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It's the End of the World and I'm in My Bathing Suit

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Twelve-year-old Eddie Gordon Holloway has concocted his most genius plan ever to avoid chores... especially the dreaded L-A-U-N-D-R-Y. If he can wear all the clothes he owns, he'll only have to do the laundry once during his school break. On the day of the highly anticipated Beach Bash, Eddie's monstrous pile of dirty laundry is found by his mom. And Eddie's day has just ta Twelve-year-old Eddie Gordon Holloway has concocted his most genius plan ever to avoid chores... especially the dreaded L-A-U-N-D-R-Y. If he can wear all the clothes he owns, he'll only have to do the laundry once during his school break. On the day of the highly anticipated Beach Bash, Eddie's monstrous pile of dirty laundry is found by his mom. And Eddie's day has just taken a turn for the worst. Now he's stuck at home by himself, missing the bash, and doing his whole pile of laundry. But mid-cycle, the power goes out! With his first load of laundry wet and the rest of his stuff still filthy, he sets out to explore the seemingly empty neighborhood in his glow-in-the-dark swim trunks, flip-flops, and a beach towel. He soon meets up with other neighborhood kids: newcomer Xavier (who was mid-haircut and has half his head shaved), Eddie's former friend Sonia (who has spent her entire break trying to beat a video game and was mid-battle with the final boss), and siblings Trey and Sage (who are dealing with major sibling drama). As they group up to cover more ground and find out what happened, they realize that their families aren't coming back anytime soon. And as night falls, the crew realizes that they aren't just the only people left in the neighborhood, they might be the only people left... anywhere.


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Twelve-year-old Eddie Gordon Holloway has concocted his most genius plan ever to avoid chores... especially the dreaded L-A-U-N-D-R-Y. If he can wear all the clothes he owns, he'll only have to do the laundry once during his school break. On the day of the highly anticipated Beach Bash, Eddie's monstrous pile of dirty laundry is found by his mom. And Eddie's day has just ta Twelve-year-old Eddie Gordon Holloway has concocted his most genius plan ever to avoid chores... especially the dreaded L-A-U-N-D-R-Y. If he can wear all the clothes he owns, he'll only have to do the laundry once during his school break. On the day of the highly anticipated Beach Bash, Eddie's monstrous pile of dirty laundry is found by his mom. And Eddie's day has just taken a turn for the worst. Now he's stuck at home by himself, missing the bash, and doing his whole pile of laundry. But mid-cycle, the power goes out! With his first load of laundry wet and the rest of his stuff still filthy, he sets out to explore the seemingly empty neighborhood in his glow-in-the-dark swim trunks, flip-flops, and a beach towel. He soon meets up with other neighborhood kids: newcomer Xavier (who was mid-haircut and has half his head shaved), Eddie's former friend Sonia (who has spent her entire break trying to beat a video game and was mid-battle with the final boss), and siblings Trey and Sage (who are dealing with major sibling drama). As they group up to cover more ground and find out what happened, they realize that their families aren't coming back anytime soon. And as night falls, the crew realizes that they aren't just the only people left in the neighborhood, they might be the only people left... anywhere.

30 review for It's the End of the World and I'm in My Bathing Suit

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bookishrealm

    Ahhhh! This was a difficult one for me to rate! I absolutely love the character and I'm looking for more books that have Black boys at the center of the narrative and don't necessarily have dark themes to them. This book and the upcoming titles have so much potential, but the pacing was extremely off which only allowed me to give it 3.5 stars It's the End of the World and I'm in My Bathing Suit was a cover read. From the moment that the cover was revealed, I knew that I had to get my hands on thi Ahhhh! This was a difficult one for me to rate! I absolutely love the character and I'm looking for more books that have Black boys at the center of the narrative and don't necessarily have dark themes to them. This book and the upcoming titles have so much potential, but the pacing was extremely off which only allowed me to give it 3.5 stars It's the End of the World and I'm in My Bathing Suit was a cover read. From the moment that the cover was revealed, I knew that I had to get my hands on this book. It looked so fun and the perfect read for the summer. The story centers around Eddie who is excited to go to the community end of the summer bash. His plans are quickly ruined when his mom discovers that he's spent the entire summer not doing any of his laundry. Instead of going to the bash, his mother makes him stay home and do the laundry. The pacing of this book was all wrong. Clearly, from the title, readers know that something is going to happen to not only Eddie's community, but the entire world. However, the first 30-40% of the book is spent describing how frustrated Eddie is about doing his laundry, the relationship that he has with his family, and the process that he has to go through to do his laundry. If I wasn't curious about how this book was going to end, I think that I would have stopped reading it. It takes way too long for anything to actually happen and even then, readers are left with a cliff-hanger indicating that the story will continue in another installment. This first section was slightly boring and repetitive and I found myself losing focus on the story a few times. What I did enjoy was Eddie as a character and the potential that this series may have. Eddie is hilarious and I really enjoyed the shenanigans that he and the supporting cast get into towards the end of the novel. There is so much potential with these books based off of some things that ended up happening throughout the course of the novel. It got weird and definitely gave off some dystopian like vibes. There were also some great conversations shared between Eddie and another character which ended up detailing how Eddie copes with having ADHD. This book also does a great job exploring feelings associated with the grieving the loss of a parent while also attempting to build a relationship with a stepparent. It's conflicting and Reynolds does a great job showcasing that in Eddie's character. Overall, this was a solid read. I wanted a little more; however, I think I'll be continuing the series to see where the story is going to go.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Betsy

