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Artifact Space

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Out in the darkness of space, something is targeting the Greatships. With their vast cargo holds and a crew that could fill a city, the Greatships are the lifeblood of human-occupied space, transporting an unimaginable volume - and value - of goods from City, the greatest human orbital, all the way to Tradepoint at the other, to trade for xenoglas with an unknowable alien s Out in the darkness of space, something is targeting the Greatships. With their vast cargo holds and a crew that could fill a city, the Greatships are the lifeblood of human-occupied space, transporting an unimaginable volume - and value - of goods from City, the greatest human orbital, all the way to Tradepoint at the other, to trade for xenoglas with an unknowable alien species. It has always been Marca Nbaro's dream to achieve the near-impossible: escape her upbringing and venture into space. All it took, to make her way onto the crew of the Greatship Athens was thousands of hours in simulators, dedication, and pawning or selling every scrap of her old life in order to forge a new one. But though she's made her way onboard with faked papers, leaving her old life - and scandals - behind isn't so easy. She may have just combined all the dangers of her former life, with all the perils of the new . . .


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Out in the darkness of space, something is targeting the Greatships. With their vast cargo holds and a crew that could fill a city, the Greatships are the lifeblood of human-occupied space, transporting an unimaginable volume - and value - of goods from City, the greatest human orbital, all the way to Tradepoint at the other, to trade for xenoglas with an unknowable alien s Out in the darkness of space, something is targeting the Greatships. With their vast cargo holds and a crew that could fill a city, the Greatships are the lifeblood of human-occupied space, transporting an unimaginable volume - and value - of goods from City, the greatest human orbital, all the way to Tradepoint at the other, to trade for xenoglas with an unknowable alien species. It has always been Marca Nbaro's dream to achieve the near-impossible: escape her upbringing and venture into space. All it took, to make her way onto the crew of the Greatship Athens was thousands of hours in simulators, dedication, and pawning or selling every scrap of her old life in order to forge a new one. But though she's made her way onboard with faked papers, leaving her old life - and scandals - behind isn't so easy. She may have just combined all the dangers of her former life, with all the perils of the new . . .

30 review for Artifact Space

  1. 5 out of 5

    William Gwynne

    Interview with Miles Cameron talking about Artifact Space and more - The Brothers Gwynne Finished Artifact Space, and it can be said that Miles Cameron does not just write fantasy well, or just historical fiction, or sci-fi, but can write all three with equal aplomb. From the beginning Christian/Miles Cameron brings his distinctive style to the table, yet slightly moulds it to fit well with his setting and characters. We are thrown into a futuristic society, following the character Marca Nbaro, wh Interview with Miles Cameron talking about Artifact Space and more - The Brothers Gwynne Finished Artifact Space, and it can be said that Miles Cameron does not just write fantasy well, or just historical fiction, or sci-fi, but can write all three with equal aplomb. From the beginning Christian/Miles Cameron brings his distinctive style to the table, yet slightly moulds it to fit well with his setting and characters. We are thrown into a futuristic society, following the character Marca Nbaro, who joins one of the great ships destined for a trade point to collect xenoglas, a precious material that almost dominates society. But, she is a character with a traumatic past and suffers as a result, with no trust for those around her and a constant foreboding of being discovered and thrown out of her newfound home. After finishing Artifact Space, I can say that Miles Cameron is a master of characters. The subtle hints to the past of characters, and their complex fluctuation of moods and idiosyncrasies is just wonderfully represented in the form of an array of personalities and circumstances. I am not widely read in the science fiction genre, but I can say with relative confidence that Miles Cameron has formed a unique and fresh setting with great detail within these pages, making you feel almost as if you actually are in space, and that you know now what it would be like to fly or be posted on a great ship. Full Review to Come To hear a short pitch of this sci-fi debut from Miles/Christian Cameron himself, to see if this is for you, you can click on a link here - The Brothers Gwynne

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sebastien Castell

    I sometimes think every writer of military science fiction is secretly (some not so secretly) trying to write Horatio Hornblower in space. That would be terrific for me as a reader, since I loved the Horatio Hornblower stories of daring, honour, valour, and ingenuity overcoming adversity rather than brute force. Alas, I've never really found a science fiction series that gave me those same Hornblower vibes while offering a believable and intriguing context in which those adventures could take pl I sometimes think every writer of military science fiction is secretly (some not so secretly) trying to write Horatio Hornblower in space. That would be terrific for me as a reader, since I loved the Horatio Hornblower stories of daring, honour, valour, and ingenuity overcoming adversity rather than brute force. Alas, I've never really found a science fiction series that gave me those same Hornblower vibes while offering a believable and intriguing context in which those adventures could take place. Until now. Artifact Space is what fans of Star Trek the Next Generation who've longed for something updated and more reflective of a diverse human society yet still holds to that same core of optimism and idealism about human beings have been waiting for. It's filled with intriguing space ship troubles, conflicts large and small, the spirit of camaraderie one would hope we'd achieve when going into space, and yet with all the intricacies of our human foibles intact rather than glossed over. The story centres on Marca Nbaro, a new midshipper on the Greatship Athens – a massive space faring vessel run not by a purely benevolent government but by a consortium of business interests inspired (one suspects) by Venetian mercantile culture. Marca has a troubled past, and the things she's had to do to get a position on the Athens frequently leave her vulnerable to those out to get her. But she also finds friends aboard the ship, and a growing sense of purpose even as the near-calamitous situations she winds up in reveal her strengths. Because I'm not a frequent reader of sci-fi (not because I don't like the genre but because I often don't quite get it due to my own ineptitude), I often find myself shunted out of a book because the science is either so sparse as to be magic or so lovingly rendered as to be a textbook about things that don't work in the real world. Kind of like when you read a fantasy novel with four thousand houses, countries, shires, and whatever else and realize you've just memorized a history that won't actually help you at all in your daily life. Artifact Space manages to find a path for the reader in which the science of space travel is balanced against an equally enticing and complex culture and economy. Yes, I meant that: the economics are actually interesting here. More importantly, Cameron never piles on so much at once that you find yourself lost amidst figures and facts about either space travel or the intricate human culture that's achieved it. Another aspect of Artifact Space I enjoyed was that – as one would expect on a massive ship hurtling through space – the book is somewhat episodic. It's not one long, drawn-out singular problem (though there is a mystery that threads the entire narrative), but more the ongoing adventures of Marca NBaro and the crew of the Greatship Athens. If that sounds like a pitch for this to be a television series, it is; I really, really want to see this as a TV show that sits somewhere between Star Trek the Next Generation and The Expanse. Anyway, enough gushing. Let me grind my axe against the insufferably talented Miles Cameron here a moment by saying I wish he'd added a glossary and dramatis personae to the book. Every acronym, concept, and character is explained, but if you glide over those parts, you'll find yourself later wondering what the heck that term is they keep using every time they're referring to the organization they work for or the ones it competes against. However, if you're reading this review, then I can save you lots of trouble later on by advising that you pay close attention when terms and characters are introduced. Cameron doesn't drop stuff in for the hell of it – everything will be meaningful at some point in the story. Artifact Space is the beginning of what I hope will be a huge series, rich in characters and the textures of a space faring society. For those like me who want to read sci-fi but often feel like an outsider looking in when picking up a science fiction novel, Artifact Space is a welcoming delight.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Nicholas Eames

