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Just Your Local Bisexual Disaster

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In this voice-driven young adult debut by Andrea Mosqueda, Maggie Gonzalez needs a date to her sister's quinceañera - and fast. Growing up in Texas’s Rio Grande Valley, Maggie Gonzalez has always been a little messy, but she’s okay with that. After all, she has a great family, a goofy group of friends, a rocky romantic history, and dreams of being a music photographer. Tas In this voice-driven young adult debut by Andrea Mosqueda, Maggie Gonzalez needs a date to her sister's quinceañera - and fast. Growing up in Texas’s Rio Grande Valley, Maggie Gonzalez has always been a little messy, but she’s okay with that. After all, she has a great family, a goofy group of friends, a rocky romantic history, and dreams of being a music photographer. Tasked with picking an escort for her little sister’s quinceañera, Maggie has to face the truth: that her feelings about her friends—and her future—aren’t as simple as she’d once believed. As Maggie’s search for the perfect escort continues, she’s forced to confront new (and old) feelings for three of her friends: Amanda, her best friend and first-ever crush; Matthew, her ex-boyfriend twice-over who refuses to stop flirting with her, and Dani, the new girl who has romantic baggage of her own. On top of this romantic disaster, she can’t stop thinking about the uncertainty of her own plans for the future and what that means for the people she loves. As the weeks wind down and the boundaries between friendship and love become hazy, Maggie finds herself more and more confused with each photo. When her tried-and-true medium causes more chaos than calm, Maggie needs to figure out how to avoid certain disaster—or be brave enough to dive right into it.


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In this voice-driven young adult debut by Andrea Mosqueda, Maggie Gonzalez needs a date to her sister's quinceañera - and fast. Growing up in Texas’s Rio Grande Valley, Maggie Gonzalez has always been a little messy, but she’s okay with that. After all, she has a great family, a goofy group of friends, a rocky romantic history, and dreams of being a music photographer. Tas In this voice-driven young adult debut by Andrea Mosqueda, Maggie Gonzalez needs a date to her sister's quinceañera - and fast. Growing up in Texas’s Rio Grande Valley, Maggie Gonzalez has always been a little messy, but she’s okay with that. After all, she has a great family, a goofy group of friends, a rocky romantic history, and dreams of being a music photographer. Tasked with picking an escort for her little sister’s quinceañera, Maggie has to face the truth: that her feelings about her friends—and her future—aren’t as simple as she’d once believed. As Maggie’s search for the perfect escort continues, she’s forced to confront new (and old) feelings for three of her friends: Amanda, her best friend and first-ever crush; Matthew, her ex-boyfriend twice-over who refuses to stop flirting with her, and Dani, the new girl who has romantic baggage of her own. On top of this romantic disaster, she can’t stop thinking about the uncertainty of her own plans for the future and what that means for the people she loves. As the weeks wind down and the boundaries between friendship and love become hazy, Maggie finds herself more and more confused with each photo. When her tried-and-true medium causes more chaos than calm, Maggie needs to figure out how to avoid certain disaster—or be brave enough to dive right into it.

30 review for Just Your Local Bisexual Disaster

  1. 5 out of 5

    Lex Kent

    3.25 Stars. This was an okay read but not the book I was hoping for. It felt like it was an average YA read of the times. I think if I would have read this as a teenager I might have really enjoyed it, but it’s hard to compare this to some of the great YA books I’ve read recently. This is a debut so Mosqueda has the chance to work through the newbie bumps and just get better and better because there is some good potential here. I have to admit that I really struggled to get into this book. I pick 3.25 Stars. This was an okay read but not the book I was hoping for. It felt like it was an average YA read of the times. I think if I would have read this as a teenager I might have really enjoyed it, but it’s hard to compare this to some of the great YA books I’ve read recently. This is a debut so Mosqueda has the chance to work through the newbie bumps and just get better and better because there is some good potential here. I have to admit that I really struggled to get into this book. I picked this book up, and then put it back down, four times before I finally pushed myself through it on the fifth day. If this had not been an ARC book I would have DNF’d it. However, I’m glad I kept reading it because once I got about one third into the book I started to enjoy it more. Part of my main issue with the book is that it felt too long. While there were some parts I wished had more time spent on them, others were too long and they started to drag. I definitely did some skimming in the book (mostly in the first third) but I did less and less as the book went on. On a good note, I loved the family dynamics in the book. The main was in the middle of two sisters, being raised by her widowed mother. To me, this is really where the book shined. The sisterly relationships, and the mother-daughter dynamic was well written and felt real. I thought some of the secondary character in this book needed more development, but not so when it came to this loving family and they truly were my favorite scenes of the book. The romance in this book is in a triangle. Our main character is dealing with feeling for her ex-boyfriend, her best girlfriend, and the new girl who moved to town. While I didn’t mind the triangle drama -it added some needed conflict to the plot- I don’t think it was the best choice for a debut writers first romance. I will not give away which person our main character picked, but because she had to spend time on all three characters and potential relationships with all of them, there was not a lot of time left for the one she did pick. That’s a big ask to write about one character having feelings for three people in any book, so I think it was a bit much to take on for a new author. And while I liked who the main ended up with, I didn’t really feel the connection with them that I needed to because they didn’t have a ton of alone time together -since a lot of time was spent with other characters-. TLDR: This was an average YA and a decent debut book. It was hard to get into, but the book does improve as the story goes on. This book had some good things going for it like well written family scenes, but it just didn’t all come together for me. There were also a lot of pop culture references that seemed out of place or just got stale after a while. Maybe I’m getting too old but it really didn’t work having memes quoted to me in this book. In the end this is not a book I can recommend, but I would not say stay away either. I think a younger audience might appreciate it more than I was able to. An ARC copy was given to me for a review.

