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For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tender Hearts: A Love Letter to Women of Color

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The founder of Latina Rebels’ “electrifying debut” (LA Times) arms women of color with the tools and knowledge they need to find success on their own terms   For generations, Brown girls have had to push against powerful forces of sexism, racism, and classism, often feeling alone in the struggle. By founding Latina Rebels, Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodríguez has created a commun The founder of Latina Rebels’ “electrifying debut” (LA Times) arms women of color with the tools and knowledge they need to find success on their own terms   For generations, Brown girls have had to push against powerful forces of sexism, racism, and classism, often feeling alone in the struggle. By founding Latina Rebels, Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodríguez has created a community to help women fight together. In For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tender Hearts, she offers wisdom and a liberating path forward for all women of color. She crafts powerful ways to address the challenges Brown girls face, from imposter syndrome to colorism. She empowers women to decolonize their worldview, and defy “universal” white narratives, by telling their own stories. Her book guides women of color toward a sense of pride and sisterhood and offers essential tools to energize a movement. May it spark a fire within you.


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The founder of Latina Rebels’ “electrifying debut” (LA Times) arms women of color with the tools and knowledge they need to find success on their own terms   For generations, Brown girls have had to push against powerful forces of sexism, racism, and classism, often feeling alone in the struggle. By founding Latina Rebels, Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodríguez has created a commun The founder of Latina Rebels’ “electrifying debut” (LA Times) arms women of color with the tools and knowledge they need to find success on their own terms   For generations, Brown girls have had to push against powerful forces of sexism, racism, and classism, often feeling alone in the struggle. By founding Latina Rebels, Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodríguez has created a community to help women fight together. In For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tender Hearts, she offers wisdom and a liberating path forward for all women of color. She crafts powerful ways to address the challenges Brown girls face, from imposter syndrome to colorism. She empowers women to decolonize their worldview, and defy “universal” white narratives, by telling their own stories. Her book guides women of color toward a sense of pride and sisterhood and offers essential tools to energize a movement. May it spark a fire within you.

30 review for For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tender Hearts: A Love Letter to Women of Color

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sarita

    I started this last night and it’s fucking brilliant. I wish I had this book in college/grad school. This is the book I always knew I needed but couldn’t find. Highly recommend. Para nuestra Latinx this book was written for you.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Never in my life have I read a book that reflected such similar experiences to those that I have gone through. As a Latina daughter of immigrants, Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodriguez excellently captures my struggles and that of other Brown and Black women. She covers topics such as colorism, feminism, and societal values through beautiful and moving writing. I was blown away and truly recommend this eye-opening piece. Especially to my fellow women of color, this love letter powerfully arms us with t Never in my life have I read a book that reflected such similar experiences to those that I have gone through. As a Latina daughter of immigrants, Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodriguez excellently captures my struggles and that of other Brown and Black women. She covers topics such as colorism, feminism, and societal values through beautiful and moving writing. I was blown away and truly recommend this eye-opening piece. Especially to my fellow women of color, this love letter powerfully arms us with tools to maneuver life on our own terms. Thank you Net Galley for this arc in exchange for an honest review!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    “Remember who you are, and the rest will come.” For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tender Hearts by Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodríguez is a book, that everyone should read. I hesitated to pick this book up because I wasn’t sure if it’s where I, a white reader, belong. The last thing I wanted to do is claim a book that was not intended to target a white audience in the first place. This book is not an objective take on white supremacy or an analysation of racism and oppression of BIPOC – That’s exact “Remember who you are, and the rest will come.” For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tender Hearts by Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodríguez is a book, that everyone should read. I hesitated to pick this book up because I wasn’t sure if it’s where I, a white reader, belong. The last thing I wanted to do is claim a book that was not intended to target a white audience in the first place. This book is not an objective take on white supremacy or an analysation of racism and oppression of BIPOC – That’s exactly what makes it stand out. Divided into different chapters, the book breaks up major topics, such as decoloniality, toxic masculinity or the politics of respectability. In the process of reading, I became more and more aware of institutional racism and the ground that it’s built on. Prisca’s writing style is very declamatory and emphatic: to read of such painful experiences as hers is not easy but at the same time it’s reality and this book just shows one more time, that society has to face that reality. White people need to do more then just rely on their privileges; there are major problems that must be addressed and dealt with. While reading this book I learned a lot – probably more than I ever did in school or at university, regarding the above-mentioned topics. This book opened my eyes and I hope that, as Prisca herself mentions, for all BIPOC who feel helpless or alone, it can be a support and a guideline on how to demand their space in the places that they belong and on how to shine, even though white supremacy doesn’t want them to.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Eduvigues Cruz

    Thank you for the words I didn’t know I needed. This is 100% a book for US, for the brown girls. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. Please please read this.