    Surprise, surprise! Another awesome book from Miles Cameron, who writes like no one else I know. There's an honesty in his work, a mix of high adventure and war-time camaraderie fused with gritty, day-to-day details that makes the setting and characters feel, for lack of a better term, really, really real. If you liked the style he honed in the Traitor Son Cycle and perfected in his Masters and Mages series, there's more of that here: but in space! And if you haven't read him yet, this is a great Surprise, surprise! Another awesome book from Miles Cameron, who writes like no one else I know. There's an honesty in his work, a mix of high adventure and war-time camaraderie fused with gritty, day-to-day details that makes the setting and characters feel, for lack of a better term, really, really real. If you liked the style he honed in the Traitor Son Cycle and perfected in his Masters and Mages series, there's more of that here: but in space! And if you haven't read him yet, this is a great place to start.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nick Borrelli

    There is virtually no buildup at all in the beginning of this book as we immediately encounter the main character Marca Nbaro as she is being pursued by some gigantic scary dudes. For what reason isn't clear at that moment but the excitement of the chase and the tension with regard to whether or not she will be caught is thrill enough. This is the launching point (no pun intended) for Cameron's ARTIFACT SPACE and it really doesn't ever let up from there. The tone is set in the opening chapter fo There is virtually no buildup at all in the beginning of this book as we immediately encounter the main character Marca Nbaro as she is being pursued by some gigantic scary dudes. For what reason isn't clear at that moment but the excitement of the chase and the tension with regard to whether or not she will be caught is thrill enough. This is the launching point (no pun intended) for Cameron's ARTIFACT SPACE and it really doesn't ever let up from there. The tone is set in the opening chapter for what turns out to be an unbelievably action-packed space opera interwoven with so many different intriguing mysteries that make up the heart of the story. There are so many cool elements to this book, and one of them is the amazing Greatships that can carry up to 10,000 crew members. Oh and did I mention they are shaped like swords? You didn't think that Miles Cameron was going to leave his epic fantasy influences behind completely did you? Envisioning these transport ships and their unique construction really captured my imagination and Cameron does an outstanding job of giving such a vivid description of these enormous space vessels. So right away I was blown away by the technology aspect of this story. But this isn't just a hollow tale with cool tech as window-dressing, on the contrary, this story is about a person trying to overcome a dubious past that seems to follow her wherever she goes. And along the way we find that Cameron takes us in so many directions we never even imagined with thrilling side-stories aplenty. As I was reading ARTIFACT SPACE I made a comment that it reminded me of some of the space operas of Peter F. Hamilton, and there are some similarities. However, what Miles Cameron achieves that I never seemed to get from Hamilton's books is that complexity and depth of character development. And that in the end is what seriously separates this SF story from so many others. Yes there is a ton of action and suspense, yes there are cool ideas and advanced science, but there is also a moving human element that I rarely have come across, that made this a much more fulfilling read. Marca is such an easy character to root for as she seems to have gotten a pretty raw deal and her plight is one that is very relatable. Does she always go about things the legal and honest way? Not really. But we can't really fault her for it most of the time because her earnest intentions are always behind her sometimes questionable actions. And let's be honest, who doesn't love seeing someone who has had their life placed firmly behind the 8-ball dish out some payback? So yeah there were quite a few times when I definitely cheered out loud for her. As I finished the book I couldn't believe how quickly those last 100 pages or so went. If you are looking for a fun and electrifying SF book to engross yourself in this summer, ARTIFACT SPACE is the book that will satisfy on so many levels. I totally enjoyed this multi-layered space opera and would recommend it to anyone looking for an accessible SF book that doesn't bog you down with overly-technical mumbo jumbo and headache-inducing terminology. Read and savor this one for the wonderful space adventure and the extraordinary story. Well Miles Cameron, you can add yet another genre, Science-Fiction, to the ever-expanding list that you have already mastered.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Edward

    So Christian can write fantasy, historical fiction, and now sci-fi, perfectly. This man is a genius! Fantastically brilliant character driven sci-fi with those details that fans of Cameron will continue to love and some of the best character work written that will attract hordes of new readers like bees to honey, or knights to armour!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Janny

    Totally loved this book. If you enjoy a CJ Cherryh style of 'determined waif in space' coupled with the tough metric of 'hard work and merit matters' to advance a well rounded protagonist with a checkered start in life - a scenario encountered so beautifully in the Liaden series by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller, - run, don't walk, and snag a copy of this book. If you are wanting a rousing space opera with lots of suspense, sharp action, true diversity, and a stunning, quick paced plot, you will fi Totally loved this book. If you enjoy a CJ Cherryh style of 'determined waif in space' coupled with the tough metric of 'hard work and merit matters' to advance a well rounded protagonist with a checkered start in life - a scenario encountered so beautifully in the Liaden series by Sharon Lee and Steve Miller, - run, don't walk, and snag a copy of this book. If you are wanting a rousing space opera with lots of suspense, sharp action, true diversity, and a stunning, quick paced plot, you will find the characterization on page here is just as beautifully drawn. And cool swords, scribed by an author with hands on knowledge - I'm hooked for the duration. Sequel please, and soon! A very long time since a book this tautly written kept me up past my bedtime!

