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New Mutants by Vita Ayala, Vol. 1

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On the edge of Krakoan society, the New Mutants let loose in the Wild Hunt! Going big, blowing things up, and combining powers to see who can be crowned king of the mountain. But something lurks in the trees. Something old…and hungry. And its favorite prey is young mutants! As Karma and Dani delve deeper into their nightmares, a spider sets his eyes on the most vulnerable On the edge of Krakoan society, the New Mutants let loose in the Wild Hunt! Going big, blowing things up, and combining powers to see who can be crowned king of the mountain. But something lurks in the trees. Something old…and hungry. And its favorite prey is young mutants! As Karma and Dani delve deeper into their nightmares, a spider sets his eyes on the most vulnerable among the team. And as the Wild Hunt goes on, someone vanishes without a trace, plans long in motion begin to unfurl — and children who play at being adults must now prepare for the fight of their lives. COLLECTING: New Mutants (2019) 14-18


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On the edge of Krakoan society, the New Mutants let loose in the Wild Hunt! Going big, blowing things up, and combining powers to see who can be crowned king of the mountain. But something lurks in the trees. Something old…and hungry. And its favorite prey is young mutants! As Karma and Dani delve deeper into their nightmares, a spider sets his eyes on the most vulnerable On the edge of Krakoan society, the New Mutants let loose in the Wild Hunt! Going big, blowing things up, and combining powers to see who can be crowned king of the mountain. But something lurks in the trees. Something old…and hungry. And its favorite prey is young mutants! As Karma and Dani delve deeper into their nightmares, a spider sets his eyes on the most vulnerable among the team. And as the Wild Hunt goes on, someone vanishes without a trace, plans long in motion begin to unfurl — and children who play at being adults must now prepare for the fight of their lives. COLLECTING: New Mutants (2019) 14-18

30 review for New Mutants by Vita Ayala, Vol. 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Vita Ayala comes onboard as the 3rd writer in 14 issues and the book is instantly boring. She changes the focus of the book, making the OG New Mutants teachers for bored children on Krakoa. God, it's so boring that just thinking about it puts me to sleZZZZZZZ...... Sorry dozed off there. It's pretty clear that Rod Reis is trying to evoke Bill Sienkiewicz. The art just looks sketchy and unfinished with zero backgrounds. Everyone is just floating in space. There's a lack of attention to the story t Vita Ayala comes onboard as the 3rd writer in 14 issues and the book is instantly boring. She changes the focus of the book, making the OG New Mutants teachers for bored children on Krakoa. God, it's so boring that just thinking about it puts me to sleZZZZZZZ...... Sorry dozed off there. It's pretty clear that Rod Reis is trying to evoke Bill Sienkiewicz. The art just looks sketchy and unfinished with zero backgrounds. Everyone is just floating in space. There's a lack of attention to the story too. Karma is reborn. On the same page she crawls out of her egg with two legs. Then the next panel shows her with her prosthetic leg poking out of her robe. Being reborn in a new body would have regenerated her leg. It wasn't a birth defect. It was cutoff by Cameron Hodge during Second Coming.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Another volume, another new writer for New Mutants. In comes Vita Ayala to shake things up a little by shifting the core cast, and the status quo, away from what it was before. New Mutants is suddenly a tale of two halves. There's the actual New Mutants like Moonster and Wolfsbane, who have problems of their own, and then there's the new mutants lowercase, like Scout, Cosima, and Anole, who are running afoul of the Shadow King. The problem is that that both stories don't really seem to be going a Another volume, another new writer for New Mutants. In comes Vita Ayala to shake things up a little by shifting the core cast, and the status quo, away from what it was before. New Mutants is suddenly a tale of two halves. There's the actual New Mutants like Moonster and Wolfsbane, who have problems of their own, and then there's the new mutants lowercase, like Scout, Cosima, and Anole, who are running afoul of the Shadow King. The problem is that that both stories don't really seem to be going anywhere, and when they intersect, it's so the characters can all yell at each other for ~not understanding what I'm going through~. I like all of the characters involved in this book, and the Shadow King is always a villain to watch out for, but it definitely feels like there's a disconnect behind this new direction. Because there are two seemingly disparate plotlines going on, neither of them advance very much as the book goes on, so the pacing's all over the place. That, and the suddenly huge cast of characters means that sometimes you'll go two or three issues without seeing certain people. It's bizarre, to say the least. The art's pretty good though, mostly because Rod Reis has stuck around for these issues for the most part. It doesn't help save the story, but at least it's pretty to look at. New Mutants reinvents itself for the third time in twelve issues, to varying degrees of success. It's pulled in too many directions at once, and manages to not be particularly successful at any of them. There are sparks of good ideas for certain, but it's taking a long time to get to the payoffs.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    Vita Ayala's New Mutants run is scatterbrained until the finally two issues when the pieces finally click into the place. The idea that certain monstrous-looking mutants might not have as much mutant pride is a solid one, but it took too long to materialize. Side-plots run rampant and, in a recurring New Mutants theme, none of the characters receive introductions (or re-introductions?). Half the mutants I met in Ed Brisson and Jonathan Hickman's runs don't appear. And yet the book is still overs Vita Ayala's New Mutants run is scatterbrained until the finally two issues when the pieces finally click into the place. The idea that certain monstrous-looking mutants might not have as much mutant pride is a solid one, but it took too long to materialize. Side-plots run rampant and, in a recurring New Mutants theme, none of the characters receive introductions (or re-introductions?). Half the mutants I met in Ed Brisson and Jonathan Hickman's runs don't appear. And yet the book is still overstuffed with characters. It doesn't help that Rod Reis's artwork is basically incoherent. The colors: great. The character designs, action, and finished look: lacking.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Rylan