  5. 4 out of 5

    TKP

    WOW. What a book! Totally unapologetic about her background and this is exactly how I feel how books should be. The author is clear that she is an ethnic minority writing a book for ethnic minorities, so stuck she is to this that she uses the words that fit her mouth the best (Spanish) which she does not explain nor does she italicise. I love that about this. Those who wrote classics did not write them for black or brown people and I think it's high time books were written for us an audience and WOW. What a book! Totally unapologetic about her background and this is exactly how I feel how books should be. The author is clear that she is an ethnic minority writing a book for ethnic minorities, so stuck she is to this that she uses the words that fit her mouth the best (Spanish) which she does not explain nor does she italicise. I love that about this. Those who wrote classics did not write them for black or brown people and I think it's high time books were written for us an audience and for other people after. I absolutely loved this book, it spoke to me so much and I wish I had this book when I was in my formative years. I will be buying a hardcopy version of this book. 4/5

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sofia Mendoza

    For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tenders Hearts: A love letter to WOC is exactly that. The most intimate, loving, raw love letter to us brown girls in the U.S. who are caught at the intersection of race, class, and gender. Prisca is a brave and courageous genius for incorporating her life stories with sociopolitical concepts that are only offered to those in academia. She unapologetically exposes white fragility, US intervention in creating and maintaining conflict and poverty in other count For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tenders Hearts: A love letter to WOC is exactly that. The most intimate, loving, raw love letter to us brown girls in the U.S. who are caught at the intersection of race, class, and gender. Prisca is a brave and courageous genius for incorporating her life stories with sociopolitical concepts that are only offered to those in academia. She unapologetically exposes white fragility, US intervention in creating and maintaining conflict and poverty in other countries (countries like hers and where my parents are from). She compassionately admits to her own perpetuation of white supremacy with a self awareness that only comes by through acknowledging and working through her own traumas. With a lump in my throat (my body’s signal for something that desperately needs to be said) I said to my husband, “can you imagine all the liberated brown girls and women and how they will shape the world? Can you imagine our daughter growing up with this liberation?” Prisca is a brilliant author, writer, and storyteller. Her words are precise and piercing as she writes through her wounds and delivers through the most tender parts of her hearts and existence. It’s no surprise that the parts of the book that had the most impact on me were the Author’s note (“Dear brown girl”) that had me in tears within the first few lines, and in her conclusion where she spoke of desahogandonos, letting it go - a literal undrowning. Her call to action is that of self-preservation in the service of our self-love, healing and commitment to the work. And I accept wholeheartedly. Gracias por tu sabiduria, medicina, courage, and words Prisca. Gracias por desahogarte primero.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ness (Vynexa)

    Thank you Perseus Books for providing me with an early copy of For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tender Hearts When I requested this non-fiction novel, I had this preconceived idea that it was going to be a fluffy, heart warming read. I was incorrect. Instead, it was angry and demanded to be read and acknowledged. Which is exactly what I did. Reading this work of non-fiction was like sitting in front of a TV, hearing the sound of the VCR and the sound of electric current passing through, seeing Thank you Perseus Books for providing me with an early copy of For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tender Hearts When I requested this non-fiction novel, I had this preconceived idea that it was going to be a fluffy, heart warming read. I was incorrect. Instead, it was angry and demanded to be read and acknowledged. Which is exactly what I did. Reading this work of non-fiction was like sitting in front of a TV, hearing the sound of the VCR and the sound of electric current passing through, seeing many parts of my life. I am a first generation Cuban American. My mother along with her siblings and mi Abuela came from Cuban to Miami when my mother was in her early teens. So it was also seeing what life was most likely for them when Miami wasn't really the Miami we know today. This book covers so much and there were many topics that I could not connect with because I had not lived through them, such as immigrating to the States, going to college or getting married. However, I felt seen in so many topics of having low expectations placed on me because I am Hispanic, I present as a woman, whenever I express how a person has hurt me especially when they're white. This book was just... a lot for me personally. It was a lot in the sense that I felt seen like I haven't before. I thank Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodríguez for writing this and thank the publisher for deciding to put this out into the world. I'm sure that so many Brown Latinx folks and even other Brown people who aren't Latinx will find themselves and also find themselves self reflecting and doing more research like me. Will be buying a physical copy once the paperback is out and will annotate the hell out of that one, too. I typically do not rate non-fiction ,but it felt wrong leaving this one without 5 stars. ⭐️5 STARS⭐️

