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Stupid Things I Won't Do When I Get Old

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Soon after his 50th birthday, Steven Petrow began assembling a list of “things I won’t do when I get old”—mostly a catalog of all the things he thought his then 70-something year old parents were doing wrong. That list, which included “You won’t have to shout at me that I’m deaf,” and “I won’t blame the family dog for my incontinence,” became the basis of this rousing coll Soon after his 50th birthday, Steven Petrow began assembling a list of “things I won’t do when I get old”—mostly a catalog of all the things he thought his then 70-something year old parents were doing wrong. That list, which included “You won’t have to shout at me that I’m deaf,” and “I won’t blame the family dog for my incontinence,” became the basis of this rousing collection of do’s and don’ts, wills and won’ts that is equal parts hilarious, honest, and practical. The fact is, we don’t want to age the way previous generations did. “Old people” hoard. They bore relatives—and strangers—with tales of their aches and pains. They insist on driving long after they’ve become a danger to others (and themselves). They eat dinner at 4pm. They swear they don’t need a cane or walker (and guess what happens next). They never, ever apologize. But there is another way . . . In Stupid Things I Won’t Do When I’m Old, Petrow candidly addresses the fears, frustrations, and stereotypes that accompany aging. He offers a blueprint for the new old age, and an understanding that aging and illness are not the same. As he writes, “I meant the list to serve as a pointed reminder—to me—to make different choices when I eventually cross the threshold to ‘old.’” Getting older is a privilege. This essential guide reveals how to do it with grace, wisdom, humor, and hope. And without hoarding.


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Soon after his 50th birthday, Steven Petrow began assembling a list of “things I won’t do when I get old”—mostly a catalog of all the things he thought his then 70-something year old parents were doing wrong. That list, which included “You won’t have to shout at me that I’m deaf,” and “I won’t blame the family dog for my incontinence,” became the basis of this rousing coll Soon after his 50th birthday, Steven Petrow began assembling a list of “things I won’t do when I get old”—mostly a catalog of all the things he thought his then 70-something year old parents were doing wrong. That list, which included “You won’t have to shout at me that I’m deaf,” and “I won’t blame the family dog for my incontinence,” became the basis of this rousing collection of do’s and don’ts, wills and won’ts that is equal parts hilarious, honest, and practical. The fact is, we don’t want to age the way previous generations did. “Old people” hoard. They bore relatives—and strangers—with tales of their aches and pains. They insist on driving long after they’ve become a danger to others (and themselves). They eat dinner at 4pm. They swear they don’t need a cane or walker (and guess what happens next). They never, ever apologize. But there is another way . . . In Stupid Things I Won’t Do When I’m Old, Petrow candidly addresses the fears, frustrations, and stereotypes that accompany aging. He offers a blueprint for the new old age, and an understanding that aging and illness are not the same. As he writes, “I meant the list to serve as a pointed reminder—to me—to make different choices when I eventually cross the threshold to ‘old.’” Getting older is a privilege. This essential guide reveals how to do it with grace, wisdom, humor, and hope. And without hoarding.

30 review for Stupid Things I Won't Do When I Get Old

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sandy *The world could end while I was reading and I would never notice*