    Another new writer and it’s only been 14 issues. This series continues to be very underwhelming like this volume uses Dani and Karma two of my favorites and fails to capture my attention. I was hoping this new run would fix the problems this series has had but it feels more of the same. I don’t know if I will continue this series after this volume.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Lenny

    Like most recent X-Men titles, this is overstuffed, yet somehow the pacing is frustratingly slow. Ayala does a great job writing the original New Mutants, especially Dani and Xi'an, but it's harder to connect with the teenagers, aside from always delightful Gabby - their struggle is unoriginal (see the Morlocks and others), and there isn't enough time dedicated to investment in each one. I'm always down for a Dani + Xi'an side quest (view spoiler)[(though I hate the Crucible and this changed not Like most recent X-Men titles, this is overstuffed, yet somehow the pacing is frustratingly slow. Ayala does a great job writing the original New Mutants, especially Dani and Xi'an, but it's harder to connect with the teenagers, aside from always delightful Gabby - their struggle is unoriginal (see the Morlocks and others), and there isn't enough time dedicated to investment in each one. I'm always down for a Dani + Xi'an side quest (view spoiler)[(though I hate the Crucible and this changed nothing), (hide spoiler)] but I was disappointed that the later issues focused on them instead of Magik + Jimmy's struggle to redirect younger mutants, who have an alarming amount of unstructured time, little to no purpose on Krakoa (along with basically being immortal), and are basically only spending that time on combat. It's a recipe for disaster (along with the Shadow King taking advantage of all this) that could have allowed for urgency, humor, and maybe even a return to the classic teenager feel of X-Men, particularly with the original New Mutants as the teachers - but this arc delivers none of that. Maybe things will come together better in the next volume - I love Ayala's writing so I'm more than willing to give their second volume a shot. Reis' art is gorgeous to look at, at least.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Frédéric