  7. 5 out of 5

    FanFiAddict

    Rating: 9.5/10 Thanks to the publisher and author for an advance reading copy of Artifact Space for review consideration. This did not influence my thoughts or opinions. Artifact Space is THE premiere epic space opera to have on your summer reading list. Cameron pulls no punches with razor-sharp prose, fast-paced storytelling, universe-scale world-building, and a cast of characters you can’t help but root for. Cameron fans and sci-fi fans alike are in for a real treat. ‘Apparently, once upon a time Rating: 9.5/10 Thanks to the publisher and author for an advance reading copy of Artifact Space for review consideration. This did not influence my thoughts or opinions. Artifact Space is THE premiere epic space opera to have on your summer reading list. Cameron pulls no punches with razor-sharp prose, fast-paced storytelling, universe-scale world-building, and a cast of characters you can’t help but root for. Cameron fans and sci-fi fans alike are in for a real treat. ‘Apparently, once upon a time, cooking with gas was very…’ His eyes met hers. ‘Honestly, I don’t know. Half our jargon is from the old United States Navy and the other half is from the ancient British Royal Navy, and there’s a bunch of early spaceflight operations and some even from Old Terran trucking. Navies are the most conservative linguists anywhere – we preserve even the meaningless terms for hundreds of years.’ Nbaro smiled. ‘Like by and large.’ His eyes kindled, a fellow enthusiast. ‘Exactly.’ Weird to say as Miles and I have been social media pals for what feels like forever, but this is actually the first book of his that I have read. I have heard numerous amazing things about his Traitor Son Cycle and most recently Masters & Mages, and of course all of the historical fiction he writes under Christian Cameron, but just have not had the chance to take a stab (pun intended). To say it took me some time to get used to Cameron’s writing style is a bit of an understatement, but once I figured out the flow and texture of his prose, this book flew by. The prose is very punchy and in your face; it doesn’t allow you much time to get your footing until you are thrown against a wall or having to parry for your life. I think that is part of what made this read so special. The author doesn’t waste time droning on and on with info dumps. Everything in the story serves a purpose and it is your job as the reader to keep up. Not saying things aren’t explained, but much like in grade school, the teacher is only going to say it once and then you are on your own. Marca Nbaro is such an intriguing character. The way in which she navigates her way onto the Athens (very illegally), attempts to keep a low profile while also rising up the ranks by being a badass, and is always there to lend a hand to her crewmates is such a refreshing take in a genre (military science fiction) that is generally filled with gritty, war-soaked alcoholics looking for some kind of redemption or ‘last hurrah’. She is a character that is easily likeable; one who you quickly become enamored with as you learn about her past and the reason behind throwing everything and kitchen sink at getting onboard the Athens. The book reads like a season of a TV show, which is a bit of a breathe of fresh air from a singular on-going battle or trip across the universe. Chapters feel like episodes where you can either read one and set it aside, or binge the entire thing to your heart’s content. Gives you sort of a reason to continue as chapters sometimes end on cliffhangers and, well, you just have to know what happens next. All in all, this is an extraordinary piece of science fiction that will end up on my ‘Best Of’ list for 2021.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brian Clegg

    This is a cracking (and, frankly, wrist-cracking at 568 pages) piece of space opera. That's a term that is sometimes used as a put-down to suggest pulp rubbish, but I use it affectionately. It's not trying to be great literature, but it's a great read, which is all I want from a book. The author mentions Alistair Reynolds as an inspiration - and it's certainly true that there's something of Reynolds' (or Banks') sweeping imagination of a space-based civilisation. But for me, there's more here of This is a cracking (and, frankly, wrist-cracking at 568 pages) piece of space opera. That's a term that is sometimes used as a put-down to suggest pulp rubbish, but I use it affectionately. It's not trying to be great literature, but it's a great read, which is all I want from a book. The author mentions Alistair Reynolds as an inspiration - and it's certainly true that there's something of Reynolds' (or Banks') sweeping imagination of a space-based civilisation. But for me, there's more here of a modern equivalent of Robert Heinlein at his best. Not the soppy stuff he produced towards the end of his career, but the period that peaked with The Moon is a Harsh Mistress. In fact, the basic storyline has a distinct resemblance to that of Heinlein's Starman Jones. In that 1950s novel, the main character is from a spacegoing family who manages to get a place on a ship despite not having the qualifications, and with his skill manages in the end to save the whole ship. Here, our central character, Marca Nbaro, has a similar trajectory, though both the ship Athens (which is Star Trek-like in its scale and ethos, but in the form of a massive military-supported interstellar trader rather than an exploratory ship) and the central character is much more twenty-first century science fiction. I liked the way that Miles Cameron doesn't gloss over the grunt work of getting on in an environment like this - Nbaro spends a long time working on training in different spheres - and despite the book feeling a little too long, there is plenty of action to keep the reader engaged. The characters are reasonably well drawn, though they rarely surprise you - the good guys are always obviously good guys, and similarly with the villains. Although there is also a touch of Starship Troopers in the military action side, it never dominates - this is a much more subtle book and doesn't attempt to glorify war and killing. Like many modern SF novels - particularly the military action type - the main character is female. What's fascinating given the discussions about male and female main characters is that it doesn't make any difference to the reader identifying with her - it makes you wonder why this took so long to happen. It's just an excellent example of space opera at its best. There were one or two small issues, mostly editorial. The first few pages were difficult to follow - if you just go with the flow, you do pick up what it's referring to, but Cameron deliberately introduces a flurry of not-quite-clear concepts. This isn't bad - I rather like it - but might put some readers off. The book has been converted from US (well, Canadian) into English spelling, but rather irritatingly the title hasn't been. And there were a few examples - hardly surprising in a book this length - of word repetition and other slightly clumsy bits of writing you might expect to be fixed in the edit. However, all this is trivial. This is the first half of a two-book series - it works fine as a standalone, but it's hard to imagine anyone reading it and not wanting to read the other title as well.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Liviu

