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We Only Find Them When They're Dead, Vol. 2: The Stealer

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Fifty years have passed since Captain Malik and the crew of the Vihaan II embarked on their fateful mission - and now Jason Hauer, one of the fated crew, is drawn into a conflict that threatens to tear apart the galaxy. NO ONE ESCAPES THE GODS. Fifty years have passed since Captain Malik and the crew of the Vihaan II embarked on their fateful mission - and the universe has Fifty years have passed since Captain Malik and the crew of the Vihaan II embarked on their fateful mission - and now Jason Hauer, one of the fated crew, is drawn into a conflict that threatens to tear apart the galaxy. NO ONE ESCAPES THE GODS. Fifty years have passed since Captain Malik and the crew of the Vihaan II embarked on their fateful mission - and the universe has changed in ways no one ever expected. Jason Hauer, one of the fated Vihaan II crew, is now 71 years old and living a life on the razor’s edge between the Harvesters and the Worshippers. But as these rival religious factions clash throughout the galaxy, Jason finds himself thrown into the center of the chaos and forced to confront his tortured past. But the only people who can help Jason have their own secret agenda - one that may bring him face to face with Captain Malik in ways beyond comprehension… Discover the next chapter of the acclaimed sci-fi epic from superstars Al Ewing (Immortal Hulk) and Simone Di Meo (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers) as the true consequences of Captain Malik’s mission are revealed. Collects We Only Find Them When They’re Dead #6-10.


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Fifty years have passed since Captain Malik and the crew of the Vihaan II embarked on their fateful mission - and now Jason Hauer, one of the fated crew, is drawn into a conflict that threatens to tear apart the galaxy. NO ONE ESCAPES THE GODS. Fifty years have passed since Captain Malik and the crew of the Vihaan II embarked on their fateful mission - and the universe has Fifty years have passed since Captain Malik and the crew of the Vihaan II embarked on their fateful mission - and now Jason Hauer, one of the fated crew, is drawn into a conflict that threatens to tear apart the galaxy. NO ONE ESCAPES THE GODS. Fifty years have passed since Captain Malik and the crew of the Vihaan II embarked on their fateful mission - and the universe has changed in ways no one ever expected. Jason Hauer, one of the fated Vihaan II crew, is now 71 years old and living a life on the razor’s edge between the Harvesters and the Worshippers. But as these rival religious factions clash throughout the galaxy, Jason finds himself thrown into the center of the chaos and forced to confront his tortured past. But the only people who can help Jason have their own secret agenda - one that may bring him face to face with Captain Malik in ways beyond comprehension… Discover the next chapter of the acclaimed sci-fi epic from superstars Al Ewing (Immortal Hulk) and Simone Di Meo (Mighty Morphin Power Rangers) as the true consequences of Captain Malik’s mission are revealed. Collects We Only Find Them When They’re Dead #6-10.