    EXCERPT: Perhaps you remember a few years ago, 'Saturday Night Live' spoofed the American Echo, better known as 'Alexa', beginning with this cautionary sentence: 'The latest technology isn't always easy for people of a certain age.' Referring to a fictitious partnership between Amazon and AARP, the announcer declares that the 'American Echo Silver' edition is designed specifically for the Greatest Generation. It is super loud, and responds to any name remotely like Alexa, including Allegra, Odes EXCERPT: Perhaps you remember a few years ago, 'Saturday Night Live' spoofed the American Echo, better known as 'Alexa', beginning with this cautionary sentence: 'The latest technology isn't always easy for people of a certain age.' Referring to a fictitious partnership between Amazon and AARP, the announcer declares that the 'American Echo Silver' edition is designed specifically for the Greatest Generation. It is super loud, and responds to any name remotely like Alexa, including Allegra, Odessa, Anita, Alberta, Alisha, Alessandra, Excedrin and Alopecia. I especially liked the SNL promo for the Echo Silver's handy-dandy feature that helps old people find things. 'Amelia, where did I put the phone?' 'The phone is in your right hand.' Alexa also provides the latest in sports: 'Clarissa, how many times did Satchel Paige strike out last night?' 'Satchel Paige died in 1982.' 'How many did he get?' 'Satchel Paige died. Is dead.' Unlike other Alexa editions, this one also provides an 'uh-huh feature' for long rambling stories - because you know the stereotype of old people always repeating themselves. Simultaneously hilarious and ageist, the skit highlighted several of the ways that our parents generation struggles to master new devices, social media apps and plain old email. Sure, we laugh - but it's not like we're doing so well right now, either. For instance, one friend told me about her mother's struggles with the new TV she and her siblings had given her. 'Mom loved the picture quality, but the remote just about did her in. We heard from neighbours that every so often, they'd get a call asking for help,' she said. 'We finally figured out that every time Mom accidentally hit 'menu', she practically had to dial 911 - she could press up and down on volume and channels, but the options on the menu were beyond her, so she'd need help getting back to a screen she recognized.' This friend got a good laugh out of it at the time, but now reports a new found sympathy for her mom. 'I have a new smart TV that's definitely smarter than I am,' she told me. ABOUT 'STUPID THINGS I WON'T DO WHEN I GET OLD': Soon after his 50th birthday, Steven Petrow began assembling a list of “things I won’t do when I get old”—mostly a catalog of all the things he thought his then 70-something year old parents were doing wrong. That list, which included “You won’t have to shout at me that I’m deaf,” and “I won’t blame the family dog for my incontinence,” became the basis of this rousing collection of do’s and don’ts, wills and won’ts that is equal parts hilarious, honest, and practical. The fact is, we don’t want to age the way previous generations did. “Old people” hoard. They bore relatives—and strangers—with tales of their aches and pains. They insist on driving long after they’ve become a danger to others (and themselves). They eat dinner at 4pm. They swear they don’t need a cane or walker (and guess what happens next). They never, ever apologize. But there is another way . . . In Stupid Things I Won’t Do When I’m Old, Petrow candidly addresses the fears, frustrations, and stereotypes that accompany aging. He offers a blueprint for the new old age, and an understanding that aging and illness are not the same. As he writes, “I meant the list to serve as a pointed reminder—to me—to make different choices when I eventually cross the threshold to ‘old.’” Getting older is a privilege. This essential guide reveals how to do it with grace, wisdom, humor, and hope. And without hoarding. MY THOUGHTS: Getting older. We're all doing it, until we stop, and Steven has written about his parents and his own journey with an easy humour and realism that had me simultaneously laughing and recognizing little bits of both myself and my husband, and our parents. He has written a checklist of pitfalls and ways to avoid them as we reach certain milestones. He hasn't confined himself to those amongst us who are aging healthily - he himself hasn't, and he offers great advice tempered with experience on judging just how much people want to know, and just how much and how to tell them. Along with the amusing anecdotes and sage advice on aging both with and without familial support, Steven takes us through the journeys to the end of some of his beloved friends, and how well, or otherwise, they handled their impending demise. There is plenty to take away from this read. It offers a wonderful insight for children struggling to deal with the changes in their aging parents, and for those of us who have no idea how we got to the number of years we are so rapidly. I am closer to 70 than 60. Some days I feel twenty one and some days I feel ninety one. I have no idea where all those years went, and so fast! but I enjoyed them and I intend to enjoy the years left to me, without being a burden. Thanks to Steven's lists I now have markers to recognize, and actions I can take. A book for everyone, no matter your age. ⭐⭐⭐⭐.3 #StupidThingsIWontDoWhenIGetOld #NetGalley I: @mrstevenpetrow @kensingtonbooks T: @StevenPetrow @KensingtonBooks # health #memoir #aging #practicalguide #nonfiction #life THE AUTHOR: Steven Petrow is an award-winning journalist and book author who is best known for his Washington Post and New York Times essays on aging, health, and LGBTQ issues. He's currently a contributing writer to The Post and The Times as well as a columnist for USA Today. DISCLOSURE: Thank you to Kensington Books, Citadel, via Netgalley for providing both a digital ARC and an audio ARC of Stupid Things I Won't Do When I Get Old by Steven Petrow, and narrated by Michael Butler Murray, for review. All opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own personal opinions. For an explanation of my rating system please refer to my Goodreads.com profile page or the about page on sandysbookaday.wordpress.com This review and others are also published on Twitter, Amazon, Instagram and my webpage https://sandysbookaday.wordpress.com/...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alicia Bayer

    This book starts out rather humorous and sometimes mocking, but it evolves into a really helpful, heartfelt list of the ways we sabotage ourselves and our relationships in our oldest years. The author wrote it over a ten year period of his parents' last years and deaths, starting when they were alive and were sometimes just annoying in their habits but ending up with all of the wisdom he gathered from loving them, losing them, and seeing what he would do differently. Along the way he also descri This book starts out rather humorous and sometimes mocking, but it evolves into a really helpful, heartfelt list of the ways we sabotage ourselves and our relationships in our oldest years. The author wrote it over a ten year period of his parents' last years and deaths, starting when they were alive and were sometimes just annoying in their habits but ending up with all of the wisdom he gathered from loving them, losing them, and seeing what he would do differently. Along the way he also describes beloved friends who lived life (and the end of it) exceptionally well, with lessons for all of us. I read a digital ARC of this book via NetGalley.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Carla Johnson-Hicks