    Drags on a bit too long and the various subplots don’t seem to converge but I somehow feel it might actually go somewhere and the issues raised by the misfits of the bunch are pertinent. And Rod Reis still illustrates the whole book so that’s a bonus.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Another volume of New Mutants and yet another creative team. I don't know why what should be the #2 book for the Krakoa X-a-verse can't keep its writers and artists. But this time around we have both an author who is very respectful of the New Mutants' history and an artist who has a Sienkiewicz vibe without being entirely derivative, so I guess that's god. The downside of this volume is that it's slow and meandering. It doesn't feel like there's a lot of plot here, especially with an anticlimati Another volume of New Mutants and yet another creative team. I don't know why what should be the #2 book for the Krakoa X-a-verse can't keep its writers and artists. But this time around we have both an author who is very respectful of the New Mutants' history and an artist who has a Sienkiewicz vibe without being entirely derivative, so I guess that's god. The downside of this volume is that it's slow and meandering. It doesn't feel like there's a lot of plot here, especially with an anticlimatic fetch-quest taking up the core of the story. But simultaneously with that we're getting great looks at the characters of these classic New Mutants, plus a few of the younger school. And a great question of what's up with the Shadow King. Plus, continuity from the recent Sword of X crossover. So, despite its slowness, this is a fine new New Mutants: I'll look forward to the next volume, hopefully by this same author and artist.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    Guess I'm one of the few who really liked this. The storyline, which is continuous and non-episodic (unlike in Hickman's X-Men) might be a bit slow, but it does develop some characters (both old and new) and their concerns (though I was a bit surprised by the end, which didn't really tell us if Karma's trip to The Crucible actually worked). And the artwork from Rod Reis has a very Bill Sienkiewiczian-vibe about it. The numbering of these volumes is getting to be a real mess, though--Vol. 1 of Vi Guess I'm one of the few who really liked this. The storyline, which is continuous and non-episodic (unlike in Hickman's X-Men) might be a bit slow, but it does develop some characters (both old and new) and their concerns (though I was a bit surprised by the end, which didn't really tell us if Karma's trip to The Crucible actually worked). And the artwork from Rod Reis has a very Bill Sienkiewiczian-vibe about it. The numbering of these volumes is getting to be a real mess, though--Vol. 1 of Vita Ayala's run covers issues #14-18? Talk about confusing for the person who just wants to read the New Mutants title, period...

  9. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Cool to see Honeybadge--I mean Scott get some love but the rest of the cast weren't all that interesting. This book didn't do much for me, got bored pretty quickly through. I guess new Mutants comics don't do much for me. Cool to see Honeybadge--I mean Scott get some love but the rest of the cast weren't all that interesting. This book didn't do much for me, got bored pretty quickly through. I guess new Mutants comics don't do much for me.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    This book, now on its third writer in just 14 short issues, has been incredibly inconsistent so far, but Vita Ayala seems to be steering the ship in an actual direction and setting up some interesting plot threads. Rather than telling disconnected stories about the original New Mutants and some of the newer mutant youths, Ayala weaves plotlines featuring the old and new characters together. A group of the original New Mutants sends a letter to the Quiet Council bemoaning the fact that many of th This book, now on its third writer in just 14 short issues, has been incredibly inconsistent so far, but Vita Ayala seems to be steering the ship in an actual direction and setting up some interesting plot threads. Rather than telling disconnected stories about the original New Mutants and some of the newer mutant youths, Ayala weaves plotlines featuring the old and new characters together. A group of the original New Mutants sends a letter to the Quiet Council bemoaning the fact that many of the young mutants on Krakoa seem to be listless and troubled without any structure in their lives. Xavier, the sly old devil, delivers a snarky response thanking them for generously volunteering to teach these new kids and offer them the guidance they so desperately need. Ayala is clearly knowledgeable about the older characters and treats them with respect, getting their voices and personalities down very well. The newer characters (who I'm less familiar with) Scout, Anole, No-Girl, Rain Boy, and Cosmar are interesting and engaging as they get tangled up with an older X-Men villain who seems to be manipulating them for his own ends. The original characters are dealing with their own drama while trying to help the kids, and I enjoyed the way their stories related to each other. Cosmar, unable to cope with the way her appearance changed when her reality-warping powers manifested, asks Dani Moonstar to face her in the Crucible so that she might be reborn in a new body, and hopefully retain her original appearance now that she has some measure of control over her powers. Moonstar refuses, telling Cosmar that she's beautiful just the way she is. A short time later, Moonstar fights Karma in Crucible combat to help her deal with some ongoing trauma involving her lost twin brother, and Cosmar reacts to this hypocrisy in a very understandable way. I enjoy how Ayala is writing these classic mutants with love but isn't afraid to reveal serious flaws in their character. I'm actually quite interested to see how these stories move forward. And the art by Rod Reis is absolutely STUNNING. I saw another reviewer mention that he manages to remind of Sienkiewicz while not outright copying his style, and I think that's a perfect way to put it. His art is at times sketchy and chaotic, beautifully detailed, and always incredibly thoughtful in its style and arrangement. When two of the characters travel to Otherworld to search for a missing mutant, he depicts their journey in absolutely gorgeous watercolors. Everything from his panel layouts, borders, backgrounds and colors feels so deliberately and carefully chosen for the scene that I was incredibly impressed. It would be all too easy to dismiss the first few pages as "sloppy and sketchy" (and a younger me might have), but to do so would be a disservice to the amount of care he has clearly committed to this book. I very much want to see more of his work. I'm actually excited about this book again and where it's going. 3.5 STARS