    Okay, so about nine years ago I wrote a blog post called, “2013 Middle Grade Black Boys: Seriously, People?" And I don’t think it’s going to surprise anybody that I found a whopping five middle grade novels where the main character was a boy who was Black. Three of them were written by sports stars. One was historical fiction about slavery. And one, just one, was contemporary and slightly more fun (by the late great Walter Dean Myers). And I’d like to say that was a low point in publishing, but Okay, so about nine years ago I wrote a blog post called, “2013 Middle Grade Black Boys: Seriously, People?" And I don’t think it’s going to surprise anybody that I found a whopping five middle grade novels where the main character was a boy who was Black. Three of them were written by sports stars. One was historical fiction about slavery. And one, just one, was contemporary and slightly more fun (by the late great Walter Dean Myers). And I’d like to say that was a low point in publishing, but I literally think that it might have been a good year. Fortunately, #WeNeedDiverseBooks and other organizations were created, publishers saw the idea of publishing a range of voices as good for their bottom line, and voila. Now it is 2022 and things are . . . well, they’re better. Not perfect, but heading in the right direction. To my own personal joy, one of the good things about publishing right now is that we’re beginning to get away from only showing Black characters in moments of tragedy and pain. Silly, funny, downright gross books are beginning to gain some traction. So, it is with great delight that I read It’s the End of the World and I’m in My Bathing Suit. This, for me, felt like a kind of homecoming. A wonderful culmination in what I wished I could have seen way back in 2013. Here we have an incredibly funny writer. Here we have gross stuff (even if it’s just laundry) and silliness, and a cast of kids you’d follow to the end of the Earth… or has the end of the Earth come to them? Utterly carefree and ridiculous, this is a book that never takes itself too seriously. Which, naturally, means that I’m about to. Bonus Fact: Near the end of this review I will list one downside to the book. You have been warned. It was the perfect plan. When Eddie made a deal with his parents, which to say his mom and stepdad WBD (a.k.a. “Wanna-Be Dad”), the idea was that he’d do his laundry all summer and they’d stay off his back. Well, it’s halfway through the summer and the day Eddie’s been dreaming of all this time is here. It’s Beach Bash day! The whole town is headed out to Lake Erie for summertime in the fun. Everyone, that is, except Eddie. Turns out his idea to wear a different piece of clothing every day (thereby allowing him to do laundry only once all summer) has caught the attention of his mom and she is NOT pleased. So poor Eddie is stuck at home with laundry to do. And then the power goes out. And all the cell phone reception disappears. And weird fireworks are seen in the sky. And no one who goes to the beach ever, EVER comes back. Eddie’s just met up with four other kids in his neighborhood who also got left behind. He’s in his only wearable piece of clothing, a bathing suit, and suddenly things are weirder, wilder, and goofier than even he could have predicted. I’m a librarian so naturally one of the first things I’m going to do with this book is see how it’s classified (librarians think that kind of thing is fun. Seriously). So I look at its subject headings and the first thing I see is “Classification: Dystopian”. Now I see why they did that. The title, after all, does appear to sport the words “It’s the End of the World” in there. Usually world ending is on the “dys” end of “topias”. However, I don’t think the cataloger that slotted this book into that category was doing their due diligence because the fact of the matter is that in Eddie I have found one of my favorite types of narrators: The unreliable kindf. Eddie has one goal at the beginning of this book and it is to charm and convince you. Of what? Literally, whatever is popping into his head at a given moment. Once in a while his own internal dialogue will catch him in his own lies (he would not call them lies, by the way) but the fact of the matter is, you don’t know how much to trust him. And, like every truly great unreliable narrator, you’re having too much fun on this joyride to even care. But one fact I simply cannot let go of is this: This may not even be an end-of-the-world book. Seriously, the kids lose power and can’t text and within minutes they’re fairly convinced that civilization itself has collapsed. Seems a bit of a leap. And Eddie’s kind of a charmer. He might be convincing you that the world is ending. Heck, he might even believe it himself. It’s a little hard to tell in that you’re often laughing too hard about what he’s saying to tell. I read a lot of children’s books in a given year so I have to be choosy about the ones I stick with. Usually, I’ll give a book a good chapter or two to get going. If it can retain my interest during that time, awesome. If it cannot then it’s on to the next! This book? It begins with Eddie telling the child reader how to con adults into believing they're reading more than they are. I mean, that’s essentially out-and-out bribery right from the start. This is immediately followed by Eddie’s brilliant plan for getting out of doing laundry all summer. So you’ve got a con followed by a con. Who can resist that? Heck, the second con was so good that I ended up just reading passages of the book aloud to my kids. This was better than when I was sitting in my very serious, very grown-up lunchroom at work, reading this book and snorting and snucking like a stuck pig. No lie. There was chortling involved (and Eddie can confirm that that’s a word). The art of the funny middle grade novel is rare. I can’t tell you how to write one. Mediocre ones are common. Truly hilarious ones? Almost impossible. I swear we sometimes get whole years where there aren’t any funny novels for kids. Not truly funny, I mean. But this book uses a whole slew of techniques and starts interchanging them so rapidly that you never know what Reynolds is going to pull out next. Sometimes he’ll have someone do interior dialogue with an inanimate object (like a spatula). Other times he’ll imagine discussions between two concepts (if the sequence of the universe talking to itself isn’t turned into a one-person show someday, I’ll eat my geranium). He does callbacks. He makes fun of oat milk (it’s low hanging fruit but who can’t appreciate a line like the one that says his stepdad, “…drinks milk that grows outta dirt”?). Like a lot of authors, Reynolds discovered that a lot of what’s funny comes out in dialogue. I sympathize with this, since whenever I write a book, I basically just want to make it pure dialogue and nothing else. And his dialogue is amazing (there’s a part about a false ice cream man that really stands out), but it can’t hold a candle to the internal dialoguing of Eddie himself. His tangents are a thing of beauty. And my favorite moment in the book, bar none, is when someone is pounding on Eddie’s front door, and the reader is just dying to know who it is, when Eddie suddenly makes this right-hand swerve and starts talking about the reader’s emotional vulnerability and how “I wanna meet you where you are, yeah?” It’s clear that Eddie’s been to more than a few therapy sessions in his life. It’s clear that Mr. Reynolds perhaps has too. In a little author’s note at the beginning of the reviewer’s copy of this book that I received, Justin A. Reynolds says that in writing this book he wanted to make something in the vein of “Adventures in Babysitting,” “Don’t Tell Mom the Babysitter’s Dead,” “Home Alone,” etc. In other words, Justin A. Reynolds is my age, or close to it. But you get what he’s saying. He wants to write good-hearted, light -hearted, hearty fun. But he’s got a problem. He has to advance a potentially dire sounding plot, keep things light, introduce at least one actual emotional moment (and pull it off), and also put in some truly wackadoodle moments involving zombies or sports play-by-plays involving dogs. Tonally, that’s a nightmare situation. Plus, as I mentioned before, you’re getting all of this via your hero’s p.o.v. First person can be a blessing or a curse. It works here, but that was never a guarantee. Now the downside of the book. You knew there’d be one when I started this review, so don’t give me those puppydog eyes now. I’m only telling you this because I care about you. Ready? I’m not going to hold back so open wide for a great big truth sandwich. The down side of this story is . . . it ends on a cliffhanger. Not a literal one. More like, an end of Stuart Little one, with our heroes going off into the sunset. Let it be known that I established a deep and abiding disgruntlement with Stuart Little back in the third grade because of that ending, and I have never ever let my disappointment fade. Of course, Justin A. Reynolds has two great big advantages over E.B. White. 1: He is not dead (I mean, not as of this writing anyway). 2: He can write a sequel. Can and, I certainly hope, will. He’ll have to when the raging hordes of furious pre-teens flood the streets demanding their due. Their funny funny due. The tangents are going to try to convince you that this book was easy to write. I mean, maybe it was. I don’t know Justin A. Reynolds myself. Maybe he can churn out MG fiction in his sleep. But I think of this book more as an example of clockwork. There are all these intricate moving parts and it’s the author’s job not simply to fit them in but to make them work together. If I could ask Mr. Reynolds a question, just one question, I’d ask him what was the funniest joke he had to cut. Because the editing on this sucker must have been something else. It gives you the feel of off-the-cuff humor but there’s a method to this man’s madness. I think we can definitely declare it a success, no matter what, though. I’ll be curious to see how it does with the kids. To my mind, it’s Wimpy Kid levels of funny, and we haven’t seen a new book like that in a long time. So for its hidden intricacies, gags that land, heart, smarts, and general good-natured attitude, I’d declare this book a success. If the catalogers are right and this truly is a dystopian work, then I can’t think of a better reason to cheer on the end of the world. New Motto for Justin A. Reynolds: He Makes It Look Easy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Robin Loves Reading