  8. 4 out of 5

    CR

    This was a wonderful memoir that is for our time. This book is so important and was such an easy read that I think all readers should pick it up. This book brings the story to life, about fears, hopes, and more for many brown girls, POC. This story had a great voice.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Amber Williams

    I love the rawness that Prisca provided in this. It’s something every woman of color should read. “Adulthood as a woman of color required that I harden myself and keep my heart shielded.”

  10. 4 out of 5

    Clarissa

    Spanish is also the language of oppression, and I am aware of that reality constantly. When I hear other Spanish speakers express frustration toward US-born Latinx people who do not speak Spanish, that rings especially true. We forget that we were force-fed Spanish by Spanish people, Europeans. Spanish is the tangible reality of our colonization. Conversely, Spanish is also a language of liberation, because what our countries have individually done with it is artful... We have taken this thing th Spanish is also the language of oppression, and I am aware of that reality constantly. When I hear other Spanish speakers express frustration toward US-born Latinx people who do not speak Spanish, that rings especially true. We forget that we were force-fed Spanish by Spanish people, Europeans. Spanish is the tangible reality of our colonization. Conversely, Spanish is also a language of liberation, because what our countries have individually done with it is artful... We have taken this thing that was imposed on so many of us, and we have transformed it into a beautiful expression of survival. When you learn to dream and think in both languages, when your migration has scripted two languages into your essence, you learn to feel safest with those who can speak both fluently. Those people get me. They understand what it means to translate complicated documents for their Spanish-speaking parents, abuelxs, and tixs. They understand what it means to grow up too quickly because you were reading court summons, filling out government aid documents, or just hearing an English-speaking doctor talk about you mami like she deserved whatever illness she came in with due to her lack of English comprehension. Learning to take blows for your parents, and learning not to translate the ugliness that comes with language hierarchies, means you cannot pretend those hierarchies don't exist. Bilingual people understand that English-only speakers never had to unlearn their native language, never had to have their cultura taken from them. This is a book I wish I had in my formative years. Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodríguez is a brown girl writing to and for brown girls, and she clearly states her audience at the beginning of this book. She is completely unapologetic about who she is, where she comes from, and her personal experiences. Her writing style is raw and poignant and she seamlessly weaves personal stories with difficult topics such as colorism, toxic masculinity, white fragility, etc., and while her stories may not be universal, even within the Latinx community, what she says rings true for many brown girls. As a US-born Latina, I cannot relate to the author's (or my family's) migrant experience. I did not struggle with adapting and learning English because I immediately learned it alongside Spanish, and even know it better because I had a formal education in it. I was lucky enough to grew up in a community surrounded by Latinxs, many of which, including myself, were encouraged to seek higher education. Like the author, however, I was the first in my family to go to college and then grad school, but even with all that encouragement, I still had moments when I felt out of place in the world of academia and still occasionally experience them in my workplace. I am also not new to microagressions and white fragility where white people feel the need to immediately defend themselves and blame me for taking their offense comments "the wrong way." Personally, I have always been proud of my heritage and never shied away from it, but I'd be lying if I said I've never toned myself down to fit in because I don't want to come off as too much. Mostly it's something I've done subconsciously in new classes in college or new jobs because I am often one of a few POC. It's done in the ways I dress and accessorize my body or how articulate I am when I speak. This book validated my thoughts and experiences in ways I have only recently been able to vocalize. It arms us with tools and language we need to go through life on our own terms. Thankfully, being unapologetically ourselves is something I see more and more Latinas doing and it warms my heart.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Patricia Vidal

