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Two Moons, Vol. 1: The Iron Noose

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RUMBLE and BPRD writer JOHN ARCUDI is back at Image with rising star VALERIO GIANGIORDANO for an all-new horror series set in the midst of the Civil War. In the middle of the horrors of the American Civil War, young soldier Virgil Morris discovers that he can't leave his Pawnee origins behind him. Visited by ghosts and visions, he learns that the war is not the worst evil h RUMBLE and BPRD writer JOHN ARCUDI is back at Image with rising star VALERIO GIANGIORDANO for an all-new horror series set in the midst of the Civil War. In the middle of the horrors of the American Civil War, young soldier Virgil Morris discovers that he can't leave his Pawnee origins behind him. Visited by ghosts and visions, he learns that the war is not the worst evil he and his new friend, nurse Frances Shaw, face. Together - and apart - Frances and Virgil combat madness and hell itself. Collects TWO MOONS #1-5


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RUMBLE and BPRD writer JOHN ARCUDI is back at Image with rising star VALERIO GIANGIORDANO for an all-new horror series set in the midst of the Civil War. In the middle of the horrors of the American Civil War, young soldier Virgil Morris discovers that he can't leave his Pawnee origins behind him. Visited by ghosts and visions, he learns that the war is not the worst evil h RUMBLE and BPRD writer JOHN ARCUDI is back at Image with rising star VALERIO GIANGIORDANO for an all-new horror series set in the midst of the Civil War. In the middle of the horrors of the American Civil War, young soldier Virgil Morris discovers that he can't leave his Pawnee origins behind him. Visited by ghosts and visions, he learns that the war is not the worst evil he and his new friend, nurse Frances Shaw, face. Together - and apart - Frances and Virgil combat madness and hell itself. Collects TWO MOONS #1-5