  11. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Mostly, the Dawn Of X books which weren't taken out back and shot after one arc have had reasonably consistent writers, at least. New Mutants being the exception, with three Volume 1s in a row, which even by modern Marvel standards is taking the piss (though I can think of plenty of titles which had two...). In fairness, it was at least a different writer each time, not just some pointless rebadging drawn by a marketing mirage. And there are lots of different things a New Mutants book can be by Mostly, the Dawn Of X books which weren't taken out back and shot after one arc have had reasonably consistent writers, at least. New Mutants being the exception, with three Volume 1s in a row, which even by modern Marvel standards is taking the piss (though I can think of plenty of titles which had two...). In fairness, it was at least a different writer each time, not just some pointless rebadging drawn by a marketing mirage. And there are lots of different things a New Mutants book can be by this point. Hickman took some of the original eighties New Mutants – now allegedly grown-ups – off for a sitcom in space; I don't really know what Ed Brisson did, because for some reason his Volume 1 remains oddly expensive even in Comixology sales. And now Ayala splits the difference, with original New Mutants like Magik and Dani Moonstar trying to play mentor to a younger and even stranger generation who are struggling to adjust to life on the weird alleged paradise that is Krakoa. Frankly, when it comes to the junior mob, several of them – Fauna? Cosmar? – are well beyond my level of X-geekery, and I have no idea why adorable tiny Wolverine clone Honey Badger now appears to be going by Scout instead. There is a plot of sorts, hinged on the Shadow King*, who at once seems to be up to his usual bullshit while being given a sympathetic backstory, a circle which, thank goodness, is ultimately more or less squared. Also there was what looked like some more bullshit with fucking Otherworld, which I was at least hoping might confine itself to appearing in the worst ongoing X-book and the one I've dropped, Excalibur, now that X Of Swords is out of the way. To be fair, though, at least here it did end up feeling more fairytale, less bad fantasy trilogy than in other recent appearances. And anyway, this is hardly the only current X-book which is consistently more enjoyable the further it veers into plotless social/superhuman comedy-drama. It's not perfect even then – Magik in particular is being played a bit too human and relatable for my liking, and one use of 'boar' when 'boor' would fit much better suggests that editorial could have paid closer attention. But these are minor quibbles; for the most part it's a weird, charming coming-of-age yarn, with Reis' gorgeous art conferring something of the same luminous yet unsettling quality which Billy the Sink brought to the original New Mutants series. *I still find it hard to process that he's now a character the wider world can be expected to know, what with having been the chief antagonist in the Legion TV series, which itself still seems like a thing I dreamed. What a world, eh?

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ross

    You can't tell a solid story when you keep changing creative teams. Seriously. Also, there's no advancement towards a over arcing theme. New Mutants is a book about a group watching over another group...but both groups keep shifting around and not really advancing the narrative. I'm guessing they're leading up to a Shadow King exorcism. Isn't he the darkness that Legion felt? They mention that they were supposed to 'teach the children' and this just seems like filler until they actually do someth You can't tell a solid story when you keep changing creative teams. Seriously. Also, there's no advancement towards a over arcing theme. New Mutants is a book about a group watching over another group...but both groups keep shifting around and not really advancing the narrative. I'm guessing they're leading up to a Shadow King exorcism. Isn't he the darkness that Legion felt? They mention that they were supposed to 'teach the children' and this just seems like filler until they actually do something that looks like that. Cypher is back from his honeymoon. What does he do around here?? Karma has a white rabbit manifestation of something from her past Rahne wants her half wolf demon son to be resurrected. (thought he was EVIL evil) Warpath provides advice for everyone (only helpful one out of the group) Dani runs around hugging sad people and not quite 'being there' when needed.. then we have the NEW 'New Mutants' a bunch of kids that are upset because their powers have either done something to them physically or spiritually...

