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The Shadow

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Even time cannot stop the Shadow.    Only two people know Lamont Cranston's secret identity as the Shadow, a vigilante of justice: his greatest love, Margo Lane -- and his fiercest enemy, Shiwan Khan. Then Khan ambushes the couple, who have the slimmest chance of survival ... in the uncertain future. A century and a half later, Lamont awakens in a world both unknown and distu Even time cannot stop the Shadow.    Only two people know Lamont Cranston's secret identity as the Shadow, a vigilante of justice: his greatest love, Margo Lane -- and his fiercest enemy, Shiwan Khan. Then Khan ambushes the couple, who have the slimmest chance of survival ... in the uncertain future. A century and a half later, Lamont awakens in a world both unknown and disturbingly familiar. The first person he meets is Maddy Gomes, a teenager with her own mysterious secrets, including a more than passing familiarity with the legend of the Shadow. Most disturbing, Khan's power continues to be felt over the city and its people. No one in this new world understands the dangers of stopping him better than Lamont Cranston. He also knows he's the only one who stands a chance. The Shadow must prove that he's not only a super crime-fighter, but an icon.


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Even time cannot stop the Shadow.    Only two people know Lamont Cranston's secret identity as the Shadow, a vigilante of justice: his greatest love, Margo Lane -- and his fiercest enemy, Shiwan Khan. Then Khan ambushes the couple, who have the slimmest chance of survival ... in the uncertain future. A century and a half later, Lamont awakens in a world both unknown and distu Even time cannot stop the Shadow.    Only two people know Lamont Cranston's secret identity as the Shadow, a vigilante of justice: his greatest love, Margo Lane -- and his fiercest enemy, Shiwan Khan. Then Khan ambushes the couple, who have the slimmest chance of survival ... in the uncertain future. A century and a half later, Lamont awakens in a world both unknown and disturbingly familiar. The first person he meets is Maddy Gomes, a teenager with her own mysterious secrets, including a more than passing familiarity with the legend of the Shadow. Most disturbing, Khan's power continues to be felt over the city and its people. No one in this new world understands the dangers of stopping him better than Lamont Cranston. He also knows he's the only one who stands a chance. The Shadow must prove that he's not only a super crime-fighter, but an icon.

30 review for The Shadow

  1. 5 out of 5

    Adam Burton

    I’m not going into details, because the book isn’t out yet (I read an electronic uncorrected proof), but jeez, y’all. I really, really wanted to like this book, because I’ve been a huge fan of The Shadow since I was a kid and found recordings of the radio show and read the DC comics. I hoped this book would herald a new golden age for the character. My hopes were summarily dashed. To summarize without spoiling, I’ll say that the biggest problem is that this is NOT The Shadow. Patterson and Sitts I’m not going into details, because the book isn’t out yet (I read an electronic uncorrected proof), but jeez, y’all. I really, really wanted to like this book, because I’ve been a huge fan of The Shadow since I was a kid and found recordings of the radio show and read the DC comics. I hoped this book would herald a new golden age for the character. My hopes were summarily dashed. To summarize without spoiling, I’ll say that the biggest problem is that this is NOT The Shadow. Patterson and Sitts pitched nearly a century of amassed continuity out the window by having the pulp magazines and radio show exist in the same world as the actual character, so the character can dismiss them as nonsense and thus the authors have a free hand to make The Shadow whatever they want. And let me tell you, their conception is FAR inferior to Walter Gibson’s creation. Further, the book reads like a YA novel, with most of the narrative driven by a teen protagonist. The book doesn’t appear to be marketed that way, but it feels like it nonetheless. Finally, there are some substantial holes in logic and plot that, never mind a truck, an aircraft carrier could cruise through with ample room to spare. I’m sure Patterson devotees will enjoy this regardless, but if The Shadow indeed returns to life in prose, I really hope it’s the real Shadow and not this imposter.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jack March