30 review for We Only Find Them When They're Dead, Vol. 2: The Stealer

  1. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    There's some cool sci-fi here. I just need a lot of it explained to me. Between the constant time jumps back and forth and the odd angled art and filtered colors that make it impossible to tell who is who, I constantly feel lost. Plus there's the fact that this arc jumps 50 years into the future so that it's all new characters I have to get to know. Still there's enough here to like. The plan is to steal a God. The art is very pretty. I'll stick around for the final arc. There's some cool sci-fi here. I just need a lot of it explained to me. Between the constant time jumps back and forth and the odd angled art and filtered colors that make it impossible to tell who is who, I constantly feel lost. Plus there's the fact that this arc jumps 50 years into the future so that it's all new characters I have to get to know. Still there's enough here to like. The plan is to steal a God. The art is very pretty. I'll stick around for the final arc.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    I'm sorry, I just can't do it anymore. The art is beautiful in stasis but it makes the action unintelligible, the number of characters and the constant time jumps ruin any flow and make the plot hard to follow, probably because it's not that interesting in the first place. The ending of the first volume was a bold move, sure, but it makes this one a blank slate that's filled in with mush and yet requires the reader to reinvest a whole new bunch of emotions into the book. I'm out. I'm sorry, I just can't do it anymore. The art is beautiful in stasis but it makes the action unintelligible, the number of characters and the constant time jumps ruin any flow and make the plot hard to follow, probably because it's not that interesting in the first place. The ending of the first volume was a bold move, sure, but it makes this one a blank slate that's filled in with mush and yet requires the reader to reinvest a whole new bunch of emotions into the book. I'm out.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Fifty years have passed since the end of issue 5, and the galaxy is a very different place. The space gods that were once mined for everything they were worth are now revered for the gods that they are - specifically, the man who transformed himself into one. But someone wants to steal the sacred body of Malik. Maybe more than one somebody. The biggest heist in the universe is about to take place. The problem with this second arc of WOFTWTD is two-fold. We don't get to see any of the developments Fifty years have passed since the end of issue 5, and the galaxy is a very different place. The space gods that were once mined for everything they were worth are now revered for the gods that they are - specifically, the man who transformed himself into one. But someone wants to steal the sacred body of Malik. Maybe more than one somebody. The biggest heist in the universe is about to take place. The problem with this second arc of WOFTWTD is two-fold. We don't get to see any of the developments that we're told about that occurred in the last fifty years, so the book devolves into a lot of talking heads. Lots of tell, don't show, which seems a bit backwards for a comic book. And aside from one or two of them, we're not familiar with any of these characters, so it's like hitting the reset button and relaunching with a new issue #1. That would be fine usually, but it does feel like the rug's been pulled out from under us just as we were getting our footing. Once I adjusted, I did enjoy this though. The intrigue and the double crosses come thick and fast, and the world that Ewing creates with his words is vivid even if it's not actually depicted most of the time. And of course, Simone Di Meo's neon streaked artwork is still wonderful, and a perfect fit for a space age story like this. Despite feeling like you're playing catch-up after only five issues, WOFTWTD continues to compel, even if it's nothing like the book I was expecting it to be. With only five more issues to go before the series concludes, we'll have to see if it can reinvent itself yet again before the end.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    The problems with storytelling and art from the first volume are not corrected, and things are further complicated by a tedious parade of crosses, doublecrosses, and doubledoublecrosses, that make little sense and at this point hold no interest.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    This comic series went from a time jumping heistt story to a political intrigue story, and it totally lost me. We move ahead into the future for new characters, even though we really didn't get to know the previous ones very well, and I think we're supposed to see a bit of a change in the society but things were pretty bare bones in the last volume, so I didnt notice what the changes were. I mentioned in my review of volume one that the art was either going to "floor you" or turn you off. While I This comic series went from a time jumping heistt story to a political intrigue story, and it totally lost me. We move ahead into the future for new characters, even though we really didn't get to know the previous ones very well, and I think we're supposed to see a bit of a change in the society but things were pretty bare bones in the last volume, so I didnt notice what the changes were. I mentioned in my review of volume one that the art was either going to "floor you" or turn you off. While I didn't mind the vibrant stylish color palletes against the black backgrounds in a book focused on space battles and floating gods, I thought it did a huge disservice to a book about politics and religion. With no characters to care about, and art that seemed to clash with the story, I checked out pretty early on this. I mean, I kept reading it, but I wasn't enjoying it, and it never rebounded with an idea that made me flip back to see if I missed anything. I won't be picking up volume three.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    This book thinks it's too clever by half. Which is a pity because it's got a great background and it's telling a big, long-spanning story. I'd love to love it. But the storytelling is so fractured by the constant jumping between different time periods that it borders on unreadable. And the art, even though it's got better contrast in this second volume still goes to hell whenever there's action, so that you can't tell what in the world happened. Sigh. This book thinks it's too clever by half. Which is a pity because it's got a great background and it's telling a big, long-spanning story. I'd love to love it. But the storytelling is so fractured by the constant jumping between different time periods that it borders on unreadable. And the art, even though it's got better contrast in this second volume still goes to hell whenever there's action, so that you can't tell what in the world happened. Sigh.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Stuart McInally

    Read via single issues #6-10 Well, 5 issues and 1 trade later and I think I can stop here. At first I thought the skipping time frames might have been a problem done away with in this arc but couching the narrative in a heist story really did away with that entirely. The flashbacks are at least handled better art-wise, with the affected scenes being couched in a greyscale-with-red-details style that feels like it has significance for some scenes whilst stretching the symbolism thin on others. But Read via single issues #6-10 Well, 5 issues and 1 trade later and I think I can stop here. At first I thought the skipping time frames might have been a problem done away with in this arc but couching the narrative in a heist story really did away with that entirely. The flashbacks are at least handled better art-wise, with the affected scenes being couched in a greyscale-with-red-details style that feels like it has significance for some scenes whilst stretching the symbolism thin on others. But that's really the one positive I can give this over the previous volume. The narrative continues to hop around like a rabbit with ADHD, often giving exposition for backgrounds that simply aren't needed and could have been summed up in a page tops, while the art remains impeccably beautiful in the vacuum of singular panels and feeling almost unreadable when action takes place. There was a double page spread at one point, filled with individual panels highlighting actions and characters' reactions and I have no idea what was happening, with most of the panels having an obnoxious white highlighting box that didn't offer any clarification to anything going on. I can see what Ewing and Di Meo are going for with this series, I really do, but the refusal to add to the mystery of what the gods are in this volume whilst placing the plot yet again in characters that they want us to get invested in but ensuring the time spent with them in the "here and now" is contested with both flashbacks and the fact the next volume won't even feature them is really grating on me now.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Paul Gzt