    To be a working class BIPOC in academia in a PWI (predominantly white institution) is a wild ride. The posts from @latinrebels made me smile every day I was not sure if my reasons to pursuit graduate school were still valid, namely: "I am doing this because I am not supposed to be here." I was studying Comparative Literature in an elitist institution in the UK, and I was confronted by the first time with well-intentioned highly educated white people who would raise their hands to argue things su To be a working class BIPOC in academia in a PWI (predominantly white institution) is a wild ride. The posts from @latinrebels made me smile every day I was not sure if my reasons to pursuit graduate school were still valid, namely: "I am doing this because I am not supposed to be here." I was studying Comparative Literature in an elitist institution in the UK, and I was confronted by the first time with well-intentioned highly educated white people who would raise their hands to argue things such as: 'but postcolonialism is offensive for Europeans', and white professors would make jokes about 'postcolonial novels being the same boring story'. I am not new to white fragility. I had been racialised in Europe countless times, taken for a gipsy: 'gipsies are animals, they stink', said to shut the fuck up because my political opinions are ridiculous, told to educate myself, or even 'flattered' as it follows: 'you don't look Peruvian because Mayas and Incas are disgusting and ugly', etc. The typical daily casual racism where I just laugh because otherwise everything becomes too absurd: 'You can't get a tan', 'you don't need sunscreen', 'you don't need make up for your skin tone', 'you would be considered Black by many Scottish', etc... But in many ways I am new to the racism embedded within what I have always considered safe spaces (if compared with the wide big world). I don't think it is easy for white people to understand how exhausting it is to participate in this dance where Brown girls must proof to possess a fantastic sense of humour, which is measured with our own humiliation. I don't think upper middle class white people (the vast majority in academia) can even relate with the feelings of many doors shut to those of us who have neither money for internships nor a security net. It is not one or two years playing in an uneven field, it is a life of always having to pretend that yes, we are equals. And I am ok with that. Hey, we are after all privileged Brown people who got an education in countries where most people can't even dream about going to university. As Prisca puts it, our parents crawled so we could run. But what is really infuriating is the fact that white people can't stand feel excluded from the conversation, for once. They desperately try either proof that identity politics will only lead us to tribalism or try to focus on ridicule 'the oppressed Olympics' in order to make all oppression even. Say "you are a black woman but I am a queer white man, we are the same." And it is not. Prisca's talent is to put that anger to work in order to write a love letter to all Brown women who had to deal with colorism, toxic masculinity, abusive backgrounds, and the consequent feeling of not being good enough in spaces that are not meant for us, etc. She gives a fuck about 'hurting' white people's white feelings because this book is not addressed to them. It is not about convince white people of anything. This book is about giving tools to Brown girls so none of us is gaslighted on a daily basis, and especially not by our own friends and family. We are not locas or histéricas. I read it in a couple of days as my sharp heart needed to be reminded that my academic burnout shall pass, because after all, taking up space in the ivory tower is not a whim of my ego, it is a duty.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Divya

    This series of essays, written by the woman behind Latina Rebels had me in my feelings. Truly therapeutic reading for brown girls. I really appreciated how the author states right from the beginning that this is her target audience so if anyone reading this doesn't identify and feels some type of way about it, then it's not for them. Some of the little details, like the shame that comes from body hair policing and the transformative power of red lipstick sped past the sharp edges and hit me direc This series of essays, written by the woman behind Latina Rebels had me in my feelings. Truly therapeutic reading for brown girls. I really appreciated how the author states right from the beginning that this is her target audience so if anyone reading this doesn't identify and feels some type of way about it, then it's not for them. Some of the little details, like the shame that comes from body hair policing and the transformative power of red lipstick sped past the sharp edges and hit me directly in the most tender parts of my heart. While this book has very unapologetically been written specifically for brown women, I have been recommending it to everyone who has an interest in expanding their understanding of intersectionality. Like the author, I find that academia doesn't have all the words for expressing these nuanced experiences, and I think we can all benefit from reading this book, which is grounded in the author's lived experiences.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Karla Cruze-Silva

    Have you ever read something that spoke to your soul? That made you feel seen? That made you feel validated? That made you think, “fuuuuuck, me too.” Well this was the book that made me feel all those things plus so much more. I laugh, I cried, I paused. This book has made me reflect on my own journey, especially in academia. This book covers a variety of topics such as voluntourism, colorism, intersectionality, imposter syndrome, and much more. For too long, brown girls have dealt with racism, Have you ever read something that spoke to your soul? That made you feel seen? That made you feel validated? That made you think, “fuuuuuck, me too.” Well this was the book that made me feel all those things plus so much more. I laugh, I cried, I paused. This book has made me reflect on my own journey, especially in academia. This book covers a variety of topics such as voluntourism, colorism, intersectionality, imposter syndrome, and much more. For too long, brown girls have dealt with racism, sexism, all the isms. This book tells brown girls that we are seen, that our experiences are valid, that we are knowledge holder, and that the US system will do everything in its power to bring us down. BUT we have power and collectively we can work to dismantle the oppressive systems. It won’t be easy but we can fight, together. Gracias Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodriguez (@priscadorcas ) 💜. This love letter is powerful. Gracias por compartir tus experiences with us. Gracias por recordarnos que rest is necessary y que siempre hay que luchar.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jojo