    Eddie Gordon Holloway is a twelve-year-old boy with a new responsiblity over the summer holiday - his own laundry. Disgusted with the impending chore, Eddie comes up with a fabulous idea - he will wear every stitch of clothing he has and make it so that he only has to do laundry just once this summer. When he gets down to his last item, a pair of swim trunks, Eddie is forced to face the inevitable. Unhappy that his mother has remarried is only one of Eddie's problems. His older brother is incredi Eddie Gordon Holloway is a twelve-year-old boy with a new responsiblity over the summer holiday - his own laundry. Disgusted with the impending chore, Eddie comes up with a fabulous idea - he will wear every stitch of clothing he has and make it so that he only has to do laundry just once this summer. When he gets down to his last item, a pair of swim trunks, Eddie is forced to face the inevitable. Unhappy that his mother has remarried is only one of Eddie's problems. His older brother is incredibly annoying. Then there is Beach Bash - the ultimate summer party - and the perfect time to ask childhood friend Ava to go steady with him. Eddie dives in - bad smells notwithstanding - and as he struggles to get his first load of laundry going, the power goes out. In short order, Eddie realizes that the power is out everywhere, and he soon finds himself with four of his friends. In fact, Eddie, his four friends, and who else? No one else. No other kids. No adults. No power. No cell service. And he is in his swim trunks. What fun! I loved this snarky middle-grade read. In fact, I have only read a small handful of middle grade titles, but I found this one to be quite enjoyable, leaving me more than interested to read more of Justin A. Reynolds books as well as other middle grade titles. Many thanks to Scholastic Press for this ARC for review. This is my honest opinion.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Eddie made a deal with his mother and stepfather-- he'll be responsible all summer, and they'll give him a little more freedom. It's gone okay all summer, but on the eve of an big end of summer bash along the shores of Lake Erie near Cleveland, he's run into a little problem. His plan was to ration his clothing and do all of his laundry at once, instead of regularly, the way his mother envisioned his end of the deal going. When she discovers that he was saving all ARC provided by Edelweiss Plus Eddie made a deal with his mother and stepfather-- he'll be responsible all summer, and they'll give him a little more freedom. It's gone okay all summer, but on the eve of an big end of summer bash along the shores of Lake Erie near Cleveland, he's run into a little problem. His plan was to ration his clothing and do all of his laundry at once, instead of regularly, the way his mother envisioned his end of the deal going. When she discovers that he was saving all of his dirty clothes in his closet, she cracks down-- he can't go to the bash until he does all of his laundry. He even tries to butter up his stepfather (who is NOT as good as his real father, who died two years ago) to get him to change his mind. No dice. Eddie is left to haul all of his laundry to the basement and spend at least two hours (thanks to the quick cycle) washing and drying clothes. Not far into the process, however, the power goes out. Clearly, he can't do laundry, so he starts to investigate what's going on. He runs into his friend Xavier, and later his best friend Sonia,and another friend, Trey, and his young sister Sage.They all notice that something is up with the neighborhood, since no one but the five seems to be around. The big concern, however, is that Sonia lost power in the middle of a video game, so they recreate that in the front yard. It's a lot of fun, but it makes them hungry, so they all collect junk food and have a feast. Still, there is no communication from any of their families. They spend the night, decide to "borrow" supplies from neighbors' houses, and finally come to the conclusion that they need to get to the lake to see what has happened to their families. It's too far to walk, so the obvious solution is to take Eddie's step dad's car-- a vintage Thunderbird left to him by his own father. The book ends on this cliffhanger, with the promise of a second volume. Strengths: The cover is fantastic, and the promise of a beach bash with picnic food, slushies, and a girl on whom Eddie is crushing is a wonderful combination. Young readers will understand Eddie's dislike of household chores and admire his plan to streamline his laundry process. The Cleveland setting is perfect, even if "Carterville" is fictional. Eddie's step father seems like a great guy, but it's understandable that Eddie is having difficulty accepting him, since his father's death is still fairly recent. He is glad his mother is happy again, but his loss is still fresh. The idea of having the run of an entire neighborhood, and being able to break into neighbors' houses to borrow things speaks to a very deep desire to have unlimited freedom and see inside other peoples' homes-- think Nelson's The Girl Who Owned a City. There's something deeply satisfying about reading about children who have this kind of agency and opportunity to be free of adult supervision. The writing style is rather pell mell, echoing perhaps Eddie's ADHD. This has some overtones of dystopia (depending where the next book goes), but has an upbeat, fun treatment of it. Weaknesses: 100 pages in, all that has happened is some family drama about Eddie's actions. He's still doing laundry. That is a VERY long time for, in the words of my students "Nothing to happen". By the time one of Torrey Maldonado's books would be over (150 pages), Eddie is still talking to his friends and debating what they should do. There's a lot of repetition as well. We hear many times about Eddie's older brother, how his step father isn't his Real Father, and how his laundry idea was such a great one until he gets stuck with a pile of dirty clothes. Perhaps the 1990s kids' movies on which reynolds has modeled his story operate in a similar vein, and I am just too old to understand this style. Also, what 12 year old has THAT many pairs of underwear? What I really think: In theory, this is a fabulous idea, but the execution is somewhat wanting for me personally. The fact that this is not a stand alone is unfortunate. I may wait to see how many books it takes to wrap up Eddie's story, and the direction the story takes, before purchasing. The cover is fantastic, and I think my readers will immediately pick it up, but I also wonder how long they will spend reading it before returning. Some of my students give up on Horowitz's Stormbreaker after three chapters because it seems to dull to them.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rorie Cox-steib