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joey Nardinelli

    This volume feels very interstitial in its narrative arch. I actually don’t think I’ve read all the content so far about Otherworld which is making jumping around from series to series a bit more confusing than it should be. Cosma remains a character I can see clearly being manipulated by external evils and I wasn’t completely sold on Karma’s arc here since it ended so abruptly and without some sort of reunification with her brother. I think there’s just a lot of character bloat at this point an This volume feels very interstitial in its narrative arch. I actually don’t think I’ve read all the content so far about Otherworld which is making jumping around from series to series a bit more confusing than it should be. Cosma remains a character I can see clearly being manipulated by external evils and I wasn’t completely sold on Karma’s arc here since it ended so abruptly and without some sort of reunification with her brother. I think there’s just a lot of character bloat at this point and while that sounds fun on paper, it means a lot of treading water when there just no really space for any exposition.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Adam Williams

    This is another mixed bag for me, with another creative team taking over New Mutants. I give it big points for the art, Rod Reis might be my favorite artist in the X office right now aside from Pepe Larraz. The story -- I like the way Vita Ayala writes all of the old school New Mutants, and Karma and Dani's adventures in particular are a highlight. But then the whole kids plot is a little too after-school-special for my taste, and what's worse, they're not particularly interesting characters to This is another mixed bag for me, with another creative team taking over New Mutants. I give it big points for the art, Rod Reis might be my favorite artist in the X office right now aside from Pepe Larraz. The story -- I like the way Vita Ayala writes all of the old school New Mutants, and Karma and Dani's adventures in particular are a highlight. But then the whole kids plot is a little too after-school-special for my taste, and what's worse, they're not particularly interesting characters to focus on. I'm very intrigued by the Shadow King story, but I don't know who Rain Boy is and I do not care.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eye-ra

    This felt like it could’ve been a little more solid but also staged things in their voice for the next installment. Love the characters no matter what

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lulu (the library leopard)

    Vita Ayala and Rod Reis I owe you my life…

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kris Ritchie

    2.5 rounded down. Very flip and skip if you didn't read a lot of older New Mutants stuff...which I never did. 2.5 rounded down. Very flip and skip if you didn't read a lot of older New Mutants stuff...which I never did.

  18. 5 out of 5

    James

    I have come to prefer the New Mutant storylines over the original X-Men. They just seem more relevant and interesting to me. The art was nice in this volume.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Amy Rae