    Excellent space opera that for the first 3/4 or so is utterly awesome and I thought it would easily be my number one book of the year, but then it goes into the "heroin has to save not only herself, her friends, the ship, the existing order - Marca, the heroine is an orphan who grew up in a brutal orphanage technically for the children of the privileged but left to the mercies of a venal and merciless patrician boss, while on the other hand, she is also the nominal head of one of the most patric Excellent space opera that for the first 3/4 or so is utterly awesome and I thought it would easily be my number one book of the year, but then it goes into the "heroin has to save not only herself, her friends, the ship, the existing order - Marca, the heroine is an orphan who grew up in a brutal orphanage technically for the children of the privileged but left to the mercies of a venal and merciless patrician boss, while on the other hand, she is also the nominal head of one of the most patrician of patrician families so with a little cash and a good service record, she is slated to be a future leader of the society regardless and people already start placing bets on her ascending to power eventually - but also the universe and even the multiverse too" mode, upping the stakes and action to almost jumping the shark/losing the suspension of disbelief levels, so one starts wondering what is for her to save in the next volume... Hence while I greatly enjoyed it and would easily make my top 10 of the year, Artifact space would have done better to go a bit more gradually in the clearly predicted ascent of Marca; this being said, the characters, the universe, the action, and even the fairly telegraphed romance are really compelling and the pages turn by themselves, so one wants more as son as possible Highly recommended

  10. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    I thoroughly enjoyed The Traitor Son Cycle series, which prompted me to try another read from Miles Cameron. I have to say he can write a space odyssey just as well as swords and sorcery. This story centers around Marca Nbaro and her dream of flying, but achieving that dream is not an easy path, but one filled with hours and hours of hard work, along with deception. The reader joins in her quest, while learning the ins and outs of future space travel and trade. Its high tech without becoming so I thoroughly enjoyed The Traitor Son Cycle series, which prompted me to try another read from Miles Cameron. I have to say he can write a space odyssey just as well as swords and sorcery. This story centers around Marca Nbaro and her dream of flying, but achieving that dream is not an easy path, but one filled with hours and hours of hard work, along with deception. The reader joins in her quest, while learning the ins and outs of future space travel and trade. Its high tech without becoming so scientific that sometimes turns a novel into a text book, quickly losing my attention in the shuffle. As far as characters go, I want to hear more from them, the crew was fun and fascinating, right down to an eccentric AI. The ending swings a door wide open that I'll anxiously await to enter. I listened to the story enjoying the talented narration of Nneka Okoye, whose voice seemed perfect for performing this space story of the future.

  11. 5 out of 5

    S.J. Higbee

    This is one of my reading highlights of the year so far – and I can safely say that this one is definitely going to make my Outstanding Reads List of 2021. Marca is an engaging, sympathetic protagonist, who has had a tough time of it and makes a desperate break for a chance at a decent life. With help from someone else whose chances have already been ruined… I also liked the world. The merchanting ship Athens and the dynamic with the crew and the wider world holds together in a credible, diverse This is one of my reading highlights of the year so far – and I can safely say that this one is definitely going to make my Outstanding Reads List of 2021. Marca is an engaging, sympathetic protagonist, who has had a tough time of it and makes a desperate break for a chance at a decent life. With help from someone else whose chances have already been ruined… I also liked the world. The merchanting ship Athens and the dynamic with the crew and the wider world holds together in a credible, diverse world that I believed in. There is an upbeat vibe to this world, despite the dangers they undergo, which reminded me, at times, of Nathan Lowell’s enjoyable series The Golden Age of the Solar Clipper. What I especially enjoyed was learning about the onboard politics and rhythms, so that when the Athens is threatened, I very much cared. It was difficult to put the book down as I wanted them all to survive. And that concern and tension was sharpened when some of the crew don’t make it. Overall, it was an engrossing memorable read that had me very sorry to reach the end – and hopeful that the second book in this series won’t take too long to hit the shelves. Very highly recommended to fans of well written space opera adventures. While I obtained an arc of Artifact Space from Netgalley, the opinions I have expressed are unbiased and my own. 10/10

  12. 4 out of 5

    Josie ❃The Bubbly Book Reviewer❃

    Great first chapter, lots of character development. In just minutes I really came to care about our main character Marca Nbaro. I didn’t want to put Artifact Space down. I stayed up late reading it and finished it the very next morning. And I loved the ending. A pet hate of mine is a series that ends on a cliffhanger. Cameron wrote a great book, with great pace and a whole story with a beginning, middle and end. I felt satisfied when I finished this book. There was enough resolution for me to go Great first chapter, lots of character development. In just minutes I really came to care about our main character Marca Nbaro. I didn’t want to put Artifact Space down. I stayed up late reading it and finished it the very next morning. And I loved the ending. A pet hate of mine is a series that ends on a cliffhanger. Cameron wrote a great book, with great pace and a whole story with a beginning, middle and end. I felt satisfied when I finished this book. There was enough resolution for me to go “awesome”, yet the same moment made me want to read book 2 - RIGHT NOW. I feel ok about this because if memory serves, I heard that Cameron has finished or nearly finished book 2, so hopefully I don’t have too long to wait. Book 2 will be a preorder for me. I am more than happy to recommend this as a 5 star read. This ship is a merchant ship and I am happy to say that there was no heavy politics and the science was heavy enough for sci-fi fans, but not too heavy for those new to the genre. Thank you to NetGalley & Orion Publishing Group Gollancz for an advance copy.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Phil On The Hill

    Impatient, angry and on edge, our hero Marca Nbaro finds herself on the run from an orphanage, posing as a midshipman on one of the greatest star ships of human kind. Will her past be discovered? Who can she trust? Adaptable, fast, intelligent and above all lucky Nbaro finds herself caught up in a labyrinthine net of ship politics, trade and a plot to destroy her ship, the Athens. Rich in character development, a diverse cast in the crew of The Athens and great world building. Indeed The Athens i Impatient, angry and on edge, our hero Marca Nbaro finds herself on the run from an orphanage, posing as a midshipman on one of the greatest star ships of human kind. Will her past be discovered? Who can she trust? Adaptable, fast, intelligent and above all lucky Nbaro finds herself caught up in a labyrinthine net of ship politics, trade and a plot to destroy her ship, the Athens. Rich in character development, a diverse cast in the crew of The Athens and great world building. Indeed The Athens is one of the most interesting characters. Cameron describes the Athens as a a vessel of great age, but decked out in old brass, engravings and murals. I envisioned something with an Art Deco feel. A sword 7km long based around four huge gauss cannons. A trading vessel and aircraft carrier in one. A small floating city. I loved it, as the story takes us into many of the spaces within this construct. Marca struggles to control her angry and suspicion of everyone, but we slowly see a confident and skilled woman appear. The only bad thing about this book is having to wait for the sequel. Miles (Christian) Cameron has written the most exciting and rich space opera of the decade. The author provided me with an early proof to read, as I organised an event for him in 2019 and we were discussing something in the future. It was not provided for purposes of review, but given I enjoyed it so much, what the hell. March 2021