    I'm sure we all think our parents or grandparents can be embarrassing and do things that we would never do when we get to their age, well, think again. When Steven Petrow was 50, he began to make a list of all the things his parents were doing wrong and eventually, all these lists became this book. Now, I am in my 60s and I laughed wholeheartedly as I listened to this book. I also had a list in my mind of things my mother did that I was never going to do, but, I know I have turned into my mother I'm sure we all think our parents or grandparents can be embarrassing and do things that we would never do when we get to their age, well, think again. When Steven Petrow was 50, he began to make a list of all the things his parents were doing wrong and eventually, all these lists became this book. Now, I am in my 60s and I laughed wholeheartedly as I listened to this book. I also had a list in my mind of things my mother did that I was never going to do, but, I know I have turned into my mother, at least partly. There is a lot to laugh at in this book, as you see yourself in its pages, but there are also some serious points that are helpful. If you are a younger person reading or listening to this book, listen carefully. You will see where you might be able to curb your frustrations and impatience with older relatives and friends. One really important thing I took from this book is that we need to have a positive frame of mind and live life to the fullest, even as we age. I really enjoyed Steven Petrow's anecdotes that he shared with his readers and I think I would love to meet and talk to him. The audiobook was narrated by Michael Butler Murray and I loved his performance and reading of this book. I really felt like I was sitting and listening to someone sharing their stories with me in a café or livingroom. I definitely recommend this book to everyone. It is a pure delight. The publisher generously provided me with a copy of this book upon request. The rating and opinions shared are my own.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Konet

    I do not consider myself old yet, I will be 38 next month in June. I like that this book was about not letting your age getting in the way of living your life. I would say 95% of this book humorous but it was also very personal and honest about the aging process and that old age does not have to be a death sentence. Filled with wonderful anecdotes and humor. I definitely recommend this for anyone who is trying to fight their age and the aging process. I think I will get this at publishing, it was I do not consider myself old yet, I will be 38 next month in June. I like that this book was about not letting your age getting in the way of living your life. I would say 95% of this book humorous but it was also very personal and honest about the aging process and that old age does not have to be a death sentence. Filled with wonderful anecdotes and humor. I definitely recommend this for anyone who is trying to fight their age and the aging process. I think I will get this at publishing, it was that good. I sincerely hope Steven Petrow writes more nonfiction if it is as good as this one. Thanks to Netgalley, Steven Petrow and Kensington Books for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. I also thank Kensington Books for an auto approval to all the wonderful titles in the publisher's collection. Available: 6/29/21

  5. 5 out of 5

    Alina

    This book is not interesting, funny nor was it amusing. I decided I had enough at 32%

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ioana

    Thank you NetGalley and Kensington Books for this ARC! As a young(ish) person you always look and think about old people as people at least twice your age. The truth is that old is more a mental thing than a physical thing, the classical POV of "age is just a number". And is always closer than you think, might just be the next phone update.... Petrow's book starts off kind of gloomy and even a bit scary about what life after a certain age (I'd say around 50 yo...) looks like and what to expect by Thank you NetGalley and Kensington Books for this ARC! As a young(ish) person you always look and think about old people as people at least twice your age. The truth is that old is more a mental thing than a physical thing, the classical POV of "age is just a number". And is always closer than you think, might just be the next phone update.... Petrow's book starts off kind of gloomy and even a bit scary about what life after a certain age (I'd say around 50 yo...) looks like and what to expect by looking at older folks. "Stupid Things I Won't Do When I Get Old" is actually funny and insightful. It helps us understand our parents, grandparents and older coworkers better and have better relationships. But it also makes a good point about making your own list to keep yourself on your toes and always young and youthful. I fully enjoyed every minute of this book and cannot wait for everyone to read it!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dora Okeyo

    Growing old is inevitable, just like the saying goes "what goes up but never comes down?" and the answer is always "age," well, this book was downright hilarious. When I saw it on Netgalley, I was hooked by the title alone because I wanted to know what stupid things the author wouldn't do when he gets old, but what I found instead was a list of experiences that highlight the fears and our take on aging that made this book relatable. Thanks Netgalley for the eARC. Growing old is inevitable, just like the saying goes "what goes up but never comes down?" and the answer is always "age," well, this book was downright hilarious. When I saw it on Netgalley, I was hooked by the title alone because I wanted to know what stupid things the author wouldn't do when he gets old, but what I found instead was a list of experiences that highlight the fears and our take on aging that made this book relatable. Thanks Netgalley for the eARC.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Allison

    3.5 stars. This book was funny and entertaining. The author made a lot of great observations about growing older and wrote about what he intends to do differently than those he observed around him. As a young mobility aid user, I especially liked that he didn’t feed the stereotype about mobility aids being embarrassing and isn’t ashamed by the idea of using one someday. I’m not exactly sure what genre this book falls under other than maybe just non-fic/entertainment. It wasn’t really a self-dev/a 3.5 stars. This book was funny and entertaining. The author made a lot of great observations about growing older and wrote about what he intends to do differently than those he observed around him. As a young mobility aid user, I especially liked that he didn’t feed the stereotype about mobility aids being embarrassing and isn’t ashamed by the idea of using one someday. I’m not exactly sure what genre this book falls under other than maybe just non-fic/entertainment. It wasn’t really a self-dev/advice type book and had strong autobiography type vibes because of how many personal stories it contained. Thanks NetGalley for the ARC audiobook!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jaime