  2. 4 out of 5

    booksandzoe

    Landing somewhere around 3.5 stars, this book was kinda a mixed bag for me! I really enjoyed the messy bisexual representation and the storytelling, but I found the writing to be lacking in places and entirely too much in others, leaving me skimming through some scenes. I really liked the main character, and found her to be a really unique protagonist compared to most YA contemporaries. Aspects of her personality were extemely accurate to the average Gen-Z kid and little aspects of her like the f Landing somewhere around 3.5 stars, this book was kinda a mixed bag for me! I really enjoyed the messy bisexual representation and the storytelling, but I found the writing to be lacking in places and entirely too much in others, leaving me skimming through some scenes. I really liked the main character, and found her to be a really unique protagonist compared to most YA contemporaries. Aspects of her personality were extemely accurate to the average Gen-Z kid and little aspects of her like the fact that she's a stoner made her feel much more real than other YA protagonists I've read about. I thought her relationships for Amanda (her best friend) and Matthew (her ex boyfriend) were really well developed. This makes sense give Maggie has known Amanda and Matthew for much longer than she knew Dani, the third love interest, but I found that I didn't really feel connected to her and Dani's relationship at all because it felt underdeveloped and lacking chemistry. I was really enjoying the book as I went along, and then out of nowhere would come a SUPER clingy pop culture reference that really wouldn't fit the vibe of the story. Stuff like the main character calling herself "emo trash" and a conversation between Maggie and Dani where they come out to each other and proceed to do the whole... Girl in Red listener lesbian and flannel with cuffed jeans bisexual thing which was just... really something. These moments were pretty minimal, but evoked such a visceral reaction of cringe inside me that I could feel my star rating decreasing every time it happened. I also think the book could use a bit of editing down in places with different details (fleshing out her relationship with her parents and Dani for example) being expanded upon. By the end of the book I felt like I was really just skimming to get to the end because I was a bit sick of reading the book. I think with about 10K words less this book would be a lot more grabbing and pleasant to read! Overall, this book was mostly fun to read and I loved some of the relationships represented, However, other times the book really fell into YA cliches and a lack of development that could keep me engaged. I would recommend this to people who read a lot, but probably wouldn't recommend it to casual readers as there are better books out there.

  3. 5 out of 5

    .

    personally, i dig this book title A LOT...😶

  4. 5 out of 5

    ash | आश ♥ [superache enthusiast]

    thank you netgalley for giving me an arc of this book! while the title and cover of just your local bisexual disaster drew me in, i was certainly left disappointed. this book was ... kinda a mess tbh? the vibes were amazing at first, and i loved all side characters but as the story progressed it felt dragging and the 10 pop-culture references in every other page was so annoying (coming from someone who actually likes them) i was glad the mc realized a few things by the end (view spoiler)[(i.e the r thank you netgalley for giving me an arc of this book! while the title and cover of just your local bisexual disaster drew me in, i was certainly left disappointed. this book was ... kinda a mess tbh? the vibes were amazing at first, and i loved all side characters but as the story progressed it felt dragging and the 10 pop-culture references in every other page was so annoying (coming from someone who actually likes them) i was glad the mc realized a few things by the end (view spoiler)[(i.e the relationships she could never have again, her boundaries, and her mistakes) (hide spoiler)] but the ending left me wishing it was tied in 100 pages less drama.

  5. 4 out of 5

    rachel ☾

    The YA novel follows self-described romantic disaster Maggie Gonzalez, a bisexual Chicana living in Texas's Rio Grande Valley, as she tries to figure out whom to ask to be her escort at her little sister's upcoming quinceañera: her charming ex-boyfriend twice over; her first crush and gorgeous best friend; or the mysterious new girl with the romantic baggage? Blog • Trigger Warning Database • Twitter • Instagram The YA novel follows self-described romantic disaster Maggie Gonzalez, a bisexual Chicana living in Texas's Rio Grande Valley, as she tries to figure out whom to ask to be her escort at her little sister's upcoming quinceañera: her charming ex-boyfriend twice over; her first crush and gorgeous best friend; or the mysterious new girl with the romantic baggage? Blog • Trigger Warning Database • Twitter • Instagram

  6. 5 out of 5

    Enne

    as a bi disaster myself, i am very much looking forward to this one

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kelly Quindlen

    Reading this now for blurb purposes. RTC. I can already say it's the love letter to the Rio Grande Valley I never knew I needed. Reading this now for blurb purposes. RTC. I can already say it's the love letter to the Rio Grande Valley I never knew I needed.