    Gorgeous art (with an eye toward the Sienkiewicz era! love it!), great writing. Vita Ayala captures so much of what I want out of an X-book. The focus is really on what it is to be a mutant teen/young adult, the story has weight and meaningful character interactions without getting grimdark, and the whole thing really allows B- and C-list characters to shine. I love a lot of A-listers, don't get me wrong, but it's when we get to see what Everyday Life With Mutations can be like that a comic feel Gorgeous art (with an eye toward the Sienkiewicz era! love it!), great writing. Vita Ayala captures so much of what I want out of an X-book. The focus is really on what it is to be a mutant teen/young adult, the story has weight and meaningful character interactions without getting grimdark, and the whole thing really allows B- and C-list characters to shine. I love a lot of A-listers, don't get me wrong, but it's when we get to see what Everyday Life With Mutations can be like that a comic feels like Peak X-Men to me. Highlights for me include digging into Gabby as more than Laura's Little Sister and referencing the fact that Evan's STILL NOT REVIVED. The Gabby stuff is especially well-done, imo--she's a weird little 13-year-old who's used to being her big sister's first priority basically all the time. (Just look at All-New Wolverine: Laura clearly cares a hell of a lot more about her little sister than her boyfriend and who can blame her, Warren's boring.) Being on her own while Laura's in the vault, and then recognizing that Laura has a lot to process post-Vault, leads her to trying to make new friends (+ get Daken to hang out with her), and she's not great at it. Despite the fact that her issues are tied up with the fact that she's a mutant, the writing is classic "I'm an awkward middle-schooler and I don't know how to fix it" fare, and it reads true both to the character and to that experience of being a young teen still figuring out socialization. That said, if you're more interested in, say, What's Up With Rahne, it might not be as satisfying a read. A lot of the storylines happening here are going to take multiple trades to come to a conclusion--that's a bonus for me, because I love when stories aren't being written for the trade, but it might be a drawback for you. I jumped in here because Hickman's New Mutants run didn't really do it for me, and I have no regrets. Looking forward to more, especially if the editors will let Ayala do more than hint at Dani/Xi'an. This title and Way of X are my two favourite things happening in X-Men right now.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    3.5 Stars. With Vita Ayala's writing reins firmly in hand, this book now takes on a much needed emotional depth, diving into what makes the kids tick and giving us the feeling of "new" mutants again, as the "New Mutants" we've come to know and love have now become the teachers and guardians of this new team. I wish that the art would be better, but with some of the more obscure aspects (Cosmar's reality warping, Mirage's dreaming, and all the weird things Warlock does) it works well enough. Highli 3.5 Stars. With Vita Ayala's writing reins firmly in hand, this book now takes on a much needed emotional depth, diving into what makes the kids tick and giving us the feeling of "new" mutants again, as the "New Mutants" we've come to know and love have now become the teachers and guardians of this new team. I wish that the art would be better, but with some of the more obscure aspects (Cosmar's reality warping, Mirage's dreaming, and all the weird things Warlock does) it works well enough. Highlights: - With Magik, Warpath, and the rest of the original "New Mutants" in charge, they take it upon themselves to begin to train the new generation to work together via what they call "Sinergy Training", which is a fancier way of saying combo moves. The newbies need to know each other's strengths and weaknesses so they can work better as a team. - ALL Mutants are welcome on Krakoa, but that doesn't mean that all the 'used-to-be-villains' should be, at least in my opinion. Shadow King is one of these, and we see the trouble he causes the new kids by influencing their young minds in the wrong direction. Not that he's making them out to be villainous, but he is playing on their self-appearance insecurities to make them more reliant on him. - Appearance is a huge topic covered in this Volume, specifically with Cosmar, Anole, and Scout. Cosmar seeks resurrection because the initialization of her powers caused her body to morph to something not human looking at all. Anole has always struggled with his more lizard-like appearance, and Scout, having come to terms with her looks long ago, is the one standing up to Shadow King and his machinations for her two friends. Lots of "You Don't Understand!" talk from our insecure teens. - Josh, a mutant with huge horns (yet his powers are unknown to me) who originally came about in "Age of X-Man", has found a place in Otherworld where he feels comfortable and more normal. Karma and Mirage go to rescue him, but get themselves in trouble with King Jamie and Lady Roma (Merlyn's daughter), owing a favor to her to be paid back in the future. - Lastly, Karma wants to endure the Trial of the Crucible, hoping to be able to separate her brother, whose consciousness she absorbed. Dani Moonstar helps her through it, and she is restored in the end. Wonder when we are going to get the brother back... and how that will affect the team dynamic. Overall, the story is getting really good, but the art is just really unappealing to me. Let's see how the team shakes out post-Gala. Recommend.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Clint

    4.5 stars I’ve enjoyed New Mutants despite its turbulent direction so far, but I think these new issues from Vita Ayala are the best yet, and I’m looking forward to where Ayala’s taking the series. Beyond the great writing, Reis’s art is gorgeous. Nearly every page is amazing and fun to spend time taking in on its own. It reminds me of Christian Ward’s similarly colorful and sloppy digital painting style (Ward even does a few covers here), but Reis’s work feels polished and finished in a way that 4.5 stars I’ve enjoyed New Mutants despite its turbulent direction so far, but I think these new issues from Vita Ayala are the best yet, and I’m looking forward to where Ayala’s taking the series. Beyond the great writing, Reis’s art is gorgeous. Nearly every page is amazing and fun to spend time taking in on its own. It reminds me of Christian Ward’s similarly colorful and sloppy digital painting style (Ward even does a few covers here), but Reis’s work feels polished and finished in a way that I haven’t seen from Ward. The story is fantastic; it feels fittingly youthful without being juvenile or annoying. I love seeing the young adult leads of New Mutants try to watch over and train Krakoa’s unruly teen and adolescent mutants. The emotional exchanges are interesting, and on a more popcorn action level there’s a ton of neat synergy power combos from teachers and students that get shown off. The heavy focus on teen mutants also means there’s a few concurrent threads of identity issues being worked through that I thought were thoughtfully explored. Separately, a core team member deals with trauma and abandonment issues in a compelling way that actually gets pages devoted to fleshing it out instead of X-Factor’s flimsy aesthetic obsession with similar issues. The venture into Otherworld does cool things with that reality’s unique possibilities that the latest Excalibur series never quite has for me. At times, it reminded me of Die’s similarly imaginative fantasy mashup adventure.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Michael Church