    A realistic read regarding how we turn into our parents as we age. I connected with this book as there were many times I used to say, “when I reach your age I will never….(fill in blank); yet, now that I am older I find myself doing exactly what my parents would have done. It’s nice to know I am not the only one experiencing this phenomenon. The book was very easy to read and the subject matter was witty instead of dull and dry. There is something for everyone in this book!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kristina Barnes

    Thank you Highbridge Audio for allowing me to read an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review. I appreciate that this author chose to share his thoughts and do so in an entertaining way. I chuckled a couple times while listening to this book. I enjoyed the humor. But honestly, I was bored for the majority of it. I found it hard to relate to. I’m not sure if I will recommend this book to others.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Zaba Cita Novine

    DNFed at 25% This was really not the right book for me and not at all what I have expected. I must say that I have no interest whatsoever in erectile disfunction in older men, dying your hair to look younger or just straight lying about your age.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bookgrrl

    3.5 stars Shortly after his 50th birthday, the author began assembling a list of “things I won’t do when I get old“. A lot of these are based on his observations of his aging parents and/or friends. The list ranges from not blaming the dog for my incontinence and not getting offended when someone says “OK boomer“, to more serious topics like knowing when to stop driving and telling people that you love them before it’s too late. The book is well written, as you would expect from a journalist with 3.5 stars Shortly after his 50th birthday, the author began assembling a list of “things I won’t do when I get old“. A lot of these are based on his observations of his aging parents and/or friends. The list ranges from not blaming the dog for my incontinence and not getting offended when someone says “OK boomer“, to more serious topics like knowing when to stop driving and telling people that you love them before it’s too late. The book is well written, as you would expect from a journalist with decades of experience and prior books under his belt. I am in my 40s, and I will admit that I do several of the things on this list already, like eating dinner at 5 PM and the “organ recital“ (this is reciting all your aches and pains with friends). But I was a bit disappointed to find that the book is really not as humorous as it was proposed to be. Don’t get me wrong, there are certainly some funny bits. But I would say the majority of the book is actually fairly serious, and frankly I am now depressed about my future. Thank you to NetGalley & Kensington Books for this advanced reader copy. All opinions expressed in this review are my own.

  13. 5 out of 5

    NaTaya Hastings

    *I received a free audio book copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. This has, in no way, affected my thoughts or opinions on it.* This book was great. Period. Full stop. I could stop right here and would have said everything that needs to be said about it. However, since I did agree to review it, I'll say more than that. I was not familiar with Steven Petrow before reading this book. As I read it, I came to understand that he is a rather famous and well-known journalist, but I had n *I received a free audio book copy of this book in exchange for my honest review. This has, in no way, affected my thoughts or opinions on it.* This book was great. Period. Full stop. I could stop right here and would have said everything that needs to be said about it. However, since I did agree to review it, I'll say more than that. I was not familiar with Steven Petrow before reading this book. As I read it, I came to understand that he is a rather famous and well-known journalist, but I had no knowledge of that beforehand. No, I chose to read this book because I thought it sounded like a funny and enjoyable way to pass the time. I was thinking of it being like Justin Halpern's "S*!# My Dad Says." It's not like that at all, although there is some humor in it. The first third of the book had me chuckling and thinking, "Yep. I know exactly what he means. My {insert elderly relative here} does that same thing, and it's so frustrating." It was humorous and relatable. The second third of the book grew a little more serious, and while there were still moments of true laughter and humor, I found myself being more pensive and listening with my, "I need to be better about that" ears on. When Petrow spoke about dementia and how it's kinder to live in the lie with them than constantly correct and hurt them, that really resonated with me, and I kept nodding my head and thinking about how much good info I was getting from this book I thought was going to be a silly distraction. The final third of the book? I was squalling. Maybe it's because my dad is in his final "no more treatments" stage of cancer or maybe it's just that we all think about losing the ones we love (and them losing us) more than we'd like to admit... Whatever it was, I had tears just streaming down my face. It was so poignant and heartfelt. It truly moved me. Up until that final stretch, I would have rated this book a solid four stars. After that, though, I had to bump it up to five. It's such a good book, and it really reminds you to make the most of each day and the time you have with your loved ones. It reminds you to say all the things that need to be said while there's still time. It's heartbreaking and heartwarming all at once. As for the other aspects - the narrator, the pacing, etc. - it was all fine. The pace of the book was excellent. I never once felt like I was being dragged along at a snail's pace. The narrator brought a lot of life into the book. He has somewhat of a David Sedaris vibe that fit well with the tone of the book. Honestly, though, he could have been the world's worst narrator, and I still would have given this book five stars. It was that good.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lynn Metzger