    This book tackles the end of the world trope with the enthusiasm and resourcefulness of a tween age boy, which in this case is an extremely good thing. Fun and funny while building up the mystery, I look forward to reading the follow up titles. Easy to recommend to kids!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jenell

    Ladybug said this is a 4/5 and she cannot wait until the next book comes out.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten

    I understand what the stream of consciousness was going for, but I felt like I read the first two chapters of a book instead of a whole book - would have preferred a bit less talk for another step or two forward in the plot...Otherwise, entertaining.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Shepard (Between-the-Shelves)

    Eddie has the perfect plan in order to avoid his least favorite chore all summer: laundry. Laundry is the worst. In order to do it the least amount of times, he has decided to wear every single piece of clothing he owns. Even if it doesn't fit with the weather. Doing that means he'll only have to do laundry once over the summer. However, on the day of the very anticipated Beach Bash, Eddie's mom finds his pile of laundry in his room. Now, he's stuck doing laundry instead of celebrating with his f Eddie has the perfect plan in order to avoid his least favorite chore all summer: laundry. Laundry is the worst. In order to do it the least amount of times, he has decided to wear every single piece of clothing he owns. Even if it doesn't fit with the weather. Doing that means he'll only have to do laundry once over the summer. However, on the day of the very anticipated Beach Bash, Eddie's mom finds his pile of laundry in his room. Now, he's stuck doing laundry instead of celebrating with his friends. Unfortunately, in the middle of his first load, the power goes out. So, he sets out in the neighborhood to figure out what's going on. But it seems that all the adults have disappeared. And Eddie and his friends might be the only ones left. Thanks to Scholastic for sending me an advanced copy of this to review! Right off the bat, Reynolds sets the humorous tone for the rest of the book. Eddie is such a snarky narrator, and his descriptions of laundry are hilarious. As are his views on a lot of things! Middle grade readers will definitely relate to Eddie's trials as a kid just trying to have fun for the summer. After all, who really wants summer to be taken up by chores? What will really draw readers in is Eddie's descriptions of laundry, of his life, of his neighborhood. Reynolds really nails the voice, right from the beginning. However, the plot itself does take a bit to get going. About the first half of the book is Eddie filling in readers with his family drama, which might make some middle grade readers lose interest. However, it is a first book in a series, so there's plenty to hook readers into wanting to continue with Eddie's story. All in all, this is a funny, down to Earth middle grade novel I think readers will thoroughly enjoy.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Heidi

    Facing the disappearance of his entire neighborhood was not what Eddie expected when he woke up the morning of the Beach Bash. He expected to spend time hanging with his friends at the beach with a slushy trying to gain the attention of his crush. But a brilliant plan gone bad leaves him stuck at home doing laundry (the worst chore ever according to Eddie--his diatribe on the subject is rather amusing but he does have some interesting points). When the power goes out, Eddie is left on his own. T Facing the disappearance of his entire neighborhood was not what Eddie expected when he woke up the morning of the Beach Bash. He expected to spend time hanging with his friends at the beach with a slushy trying to gain the attention of his crush. But a brilliant plan gone bad leaves him stuck at home doing laundry (the worst chore ever according to Eddie--his diatribe on the subject is rather amusing but he does have some interesting points). When the power goes out, Eddie is left on his own. The appearance of his friend, Xavier with half a haircut, they look around the neighborhood trying to figure out what's happening. They join forces with sports hero Trey and his sister, Sage, and Eddie's best friend, Sonia. After pulling Sonia from her video game funk, the kids go scrounging for supplies through nearby homes. Eventually, the kids realize that something has gone very, very wrong, and that maybe that their families aren't coming back. Eddie's voice is what makes this book stand out. The narrative technique the author uses had Eddie actually 'talking' to the reader, both telling his story and answering questions the reader has supposed asked. It makes for a rather light-hearted tone to a story that could have ended up being terrifying. Eddie and his friends end up being rather capable of taking care of themselves, at least in the short term. In the long term, it remains to be seen. As the first book in a series, there is clearly much more story to be told. I enjoyed the way the kids interacted with each other. There was plenty of disagreeing, teasing, and helping going on within the group. I definitely plan to read future volumes because I am very curious about what's going on and there are no answers provided in this book which sets up future volumes. An entertaining story full of heart, humor, and lots and lots of questions. A great book for readers who enjoy unusual narrative voices with a lot of snark.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Love the fun vibe of this and the irrepressible, adhd narrator. Great friend and family characterS. Also always love positive depictions of my hometown. What is a big bummer is that very little happens in the first half of the book. The repartee is entertaining but from a kid perspective the set up should have been streamlined. The other problem is once the central dilemma is introduced - all the parents have disappeared after heading to the lakeshore for a beach party - we don’t learn anything Love the fun vibe of this and the irrepressible, adhd narrator. Great friend and family characterS. Also always love positive depictions of my hometown. What is a big bummer is that very little happens in the first half of the book. The repartee is entertaining but from a kid perspective the set up should have been streamlined. The other problem is once the central dilemma is introduced - all the parents have disappeared after heading to the lakeshore for a beach party - we don’t learn anything more about what might have happened. The cliff hanger ending is simply a ‘to be continued’ with no hint of what the kids will find when they reach the shore. Imho readers deserved some sort of foreshadowing. For most kids a couple months is an eternity and for any hope of readers engaging with a series we need to be hooked.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Porshea DiMera

