on US Route 1 from Plainsboro and two towns north of West Windsor. I either know where many of the settings are or I have been there. Most importantly, Fabian Nicieza, kudos for portraying the wonderful ethnic diversity of this area. I have always been glad that my two children grew up here.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Riya

    More than the story, I was impressed with the author's dead-on description of West Windsor's culture! He captured the residents so well that I could've imagined Kenny, Sathwika, or Andrea to be my next-door neighbor. The murder plotline was not completely unique, but the characters and humor really made the book enjoyable. I would love to see this turned into a film since some scenes, like Andrea's visualizations, were made for (and would benefit from) the screen. Mr. Nicieza has mentioned a sec More than the story, I was impressed with the author's dead-on description of West Windsor's culture! He captured the residents so well that I could've imagined Kenny, Sathwika, or Andrea to be my next-door neighbor. The murder plotline was not completely unique, but the characters and humor really made the book enjoyable. I would love to see this turned into a film since some scenes, like Andrea's visualizations, were made for (and would benefit from) the screen. Mr. Nicieza has mentioned a second book so I am looking forward to seeing more of the characters and digging further into Andrea's backstory!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Janice Laucka

    I wanted to like this book, I thought the writing was good in the beginning and I was ready for a good story and then bam! It turned into this surface criticism of white supremacy crap! Instead of writing about the underlying issue of how Suburbs function it became leftist propaganda! I want a real story!

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