    Shortly after his fiftieth birthday, Petrow confesses, he started keeping a kind of anti-to do list: “a highly judgmental, not-quite-mean-spirited-but-close accounting of everything I thought my parents were doing wrong” as they navigated (or, in many cases, denied being in) their twilight years. Stupid Things I Won’t Do When I Get Old is the hilarious, life-affirming, heartbreaking, and surprisingly practical result. In 40+ bite-sized chapters with titles like “I Won’t Lie About My Age (Even on Shortly after his fiftieth birthday, Petrow confesses, he started keeping a kind of anti-to do list: “a highly judgmental, not-quite-mean-spirited-but-close accounting of everything I thought my parents were doing wrong” as they navigated (or, in many cases, denied being in) their twilight years. Stupid Things I Won’t Do When I Get Old is the hilarious, life-affirming, heartbreaking, and surprisingly practical result. In 40+ bite-sized chapters with titles like “I Won’t Lie About My Age (Even on Dating Apps),” “I Won’t Hoard the Butter Pats,” and “I Won’t Be Ordering the Early Bird Special,” Petrow, now in his sixties, draws heavily on his parents’ and his own experiences to explore the realities of old age and the many ways that senior citizens can complicate and limit their lives by pretending that they aren’t getting older. For example, Petrow cites his father’s refusal to use hearing aids, preferring to isolate himself and forego social interactions with loved ones rather than to look "old." Similarly, his mother wouldn’t use her walker, claiming that it clashed with her outfit each time he mentioned it and reminded her that a bad fall could be disastrous. Coming to terms with the aging process and accepting help when it’s needed, he argues, is the best way to maximize our enjoyment and independence in the years to come. I laughed and nodded in agreement through the first two sections of the book, “Stupid Things I Won’t Do Today” and “Stupid Things I Won’t Do Tomorrow.” As a 50-something Gen Xer, Petrow’s stories of making the most of his 50s and 60s are relevant to me, and his advice is wise and useful. In the third section, “Stupid Things I Won’t Do at ‘The End,’” he movingly guides readers through his parents’ final years. He is viscerally honest in describing his frustration, anger, and pain as these two much-loved, larger-than-life personalities slipped into dementia and ill health and entreats readers to have more compassion and understanding than he did. I admit that I blubbered through these final chapters. And yet, I didn’t find the book depressing. On the contrary, it was uplifting. Petrow has inspired me to take action now in order to make the most of my golden years and to avoid becoming a burden to my loved ones. Petrow’s writing is full of warmth and style, and reading it feels like talking to a close friend. Although he frequently discusses painful moments during his life, he never loses hope or veers into self-pity. “I see more clearly now that I meant the list to serve as a pointed reminder – to me - to make different choices when I eventually crossed the threshold into my ‘senior,’ ‘sunset,’ or ‘silver’ years,” he acknowledges. “By sharing them in this book, I hope others may come to a greater awareness of the choices we make once we begin to think of ourselves as ‘old.’” I would highly recommend this book for anyone who has senior parents or is facing their senior years themselves. In fact, I’ve already begun making some of the changes he recommends. I’ve stopped hitting the space bar twice after the end of a sentence. It’s been an extremely difficult habit to break, but I’m doing it. Take that, old age! Thank you, Kensington Books and Goodreads, for giving me the opportunity to read and review this book for free.

  15. 4 out of 5

    David

    Really enjoy his writing via the Washington Post, so I knew this would be good, and it didn't disappoint. It's more serious than the cheeky title might suggest, though there are funny lighthearted bits as well (it seems that I'm marking myself as old by putting two spaces after a period, but whatever -- it's automatic at this point and as far as I know doesn't really hurt anyone). Does a good job of blending what he observed in his parents' aging process and what he hopes for in his own (we're ab Really enjoy his writing via the Washington Post, so I knew this would be good, and it didn't disappoint. It's more serious than the cheeky title might suggest, though there are funny lighthearted bits as well (it seems that I'm marking myself as old by putting two spaces after a period, but whatever -- it's automatic at this point and as far as I know doesn't really hurt anyone). Does a good job of blending what he observed in his parents' aging process and what he hopes for in his own (we're about the same age, what demographers would probably call "young-old"). It's a delicate balance in that pointing out stuff that was exasperating about your deceased parents can come off as a little mean, but he mostly keeps it IMO on the side of being honest about their foibles but loving as well. Very sad piece about not wanting to be as disappointed with his life as his (highly accomplished) Dad appeared to be in the end. Some of it fits the "I won't......" format quite well (e.g., being determined to cough up his driver's license graciously when he's no longer a good enough driver to be safe), whereas a few just struck me as observations of something characteristic of old people but not really likely promises to keep. Are you really going to keep the temperature setting in your home much too cold for your own comfort level in order to prevent its being too warm for young people who come over to visit? Maybe Steven Petrow is that nice and selfless, but not me. This particular issue hasn't kicked in for me yet, but if/when it does I am putting young people on notice -- wear one of those ice vests to pre-cool before you visit, because I am not freezing in my own home!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Trijntje