    Craig of the Creek meets This Is the End in this hilarious middle grade novel by Justin A. Reynolds. Much of childhood feels like it goes unrecognized for the genius presented during this period. For Eddie, the main character of It’s the End of the World and I’m in My Bathing Suit, this summation defines precisely how he feels as a twelve year old with under-appreciated ideas. The main injustice he encounters in this book? Why, his mother grounding him from the biggest beach day event of the summ Craig of the Creek meets This Is the End in this hilarious middle grade novel by Justin A. Reynolds. Much of childhood feels like it goes unrecognized for the genius presented during this period. For Eddie, the main character of It’s the End of the World and I’m in My Bathing Suit, this summation defines precisely how he feels as a twelve year old with under-appreciated ideas. The main injustice he encounters in this book? Why, his mother grounding him from the biggest beach day event of the summer all because she fails to venerate the strategy Eddie developed for getting through the summer without being stuck in the creepy basement every week. You see, the basement is a no man’s land where things linger in the dark and Eddie wants to spend as little time there as possible. So when his mom leaves him in charge of taking care of his needs throughout the summer, he decides that he will wear every article of clothing he owns, which should last him through the beach day—when all he’ll have left is his swimsuit. Then he’ll take care of all of his laundry before school starts. What’s not to love in the plan, right? Find the full review here: https://blackgirlscreate.org/2022/03/...

  12. 5 out of 5

    Khadesia

    This book is good for those who want a chill read. The narrator/main character is great. I guess because I didn't know there would be a continuation, I was waiting on plot twists or something more. I will be reading the next installment though. This book is good for those who want a chill read. The narrator/main character is great. I guess because I didn't know there would be a continuation, I was waiting on plot twists or something more. I will be reading the next installment though.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    Utterly ridiculous, with a charming narrator, some laugh out loud moments, and an unforgivably ambiguous cliffhanger ending.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Wendy Thomas

    I cannot wait until the sequel. So good.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cara Meredith

    The boys and I had so much FUN reading this book. Never have I heard them utter “cliffhanger” and not want to stop reading at the end of the night!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Traci

    Its been a while since I’ve laughed so much while reading a middle grade novel. I absolutely love the main character who also narrates the story. He’s charming, funny, a bit of a con man, & 100% lovable. The audio version is AMAZING! Fans of humor will really enjoy this one.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jill

    When Eddie Holloway woke up, he was ready for the best day of the summer. It was the one day he’d been waiting for, the big Beach Bash. Every year, he and his family would pack a cooler full of sandwiches, snacks, and soda, and head for the beach for an entire day of fun, sand, junk food, and fireworks. And it’s the culmination of his intricate plan. You see, this summer Eddie had made a deal with his mother. He would do his own laundry all summer if he could have the freedom to relax and have f When Eddie Holloway woke up, he was ready for the best day of the summer. It was the one day he’d been waiting for, the big Beach Bash. Every year, he and his family would pack a cooler full of sandwiches, snacks, and soda, and head for the beach for an entire day of fun, sand, junk food, and fireworks. And it’s the culmination of his intricate plan. You see, this summer Eddie had made a deal with his mother. He would do his own laundry all summer if he could have the freedom to relax and have fun with his friends. Not many 12-year-olds would come up with a deal like that, or make such a detailed plan for his laundry duties. But Eddie is not an ordinary kid. For one thing, he’s got a real gift for gab and can talk your ear with lots of information and more than a few dad jokes to keep it entertaining. For another, he’s willing to go all in on a plan like his grand laundry scheme. It’s pretty brilliant of him to decide to not to laundry until he has to. He has been wearing every piece of clothing he has, including that ugly Christmas sweater, in order to get to the last day of his plan, the day of the Beach Bash, when his only article of clean clothing is his bathing suit. Which is perfect, right? Except for that one thing he couldn’t plan for. His mother. When his mother finds out about Eddie’s grand plan, then it all comes crashing down. And by all crashing down, I mean the mountain of dirty laundry he had been piling in his closet, letting them build their stink until it was overwhelming. His mother did not believe in Eddie’s plan. She came up with a plan of her own—that he stay home from Beach Bash and do his laundry, even if it takes all day. His stepdad stands up for him and says that he’ll come back to take Eddie to the bash if he gets all his laundry done in time. But Eddie knows it will still take hours. He’s on his second load in the washer when the power goes out, leaving him in the dark basement. When he goes upstairs, he finds out that it’s not just his house. It’s the whole neighborhood that has gone dark, or as dark as it can with the sun way up in the sky. He finds some other kids who are still around—his friend Xavier who was halfway through giving himself a haircut, Sonia who was about to win her video game, and the school’s best athlete Trey and his little sister Sage, who maybe reads minds. The five of them spend the rest of the day together, eating all the junk food they can carry and later, when it’s getting dark and there is no one else around anywhere, find supplies for the night. They set up sleeping bags and flashlights, sleeping under the stars. No one has any cell phone service, so they don’t know what happened on the beach. And without power, there is no news, no internet, no television. And no one seems to be coming back from the beach, so even that next morning, it’s just the five of them. What’s happening, and how can five kids survive it? It’s the End of the World and I’m in My Bathing Suit is a fun apocalypse story for middle graders. Author Justin A. Reynolds brings a story with lots of action and a stellar narrator, just in time for summer vacation. The kids in this story are smart but they’re also willing to be there for each other, and it’s sweet to see them band together to try to figure out what’s going on. I enjoyed reading this book, mostly because Eddie is such a compelling character. He has a way of drawing me into his conversation, his thoughts, his way of being in the world, and making me believe in him and cheering him on, whether it’s for his laundry insanity or his dream of talking to Ava Bustamante. Eddie is a lot of fun to hang out with, so while I’m not a big fan of apocalypse stores, I enjoyed this one a lot and think it would be a great book to pick up for any bored kids you know, looking for something to do this summer. Galleys for It’s the End of the World and I’m in My Bathing Suit were provided by Scholastic Press, with many thanks.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dusty