  14. 5 out of 5

    Red Beards Book Reviews

    Artifact space is  the first book in Miles Cameron's new debut Sci-Fi series The Arcana Imperri. This is the first book I've read by Cameron but I'm well aware of his previous work in the fantasy and Historical Fiction Genres and I'm a massive fan of his Writing Fighting videos on twitter. Cameron has made an effortless jump into the Sci-Fi genre with this absolutely stormer of a book that was such a fun read.  The story basically follows the MC Marca Nbaro as she tries to fulfil a life long drea Artifact space is  the first book in Miles Cameron's new debut Sci-Fi series The Arcana Imperri. This is the first book I've read by Cameron but I'm well aware of his previous work in the fantasy and Historical Fiction Genres and I'm a massive fan of his Writing Fighting videos on twitter. Cameron has made an effortless jump into the Sci-Fi genre with this absolutely stormer of a book that was such a fun read.  The story basically follows the MC Marca Nbaro as she tries to fulfil a life long dream of becoming part of the crew on one of the Great Ship. We're immediately thrown in the middle of a tense chase as Nbaro tries to escape the people hunting her and present forged documents to start a new life on board the Athens. I must confess I was a little bit confused at this stage, the first 10% of the book is so explosive and everything seems to be happening in one go but once you gather your bearings and start to settle in, you're in for one hell of a journey through space where you will encounter poisonous betrayals, camaraderie and captivating space battles. The world-building is truly exceptional in Artifact Space. We spend the majority of the book on board the Great Ship, Athens. This usually wouldn't sound too exciting for me as a reader but there's no surprise that Cameron makes it entertaining and leaves you completely immersed in the lives of the crew. There is an absolutely tonne that happens on the ship that is guaranteed to keep the reader entertained and I especially liked the combat classes and the space missions. Nbaro is taught to fight with swords and grappling in different levels of gravity which I found really interesting. I've heard quite a lot about how rich and engaging Cameron's characters are and wow, I was not disappointed. I instantly took a liking to Nbaro and enjoyed watching her grow from the withdrawn individual whose constantly got her guard up to a powerful woman whose finally found her true calling. There were times when Nbaro just turns up for a normal shift and nothing extreme happened and yet I would be completely entranced by her normal day-to-day life. I also found the other characters to be fleshed out, believable and very engaging. Each character has their own unique personality and characteristics and I loved the feeling of fierce loyalty and camaraderie between the Athens crew. I only occasionally read Sci-Fi but I found myself being quite excited for this. It was a chance to find a new author and swords and sword fighting has always been fascinating to me, especially since I've started watching the writing fighting videos. Overall, I enjoyed Artifact Space more than I thought I would and I cannot wait to continue the journey in the next installment. I think a lot of people are going to enjoy this book, whether you're an avid Sci-Fi reader or just an occasional Sci-Fi reader like me, I would definitely recommend it as a must read book of 2021.  A massive thank you Miles Cameron for providing me with a copy of Artifact Space to read and review.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ariana

    Artifact Space blew my mind. I am relatively new to science fiction, having always preferred fantasy, and I was worried I wouldn’t be able to appreciate this book, especially when seeing other reviews that compare it to some of the older, classic sci-fi. But while I am sure some elements and references went straight over my head, I needn’t have been concerned. Miles Cameron’s fist science fiction novel has shot up through the ranks to become one of my favourite reads of the year. I simply couldn Artifact Space blew my mind. I am relatively new to science fiction, having always preferred fantasy, and I was worried I wouldn’t be able to appreciate this book, especially when seeing other reviews that compare it to some of the older, classic sci-fi. But while I am sure some elements and references went straight over my head, I needn’t have been concerned. Miles Cameron’s fist science fiction novel has shot up through the ranks to become one of my favourite reads of the year. I simply couldn’t put it down; whenever I was reading, the rest of the world fell away and it would take quite a bit to pull me back out. And even when I wasn’t reading, the story had me in its grip. Marca Nbaro, the main character, is someone who is endearing, though it took me a few pages to figure that out. We’re introduced to her in what is a high tension moment – she’s hiding from someone, and she is trying to sneak her way onto the Greatship Athens, for reasons initially unclear. Very quickly, though, I was invested in her struggle, and incredibly fascinated by the world she inhabits. Nbaro is from City, the greatest orbital in Human Space, and grew up in the Orphanage, run for the children of those who die on duty. City seems to be modelled on Venice, and has the original piazza San Marco relocated on it, which is incredibly cool, and only one of the many details that made me fall in love with the book. And there are so many details, which I could go on and on about – the androgynous people, the sword shaped Greatships, the complex societal structure, the references within society to things from our earth, that nobody really understands anymore (such as James Bond and rock, paper, scissors), the sword fighting in space, the holographic tattoos… what a world! Anyway, back to Nbaro – she succeeds in getting onto the Athens, and we discover she was prevented from graduating and joining the force because of something that happened at the Orphanage, but that she has great talent and is even descended from one of the early captains of the Greatship Athens. From the premise, I expected Nbaro’s story to be one of clandestine movements and fear of discovery, and it is for a while, but I think I was just as surprised as Nbaro to find that the cast of characters she encounters aboard her new home are loveable, supportive, and impressed by Nbaro’s quick thinking. Our protagonist quickly rises in people’s esteem, and I loved watching her grow and come into her own. All of Cameron’s characters have a vivacity to them, and though there were quite a few to keep track of, I loved them all, with their complexities, quirks, and energy. In fact, this entire book has a very particular energy – it’s like an undercurrent throughout, making even the quiet moments thrum, and making the action scenes arrive suddenly and with great power. Part of this, I think, comes from the mystery of who in the vastness of space is targeting the human Greatships, with Athens seeming to be the next target – Nbaro (and the reader) never knows when a quiet, boring watch might turn into an emergency situation. There were so many threads to unravel during the course of the story, and while some questions were answered, I now wait impatiently for the second book to find out more, and you can be sure Artifact Space will be occupying my thoughts for some time to come.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Keight

    By far the best book I've read all year, and maybe Cameron's best book to date. The book starts out in the action with a tense chase and never stops. Marca Nbaro is the kind of protagonist that you root for in this incredibly epic sci-fi world, with its massive ships, unique combat systems, massive trade networks, unique planets and non-humanoid aliens, all inspiring wonder and page-turning excitement to the very end! By far the best book I've read all year, and maybe Cameron's best book to date. The book starts out in the action with a tense chase and never stops. Marca Nbaro is the kind of protagonist that you root for in this incredibly epic sci-fi world, with its massive ships, unique combat systems, massive trade networks, unique planets and non-humanoid aliens, all inspiring wonder and page-turning excitement to the very end!