  8. 4 out of 5

    laurel [the suspected bibliophile]

    3.5, rounded down. Don't get me wrong—this was good and entertaining, but I found myself skimming through quite a bit of it. I felt it was too long and not the book for me, which is 100% on me for continuing to read YA contemporary when I was in the mood for speculative literary fiction (#moodreaderproblems). However, this is DEFINITELY going to be the book for other people, and it probably definitely would have been the book for me when I was a teen and super duper closeted bisexual (I was so fuc 3.5, rounded down. Don't get me wrong—this was good and entertaining, but I found myself skimming through quite a bit of it. I felt it was too long and not the book for me, which is 100% on me for continuing to read YA contemporary when I was in the mood for speculative literary fiction (#moodreaderproblems). However, this is DEFINITELY going to be the book for other people, and it probably definitely would have been the book for me when I was a teen and super duper closeted bisexual (I was so fucking closeted I didn't even realize it myself). There is a lot to love in this book. Amazing rep, for starters. A cute subversion of the "bisexual who can't decide" trope/stereotype. A supportive (and messy) friend group. A fantastic set of siblings. A mom who had just the right amount of guidance while being real herself (and also messy). And a lot of (actually contemporary for today's teens) music...although there was mention of Weezer, Blink 182 and some other band I grew up with as a teen a bajillion (going on twenty years ago is a bajillion in teen years) years ago, so maybe that loses some cred there. Also there was a lot of flannel and converse. Is flannel a thing again? Because if so, my wife will be thrilled. Full RTC I received this ARC from NetGalley for an honest review

  9. 5 out of 5

    Casper

    Book Blog || Twitter || 25+ Book Discord Thank you to NetGalley and ‎Feiwel & Friends for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Full review can be found at: ‎https://casperintherye.wordpress.com/... ALERT!!!! The bisexual main character in this book actually has interest in more than one gender. Yes, I know. I'll give you a minute to process that. Because as someone who actively seeks out bisexual book characters, 95% of the time the bisexual character has previously dated the opposite sex and Book Blog || Twitter || 25+ Book Discord Thank you to NetGalley and ‎Feiwel & Friends for an ARC in exchange for an honest review. Full review can be found at: ‎https://casperintherye.wordpress.com/... ALERT!!!! The bisexual main character in this book actually has interest in more than one gender. Yes, I know. I'll give you a minute to process that. Because as someone who actively seeks out bisexual book characters, 95% of the time the bisexual character has previously dated the opposite sex and now they're dating the same sex for the first time and coming to terms with that. Now, make no mistake, there's nothing inherently wrong with that. But, I want to read characters that have active interest in both the same sex and the opposite sex because that's my bisexual experience. It just feels so great to see that unapologetically represented here. Big kudos to Mosqueda. The plot is pretty straightforward. With Maggie's younger sister's quinceñera looming overhead, Maggie is on the hunt for the perfect escort. The problem? She has a crush on three different people: Her best friend, her (twice over) ex-boyfriend, and the new girl at school. With a circle of supportive friends and family, Maggie navigates her messy relationships and uncertainties. I applaud this book for having raw, realistic characters who make mistakes and grow throughout the book. That being said, this book is really a 3.5 star rating for me. I struggled deciding whether to move it down to 3 stars or up to 4 stars, but I decided that for a teenage audience, the topics explored in this book are important enough and well enough written that it could be really helpful. The book starts out strong, but the pacing starts to go off the rails at some point. Certain parts of the story that I thought should have been explored more were kind of skimmed over and other parts were so thoroughly written that they became boring and repetitive. I also thought some of the things the characters said and the constantly namedropping of bands got cringy/old after a while. Still bumped it up to 4 stars for having a great bisexual main character who navigates raw and real emotions.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Noah

    That's one hell of a title. That's one hell of a title.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Janna

    i feel personally attacked by this title in the best way possible i post about queer books here: instagram / tiktok /twitter i feel personally attacked by this title in the best way possible i post about queer books here: instagram / tiktok /twitter