    This is a laundry list of things the author has noted over the years that "old" people do, and his personal stories of why he is going to try to stop himself from falling in step with them, and why. Some are funny and obvious. Some are just his own taste. Some hauntingly (because I'm just about his age) sound like someone reassuring themselves, just a bit, that if they don't do these old people things maybe they aren't yet old. Yet somehow he acknowledges his age, and seems mostly accepting of i This is a laundry list of things the author has noted over the years that "old" people do, and his personal stories of why he is going to try to stop himself from falling in step with them, and why. Some are funny and obvious. Some are just his own taste. Some hauntingly (because I'm just about his age) sound like someone reassuring themselves, just a bit, that if they don't do these old people things maybe they aren't yet old. Yet somehow he acknowledges his age, and seems mostly accepting of it, so that's not saying I think he's in denial about it! As I got further along in the book, I found myself skimming more. I'd read his "what I won't do" thesis but them skim over his personal story of where he encountered this as a life-changing thing to avoid. I guess that's because we'll all recognize these traits (complaining about the cost of things, for instance, or achy joints), but we all have our own bugaboos as to why or how hard to avoid them. I will say I also found it kind of depressing... by the time I got 2/3 of the way through it felt like a laundry list of all the traits we're headed to in old age that can seem, frankly, horrifying when you put them all together in a book as if we are all destined to fall prey to each one. And we all know we can't escape aging...

  17. 4 out of 5

    Susan

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book; I literally read it in one sitting. And, as I read it I kept thinking “How true.” or “ I have to remember that for the future.” Mr Petrow writes with much insight gleaned from observing family members (especially his parents) and many friends age . The book not only points out things that are not a given of aging and how we can avoid these preconceived notions but also gives many explanations of why we act this way. Whether it's eating dinner earlier (hello Early I thoroughly enjoyed this book; I literally read it in one sitting. And, as I read it I kept thinking “How true.” or “ I have to remember that for the future.” Mr Petrow writes with much insight gleaned from observing family members (especially his parents) and many friends age . The book not only points out things that are not a given of aging and how we can avoid these preconceived notions but also gives many explanations of why we act this way. Whether it's eating dinner earlier (hello Early bird special), refusing to use a walker or a hearing aid or many other situations we deal with as we and our our parents age. There is also a considerable part of the book dealing with how to live the life we truly want, how not to waste the time we have on this earth and how to plan for our eventual old age. I was fortunate to receive an e- copy of this book to review, I have already ordered a copy of this book to reread and use for future reference.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    I received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I went into this book thinking it was humor, and I was right. But it was so much more. I thought it would be light & fluffy funny bits, but then I started realizing, "Hey, this is me!". The author, Steven Petrow is my age, and it's nice to hear from someone of my generation talk about the facts of getting old. The part I really related to is getting rid of 'stuff'. It seems that we spend our lives collecting things, and it's har I received this ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I went into this book thinking it was humor, and I was right. But it was so much more. I thought it would be light & fluffy funny bits, but then I started realizing, "Hey, this is me!". The author, Steven Petrow is my age, and it's nice to hear from someone of my generation talk about the facts of getting old. The part I really related to is getting rid of 'stuff'. It seems that we spend our lives collecting things, and it's hard to get to the point when you realize you need to unload stuff, and not leave it for others to tend to after you are gone. I loved how honest the author was about the issues we may have as we get older. He approaches these facts with humor and honesty. Some books I start reading and think, "hope this picks up the pace", but Mr. Petrow had me hooked right from the start. I absolutely LOVED this book!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    3.5 smart stars, rounded up to 4. I started writing my ‘old age manifesto’ 2 years ago. Steven Petrow spent ten years jotting down things as his parents aged and asked friends to share ‘concerns’ about aging. Stupid Things I Won’t do when I Get Old is honest, practical, and a little bit funny. Petrow shares stories, especially of his parents, in personable, yet relatable ways. He also shares insights from friends who aged well. A few of the dos and don’ts: Don’t hoard, don’t drive when you should 3.5 smart stars, rounded up to 4. I started writing my ‘old age manifesto’ 2 years ago. Steven Petrow spent ten years jotting down things as his parents aged and asked friends to share ‘concerns’ about aging. Stupid Things I Won’t do when I Get Old is honest, practical, and a little bit funny. Petrow shares stories, especially of his parents, in personable, yet relatable ways. He also shares insights from friends who aged well. A few of the dos and don’ts: Don’t hoard, don’t drive when you shouldn’t, do use a cane or walker rather than fall and break bones, do get hearing aids if you need them, do shower so you won’t smell bad, do consider writing your own obituary, do make sure your final wishes are known, do make friends of many ages, and say, “I love you” often. Narrator Michael Butler Murray had a well-paced, easy-to-understand-and-listen-to voice. Thanks to Netgalley and the publisher for providing an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    Unfortunately, this book is one I had to skim through, a lot, in order to finish. (And I nearly DNF'ed it...) I expected a funny and insightful personal list of things to avoid doing as you get older, but sadly the book was neither. It feels more like a bitter account of the struggles of a man growing older, focusing on somewhat shallow things, like dying your hair to look younger, lying about your age, talking, in lengthy depth, about erectile dysfunction and male insecurities about getting older Unfortunately, this book is one I had to skim through, a lot, in order to finish. (And I nearly DNF'ed it...) I expected a funny and insightful personal list of things to avoid doing as you get older, but sadly the book was neither. It feels more like a bitter account of the struggles of a man growing older, focusing on somewhat shallow things, like dying your hair to look younger, lying about your age, talking, in lengthy depth, about erectile dysfunction and male insecurities about getting older. It could have been funny and a sort of "what not to do" guide/list as you face the inevitable fact of ageing. But... no. It just fell flat and not interesting at all. I don't know if I'd recommend this book or not, but it wasn't the book for me sadly. I still want to thank NetGalley and the publisher HighBridge Audio for allowing me to listen to the audiobook version in exchange for my honest review and opinion. #StupidThingsIWontDoWhenIGetOld #NetGalley