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mr Chuck

    Worldbuilding at its best. A strong adventure in space set in such a real universe that seems to pull you inside and make you live every moment of it. You follow Marca Nbaro's journey from the orphanage onto one of humanity's great ships as it travels towards an alien species to trade for the precious xenoglass. Along the trip, Marca has to work, study and protect the great ship that becomes her life and family. This book is very well told and studied. I felt I learned how to travel the stars and h Worldbuilding at its best. A strong adventure in space set in such a real universe that seems to pull you inside and make you live every moment of it. You follow Marca Nbaro's journey from the orphanage onto one of humanity's great ships as it travels towards an alien species to trade for the precious xenoglass. Along the trip, Marca has to work, study and protect the great ship that becomes her life and family. This book is very well told and studied. I felt I learned how to travel the stars and how to pilot and fight in zero-g. However, as much as I appreciated the book it became tiresome for me after around 80%. The length of the story and the details of the ship after such a length started to bore me and I wanted it to end. I enjoy big reads but this one felt like it could have taken 10-15% out and would have been a better read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mustrum Ridcully

    9.5/10 a near perfect space opera The author is hitting all the right space opera notes and it’s going to be a long wait for the next book that rounds out this story, not that we are denied a quite satisfying end to volume one just that wanted to be able to continue the saga. Well written and a genuine page turner I just wanted more. If this is a set up for a full series and not just book one of a two book story as the author seems to indicate in his end note then we could be in for a very intere 9.5/10 a near perfect space opera The author is hitting all the right space opera notes and it’s going to be a long wait for the next book that rounds out this story, not that we are denied a quite satisfying end to volume one just that wanted to be able to continue the saga. Well written and a genuine page turner I just wanted more. If this is a set up for a full series and not just book one of a two book story as the author seems to indicate in his end note then we could be in for a very interesting multi book career arc of the Hornblower saga sort. My favorite novel of the year so far.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    I can think of a few people who'd really enjoy this. Review to come. I can think of a few people who'd really enjoy this. Review to come.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Penny Staples

    An exceptionally good book by a favourite author of mine. Strong characters and an engaging, immersive world. Could not put it down.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Matt Heppe

    Artifact Space is one of the best science fiction novels I’ve ever read. I’ve been a fan of Miles (Christian) Cameron for some time. He brings the same great storytelling and world-building to his science fiction that I’ve experienced in his fantasy and historical fiction. Cameron is a terrific storyteller. In Artifact Space, we follow Marca Nbaro, a troubled orphan who illegally gains a commission as a junior officer on a massive Greatship. Nbaro is a great protagonist, and Cameron does a wonde Artifact Space is one of the best science fiction novels I’ve ever read. I’ve been a fan of Miles (Christian) Cameron for some time. He brings the same great storytelling and world-building to his science fiction that I’ve experienced in his fantasy and historical fiction. Cameron is a terrific storyteller. In Artifact Space, we follow Marca Nbaro, a troubled orphan who illegally gains a commission as a junior officer on a massive Greatship. Nbaro is a great protagonist, and Cameron does a wonderful job with her development over the course of the novel. When I say Greatship, think supercarrier crossed with a giant container ship. The Greatships are massive merchant ships and are the lifeblood of human civilization. Cameron served in the United States Navy as an intelligence officer and crewmember of an S-3 Viking. These experiences shine through in his realistic depiction of life on a massive spaceship. One of the things I most love about Cameron’s books is how he brings out the details of life (clothing, training, technology, social structure, economics, and more) without lecturing the audience. Everything comes out organically in the story and adds tremendous depth to the world he’s creating. Artifact Space is a grittier, more realistic style of science fiction. It’s not magical fantasy (Star Wars) in space. Cameron pays attention to physics, Newtonian laws, and realistic technology (The Expanse). It is a style I much prefer in my science fiction. I’m not going to go into the details of the story. I’ll just say that it is part spy thriller, military space epic, and space exploration novel in one package. Cameron makes it all work together seamlessly. I give Artifact Space my highest recommendation.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I LOVED this book! Every single page was highly interesting, and just about a role model for what I enjoy in a book. The protagonist Marca is a scared, traumatized, socially awkward new officer on a huge merchant ship. We see her struggle to overcome her instinctive bias against people with power and money, and try to trust some of the good people she finds herself surrounded with. There is an optimistic Star Trek feel to this, in the focus on morality, humanity, and everyone presenting their be I LOVED this book! Every single page was highly interesting, and just about a role model for what I enjoy in a book. The protagonist Marca is a scared, traumatized, socially awkward new officer on a huge merchant ship. We see her struggle to overcome her instinctive bias against people with power and money, and try to trust some of the good people she finds herself surrounded with. There is an optimistic Star Trek feel to this, in the focus on morality, humanity, and everyone presenting their best self all the time. The ship master even says "make it so". Maybe that's a typical Navy phrase. There are other military terms sprinkled throughout, and the book in general is highly militaristic, being that it takes place almost entirely on a ship with a very military-like command structure and they are under attack. The science is strong, but not overwhelmingly into abstract physics. I agree with Marca, who reminisces on losing interest when the physics get religious. There is faster than light travel, one or two mentions of Cherenkov radiation, a bit of relativistic time bubbles, and the complexity of space navigation, but all in an extremely plausible and interesting way. There is great technology, and a nice glimpse without getting too heavy-handed into a possible socioeconomic culture of the future. The supporting characters are terrific, developed just enough to feel real. It's a bit unrealistic how Marca is deputized as a secret service agent, but it makes for a great story so go with it! This is a terrific book that is tied together very well in the end and could be considered whole on it's own, but boy do I ever want the sequel!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chase