  12. 4 out of 5

    Cande

    Just Your Local Bisexual Disaster by Andrea Mosqueda is the perfect read for June. It follows Maggie, a bisexual Chicana, who has to find a date for her sister’s quince. things get complicated when she has to figure out if she wants to give her ex-boyfriend a second chance, confess her crush to her best friend or explore her feelings for the new girl in town. This was such a fun story, with pure chaos and bisexual disasters. Maggie is a messy character, trying her best. She’s wondering what love Just Your Local Bisexual Disaster by Andrea Mosqueda is the perfect read for June. It follows Maggie, a bisexual Chicana, who has to find a date for her sister’s quince. things get complicated when she has to figure out if she wants to give her ex-boyfriend a second chance, confess her crush to her best friend or explore her feelings for the new girl in town. This was such a fun story, with pure chaos and bisexual disasters. Maggie is a messy character, trying her best. She’s wondering what love is, and how it feels for the different people in her life. She loves photography, but she isn’t sure if leaving her town for university is what she wants to do anymore. She’s the definition of a disaster (sorry not sorry, Maggie!). But it’s impossible to not root for her, she’s such a caring and sympathetic character. She’s afraid of stepping out of the familiar, she’s scared of disappointing her mom and sisters after everything they have done for her. She’s scared, she’s seventeen, she’s pure angst and she’s your local bisexual disaster Yes, this is a story about romantic love and crushes. But it is also about figuring out life after high school, the way friendships and dreams change. It’s about family and sisters and a big quince. Maggie is so afraid of how things are changing in her relationships, that she wants to hold on to the familiar so hard. She makes mistakes along the way and she learns how to fix them. Her relationships help her grow and in turn, her relationship with her loved ones grows as well. Andrea brings such charming characters to life. It’s a poignant story, with so much thought behind it. Maggie discusses many times different biphobic stereotypes. It's how self-aware the story is that won me over some of my doubts at the beginning of the book. Like how Maggie comments about being a bisexual girl who isn't sure about her feelings for these three people and how it looks like she can't decide. These instances are properly called out, I just want to say. Maggie acknowledges these stereotypes, which I thought was very well done. There is an intention behind Maggie's (questionable) choices, which makes her character more nuanced, and more charming as well. One of my favorite things about the story was the relationship between Maggie and her sisters. They fight and tease each other but they are always there to hold each other up. Their love for Maggie carries her so far. It warmed my heart. I feel like if you love YA romance and messy YA protagonists, Just Your Local Bisexual Disaster is a must-read.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Belle Ellrich

    *I was provided a digital galley via Edelweiss+ in return for my honest review. This does not affect my opinion* Just Your Local Bisexual Disaster will touch your heart in more ways than one. I felt seen, I felt represented, and I felt touched on every single page of this book. Andrea Mosqueda took my heart and broke it into a thousand pieces, and then stitched them all back together. If there was one book I would die for, it would be Just Your Local Bisexual Disaster. Characters – Mosqueda allowed *I was provided a digital galley via Edelweiss+ in return for my honest review. This does not affect my opinion* Just Your Local Bisexual Disaster will touch your heart in more ways than one. I felt seen, I felt represented, and I felt touched on every single page of this book. Andrea Mosqueda took my heart and broke it into a thousand pieces, and then stitched them all back together. If there was one book I would die for, it would be Just Your Local Bisexual Disaster. Characters – Mosqueda allowed her characters to make mistakes. In their development, she made them imperfectly perfect. Magdalena, or “Maggie,” is the main character, and she is put through quite a bit of emotional turmoil and tough decisions. It was clear that Mosqueda did what she could to get across that Maggie is a teenager, and teenagers make decisions that seem silly or stupid. Teenagers are stubborn, too, and Maggie was. I loved that Mosqueda was obvious in how much she pushed through Maggie to teach readers that mistakes are inevitable–it’s how you fix and make up for them that determines your outcome. When it came to the side characters, I loved them just as much. Alyssa and Veronica were the sisters I never had, the sisters I wish I had in my life. They were by Maggie’s side, even when she was at fault, and they pushed her to be a better person. They contributed so much to the story that, without them involved, I feel like this book wouldn’t have been what it is. Matthew was a bit difficult for me to like, and for good reason. He’s Maggie’s ex-boyfriend, so I feel like that’s a bit explainable in and of itself. But he’s a messy character. He has a lot of flaws, and he’s starting to realize it. He leaned on Maggie as a friend, even when he reminisced on them as a pair. I especially adored his development, even when I thought he was a horrible match-up for Maggie. And Amanda was the person I easily pictured her to be. Amanda is Maggie’s best friend, but she’s given our main character so many signals that she might not be as straight as she’s claimed to be. Her character was one I could easily picture in people I’d previously had in my life–ones who were still learning what the difference between loving someone as a friend and loving someone as a significant other was all about. And then there was Dani. Dani who was hurt in the past, Dani who was scared to open up to something new, Dani who knew she had a problem she needed to work on but was still stuck in a bad habit. Dani who I rooted so much for and was happy to see get the development I knew Mosqueda would deliver. Her character was truly one I think a lot of people can see themselves as, even as a side character. She wasn’t fragile, but she was scared–and so was Maggie. Overall, I couldn’t speak any higher about the character development, that as I read, I loved more and more. Plot – It was easily noticeable just how well thought out and hard-worked on this plot was. Even the smallest of details became recognizable, and it was made to feel like you’re watching a movie. The scenes played out so easily in my head with little static or fog, and I kept yearning for more. There were no inconsistencies, no backtrack-wayward throws. Everything meshed into the story so well that it was hard to let go by the ending. Writing Style – Andrea Mosqueda’s writing style feels like that “welcome home” you’ve been waiting to hear. It comes with the warm, fuzzy feeling, and she knows just how to enrapture her readers with her words. I found myself completely immersed and entranced into the the book within the first few paragraphs, and I fell more in love as the book went out. The emotions and feelings she was able to portray through her writing felt as real as they would be if you were experiencing them for yourself, in person. World Building – Like I’ve mentioned in previous reviews, I normally don’t touch on world building in non-fantasy novels. But in the case of Just Your Local Bisexual Disaster, Mosqueda built for us a place that we could picture, touch and feel all within the confines of our imagination and her provided detailing. I felt like I was physically following Maggie into her family’s little store–doubling as a home, and I could fully picture the town that she and her family lived in and frequented. Mosqueda’s attention to detail, even in the smallest ones, was there and obvious on page, and it made the reading experience all the more special. Overall – I adored and loved this book with every fiber of my being. Maggie was the perfect main character for this story, and I loved being able to follow her through her trials of love and learned lessons. You could truly tell that Andrea Mosqueda wrote this for the bisexual teens–or even the bisexual adults who struggled during their teens–that needed this story. I needed this story, and I’m so honored to have had the chance to read it. For that, I rate this book 5 stars. I highly recommend this novel, and I look forward to reading more from Mosqueda in the future.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Amourousse ✨ (Maria)