    Here I thought Way of X was supposed to be the spiritual book diving into the deep philosophical questions of the new Krakoan era. I love the character work being done here. There are questions and responses that really fit into what I think makes a lot of sense given the status quo right now. What’s more, it doesn’t yet answer them fully. There’s so much room to explore what this all means and how it can take shape. I’m glad the series is still ongoing because, aside from how massive the cast i Here I thought Way of X was supposed to be the spiritual book diving into the deep philosophical questions of the new Krakoan era. I love the character work being done here. There are questions and responses that really fit into what I think makes a lot of sense given the status quo right now. What’s more, it doesn’t yet answer them fully. There’s so much room to explore what this all means and how it can take shape. I’m glad the series is still ongoing because, aside from how massive the cast is, there is so much for Vita Ayala to keep digging into with these questions. Honestly, the art took some getting used to. Rod Reid does fantastic work, but some of it was (I think intentionally) disorienting to a degree that I didn’t know what was happening at times. It feels very evocative of Bill Sienkiewicz. I’ve never been a huge fan of Dani or Karma, but they’ve got a lot of great moments in this. I’ve also been influenced by listening to the Cerebro podcast recently to root for them as a couple, but that’s beside the point. All the leads, including John Proudstar, Magik, Rhayne, Gabby, and others, are given something to do, unique issues and different ways to approach them. It’s a fascinating ensemble book, and that’s saying almost nothing of the secondary characters like Anole and Cosmar. This was already a really strong title, and giving it a single creative team to tackle such interesting themes and stories is only going to make it better.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    trying to catch up on x-men comics and there's legit 50+ issues i need to read across idk 12+ different titles before i can get to the big hellfire gala crossover event. i try to read by trades which means there's like 1 issue at the end of several of them that i can't get to yet so i can't mark it off here until i finish all the other ones which is stressing me out lol. the interconnectedness of these books is both the best and worst thing about them i enjoy how painted the artwork in this seri trying to catch up on x-men comics and there's legit 50+ issues i need to read across idk 12+ different titles before i can get to the big hellfire gala crossover event. i try to read by trades which means there's like 1 issue at the end of several of them that i can't get to yet so i can't mark it off here until i finish all the other ones which is stressing me out lol. the interconnectedness of these books is both the best and worst thing about them i enjoy how painted the artwork in this series looks and how that gives it flexibility to randomly pull off a diff vibe like that double page spread with dani and xi'an in otherworld. i haven't read much of the original new mutants so idk their past but i really liked their friendship here. once again the issue of some mutants passing as regular humans who just happen to have extremely cool magic powers vs those whose bodies have completely warped is raised and i don't know that there'll ever be a good solution to that. i can't believe that krakoa just has all these former supervillains running wild and all the children running wild too like why didn't they set up a school when they set up the nation pls so many of you have experience as teachers ?? bless gabby though please let an adult actually give her some real help

  24. 4 out of 5

    Gavin Wask

    Another great series, for me, if you move away from the main X-Men books you get some awesome stories. The New Mutants focus is two-fold, firstly on the mainstays of Mirage, Karma, Warpath, Warlock, Magik and Wolfsbane, who have taken over trying to teach the younger mutants who are left bored on Krakoa and like most teenagers when bored are causing trouble. Then you focus on some of the teenagers themselves, Anole, Cosmar, No-Girl and Rain Boy who are being helped/lead astray by The Shadow King - Another great series, for me, if you move away from the main X-Men books you get some awesome stories. The New Mutants focus is two-fold, firstly on the mainstays of Mirage, Karma, Warpath, Warlock, Magik and Wolfsbane, who have taken over trying to teach the younger mutants who are left bored on Krakoa and like most teenagers when bored are causing trouble. Then you focus on some of the teenagers themselves, Anole, Cosmar, No-Girl and Rain Boy who are being helped/lead astray by The Shadow King - I mean seriously why would they have him on Krakoa, that's just nuts! And Scout who is trying to help her friends. The mix of old, New Mutants and New, New Mutants work incredibly well and it is fantastic to see some of my favourites getting the page time they deserve. Throw in Mirage and Karma going back to the Otherworld and Karma trying to finally separate herself from her brother Tran, then you have some great storylines and a very enjoyable read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Lawson