    If the author wanted me to care about characters betraying other characters it would have helped if they'd first made me care about any of the characters. If the author wanted me to care about characters betraying other characters it would have helped if they'd first made me care about any of the characters.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    The first volume ended with a leap into the interstellar dark, a first glimpse of a live space-god. You might expect the second would pick up there – but rather than answer any of the big questions just yet, it jumps forward in time. Gods have stopped appearing, destabilising the economy, and a new faith has grown up around Malik's actions in the first volume. I say 'faith'; as is the way of religions, it has already splintered, and not amicably. I strongly suspect this one will read better in a The first volume ended with a leap into the interstellar dark, a first glimpse of a live space-god. You might expect the second would pick up there – but rather than answer any of the big questions just yet, it jumps forward in time. Gods have stopped appearing, destabilising the economy, and a new faith has grown up around Malik's actions in the first volume. I say 'faith'; as is the way of religions, it has already splintered, and not amicably. I strongly suspect this one will read better in a trade than it did as singles, and that in turn the series will read better once it's completed than it does in separated books, but alas, the market isn't there to publish like that and so, much like the characters, we grope forward, hoping it will all make sense in the end, and certainly without the procedure being prone to quite such horrible backfires and betrayals as some of the poor bastards here encounter.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Billy Jepma

    I expected to read this volume, be reminded why so much of the first volume didn't work for me, and then dismiss it. That didn't happen, though, because Ewing did what every writer should do when they need to win over an audience: stage a heist. Volume 2 of We Only Find Them When They're Dead keeps some of the baggage of its predecessor—overly dense worldbuilding, an art style that borders on incoherent—but it improves in almost every other facet. We focus on an almost entirely new cast of chara I expected to read this volume, be reminded why so much of the first volume didn't work for me, and then dismiss it. That didn't happen, though, because Ewing did what every writer should do when they need to win over an audience: stage a heist. Volume 2 of We Only Find Them When They're Dead keeps some of the baggage of its predecessor—overly dense worldbuilding, an art style that borders on incoherent—but it improves in almost every other facet. We focus on an almost entirely new cast of characters, which is good because they have some personality to differentiate themselves. The lore Ewing is playing with is pretty messy, but the political and religious machinations he delves into here are compelling. I'm such a sucker for the double-and-triple-crosses that the abundance of schemes and secret motivations really worked for me. I'm still mixed on Simone Di Meo's art, as unique as it is. Any moments of action are just about impossible to follow, and the compositions sometimes feel obtuse for obtuse's sake. Granted, I like the overall design a lot and thought the architecture and general aesthetic of this volume were inarguably cool. There's some great energy in Di Meo's artwork, to be sure, but it sometimes felt like I had to wrestle with it to understand what was going on. I wouldn't say I'm entirely on board with the series yet, especially with how this ends, but I'm going to stick around for Volume 3, which I certainly wasn't to be the case going in. If this volume is anything to go by, the series is far vaster than the Firefly-vibes of the first led me to believe. The world that Ewing and Di Meo have created is weird and dizzying, and despite the inconsistent executions, I'm too curious to wall away before knowing what they're driving toward. This gets a 3.5 from me.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Individual issue reviews: #6 | #7 | #8 | #9 | #10 Total review score: 2.9 Individual issue reviews: #6 | #7 | #8 | #9 | #10 Total review score: 2.9

  12. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Mauney

    Beautiful art as usual but some of the action panels are extremely difficult to follow due to the lens/filter choices and the lack of follow through between those action panels. Curious still where the story is leading to as we get just drips and drabs again for the larger arch but not a strong compass bearing.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    I liked the first volume, but I enjoyed this one a whole lot more. The art is breathtaking and the fact that this volume is an entirely different genre, sci-fi espionage, made it a very fun and addictive read. Looking forward to volume three.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Mosley

    Beautiful art but the plot is straw with nothing much to hold things together.

  15. 5 out of 5

    David Sanz

    Te cambian totalmente el ritmo y dejan muchas incógnitas en el aire. ¡Necesito saber más!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rowen H.

    3.5 stars, I think? Little hard to follow

  17. 4 out of 5

    Viscious

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jim Furey

  20. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Martin

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mike Burgess

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rod

  23. 4 out of 5

    P R

  24. 4 out of 5

    Delaney Bianca

  25. 4 out of 5

    Gianluca Porcu

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shouvik Roy

  27. 4 out of 5

    Goran

  28. 4 out of 5

    Chloe COVOLAN

  29. 4 out of 5

    Xavier

  30. 4 out of 5

    C. Edward Edward

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