    This book doesn't even have a description but the title is something I'd call my autobiography so you know...I HAVE TO READ IT✨ This book doesn't even have a description but the title is something I'd call my autobiography so you know...I HAVE TO READ IT✨

  15. 5 out of 5

    Phobos

    Instagram | Book Blog | Twitter Thank you to publisher Fierce Reads and Colored Pages Book Tours for providing a free copy of the book to review. Content Warnings: biphobia (mostly internalized), past death of a parent | Minor: police brutality (past), gun violence (past), cheating (past), pregnancy, drug use 3.25 stars rounded way up because we need more OwnVoices queer POC rep. This book was honestly very much the YA bisexual love story it set out to be. What made it stand so strongly is the fact Instagram | Book Blog | Twitter Thank you to publisher Fierce Reads and Colored Pages Book Tours for providing a free copy of the book to review. Content Warnings: biphobia (mostly internalized), past death of a parent | Minor: police brutality (past), gun violence (past), cheating (past), pregnancy, drug use 3.25 stars rounded way up because we need more OwnVoices queer POC rep. This book was honestly very much the YA bisexual love story it set out to be. What made it stand so strongly is the fact that this isn't your typical coming out plus romance, and instead, the romance takes center stage and is very distinctly with a man and two women (one lesbian) as love interests for Maggie, our female main character. Love that. In the way that much fiction features an all-white cast, this one takes place in a Mexican-American community. Their Mexican identity is important. There are untranslated Spanish sentences, which I don't mind as someone who knows enough Spanish, but even if I didn't, the context clues are there. In terms of characters, we have our bisexual disaster main character Maggie. She is exactly the messy unapologetic bisexual you'd expect with a title like this. And 2/3 of her love interests are equally as messy and dramatic as she is. And while the three love interests get a solid amount of background, their personalities aren't complex and are ultimately archetypes. Despite that, they all feel like proper teens. I actually felt old while reading this since I'd never heard the term "finsta" before this. Ugh, I was on Urban Dictionary and everything. Don't look at me. Told from the singular first-person POV of Maggie, the prose is well suited to the story in its mellow manner. The overall pacing, especially in the beginning, is slow in a careless way more filler than deliberate. The book could have told the same story in about 100 fewer pages and been all the stronger for it. The plot itself is a very classic romantic comedy. There's something acutely "teen movie rom-com" about turning your relationship woes into a school project. Overall, this was a neat read. Most of all, I enjoyed the definitely messy and stereotypical, but ultimately valid representation. I'd recommend this to lovers of YA, bisexual characters, sapphic relationships, drama, love triangles- all that good stuff. If that's distinctly not your thing and you're considering it, don't.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    I received an advance copy from Feiwel and Friends via Netgalley for review purposes. This in no way influences my review; all words, thoughts, and opinions are my own. Content notes: (view spoiler)[past death of parent by police murder, underage alcohol consumption, marijuana use, biphobia (challenged), pregnancy of side character (hide spoiler)] This book perfectly speaks to messy teenage romance and feelings, and navigating friendship and romance, especially when the person you think you like i I received an advance copy from Feiwel and Friends via Netgalley for review purposes. This in no way influences my review; all words, thoughts, and opinions are my own. Content notes: (view spoiler)[past death of parent by police murder, underage alcohol consumption, marijuana use, biphobia (challenged), pregnancy of side character (hide spoiler)] This book perfectly speaks to messy teenage romance and feelings, and navigating friendship and romance, especially when the person you think you like is also your best friend. Maggie is such a fantastic protagonist, and I loved being a part of her journey of figuring out who she likes and wants to take to her sister’s Quince. Full review closer to release! Full review: This book perfectly speaks to messy teenage romance and feelings, and navigating friendship and romance, especially when the person you think you like is also your best friend. Maggie is such a fantastic protagonist, and I loved being a part of her journey of figuring out who she likes and wants to take to her sister’s Quince. Maggie’s younger sister is getting ready for her quinceñera and as one of her damas, Maggie needs to figure out who she wants to take as her date. Her ex-boyfriend-returned-to-friend Matthew seems to be sending her mixed, confused signals on whether he likes her and wants to try again, further complicated by the fact he’s got a new girlfriend. Her best friend was one of her first crushes that she thinks she’s moved on from because Amanda is straight, but what if the touches and hugs between them mean more than Maggie initially thinks? And then there’s Dani, a girl who just moved to town and has her own baggage with past relationships and less-than-stellar reactions to work through. In order to figure out who Maggie actually likes, she decides for her art project to do a series of photographs on a private finsta with captions to navigate her emotions in a way she’s used to understanding the world. This book is truly such a delight and gave me so many feelings while reading it. I related very much to Maggie working through her feelings and trying to figure out whether her feelings for her best friend are platonic or romantic. The complicated, messy friendships were so relatable and such a highlight of this book. I also loved Maggie’s relationships with her sisters Veronica and Alyssa, as well her mom and Veronica’s boyfriend CJ. Seeing all the different relationships and how much love there is for family and community was so well balanced and perfectly told this story. I truly just loved this book and cannot wait for more people to fall in love with Maggie’s journey.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Booklover (Ash)