  21. 4 out of 5

    Andrea Pole

    Stupid Things I Won't Do When I Get Old by Steven Petrow tapped into all of my emotions. This is a highly personal, yet relatable, look at the aging process, and it is as honest and unfiltered as it is witty and sharp. The author delves into an inevitable experience of the human condition, that of aging. We cannot help but laugh at his shrewd observations of a process that is familiar in each of our own lives, either as something we are experiencing ourselves, or have witnessed in those we hold Stupid Things I Won't Do When I Get Old by Steven Petrow tapped into all of my emotions. This is a highly personal, yet relatable, look at the aging process, and it is as honest and unfiltered as it is witty and sharp. The author delves into an inevitable experience of the human condition, that of aging. We cannot help but laugh at his shrewd observations of a process that is familiar in each of our own lives, either as something we are experiencing ourselves, or have witnessed in those we hold dear. While the early essays seem, for the most part, to offer lighthearted perspective, they gradually move to a much darker place, reflecting on the finite nature of our time with our parents, and the crippling fear of growing old alone. While I expected a witty take on the aged, Mr Petrow also leaves us pondering our own mortality. Many thanks to NetGalley and Kensington for an ARC.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    Thank you Netgalley for this ARC of Stupid Things I Won't Do When I Get Old by Steven Petrow.. I just turned 40 a few weeks ago, and while I don't consider that to be old, I'm also no longer under the impression that I'm immortal anymore. Getting older is a mixed bag, mostly awesome, sometimes frustrating. This was kind of the perfect read since it's something I've been thinking about a lot lately. Petrow breaks his books down into short chapters, all highlighting, hence the title, stupid things h Thank you Netgalley for this ARC of Stupid Things I Won't Do When I Get Old by Steven Petrow.. I just turned 40 a few weeks ago, and while I don't consider that to be old, I'm also no longer under the impression that I'm immortal anymore. Getting older is a mixed bag, mostly awesome, sometimes frustrating. This was kind of the perfect read since it's something I've been thinking about a lot lately. Petrow breaks his books down into short chapters, all highlighting, hence the title, stupid things he won't do when he gets old. Some of them are funny and benign, like not constantly complaining about aches and pains, or not smelling bad. Others are much more impactful like, never missing a chance to say I love you. He writes with a lot of anecdotes and with a lot of sweet nostalgia and history. I definitely learned a few things, and made some resolutions of my own.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    We are all getting older, no matter your current age, and being self-aware as to our changing needs and limitations is important. It's also important to be open to learning and trying new things. This book is a look at how the author is trying to age gracefully and what he's learned by watching those who've gone before him with thoughtfulness and humor. I love that his goal is to try to be more aware of how others are impacted as well. Yes, we all love our independence, but there's a time when t We are all getting older, no matter your current age, and being self-aware as to our changing needs and limitations is important. It's also important to be open to learning and trying new things. This book is a look at how the author is trying to age gracefully and what he's learned by watching those who've gone before him with thoughtfulness and humor. I love that his goal is to try to be more aware of how others are impacted as well. Yes, we all love our independence, but there's a time when those car keys need to be hung up for good. Seeing friends age, I've learned one can either choose to be stuck in the past or to move forward. Our best years can be ahead of us if we're open to moving forward. Thank you HighBridge Audio and NetGalley for the audio ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Toni

    It was the title of this book that " got me". According to the CDC I am already old, so I had to learn what not to do. Tha authors philosophy is to not let a number , our age, get in the way of living our life.The book consists of many short Chapters which does cover every topic such as Tavis vs users, using a walker, urination frequency, therapeutic lies, stopping driving, assisted living, and much much more. This is a fun book with lots of humor. It helps reassess aging and look at it in an ent It was the title of this book that " got me". According to the CDC I am already old, so I had to learn what not to do. Tha authors philosophy is to not let a number , our age, get in the way of living our life.The book consists of many short Chapters which does cover every topic such as Tavis vs users, using a walker, urination frequency, therapeutic lies, stopping driving, assisted living, and much much more. This is a fun book with lots of humor. It helps reassess aging and look at it in an enthusiastic manne. In other words accept it willingly.I saw either myself or situation s I'd been in with my parents in every chapter. I want tothank the author, Kensington Publishing and NetGallet for the opportunity to read and review this self help book. it's publication date is 6/29/21