    James Patterson is a hack. It's not uncommon for him to publish somewhere between 7 to 15 books a year. Patterson and his team of ghost writers, have figured out a way to industrialize the writing process and create a cash cow by brilliantly marketing absolute garbage to readers. It's as if Patterson's books are put together on an assembly line and what comes out on the other end when the book making process is complete is sometimes difficult to ascertain. Patterson's latest book, The Shadow re- James Patterson is a hack. It's not uncommon for him to publish somewhere between 7 to 15 books a year. Patterson and his team of ghost writers, have figured out a way to industrialize the writing process and create a cash cow by brilliantly marketing absolute garbage to readers. It's as if Patterson's books are put together on an assembly line and what comes out on the other end when the book making process is complete is sometimes difficult to ascertain. Patterson's latest book, The Shadow re-imagined just isn't the Shadow. It's not even a shadow of The Shadow. It's poorly written young adult fiction loosely based on Walter B. Gibson's 1930's serialized dramas, pulp novels, comic strips, etc. If you want to read the Shadow, you would be better off going back and reading the pulp reprints by Walter Gibson (Maxwell Grant) or Lester Dent which you can still purchase on Amazon.com. I would start by reading The Living Shadow (The Shadow #1) and see if you like it. As far as Patterson's attempt to cash in on this memorable pulp classic, you're best to steer clear of his lazy drivel that is clearly piggybacking off it's predecessor's success which already was "pulp" writing to begin with. You would think that Patterson could improve on that, but he's clueless in trying to capture the atmosphere and characters fro the original stories. I guess whereas Roger Corman is the king of crap cinema, James Patterson is the Baron of bad books.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    It was a curious choice to send The Shadow 150 years into the future. But he has been sent into modern times before, so why not? I did find it odd that he woke up into a dystopian future that wasn't much different than the 1930's. Really the only difference was that there were TV's since technology had stopped advancing and had regressed. What's the point if it doesn't feel like the future? The book itself was just OK. Patterson made The Shadow and Khan too powerful to make this very interesting. It was a curious choice to send The Shadow 150 years into the future. But he has been sent into modern times before, so why not? I did find it odd that he woke up into a dystopian future that wasn't much different than the 1930's. Really the only difference was that there were TV's since technology had stopped advancing and had regressed. What's the point if it doesn't feel like the future? The book itself was just OK. Patterson made The Shadow and Khan too powerful to make this very interesting. By the end, they're shape-shifting and throwing lightning bolts, exhibiting God-like powers. That's not The Shadow to me. The Shadow to me is Batman with powers of hypnosis. That's how I think he works best.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Thompson