    Are you sure that this title isn't based on anyone. Like yknow, me? 😳😂😂 Goodreads | My blog | Storygraph | Pinterest | Instagram prereview written 14th november Are you sure that this title isn't based on anyone. Like yknow, me? 😳😂😂 Goodreads | My blog | Storygraph | Pinterest | Instagram prereview written 14th november

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    Coming of Age, Bisexual, Latinx, Mexican American, LGBTQIA, YA. I adored this book and loved the main character Maggie who uses a school art project to short out her complicated feelings towards her ex, her BFF, a new girl and her future. I completely felt for Maggie and her dilemmas with all the relationships in her life and coming to terms with life and love. Mosqueda did a fantastic job of drawing me into Maggie’s world and back to my teenage years, making me wish I had stories like these grow Coming of Age, Bisexual, Latinx, Mexican American, LGBTQIA, YA. I adored this book and loved the main character Maggie who uses a school art project to short out her complicated feelings towards her ex, her BFF, a new girl and her future. I completely felt for Maggie and her dilemmas with all the relationships in her life and coming to terms with life and love. Mosqueda did a fantastic job of drawing me into Maggie’s world and back to my teenage years, making me wish I had stories like these growing up. Everything about this story felt authentic and genuine and how a real 17-year-old would deal with her issues. I really appreciated and liked how Mosqueda approached relationships between Bi and Straight individuals and how to navigate certain actions and boundaries. Such a fantastic book, a really compelling coming-of-age story. Also, I’d like to give a special shout-out to the narrator Stacy Gonzalez who did a wonderful job. Special thank you to #NetGalley, #AndreaMosqueda and #MacmillanAudio for sharing this digital copy, these are my honest thoughts on #JustYourLocalBisexualDisaster. Also, a thank you to narrator #StacyGonzalez.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tib

    3.5/5 CW: biphobia (mostly internalized), death of a parent via police, police brutality (off page), gun violence (off page), cheating mentioned, pregnancy (briefly mentioned at the end), drug use (weed), smoking This was a fun read! Maggie is, as the title indicates, a hot bisexual disaster. She was messy, selfish, and has so many complicated feelings for her ex, best friend, and the new girl at school so she creates a finsta as a school art project to try and detangle those feelings and see who 3.5/5 CW: biphobia (mostly internalized), death of a parent via police, police brutality (off page), gun violence (off page), cheating mentioned, pregnancy (briefly mentioned at the end), drug use (weed), smoking This was a fun read! Maggie is, as the title indicates, a hot bisexual disaster. She was messy, selfish, and has so many complicated feelings for her ex, best friend, and the new girl at school so she creates a finsta as a school art project to try and detangle those feelings and see who she wants to escort her to her sisters quince. I loved Maggie as a character. She loves her family and friends fiercely and, despite having some residual feelings for her ex, really wants to make things work with him as friends. She just can't see past herself and her wants/needs sometimes when it comes to being there for them while also at the same time pushing herself to want things because she thinks that's what's expected of her and she doesn't want to let anyone down. Like I said, she's a hot mess and honestly, junior year of high school is usually where that hot messiness starts because it's such a pivotal year for most teens. I loved watching her grow throughout the book as well as seeing how close she and her sisters are. I'm giving it 3.5 stars because it's a pretty basic storyline with nothing really exciting or new added and because there are so many love interests and people, the side characters felt a little flat. But that's okay! I still really enjoyed my time reading it and I'm glad this wasn't a huge disappointment because I'm going to be honest it was a title and cover buy for me!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sofi Mascaró