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stefanie Bevins

    I really liked this book. I think it provides a lot of really great outlooks and valid points about life and what should be taken seriously and what shouldn't. There's a lot of good lessons in it. I'm in my early 30s so I am a little ways off from the authors definition of 'old' but there are very legitimate points such as planning your funeral and writing letters to your loved ones for after you pass that are things that could be done when you are younger, just to prepare since unfortunately we I really liked this book. I think it provides a lot of really great outlooks and valid points about life and what should be taken seriously and what shouldn't. There's a lot of good lessons in it. I'm in my early 30s so I am a little ways off from the authors definition of 'old' but there are very legitimate points such as planning your funeral and writing letters to your loved ones for after you pass that are things that could be done when you are younger, just to prepare since unfortunately we never know when it is our time to go. I enjoyed how Steve Petrow shared stories of his parents and family with many of the 'stupid' things he won't do when he's old

  26. 4 out of 5

    Anjana Baidya

    A solid 3.5 for me. Thank you NetGalley, Steven Petrow and Kensington Books for the audiobook. This book really gives an amazing peek in someone's life and how he lives despite his growing age. He made this book personal and relatable. He talked about relationship between parents and the children and how they change or evolve as we age. It was very relatable. This book starts in a humorous way. And I would say most of the book goes that way but as we dive deeper, it depicts some deeper and seriou A solid 3.5 for me. Thank you NetGalley, Steven Petrow and Kensington Books for the audiobook. This book really gives an amazing peek in someone's life and how he lives despite his growing age. He made this book personal and relatable. He talked about relationship between parents and the children and how they change or evolve as we age. It was very relatable. This book starts in a humorous way. And I would say most of the book goes that way but as we dive deeper, it depicts some deeper and serious issues. He write all of it in amazingly honest way. It is also a LGBTQA+ book, and I am glad I listened to it in pride month

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bonnie

    This is not a book that would appeal to the general public. However, if you are of a certain age or have ageing parents or have experienced or are having problems with ageing parents it is well worth a read. Steven Petrow approaches the subject with candour, humour and empathy. He clearly adored his elderly parents. Each chapter addresses so many of the experiences my sister and I had to deal with our parents. I am almost at the ‘old’ age phase of life but still in good mental and physical healt This is not a book that would appeal to the general public. However, if you are of a certain age or have ageing parents or have experienced or are having problems with ageing parents it is well worth a read. Steven Petrow approaches the subject with candour, humour and empathy. He clearly adored his elderly parents. Each chapter addresses so many of the experiences my sister and I had to deal with our parents. I am almost at the ‘old’ age phase of life but still in good mental and physical health but am well aware that this won’t last so I will start to seriously consider many of the issues he addresses as I don’t want to be a burden to my children - well, maybe just a little bit!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tammy Sutcliffe

    Such an interesting twist on growing older! I listened to the audiobook and it was sentimental, sweet, educational and heartfelt! Author Steven Petrow at times made me sad, laugh out loud, take notes and agree with his assessment of his own family and the general population. There is lots of great advice on aging and how to change up our habits to better enjoy our later years!! This is entertaining as well as being an excellent resource!! I hope I haven’t double spaced! #StupidThingsIWon’tDoWhen Such an interesting twist on growing older! I listened to the audiobook and it was sentimental, sweet, educational and heartfelt! Author Steven Petrow at times made me sad, laugh out loud, take notes and agree with his assessment of his own family and the general population. There is lots of great advice on aging and how to change up our habits to better enjoy our later years!! This is entertaining as well as being an excellent resource!! I hope I haven’t double spaced! #StupidThingsIWon’tDoWhenIGetOld#NetGalley

  29. 5 out of 5

    Susanne

    Thank you to the author, Kensington Books and NetGalley, for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. I wasn't sure what to expect with this book, and ended up really loving it. The author starts with a humorous take, but his writing is deeply personal and he shares openly and honestly from his own life and family background, as he explores some of the mantras many of us have - consciously or subconsciously - regarding aging. At the same time, this serves as a wake-up call for things I never thou Thank you to the author, Kensington Books and NetGalley, for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. I wasn't sure what to expect with this book, and ended up really loving it. The author starts with a humorous take, but his writing is deeply personal and he shares openly and honestly from his own life and family background, as he explores some of the mantras many of us have - consciously or subconsciously - regarding aging. At the same time, this serves as a wake-up call for things I never thought about and realized I should be aware of in terms of getting older.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    This hit a little too close to home. While I am younger than the author, several of his stories could and will eventually happen to me (and all of us). Telling these stories with his wit and humor softened the blow and the reminder that respecting all people will get you respect in return was welcome. I loved these stories and highly recommend this collection. #StupidThingsIWontDoWhenIGetOld #NetGalley I received a copy from #NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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