    WOW! I didn’t think it was possible to relate to a book so much. Prisca talks about things that I can’t imagine saying out loud out of fear of what people might think. Everyone should read this book. It’s full of what it means to be a Non-Black Woman of Color. An extra hit closer to home was the fact that we are from the same country with similar backgrounds.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    I'm a 44 year old brown girl. This book is absolutely a love letter to all of us. Prisca is the voice of so many of us and this is our story. Thank you, Prisca. What an incredible gift you've given us all. I'm a 44 year old brown girl. This book is absolutely a love letter to all of us. Prisca is the voice of so many of us and this is our story. Thank you, Prisca. What an incredible gift you've given us all.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    I did not like this book. As a Latina female I could not relate to the author. Although I shared some of her personal experiences of discrimination in my youth I did not let it define who I was. I was also lucky my Father and Mother were highly educated people whose expectations were that college was the only way to be self sufficient. I am proud of my heritage and where I came from. I never let anyone tell me I can’t or won’t succeed because my skin is brown. Rating 2 out of 5

  17. 4 out of 5

    avantika

    This is a beautifully written and informative book. I cried quite a few times while reading. 5/5. Full review to come.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ale'Ta Turner

    I truly enjoyed reading For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tender Hearts by Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodriguez. Hearing Prisca's perspective and personal story was powerful and provoking. I found myself nodding my head in agreement and sitting in silence with her heartfelt words that touched the depths of my soul. Thank you Prisca for your vulnerability and powerful narrative. I truly enjoyed reading For Brown Girls with Sharp Edges and Tender Hearts by Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodriguez. Hearing Prisca's perspective and personal story was powerful and provoking. I found myself nodding my head in agreement and sitting in silence with her heartfelt words that touched the depths of my soul. Thank you Prisca for your vulnerability and powerful narrative.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Servin

    I so badly wanted to love this book, but I just didn’t. As a Latina female, I really could not relate to the author. Although I share some of her personal experiences, I’ve always been proud of my heritage and where I come from. I never let the color of my skin define my success. It’s a memoir that has a tone of harshness and anger when reading it.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bookworm

    Borrowed this on a whim from the library since it was still Hispanic/Latino Heritage Month and thought it would be a good read. I don't know much about the author, the book, etc. but it seemed like it would be a good read, not just for the month but for a change of pace and self-care. Part manifesto, part commentary, part analysis, etc., the author talks about of the many many issues that Latina (and other WOC) face from racism to colorism to sexism and misogyny to classism and more. It's a mix o Borrowed this on a whim from the library since it was still Hispanic/Latino Heritage Month and thought it would be a good read. I don't know much about the author, the book, etc. but it seemed like it would be a good read, not just for the month but for a change of pace and self-care. Part manifesto, part commentary, part analysis, etc., the author talks about of the many many issues that Latina (and other WOC) face from racism to colorism to sexism and misogyny to classism and more. It's a mix of her experiences, thoughts, analysis, history, etc. Sometimes some of it really resonated, sometimes it's really more of a stream of consciousness that isn't really clear on what the aim or goal is but rather the author just talking. It's definitely not for everyone. That's about it. This wasn't for me. I couldn't identify with a lot of what she wrote about (and that's okay!) but what bothered me more was what felt like a jumbled mix of thoughts. These are not easy conversations or issues to talk about, which might be part of it but I also did not really understand what the author was trying to get across. That said, there are plenty of people who felt it worked for them and I do think it's a good book on hand. I would imagine it'd be a great book to have at a high school library (could some of the material be a little too much for the high school set? Maybe I'd lean towards having it available than not). Borrowed from the regular library and that was best for me.