    thank you sooo much to Netgalley, Fierce Reads and Colored Pages blog tours for gifting me this book in exchange for an honest review!! OMG THIS BOOK IS JUST AMAZING AND PHENOMENAL AND IT FELT AS IF I WAS READING MYSELF OMG OMG 😱😱😱 but no, for real, besides the fact that the MC is trying to deal with her love life, it also focuses on what it feels like to take huge decisions that will impact our lives from such a young age, the way one can discover their true feelings for another person, which I thank you sooo much to Netgalley, Fierce Reads and Colored Pages blog tours for gifting me this book in exchange for an honest review!! OMG THIS BOOK IS JUST AMAZING AND PHENOMENAL AND IT FELT AS IF I WAS READING MYSELF OMG OMG 😱😱😱 but no, for real, besides the fact that the MC is trying to deal with her love life, it also focuses on what it feels like to take huge decisions that will impact our lives from such a young age, the way one can discover their true feelings for another person, which I thought was just adorable, and how important are friendships in your life. the photography aspect and the concerts were just an amazing add on to this book, something I've never read about before and it made me smile so much whenever the MC talked about pictures and concerts. the prose was amazing as well, truly felt as I was seventeen again, trying to decipher the world around me and my friends. the setting was gorgeous, I really wanted to check google maps all the time to see if those places were real. but owerall, I enjoyed the final thought: that we will all make mistakes and screw it up, but most importantly is to go after what you want the most, apologise if you ruined it and keep trying. i wish this book is read in schools, it's completely necesary even for people my age who are still on the fence about entering adulthood. an amazing read and one I will never forget, ever 💜💜

  21. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    3.5 rounded up. An #ownvoices coming of age debut featuring Maggie Gonzales, a Latinx bisexual teen who needs to find a date to her sister's quinceañera. I loved the focus on family, friendship and navigating old and new romantic relationships. Maggie's love life is a bit of a mess, she's confused about what she wants to do after high school and trying to figure out how to be a better friend, sister, girlfriend. Perfect for fans of Once Upon a Quinceañera by Monica Gomez-Hira or No filter and oth 3.5 rounded up. An #ownvoices coming of age debut featuring Maggie Gonzales, a Latinx bisexual teen who needs to find a date to her sister's quinceañera. I loved the focus on family, friendship and navigating old and new romantic relationships. Maggie's love life is a bit of a mess, she's confused about what she wants to do after high school and trying to figure out how to be a better friend, sister, girlfriend. Perfect for fans of Once Upon a Quinceañera by Monica Gomez-Hira or No filter and other lies by Crystal Maldonado and great on audio narrated by Stacy Gonzalez. Much thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for an ALC in exchange for my honest review.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kushmir

    3.5 stars. Loved the messy bi rep + the subversion of the "bisexuals can't choose" trope but this book was sorta all over the place? Maggie's voice was great and I liked that we got to see so much of her history between 2 of her love interest, plus her closeness with her friends and family. The exploration of culture was wonderful too, but there was just so much happening at once. It was like the book couldn't choose exactly what it was about. Also, I liked the first few pop culture references, b 3.5 stars. Loved the messy bi rep + the subversion of the "bisexuals can't choose" trope but this book was sorta all over the place? Maggie's voice was great and I liked that we got to see so much of her history between 2 of her love interest, plus her closeness with her friends and family. The exploration of culture was wonderful too, but there was just so much happening at once. It was like the book couldn't choose exactly what it was about. Also, I liked the first few pop culture references, but then it began to border on steroetypical. I still don't know how I feel about it. Really glad who she chose in the end though :)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Daniela

    Just Your Local Bisexual Disaster has a heartfelt story with drama, romance, and photography as Maggie tries to understand her heart and her relationships with others. Besides having amazing Bisexual and Latinx rep, this book has great, realistic characters that are flawed but lovable. I also loved how Maggie used her photography as an outlet to understand others.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Letty Leal Evans

    My little mind and heart are blown that I read two books in a row featuring queer Chicana main characters, the other being The Lesbiana's Guide to Catholic School. While I preferred TLGtCS, as it took me a while to get into this book, I loved the characters, especially appreciating their flaws and how they were allowed to make mistakes. I found this incredibly realistic. It was also nice to see a supportive friend group and family. I am from Corpus and was thrilled to see South Texas repped. Ras My little mind and heart are blown that I read two books in a row featuring queer Chicana main characters, the other being The Lesbiana's Guide to Catholic School. While I preferred TLGtCS, as it took me a while to get into this book, I loved the characters, especially appreciating their flaws and how they were allowed to make mistakes. I found this incredibly realistic. It was also nice to see a supportive friend group and family. I am from Corpus and was thrilled to see South Texas repped. Raspas y tacos para todos!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Amber

    I think the title of this says it back, sometimes you are a bisexual disaster. This book is unapologetic in knowing that you can personally be messy, but in a way that can cause growth. I received an ecopy of this book through Netgalley; however, my opinions are my own.