    Artifact Space is perhaps one of the top 3 best books I have ever read. Cameron's characterization and world building are brilliant. His prose is poignant, and transformative. There are works of literature that entertain, and then there are those rare works where the world falls away and you are transported. I could sense the almost imperceptible hum of the shipboard electronics, feel the vastness of space, and immerse myself in a world vastly unfamiliar, yet tangible like a memory of a thing ye Artifact Space is perhaps one of the top 3 best books I have ever read. Cameron's characterization and world building are brilliant. His prose is poignant, and transformative. There are works of literature that entertain, and then there are those rare works where the world falls away and you are transported. I could sense the almost imperceptible hum of the shipboard electronics, feel the vastness of space, and immerse myself in a world vastly unfamiliar, yet tangible like a memory of a thing yet to come. Somewhere as the Athens, hurtled through the unknowable vagaries of interstellar travel, I felt seen, heard and understood. It was like playing Mass Effect, or Knights of the Old Republic, and Cameron has created a universe for our imaginations to play in and even Star Wars now seems humble by comparison. I'm blown away, and I think part of my soul will always live among the stars thanks to Artifact Space.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Quiraang

    I was pleased to receive an uncorrected proof. I have been a fan of space operas for many years and this is one of the best that I have ever read. It's on a par with some of my favourite authors; Iain M Banks, Alistair Reynolds, John Scalzi. Enter the world of Marca Nbara as she flees the Orphanage to become a junior officer aboard the massive, hundreds of years old, Greatship, Athens. A roller-coaster journey across the Galaxy on a routine trading mission, that suddenly becomes fraught with dange I was pleased to receive an uncorrected proof. I have been a fan of space operas for many years and this is one of the best that I have ever read. It's on a par with some of my favourite authors; Iain M Banks, Alistair Reynolds, John Scalzi. Enter the world of Marca Nbara as she flees the Orphanage to become a junior officer aboard the massive, hundreds of years old, Greatship, Athens. A roller-coaster journey across the Galaxy on a routine trading mission, that suddenly becomes fraught with danger and enemies. Miles Cameron has created a unique, believable, universe. Great characters and their relationships are core to making this story enthralling. I can't say more without giving too much away. Bring on the next volume of the story. Just buy it!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    *copy from netgalley in exchange for a review* I’m going to be straight up on this one: I loved Artifact Space, Miles Cameron’s first foray into space opera. It has all the things I want in a book like that, including: cool technologies, a heroine we can empathise with, cheer on and feel for, and a complex universe filled with strange technologies and even stranger cultures.It also has a soupcon of the naval novel about it: stern chases, broadsides, underdogs rising through the ranks, dashing he *copy from netgalley in exchange for a review* I’m going to be straight up on this one: I loved Artifact Space, Miles Cameron’s first foray into space opera. It has all the things I want in a book like that, including: cool technologies, a heroine we can empathise with, cheer on and feel for, and a complex universe filled with strange technologies and even stranger cultures.It also has a soupcon of the naval novel about it: stern chases, broadsides, underdogs rising through the ranks, dashing heroics, that sort of thing. Above all, it’s a fun book. It’s got a story that keeps you turning the pages, trying to figure out what’s going to happen next, and characters who make you care about the story, because they’re living it. I’ll start as I mean to go on: this is a thoroughly entertaining space adventure, and one which left me eagerly awaiting its next instalment. Part of the reason for that, is the universe. A universe where interstellar travel is real, and where long distance travel necessitates a larger ship Where a handful of arks, humanity’s trade fleet, sail the deep black, their crews together for years at a time, families under a tight naval tradition. It’s a universe of the mercantile, where one versatile, but alien, product, drives the engine of the economy. Where bones of dead cultures litter the graveyards of humanity’s resurgence, stepping over the shoulders of deceased alien giants. This is a universe with old, hidden grudges, where humanity is taking its place upon a broader stage, not yet unblinkered enough from its own expansion to see the dangers lurking around the edges of their still pool. In many ways, it’s a neo-feudal world, too. Great families, with concessions based on alien technology, revel in untrammelled wealth and near-unbridled power. They buy, or expect, or influence their way onto the great ships that travel the gulf between populated stars, and in that work they learn, trade, make connections, and get very, very rich. Perhaps the common person crews the ships, but the families whose wealth shapes stellar politics, they practically own the ships. Still, there’s a sense of dependence and decay about it too, of wealth flowing in too quickly to be spent, but of a lack of innovation, a lack of need to do something different. The human polity may not be stagnant, but it may be constrained. In any case, from the carmine-spotted floors of a service orphanage, to the simulated mind of a ship AI, to the darkness between the stars, to the ruins of alien worlds, and the rising of humanity around them, this is a universe of breathtaking scope. It’s detailed, vividly imagined, and beautifully crafted. Marca Nbaro is the orphaned scion of one of the great families, now somewhat down on her luck. She’s a woman desparate to serve on one of the Greatships, to fall into the quiet family of the service, to do something better than slaving away in an orphanage - and never look back. Marca is great. She’s fiery, wary of friendship and intimacy, careful with her trust - and at the same time, keen to be surprised. She believes everyone is basically awful, but wants to know otherwise. And watching her slowly come around to her crew, her bunkmates, her superiors and otherwise - well, it’s quite a journey, and a compellingly human one. Marca also serves as an excellent lens for the reader: she’s read about the Greatships, but never been on one, so her stumbling efforts to fit in, to be worth something, to understand, mirror the reader’s own steps in the world. It helps that Marca is genuine, forthright, and accepting of her own flaws; in a world that needs a heroine, she’s doing pretty well. Smart, competent, and driven, Marca is a fantastic protagonist, whose rich emotional life (often filled with expletives and concern about doing something wrong, and sometimes rather more positive) is an absolute joy on the page. Marca is someone I’m not going to forget in a hurry - and her friends, enemies, and something-in-between’s, are similar. Each has enough layers and complexity that we know them as a person, we invest in them, we care. Cameron has always written multifaceted, compelling characters, and that’s definitely the case here. I hope you love Marca as much as I did - she kicks arse. The story I shan’t spoil, but it’s one part coming of age, one part conspiracy, one part space naval adventure, and absolutely all awesome. There’s aliens and space battles and ancient mysteries and secret cabals. There’s new worlds and romance and space fighters. There’s broadsides and submarine-sneaks, and double-crosses and power politics. There’s a larger picture that slowly comes into focus, and intimate, human moments that make you gask with their emotional intensity. Overall...yeah, go pick this one up.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mark Redman