30 review for Two Moons, Vol. 1: The Iron Noose

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Take Mike Mignola's Lord Baltimore series and move it to the Civil War while replacing the vampires with demons and you have Two Moons. The story is about a Pawnee who was raised by a white family. He's a private in the Union Army when he starts seeing some of the soldiers on both sides as monsters or evil spirits. These first 5 issues don't do enough to setup the premise of the series. It's little more than Virgil (or Two Moons) sees monsters and kills them. The artwork and dark colors worked we Take Mike Mignola's Lord Baltimore series and move it to the Civil War while replacing the vampires with demons and you have Two Moons. The story is about a Pawnee who was raised by a white family. He's a private in the Union Army when he starts seeing some of the soldiers on both sides as monsters or evil spirits. These first 5 issues don't do enough to setup the premise of the series. It's little more than Virgil (or Two Moons) sees monsters and kills them. The artwork and dark colors worked well for the most part. However, the coloring often made it hard to tell the Union and Confederate soldiers apart as there wasn't enough contrast. The monsters looked menacing and scary. Everything else about the art was very solid.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    It's not easy to write war series without making them look like propaganda. But here in the Civil War, there's plenty of talk between who's in the right and who's not. Our titular character looks like he's hallucinating demons, which given how some of the soldiers on either side act that's understandable. Of course there then comes the theme of being obscured from heritage. As a Pawnee, he ends up having to deal with an evil feeding off the war. So when he fully embraces his name as Two Moons, t It's not easy to write war series without making them look like propaganda. But here in the Civil War, there's plenty of talk between who's in the right and who's not. Our titular character looks like he's hallucinating demons, which given how some of the soldiers on either side act that's understandable. Of course there then comes the theme of being obscured from heritage. As a Pawnee, he ends up having to deal with an evil feeding off the war. So when he fully embraces his name as Two Moons, there's some catharsis but also a bit of fear from people seeing it. Like after being held back, the savage people think he is comes out. Man, there were times when I felt like a tragedy was going to befall him for racial reasons. The artwork always kept the uneasy mood and suspense. The dark colors really fit well into war stories. The way some angles arrange filled me with dread in some cases.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    So there's a young soldier in the American Civil War who was born a Pawnee Native American, but brought up by parents of European blood. When the spirits start leaving him cryptic clues, and when he shoots an absolute monster in the back of the head, he begins to learn the truth about the place and the war, and his powers against the evils therein. For a lot of the soldiers are actually demonic, half-zombie, half-Cthulhu nasties pretending to be human, and once he triggers full realisation he ca So there's a young soldier in the American Civil War who was born a Pawnee Native American, but brought up by parents of European blood. When the spirits start leaving him cryptic clues, and when he shoots an absolute monster in the back of the head, he begins to learn the truth about the place and the war, and his powers against the evils therein. For a lot of the soldiers are actually demonic, half-zombie, half-Cthulhu nasties pretending to be human, and once he triggers full realisation he can go and slice them all up – if he makes sure his own side don't get to kill him first... This is quite a good read, and I'm not sure if my rating it in less-than exuberant manner is down to my not finding such Civil War dramas interesting at all, or not. Either way, it's not too bad – the story is a tidily self-contained arc, the design is fine, with the majority of action scenes being done really well. It does follow the standard genre trope where a character is awakened to their destiny, duffs up some baddies, the end, though. I think with a touch more clarity initially as to which side was which and where all allegiances lie, I might have stretched to four stars here, for it's a perfectly competent entertainment. As it is, three and a half stars will have to remain the top encouragement I can give to those with an interest in checking it out. Nobody is at all dissuaded from doing so.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Pawnee child Two Moons lost his family to smallpox; raised by a white schoolmaster, he's now Union soldier Virgil Morris. But his heritage doesn't want to let him go so easily, and now he's getting messages from the dead, visions of spirits and monsters which soon put him in terrible danger. Arcudi is an underrated writer; on the art side, Giangiordano and Crabtree give good irruption of horror, though their more everyday scenes, while perfectly serviceable, don't have the same distinctiveness. Pawnee child Two Moons lost his family to smallpox; raised by a white schoolmaster, he's now Union soldier Virgil Morris. But his heritage doesn't want to let him go so easily, and now he's getting messages from the dead, visions of spirits and monsters which soon put him in terrible danger. Arcudi is an underrated writer; on the art side, Giangiordano and Crabtree give good irruption of horror, though their more everyday scenes, while perfectly serviceable, don't have the same distinctiveness. But for the most part I felt frustrated by this comic, which set up a question that interested me – what was it like to be a Native American soldier in America's Civil War? – and then mostly ignored it in favour of a story about an assimilated character getting dragged back into the myth-world of his people, and demons in human form feeding on the horror of war, all of which I feel like I've seen plenty of times before. (Edelweiss ARC)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Greg Trosclair

    Beautiful horror story set post Civil War in the west. Story follows former soldier Virgil Morris who is part Indian. He is followed by monsters from his Indian tribes lore. John Arcudi writes a great story. It was as good a horror tale that I have read in quite awhile. I loved Valerio Giangiordano's art work it was really quite lovely amidst the horror. Beautiful horror story set post Civil War in the west. Story follows former soldier Virgil Morris who is part Indian. He is followed by monsters from his Indian tribes lore. John Arcudi writes a great story. It was as good a horror tale that I have read in quite awhile. I loved Valerio Giangiordano's art work it was really quite lovely amidst the horror.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    I am a sucker for westerns and I have an eager interest in Civil War era storytelling in comics. Two Moons exceeded my expectations! Please read my full review over @ Diamond Bookshelf (link forthcoming).

  7. 4 out of 5

    Yagiz Erkan

    I really liked Two Moons. The blend of horror and civil war worked very well for me. I couldn't put it down once I started to read it. I also quite liked the illustration style and quality. It matches well the spirit of the story. I really liked Two Moons. The blend of horror and civil war worked very well for me. I couldn't put it down once I started to read it. I also quite liked the illustration style and quality. It matches well the spirit of the story.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Travis Chesser

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris Houston

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dillon

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alexander

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joey Hines

  13. 5 out of 5

    Anthony

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nebojsa

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rob Moore

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brock

  17. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Martin

  18. 4 out of 5

    Paul Porry

  19. 4 out of 5

    Pturingan

  20. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Villwock

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rob Schamberger

  22. 4 out of 5

    Johannes

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nowenen

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ernie Pelletier

  25. 4 out of 5

    Rishabh Upadhyaya

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mithun Gangopadhyay

  27. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kris

  29. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  30. 4 out of 5

    Dave Sammath

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