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Who knows what evil lurks in the Hearts of Men? The Shadow Knows... Or at least, the real Shadow knows. I'm not sure this guy does though. The Shadow is probably my favorite fictional character of all time. An agent of vengeance, one who manically laughs from behind a large slouch hat or from behind a hypnosis-fuelled invisibility cloak. He could be hiding in every corner of every room, as inevitable as a criminal’s guilty conscience. He took on gangsters, dismantled the Chicago mob, fought against Who knows what evil lurks in the Hearts of Men? The Shadow Knows... Or at least, the real Shadow knows. I'm not sure this guy does though. The Shadow is probably my favorite fictional character of all time. An agent of vengeance, one who manically laughs from behind a large slouch hat or from behind a hypnosis-fuelled invisibility cloak. He could be hiding in every corner of every room, as inevitable as a criminal’s guilty conscience. He took on gangsters, dismantled the Chicago mob, fought against crazed super villains, and even destroyed a multi-headed criminal organization, all with either his agents or simply his companion Margo Lane. This guy though? I couldn’t imagine him doing such things. First of all, I believe that this is the first new stand-alone novel of The Shadow since Destination: Moon by Dennis Lynds from 1967. However, the original Walter Gibson version appeared in two Doc Savage novels, Doc Savage: The Sinister Shadow from 2015 and Doc Savage: Empire of Doom from 2016 respectively. After that, The Shadow hadn’t appeared in any new non-Comic Books other than the original magazine reprints that sadly ended last year. Until now. Enter James Patterson, with Brian Sitts writing under his name. To be honest, I had some hope for this. I was hoping that this would at least be a gripping crime thriller featuring the original superhero. We didn’t get that. Instead, we got a generic Dystopian novel with some very basic Shadow elements shoved in somewhat awkwardly. This is not a novel written by a fan or someone who is familiar with the property. This seems like someone who listened to a few radio shows decades ago and decided to write a novel with what they vaguely remembered. Enough rambling. Let’s begin. The novel starts in 1937. Lamont Cranston is waiting in the 21 Club for Margo Lane, his girlfriend and also his crime-fighting partner. He has a ring in his pocket, and is ready to ask her to marry him. When she arrives, they order Lobster and drinks. It soon goes wrong, as the drinks are poisoned with a lethal dose. To try and save the both of them, Lamont somehow manages to stumble around carry Margo out of the club despite slowly dying from the poison in their systems. On the way out, it’s revealed that Shiwan Khan (a villain from the original Magazines and the 1994 movie and not the radio interestingly) poisoned the both of them. Stumbling out of the club, Lamont also manages to drive the both of them to a warehouse despite the fact he could barely stay awake. The novel then cuts to 2087, 150 years into the future. Maddy Gomes is now our main character. What’s interesting is that we are now in a 1st person perspective for every scene she is in. Every scene she isn’t in is told in 3rd person perspective. The world now is under a police state, with the entire world ran by a single person named Gismonde. Maddy skips class (after convincing a police guard to let her pass) and is informed that she has an inheritance by a man called ‘Creighton Poole’, who reminds me of Claude Fellows, a classic agent of The Shadow in the original magazines. He directs her to a warehouse. At the warehouse, Maddy finds a man in a test capsule, cryogenically cooled (not frozen, which is stated as impossible for a human body to survive in). Thawing him out and reviving him, the man says his name is Lamont Cranston. Here’s where the problems begin, only 11 chapters in. First of all, why has Maddy inherited Lamont? It’s hinted that she has some relation to him, but as far as I can tell, it’s not revealed, even past I read. Was the poison slowed by the cryogenic cooling process? Don’t know. Next, Lamont leaves and insists on going home, not realizing that his home wouldn’t be intact after a century and a half. Still, he insists so much that he steals (or ‘borrows’ as he states) a car that Maddy drives. An ambush outside the gates of his former home reveals something that reminds the reader that this in fact a story of The Shadow; Lamont turns invisible to escape from armed police. A bit of a pet peeve kept coming up. They keep writing it as ‘the Shadow’ rather than ‘The Shadow’. The Shadow is his name and title, not a random description. Anyway, next Lamont and Maddy escaped to her house. It was very clear at this point that The Shadow that was so influential to the Super Hero genre as a whole was fictional in this universe. At Maddy’s home, Lamont meets her grandmother Jessica, who reminds him of Margo. She even has a photo of her. What does this mean? Next, Maddy pulls out her vintage collection of The Shadow magazine. Lamont then tells her that they are fictionalized versions of his real cases. He had never even owned a black hat or a red scarf. He then says they had to ‘jazz up the image to push sales.’ Maddy then plays the intro of the old-time radio show, to which Lamont also says is fake. Okay then, if the magazines and the radio knew that he was Lamont Cranston and he had a girlfriend called Margo Lane and he was also The Shadow, then why didn’t anyone back in the 30s knew that he was The Shadow. Also, the radio show only had 14 episodes from 1937, not enough to form a good enough reputation. And with that chapter, I gave up. I couldn’t read anymore. Why bring the character back, only to scrap all the coolness and create a bland dystopian thriller in its place. This is not The Shadow. The fact that Conde Nast (who own have owned The Shadow since the 50s) make a big deal about reviving the character for new stores, then strip back everything that made the character iconic before throwing whatever was left into a novel. And if I put aside The Shadow and judge it as a stand-alone novel? Even then, the novel just isn’t that good. It’s set in 2087, but doesn’t have anything that would seem cool or futuristic. It’s awkwardly written and Mandy just didn’t seem that good of a character. Lamont doesn’t even talk like he’s from the 1930s. The twist is also extremely obvious. Will The Shadow make a true comeback, with his blazing .45s and his eerie and creepy laugh? Only The Shadow Knows...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    When they started speeding up the re-releases of the original versions of the Shadow magazine and no new Dynamite comic releases where coming it was quite certain that something was up. The news that James Patterson wanted the property to rejuvenate caused fear in the hearts of the Shadow fans, he either does a very good job, as most output of the Patterson factory is quite pulpy, or it is crap. There was still some serious anticipation and to state the matter quite clear I do not know what Pater When they started speeding up the re-releases of the original versions of the Shadow magazine and no new Dynamite comic releases where coming it was quite certain that something was up. The news that James Patterson wanted the property to rejuvenate caused fear in the hearts of the Shadow fans, he either does a very good job, as most output of the Patterson factory is quite pulpy, or it is crap. There was still some serious anticipation and to state the matter quite clear I do not know what Paterson or the ghost-writer Brian Sitts where thinking in delivering this book. They must have been quite pleased but I sincerely wonder why they would be anything but disappointed. The story starts in the year 1930 where Lamont Cranston & Margo lane get poisoned and to escape death they enter a Cryogenic sleep in which they hope the poison will be leaving their bodies. Enter the awakening of Lamont in 2087 in a kind of apocalyptical world, when the book turns into YA with an 18 year old being the main character who inherits the Shadow and wakes him. It turns out that some things the Shadow studied hard for the lass can do naturally. So the book starts to feel like a kinda as a poor mans attempt at fan art with a Mary Sue kinda tale. Anything exciting about the character of the Shadow or his backstory is thrown away in favour of of this YA story that makes the young girl the heroine, a bit of bummer if you are a Shadow fan. I am not sure how this book is going to relaunch the Shadow Brand. If you want to read about the Shadow find one of the re-released magazines in which Walter Gibson does a far better job and actually does bring the mystery and excitement to the reading table. Or if you prefer movies watch the 1997 movie vehicle (that got copied so much by Batman Begins) that gives a far better feel to the Shadow Character. A really poor attempt by a popular writer and his ghost-writer to update a classic character and make it not about the Shadow but a young descendent of 18 years old. Steer clear as a Shadow fan and also as YA fan as this book is a rape of of a classic character. And besides that the book does lack any excitement or drama, the one twist is a long time coming and no surprise. There may be more twists but I failed to see or recognise them in this really bad written book. Steer clear not advised.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Paula