    RATING: 4 STARS If you’re on the hunt for a genuinely fun read where you don’t have to think too much and can just enjoy it, then Justin A. Reynold’s It’s the End of the World and I’m in My Bathing Suit is the book for you. The book’s main character, Eddie, faces a problem most children have faced at some time in their life. How to best optimize summer vacation, and avoid C-H-O-R-E-S. The bane of Eddie’s existence is laundry, and his master plan is to use every single article of clothing he o RATING: 4 STARS If you’re on the hunt for a genuinely fun read where you don’t have to think too much and can just enjoy it, then Justin A. Reynold’s It’s the End of the World and I’m in My Bathing Suit is the book for you. The book’s main character, Eddie, faces a problem most children have faced at some time in their life. How to best optimize summer vacation, and avoid C-H-O-R-E-S. The bane of Eddie’s existence is laundry, and his master plan is to use every single article of clothing he owns to put it off as long as possible. Things don’t go quite as smoothly as Eddie had planned, and he must race against the clock (and an apocalypse of all things) to save the day and make it to the long-awaited Beach Bash. Simply put, this book is hilarious. There were multiple moments where I was cackling while reading. I love how the author set out to make this a love letter to childhood and the stories that never took themselves too seriously. Mr. Reynolds stirred up fond memories of my own childhood while reading. I wholeheartedly empathized with Eddie’s distaste for laundry - I hated doing it too at that age (now, I still dislike it, but I recognize it as a necessary evil required to be an “adult”). His master plan to only have to do laundry once the entire summer is something I wish I had thought of at that age (though, he probably could have come up with a better plan than shoving it all in his closet and risking the avalanche of clothes that inevitably occurred). I was shocked that a twelve-year-old somehow had enough underwear to last him an ENTIRE SUMMER - I don’t even have that many as an adult (I eventually reminded myself to stop dissecting the book and just enjoy the read, which for the most part worked). In addition to relating to Eddie’s distaste for chores, I also related to his ADHD (having the condition myself). Some people see ADHD as a burden. Other people see it as a superpower (as Eddie is told in the book). But the line I connected to the most was “Seriously, I can’t tell you how many people learn about my diagnosis and start treating me like I’m some ticking time bomb, you know, instead of like an actual person who’s trying to be his best, same as anyone.” If there’s ever been a line that’s made me feel seen and heard as someone living with ADHD, it’s that one. Overall, it’s been a blast reading such a lighthearted book, and I would happily recommend it to readers young and old who are looking for a fun, humorous, slightly dystopian kid-lit book. This is the first book I’ve read by Justin Reynolds, but it definitely won’t be my last! I’m looking forward to checking out the other books he’s written sometime in the near future. Thank you to the author, Scholastic Inc, Jaime at Rockstar Book Tours, and Edelweiss for providing me with a complimentary review copy of the book. I appreciate the opportunity to read and review It’s the End of the World and I’m in My Bathing Suit immensely. Please note - I voluntarily read and reviewed It’s the End of the World and I’m in My Bathing Suit. All opinions expressed in the review are my own and not influenced in any way.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Becky

    First sentence: On the third day of summer vacation, I devised THEE perfect three month plan.* Premise/plot: Eddie Gordon Holloway is having the worst day ever...well...it depends on your perspective, I suppose. Eddie gets grounded from participating in Beach Bash with his family. Forced to stay home and do laundry because literally EVERY item of clothing he owns (minus one bathing suit) is dirty, he's angry and anxious. (Because the laundry room is in the basement). But when the power goes out, First sentence: On the third day of summer vacation, I devised THEE perfect three month plan.* Premise/plot: Eddie Gordon Holloway is having the worst day ever...well...it depends on your perspective, I suppose. Eddie gets grounded from participating in Beach Bash with his family. Forced to stay home and do laundry because literally EVERY item of clothing he owns (minus one bathing suit) is dirty, he's angry and anxious. (Because the laundry room is in the basement). But when the power goes out, his anxiety, well, shifts and accelerates. He finds other neighborhood kids missing out on Beach Bash (Xavier, Sonia, Trey, and Sage) and they hang out together. All are hoping the power can come on soon so they can resume life as usual...some are VERY anxious to return to their video games. My thoughts: NOTHING HAPPENS. 300 pages of nothing happening. I was so annoyed. Don't tease THE END OF THE WORLD if the climax of the novel is either a) when the lights initially go out and he might have stumbled while in the basement or b) when the kids decided to eat sugary snacks. It is just all kinds of wrong to promise an actual END OF THE WORLD mystery but spend 45% of the book on a kid complaining about having to do laundry. The book ends before it even begins with literally no satisfaction and only slightly humorous moments strung together. It isn't that I hated these characters. I just wanted the story to actually move forward and for the characters to actually do something. Not "something" in the sense of moving to another room and eating candy. But, you know, beginning to figure out WHAT was going on and why their families never came back from Beach Bash. Perhaps the author couldn't decide WHAT the calamity would be and he's postponing that until book two??? Will there be a book two???? *I personally think it should be THE instead of THEE but I am copying it straight from the book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hannah DCamp