    Artifact Space by Miles Cameron is a story about new midshipper Marca Nbaro, who has managed to secure a place on the Greatship Athens. Athens is a massive space-faring vessel and the lifeblood of human-occupied space. Transporting an unimaginable volume - and value - of goods from City, the greatest human orbital, all the way to Tradepoint at the other, to trade for xenoglas with an unknowable alien species. Marca Nbaro's dream to achieve the near-impossible: escape her upbringing and venture in Artifact Space by Miles Cameron is a story about new midshipper Marca Nbaro, who has managed to secure a place on the Greatship Athens. Athens is a massive space-faring vessel and the lifeblood of human-occupied space. Transporting an unimaginable volume - and value - of goods from City, the greatest human orbital, all the way to Tradepoint at the other, to trade for xenoglas with an unknowable alien species. Marca Nbaro's dream to achieve the near-impossible: escape her upbringing and venture into space has been achieved. All it took, to make her way onto the crew of the Greatship Athens was thousands of hours in simulators, dedication, and pawning and selling every scrap of her old life to forge a new one. But though Marca has made her way on board with faked papers, leaving her old life - and scandals - behind wasn’t so easy. When we are introduced to Marca, we quickly begin to realise she’s had a troubled past, which is gradually and expertly revealed throughout the story. A story that is full of detail and a great mix of tension, action and consequences. We find out the things Marca has had to do to get a position on the Athens and more importantly, why. Some decisions that Marca makes frequently leave her vulnerable to those out to exact vengeance. Marca also finds friends aboard the ship, and a growing sense of purpose, even as the near-calamitous situations she winds up in reveals her strengths, we witness this unfolding. It was this part of the story that was fascinating to read about the growth of Marca and how she dealt with adversity! There is a great diverse range of characters filled throughout this story, as you should expect in modern SF. Characters who feel very realised, dealing with real emotive situations, all handled very well. The world Miles has created feels very unique and this is its selling point. It is very much like Miles Cameron’s fantasy series Traitor Son Cycle. The level of detail just draws into the story and grips you. The writing and prose have a nice flow to them, feeling very natural and not forced. There is a definite influence from Miles’s time in the navy and this shows through Nbaro. I don’t normally read SF but Miles Cameron has delivered another superb, quality series, just like his fantasy and historical novels. I feel this is an author at the top of his writing powers, I feel truly privilege to have read such a good book. If you have never read SF, then this series is a great starting point, and it's surely going to become a unique SF classic. My thanks to both Gollancz and Netgalley for the free e-arc. All opinions expressed are my own. #ArtifactSpace #NetGalley

  27. 4 out of 5

    Seth

    Mr Cameron has done it again. Absolutely outstanding. I have been reading sci-fi for over 40 years. During that time, I have read a mere handful of books that I could not put down. This novel is one of them. The novel is set some 500 years or so into the future. The human race has expanded to other solar systems within the Galaxy, and they are in contact with one sentient but thoroughly enigmatic alien race with whom they are engaged in trade for a substance of great value to the human race. Let th Mr Cameron has done it again. Absolutely outstanding. I have been reading sci-fi for over 40 years. During that time, I have read a mere handful of books that I could not put down. This novel is one of them. The novel is set some 500 years or so into the future. The human race has expanded to other solar systems within the Galaxy, and they are in contact with one sentient but thoroughly enigmatic alien race with whom they are engaged in trade for a substance of great value to the human race. Let the reader prepare for greed, intrigue, treachery, and war. Cameron is a master of making flawed but relatable and likeable characters. His pacing is excellent. There were many routine moments during his narration, that were punctuated by moments great tension and even fear. His writing is not flowery or bombastic, yet it is descriptive enough to give you a very good image of your surroundings. The Sci-Fi of this novel, which I believe is his first sci-fi novel, is very realistic and in line with what now is theoretically possible. And yet, it's not so technical and detailed that it's impossible to follow. I can't wait for the next installment!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mats

    Navy propaganda that appropriates social justice language to give its reactionary core a progressive veneer. There is an attempt at obfuscation, as Cameron hints at an ideological shift away from the “bad capitalism”, but while maintaining that the greatships are mercantile in purpose. Ideological history or theory is not Cameron’s forté. That said, the book is eminently readable, and I finished the whole thing in two days. The characters are fun and recognizable, and the attention to detail is n Navy propaganda that appropriates social justice language to give its reactionary core a progressive veneer. There is an attempt at obfuscation, as Cameron hints at an ideological shift away from the “bad capitalism”, but while maintaining that the greatships are mercantile in purpose. Ideological history or theory is not Cameron’s forté. That said, the book is eminently readable, and I finished the whole thing in two days. The characters are fun and recognizable, and the attention to detail is no less impressive here than it was in Cameron’s historical fiction, or even his fantasy works. He has a way of approaching his material at its granular level while retaining the narrative flow. Impressive, that. I only wish the book had something to say beyond “big ships go brrrrrr”.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mitch

    Unique, science fiction, great characterization. Really enjoyed this book, I've read Camerons other boo!s in the fantasy genre and enjoyed them, However, This book by far was the best of them all. Really liked the characters, the story was unique,and after a bit of a slow start, I devoured this book over 3 days. pretty good "world" "Space" building. Would be nice to have a little more detailed map of the Orion arm and human space. The science was decent, but the characters made the book., NBA to Unique, science fiction, great characterization. Really enjoyed this book, I've read Camerons other boo!s in the fantasy genre and enjoyed them, However, This book by far was the best of them all. Really liked the characters, the story was unique,and after a bit of a slow start, I devoured this book over 3 days. pretty good "world" "Space" building. Would be nice to have a little more detailed map of the Orion arm and human space. The science was decent, but the characters made the book., NBA to is someone you cannot help but root for. Excited for the second book "Deep Black" I will be preordering immediately.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mike Shackle

    I loved this book! In fact, I'm not sure that even sums up how much I adored it. The setting, the ships, the thrills, the spills, and most of all, the characters are all so wonderful. Miles Cameron is fast becoming one of my favourite writers. Go buy this book. I loved this book! In fact, I'm not sure that even sums up how much I adored it. The setting, the ships, the thrills, the spills, and most of all, the characters are all so wonderful. Miles Cameron is fast becoming one of my favourite writers. Go buy this book.

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