  26. 5 out of 5

    coffee

    I know that representation is important but I never really considered myself as part of the group that needed to see myself represented in a book. That's not really why I read books but OMGGGG. Reading this book felt like being home like finding home and just, I'm feeling all sorts of emotions right now. I truly love this book in ways I probably won't love other books. It's like finally receiving a present I never knew I wanted or needed or imagined could exist I know that representation is important but I never really considered myself as part of the group that needed to see myself represented in a book. That's not really why I read books but OMGGGG. Reading this book felt like being home like finding home and just, I'm feeling all sorts of emotions right now. I truly love this book in ways I probably won't love other books. It's like finally receiving a present I never knew I wanted or needed or imagined could exist

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sacha

    2.5 stars I saw this title and *knew* I would love this book. That's why it's so surprising that I just could never get into it...and I tried HARD. Maggie deserves better. Maggie, the m.c., is - as the title suggests - bisexual and somewhat of a disaster (though not that bad for her age), and though she's living in a place that is doing a better job of showing its backward attitudes toward humanity even more lately, she's fortunate to be surrounded by a relatively supportive group of family and 2.5 stars I saw this title and *knew* I would love this book. That's why it's so surprising that I just could never get into it...and I tried HARD. Maggie deserves better. Maggie, the m.c., is - as the title suggests - bisexual and somewhat of a disaster (though not that bad for her age), and though she's living in a place that is doing a better job of showing its backward attitudes toward humanity even more lately, she's fortunate to be surrounded by a relatively supportive group of family and friends. Her sister's quince is a fun backdrop because of these relationships. There are few things I dread more than a less-than-stellar review, particularly for a YA novel with an intersectionally diverse main character, but I struggled here. Everything takes forever. There is so much thinking and processing and language to say the simplest stuff. At times, I thought I could skip several chapters and lose no important information at all. To be clear, I didn't do this, but I wanted to badly throughout the read. Having completed the read, I unfortunately feel like that assumption was correct. The ingredients for greatness are here, but there's too much filler diluting the substance. Maggie is that rare bi character who demonstrates actual interest in multiple partners of distinct genders, and there is so much opportunity for a complex and meaningful dive into her character, but it just does not come together. I will recommend this one to students with some caveats because of some of the specific boxes it checks, but tighter editing here, please. *Special thanks to NetGalley and Feiwel & Friends for this arc, which I received in exchange for an honest review. The opinions expressed here are my own.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Faith

    I honestly adored this book so much. The characters and the world they lived in just felt so genuine and realistic, and it was easy to feel drawn into the story.  Maggie's narration was incredibly compelling, and I think it's impossible not to root for her. Mosqueda has done a great job creating a sympathetic character with flaws, which I think teenage readers will appreciate. I also appreciate the care she took in developing minor characters. Though the story was told from Maggie's view, all the I honestly adored this book so much. The characters and the world they lived in just felt so genuine and realistic, and it was easy to feel drawn into the story.  Maggie's narration was incredibly compelling, and I think it's impossible not to root for her. Mosqueda has done a great job creating a sympathetic character with flaws, which I think teenage readers will appreciate. I also appreciate the care she took in developing minor characters. Though the story was told from Maggie's view, all the side characters felt distinct, both in terms of their personalities and Maggie's relationships with them. I also really loved all the queer cultural references scattered throughout the book, including references to She-ra, Korrasami, Girl in Red, etc. Though this book will likely have broad appeal for YA readers in general, I think queer readers will especially adore it. All in all, I would say this book was just one great, happy read for me. I felt connected to the characters, and I was always excited to see what would come next as I was reading. If I had one complaint, there were several glaring errors with Spanish words, specifically in regards to accent marks. For example, "téta" instead of teta, "está casa" instead of esta casa, "quíen" instead of quién. However, since I read an ARC, I'm certain this will be fixed before the book is officially published. *** I received a free eARC from Netgalley in exchange for my honest review ***

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cori

    **Thank you NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for an honest review. Rating: 2.5 Unfortunately, I did something that I don't usually do and decided to DNF this book. While I was immediately attracted to the title and storyline, the actual written story was lacking and the characters didn't carry any depth. As someone who gets hooked to a book based on character growth, development, and individuality - I did not feel that in this one. After reading for a good chunk, I realized that I would rather **Thank you NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for an honest review. Rating: 2.5 Unfortunately, I did something that I don't usually do and decided to DNF this book. While I was immediately attracted to the title and storyline, the actual written story was lacking and the characters didn't carry any depth. As someone who gets hooked to a book based on character growth, development, and individuality - I did not feel that in this one. After reading for a good chunk, I realized that I would rather be reading anything else. Another aspect that I am taking into consideration is perhaps this book is not the best fit for what I generally like. While I tend to love YA - I have found that I am drawn to older YA rather than teen YA. This to me feels very teen YA and so not the best fit. Based on other ratings, it seems that there are many others who love this book and I hope that there are many more who do!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

    DNF. This isn't working for me. I feel like we're thrown right in with a million different characters with nothing to distinguish themselves from one another. Just not for me. DNF. This isn't working for me. I feel like we're thrown right in with a million different characters with nothing to distinguish themselves from one another. Just not for me.

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