    It's AP testing season my dudes, and what that means apparently is that since I finished my "Work that can be done outside of the library and without a computer" (which is a short list let me tell you), I got to read this book. The best kind of Calculus test is the one you don't take lol. This book started off really strong - the narrator's voice is so clear, and his sense of humor is peak, and I was laughing out loud at some of his lines. The cover is great, the scenario is fun. Sometimes it got It's AP testing season my dudes, and what that means apparently is that since I finished my "Work that can be done outside of the library and without a computer" (which is a short list let me tell you), I got to read this book. The best kind of Calculus test is the one you don't take lol. This book started off really strong - the narrator's voice is so clear, and his sense of humor is peak, and I was laughing out loud at some of his lines. The cover is great, the scenario is fun. Sometimes it got a little distracted, and for a book about the end of the world, there's almost nothing apocalyptic about this story. I am surprised how disappointed I am by that. In between getting just a touch bored by the never ending tangential goings-on, I was noticing a lot of plot threads that might make for a really emotional story (which I really love). Everything with Eddie's Real Dad vs. WBD, his relationship with his brother, the way things were left with his mom, the girl he has a crush on - all this made for some really heavy things that would have been great off-set with the over-the-top sillyness of the rest of the story. Instead, the only particularly emotional moment is when Eddie is talking to Trey about the pressure Trey is under because of sports. They talk about Eddie's therapy and his ADHD medication. They grow closer as a result, but Eddie doesn't grow in any way as a result of the conversation (even though he says some interesting things about his Real Dad that could've opened the door for something). (view spoiler)[There's no real hope for a sequel, but there is so much left open at the end of this that I'm going crazy. (hide spoiler)] And me, watching you to make sure you're not cheating 👀

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Eder

    Great! This was a laugh out loud, love the characters, quick single sitting read. I absolutely loved how light the book was with nothing being taken too seriously. Sometimes MG can get wayyyyy too deep. I liked the unlikely but also likely friendships with the characters being really strong in this book. I also loved the way it hopped around with the story. Eddie, main character, has ADHD and the storytelling is from Eddie’s POV and his ADHD tendencies are right there with the narration to which Great! This was a laugh out loud, love the characters, quick single sitting read. I absolutely loved how light the book was with nothing being taken too seriously. Sometimes MG can get wayyyyy too deep. I liked the unlikely but also likely friendships with the characters being really strong in this book. I also loved the way it hopped around with the story. Eddie, main character, has ADHD and the storytelling is from Eddie’s POV and his ADHD tendencies are right there with the narration to which I REALLY enjoyed. But I can see how some people might be turned off by that pacing Major critique is really just this is not an end of the world book. That doesn’t even happen until like 150 pages in. So do not go into this expecting an end of the world theme with lots of survival action type stuff. It is a light, funny, neighborhood friendship type story that is (annoyingly) set up for a sequel (without much closure in this book).

  22. 5 out of 5

    Maranda

    It's the End of the World and I'm in My Bathing Suit by Justin A. Reynolds is a fast paced juvenile fiction book for 4-6th graders. Twelve-year-old Eddie Gordon Holloway plans to enjoy the most epic summer ever! And he has a very meticulous plan to get through it with the least amount of time spent on chores. When his plan backfires, he is left home to do half a summers worth of laundry instead of enjoying Beach Bash, the event of the summer! With only a clean pair of swim trunks to wear, Eddie g It's the End of the World and I'm in My Bathing Suit by Justin A. Reynolds is a fast paced juvenile fiction book for 4-6th graders. Twelve-year-old Eddie Gordon Holloway plans to enjoy the most epic summer ever! And he has a very meticulous plan to get through it with the least amount of time spent on chores. When his plan backfires, he is left home to do half a summers worth of laundry instead of enjoying Beach Bash, the event of the summer! With only a clean pair of swim trunks to wear, Eddie gets to work. That is, until the power goes out. Home alone, with no grownups and only a few of his friends from school still on the block, Eddie soon realizes that no one is on their way to help. With no way to contact their parents and no clue about what is going on, Eddie and his friends are going to have to figure it out, on their own. This was a fun, light-hearted book by Justin Reynolds. Eddie has your typical tween problems, a girl he likes that doesn't know he exists, a step-dad that drives him crazy, an older brother who is full of teen angst, and grand plans that constantly get crushed by that dreaded thing called chores. Eddie also has ADHD, and an extremely positive outlook on his ADHD, which was refreshing. What wasn't refreshing was how, I'm guessing, Reynolds plays to this in the pacing of the narrative. Talk about whiplash. This was like reading a book on speed. The narrative is fast to begin with and then we get these really random tangents from Eddie, which are funny but also makes the story stutter a bit. On more than one occasion, I did a mental head shake thinking, "what just happened?" I do, however, think this was intentional to show how the mind of someone with ADHD works. I'm just assuming that and if that is the case, mission accomplished. It just made for slightly disjointed reading. Not a bad read and I think many kids would find it funny but it wasn't my favorite and the ending was super abrupt. This one gets 3ish stars from me. That's all for now! -M-

  23. 5 out of 5

    Angela Sandoval

    I work in a middle school library and cannot wait to recommend this book to our students (especially those boys who love Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Last Kids on Earth, and Middle School The Worst Years of My Life)! The stream of consciousness style writing was light-hearted, fun, and easy to read. And I found myself literally laughing out loud on several occasions. Kids should be able to easily relate to Eddie's thoughts on daily life, family relationships, friendships, and first crushes. Although th I work in a middle school library and cannot wait to recommend this book to our students (especially those boys who love Diary of a Wimpy Kid, Last Kids on Earth, and Middle School The Worst Years of My Life)! The stream of consciousness style writing was light-hearted, fun, and easy to read. And I found myself literally laughing out loud on several occasions. Kids should be able to easily relate to Eddie's thoughts on daily life, family relationships, friendships, and first crushes. Although the plot was pretty slow moving, it did feel like a good representation of a summer day with friends from my suburban childhood...really gave me the feels. The only criticism I have at all was that while I realize this was meant to have a cliff-hanger ending that will make you rush to get the next book, the ending felt just a little too abrupt. But I am looking forward to the sequel(s)!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bhamini Ln

    This feels so unlike most middle grade books I've read. And in the best ways possible. Firstly, it's so refreshing to read a POV that's a black tween - I'm so here for stories that I wish I had read growing up, where heroes weren't always white. Secondly, nothing really wraps up. Unlike books for kids that I'm more familiar with, there's no real sense of closure. Everybody's parents are missing, the world seems to have ended, but there's no answers. Just the great What Next. The only thing I would This feels so unlike most middle grade books I've read. And in the best ways possible. Firstly, it's so refreshing to read a POV that's a black tween - I'm so here for stories that I wish I had read growing up, where heroes weren't always white. Secondly, nothing really wraps up. Unlike books for kids that I'm more familiar with, there's no real sense of closure. Everybody's parents are missing, the world seems to have ended, but there's no answers. Just the great What Next. The only thing I would have cared more for was if the characters had had some kind of foreshadowing / intro before they popped up - it seemed a bit scrappy this way. But It definitely worth a read. You and/or your kids will love it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    D.T. Henderson