    Like a bureaucratic X-Men antagonist, I hate what I don’t understand. Specifically Otherworld. Only really having read this era of X-Men books, albeit all of them so far, I don’t understand, I dunno, most things? Who is this Shadow Man? Who is Karma? Who so that lady’s kid? I don’t know I don’t know I don’t know. But Rod Reis is great and Magik is cool and Gabby is cool and Dani Moonstar is cool and Warlock is deeply unsettling in all the right ways. I’m only reading the Reign of X via trades, so t Like a bureaucratic X-Men antagonist, I hate what I don’t understand. Specifically Otherworld. Only really having read this era of X-Men books, albeit all of them so far, I don’t understand, I dunno, most things? Who is this Shadow Man? Who is Karma? Who so that lady’s kid? I don’t know I don’t know I don’t know. But Rod Reis is great and Magik is cool and Gabby is cool and Dani Moonstar is cool and Warlock is deeply unsettling in all the right ways. I’m only reading the Reign of X via trades, so this is the first new X book I’ve read since X of Swords was collected a few months back and as much as I didn’t understand what was going on when it was over I wanted to hang out on Krakoa more.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bat Man

    I loved everything with Dani and Shan. More, please. Can’t wait till they kiss. In all seriousness, the other parts of this arc left me a bit cold—A lot of what seemed to be the principle cast are more used as side characters, and Ayala is admirably insistent on following up on a Rahne plot from the late aughts that I really did not like. Overall, this isn’t quite as effortlessly fun as Hickman’s New Mutants, but I think its highs are pretty high, especially Issues 15 and 18. Rod Reis rules at t I loved everything with Dani and Shan. More, please. Can’t wait till they kiss. In all seriousness, the other parts of this arc left me a bit cold—A lot of what seemed to be the principle cast are more used as side characters, and Ayala is admirably insistent on following up on a Rahne plot from the late aughts that I really did not like. Overall, this isn’t quite as effortlessly fun as Hickman’s New Mutants, but I think its highs are pretty high, especially Issues 15 and 18. Rod Reis rules at this. I quite enjoyed myself with this one, and I’m excited to see how it develops.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rick Brose

    At this point, New Mutants has had three writers in the course of two years. It makes for a disjointed feeling to the book. The story and art for this volume are fine. There are some cool moments. But in the end, none of it feels particularly weighty to the X-Men universe. And there are so many characters being juggled that it is a distraction. Will you have some fun with this? Maybe. But I cannot help but feel that there is a far better book to be written than what we have seen in these volumes At this point, New Mutants has had three writers in the course of two years. It makes for a disjointed feeling to the book. The story and art for this volume are fine. There are some cool moments. But in the end, none of it feels particularly weighty to the X-Men universe. And there are so many characters being juggled that it is a distraction. Will you have some fun with this? Maybe. But I cannot help but feel that there is a far better book to be written than what we have seen in these volumes.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Adan

    There is a lot going on in this collection, and I am here for all of it. Dani and Xi’an go through a lot together, Rahne is trying to deal with some trauma, and Amahl Farouk is doing something hinky with some of the younger mutants, including Cosmar and Anole. There’s even a jaunt to Otherworld in this collection. Also, I don’t know if Rod Reis did it on purpose or not, but they’re doing their best Bill Sienkiewicz impersonation, and it’s awesome.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rob Marney

    New Mutants finally delivers on what made the original title so popular. Kids get way out of their depth into superhero nonsense, some more recognizable X-characters have to bail them out, the art is gorgeous and surreal, and characters slowly grow into better versions of themselves. Does this arc make a lot of sense if you think about it too hard? No, but neither did Lila Cheney; this is the kind of book that can get away with plot holes.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    While I very much appreciate the fact New mutants finally has a consistent voice behind it's message after three writers, it also isn't the best book in the line to me like some treat it. It's asking the important questions about identity and perception, and it's very dense by Krakoan standards, it just hasn't hit for me as much as it has others. Hopefully that is fixed in the next volume, growth for these young mutants is good While I very much appreciate the fact New mutants finally has a consistent voice behind it's message after three writers, it also isn't the best book in the line to me like some treat it. It's asking the important questions about identity and perception, and it's very dense by Krakoan standards, it just hasn't hit for me as much as it has others. Hopefully that is fixed in the next volume, growth for these young mutants is good

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