  21. 4 out of 5

    virgo_reads

    'Brown Girl, this world does not want to see you survive it, so defy it and dare to thrive' This book was stunningly brilliant. Never have I read a book that so perfectly encapsulates the experiences and feelings of being a POC in a Westernised world. Prisca is an Indigenous WOC born in Managua, Nicaragua. She describes her life experiences after immigrating to the US and how at first she felt she had to fit into the dominant white gaze. It was so great to find a book that focuses on brown people 'Brown Girl, this world does not want to see you survive it, so defy it and dare to thrive' This book was stunningly brilliant. Never have I read a book that so perfectly encapsulates the experiences and feelings of being a POC in a Westernised world. Prisca is an Indigenous WOC born in Managua, Nicaragua. She describes her life experiences after immigrating to the US and how at first she felt she had to fit into the dominant white gaze. It was so great to find a book that focuses on brown people without discounting the experiences of black people. From discussing her lived experiences of academia, racism, sexualising, familial relationships and abuse, the white male gaze and decoloniality, Prisca shifts her readers persepctive to bring to light the injustices and harmful narratives formed by white people about BIPOC people. I really encourage you to read this, as you will learn a lot about marginalised communities and the society we live in. ~ thanks to NG for the chance to read this ARC

  22. 4 out of 5

    Saoirse

    This is a wonderful beginner book for people, specifically women, of color on social justice and structural discrimination. It is accessible and easy to understand. I would strongly recommend it to teenagers or young adults, especially. My only gripe with this book is that the author dismisses critical race theory (and theoretical work in general) as inaccessible and difficult to understand. She does have a point but that doesn't mean those theories don't have value. Their difficulty is due to t This is a wonderful beginner book for people, specifically women, of color on social justice and structural discrimination. It is accessible and easy to understand. I would strongly recommend it to teenagers or young adults, especially. My only gripe with this book is that the author dismisses critical race theory (and theoretical work in general) as inaccessible and difficult to understand. She does have a point but that doesn't mean those theories don't have value. Their difficulty is due to their specificity and complexity. And actually, that inaccessibility is the gap this book fills - its an introductory text which I was hoping would better prepare its readers to engage with social justice thinking on a deeper, more involved level. But it dismisses the people who are doing that thinking as "inaccessible." Overall, its a well-written book with some amazing ideas. I would give it to many teenagers in my circle. But I would also pair it with a "further reading" list.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Karla

    I spotted this book at the bookstore and the title caught my eye. I picked it up and am so glad I did. It is a memoir type of book with a critical analysis of the author’s experiences. She focuses on academia, but also uses academic language and theory to deconstruct her own lived experiences. Each chapter I read helped me feel “seen”. I would read a chapter and say “ok, this is the most relatable section” and would read another and say “no, this is the most relatable one” — and so forth. This is I spotted this book at the bookstore and the title caught my eye. I picked it up and am so glad I did. It is a memoir type of book with a critical analysis of the author’s experiences. She focuses on academia, but also uses academic language and theory to deconstruct her own lived experiences. Each chapter I read helped me feel “seen”. I would read a chapter and say “ok, this is the most relatable section” and would read another and say “no, this is the most relatable one” — and so forth. This is such a powerful, wonderful book and I’m glad it exists.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Consuelo Culver

    💋A good space to start your journey of self-love and personal development 💋 Love her voice and vulnerability. 💋 Favorite quote: “Spanglish doesn’t come with a grammar book, a class, or a dictionary. It is in the air existing only for those who have developed an ear for it.” - Juliana Delgado Lopera.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lani

    Thank you NetGalley and the publishers for this ARC in exchange for my honest review. This book excelled at describing the experiences of Latina women while empowering them to tell their own stories. A lot of the stories told are applicable to all women of color and I hope everyone reads it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Li Vasquez-Noone

    What's it like to be Latinx in the U.S.? Well, it's complicated... This book exposed so many emotions about my struggle to be BIWOC in the world. I definitely needed this, and will be thinking about it for a long time to come. What's it like to be Latinx in the U.S.? Well, it's complicated... This book exposed so many emotions about my struggle to be BIWOC in the world. I definitely needed this, and will be thinking about it for a long time to come.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Ramones

    Words cannot express how much I needed this book. Up until this book, I hadn’t really felt seen in a lot of Latina narratives and Brown Girls with sharp edges and tender hearts had me finding words for so many experiences I felt so alone in having. For ever grateful to Prisca for writing it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jackie

    This is a book I wish I had when I was growing up and while I was becoming who I am. If you know a young brown woman, make sure she reads this book, let her know she can stand up for herself and so many of us will be right behind her, to pick her up, shake her off and push her forward.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Never Without a Book

    A must read!

  30. 5 out of 5

    S (slikestoread)

    I can't explain in words what this book means to me. Thank you Prisca for writing this book. I can't explain in words what this book means to me. Thank you Prisca for writing this book.

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