    Justin A. Reynolds is one of my favorites writers. I wish I could've enjoyed this more, but it was too lackluster. I found this unfunny and boring. The characters especially the older brother felt really flat and cliché. I'm not expecting a kid to have a nuanced perspective of the people around him, but everyone felt like blank archetypes. Eddie wasn't the worst. His attention span and narrative voice is spontaneous, and his thoughts jump quickly. He's also PAINFULLY long-winded. Ultimately, too mu Justin A. Reynolds is one of my favorites writers. I wish I could've enjoyed this more, but it was too lackluster. I found this unfunny and boring. The characters especially the older brother felt really flat and cliché. I'm not expecting a kid to have a nuanced perspective of the people around him, but everyone felt like blank archetypes. Eddie wasn't the worst. His attention span and narrative voice is spontaneous, and his thoughts jump quickly. He's also PAINFULLY long-winded. Ultimately, too much time spent on laundry in the beginning. I started skimming toward the end, but I don't remember the story resolving what happened to everyone. I didn't enjoy this story, but I still think YA is where Reynolds shines. SN: I adore the cover so much. Just beautiful! 1.5

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    A confident kid who knows all the tricks to get by is on your side as you read his story. Eddie's grand summer plan backfires, leaving him alone in the house wearing his swim trunks and a giant mound of reeking laundry...when the power goes out. He's an irrepressible, though unreliable narrator, as his energy takes you through his adventures. The day ends up being more fun than he imagined as he finds his friends, they play a giant live video game, eat all the snacks they want, and camp outside. A confident kid who knows all the tricks to get by is on your side as you read his story. Eddie's grand summer plan backfires, leaving him alone in the house wearing his swim trunks and a giant mound of reeking laundry...when the power goes out. He's an irrepressible, though unreliable narrator, as his energy takes you through his adventures. The day ends up being more fun than he imagined as he finds his friends, they play a giant live video game, eat all the snacks they want, and camp outside. What happened to the adults that none of them came back? You just have to root for the group as they venture out to find out at the end. Issues of dealing with a new father-figure, ADHD and therapy ground this romp of a story. Read-alike to Brallier's "Last Kids on Earth"

  27. 4 out of 5

    Donna

    Funny, first person narrative. Eddie hates doing chores, especially laundry. So this summer, he has come up with an epic plan - wear everything he owns and then just do laundry once all summer long. When his mom finds the huge pile of dirty clothes, Eddie's plan to attend the Beach Bash is thwarted. Home alone, in the middle of doing laundry, the power goes out. With nothing to wear except his glow=in-the-dark bathing trunks. Eddie sets out to see what is going on.He finds other neighborhood kids Funny, first person narrative. Eddie hates doing chores, especially laundry. So this summer, he has come up with an epic plan - wear everything he owns and then just do laundry once all summer long. When his mom finds the huge pile of dirty clothes, Eddie's plan to attend the Beach Bash is thwarted. Home alone, in the middle of doing laundry, the power goes out. With nothing to wear except his glow=in-the-dark bathing trunks. Eddie sets out to see what is going on.He finds other neighborhood kids who were all doing carious things when the power went out, they band together to see if they can find Eddie some clothes and wait for the power or their parents to return.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marcie

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I know it would probably be less irritated by this book were I reading instead of listening to it. I'm sure it is a lot because I'm not around middle grade kids so much these days and I take too seriously their irreverence and adult disrespect. I'm sure if I can get to the end I'll have different reactions. I was particularly irratated by chapter 1600, but I'm sure some great teachers and kids will have fun with it. I probably shouldn't be writing this yet!!! In chapter 5200 I was taken by what s I know it would probably be less irritated by this book were I reading instead of listening to it. I'm sure it is a lot because I'm not around middle grade kids so much these days and I take too seriously their irreverence and adult disrespect. I'm sure if I can get to the end I'll have different reactions. I was particularly irratated by chapter 1600, but I'm sure some great teachers and kids will have fun with it. I probably shouldn't be writing this yet!!! In chapter 5200 I was taken by what seemed like an abrupt change in Eddie, Sonia, and X. I do like Betsy Birds review of this book, as I often do.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amanda Ellison

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I really wanted to like this book. The premise is excellent. Unfortunately the book spent more time than necessary with the rambling of the main character. The book was almost half over before anything real happened and then it left you on a cliffhanger so you still don't know really what happened. I'll probably read the second book when it comes out because it has potential. I understand the main character went on side tracks due to his ADHD. However if the second book spends anywhere the amoun I really wanted to like this book. The premise is excellent. Unfortunately the book spent more time than necessary with the rambling of the main character. The book was almost half over before anything real happened and then it left you on a cliffhanger so you still don't know really what happened. I'll probably read the second book when it comes out because it has potential. I understand the main character went on side tracks due to his ADHD. However if the second book spends anywhere the amount of time with the main character off track, it will be a huge turn off for the reader.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

    It's the End of the World and I'm in My Bathing Suit by Justin A. Reynolds stars a wise-cracking narrator Eddie. He thinks he's a genius, hates laundry and his older brother, and can't believe he will miss the annual Beach Bash because he is on punishment. This book should really be listed as Part 1 because although Eddie's voice is very strong, the story arc isn't even close to being finished. The book ends and the reader still has no idea what's going on in their Ohio town. Not sure if this is It's the End of the World and I'm in My Bathing Suit by Justin A. Reynolds stars a wise-cracking narrator Eddie. He thinks he's a genius, hates laundry and his older brother, and can't believe he will miss the annual Beach Bash because he is on punishment. This book should really be listed as Part 1 because although Eddie's voice is very strong, the story arc isn't even close to being finished. The book ends and the reader still has no idea what's going on in their Ohio town. Not sure if this is a Stranger Things-like tale in its beginning stages... It has potential because of the voice and the cast of friends, but I rated this lower because I don't have time for books that end so abruptly with no sense of closure. It's like the episode ended because the hour was up and the writers think you'll just get to the important details in the next one.

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