    I gave up the struggle at chapter 21 and skipped to the hokey conclusion. This was a book absolutely devoid of the charm cast by the true The Shadow.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mandy White (mandylovestoread)

    I did not read the synopsis for this book. And what a surprise! It was not what I was expecting at all but I enjoyed the ride

  8. 4 out of 5

    Adah Udechukwu

    Thumbs up to The Shadow

  9. 5 out of 5

    Aniruddha M

    The Shadow - a vigilante, mysterious figure from the 1930's is still alive! The date is 2087 and the world is ravaged by greed and social discrimination. It is now ruled by a World President and his ruthless army. The poor are helpless, marginalized and exploited. It is in this dystopian world that Lamont Cranston aka The Shadow comes back to life. Aided by the perky teenager Maddy Gomes, he takes on Gaimonde and his thugs to rid the world of another autocrat! But before that, he needs to find w The Shadow - a vigilante, mysterious figure from the 1930's is still alive! The date is 2087 and the world is ravaged by greed and social discrimination. It is now ruled by a World President and his ruthless army. The poor are helpless, marginalized and exploited. It is in this dystopian world that Lamont Cranston aka The Shadow comes back to life. Aided by the perky teenager Maddy Gomes, he takes on Gaimonde and his thugs to rid the world of another autocrat! But before that, he needs to find what happened to the love of his life, Margo Lane.... Please read my detailed review from the link below- https://www.aniblogshere.com/book-rev... Do Read 📖, Like 👍🏼, Comment 💭 or Share 🚩 ??🏼🙏🏼 #TheShadow #jamespatterson #mystery #suspense #yanovels #fantasy #books #booklover #bookreview #bookaddict #bookreviewer #bookworm

  10. 5 out of 5

    P.J.

    The Shadow is shi... not as good as I'd hoped. Full disclosure, I just finished this novel yesterday, so I'm still smarting from the trauma inflicted by this maniacally lazy and contrived half-assed scribbling. Perhaps, in time, my feelings will mellow. But for now I remain disappointed. To be clear, I'm not one of those James Patterson haters. I've read perhaps a dozen of his books and even taken his Masterclass and have found them to be categorically satisfying and expertly crafted. Patterson i The Shadow is shi... not as good as I'd hoped. Full disclosure, I just finished this novel yesterday, so I'm still smarting from the trauma inflicted by this maniacally lazy and contrived half-assed scribbling. Perhaps, in time, my feelings will mellow. But for now I remain disappointed. To be clear, I'm not one of those James Patterson haters. I've read perhaps a dozen of his books and even taken his Masterclass and have found them to be categorically satisfying and expertly crafted. Patterson is a fantastic storyteller. He creates interesting characters with unique flaws and villains who tend to have nuance and dimension. However, none of that can be found in The Shadow--and it's baffling. When I was a kid, I listened to radio recordings of The Shadow and was captivated by how dangerous the character felt, the schadenfreude of his sinister laugh. He was so much more interesting than most of the heroes I'd seen on television. In this iteration of The Shadow, any semblance of duality between Lamont Cranston and the Shadow has been erased. Cranston is a guy who can turn invisible. He doesn't laugh maniacally and abhors the use of firearms. He's a decent, vanilla guy. He can also turn into a cat and shoot fireballs in a pinch. These new abilities weren't set up at all. Rather, Cranston acquires them a la carte as needed with no explanation except that he must have developed them while in a coma for 150 years. (No, I'm not making this up). However, his original abilities of invisibility and mind-control have atrophied a lot due to lack of use, due to being in a coma for 150 years. But perhaps the least forgivable aspect of Cranston is that he fails to make the obvious decisions to get what he wants until it's convenient to the writer for him to do so. (For example: After being in a coma, he decides to strike out wandering the streets looking for Margo. Even if one could reasonably assume she were still alive after 150 years and living in NYC, wandering around the city seems like a ridiculous course of action. Why doesn't he ask the scientist who revived him, "Where's my girlfriend in a coma?" Or search the lab where's he's been revived and housed all these years? Why doesn't he track down the lawyer who seems to be handling the Cranston estate for answers?) As a reader, I'm delighted when characters make counterintuitive moves that I don't expect, but in this case, Cranston suffers from frustrating incompetence by no discernible mechanism nor any stated reason. But the main character in The Shadow isn't the Shadow, it's Maddie, a teenage girl in the dystopian future of the 2080s who also has Shadow-like superpowers she inherited--even though the other characters in this universe obtain their abilities through training. So it's as if Maddie inherited a black belt in kung fu through her DNA. (It doesn't make a lot of sense, but let's just assume Shadow powers are like being strong with the Force and go with it). Like Cranston, Maddie is a thoroughly decent person with supernatural powers and no real flaws. She has no romantic interests nor friends expect for her kindly grandmother with whom she lives. To clarify, Maddie isn't a character who "has no friends." Rather, the book doesn't mention any friends. So it's not a narrative choice of alienation that arises from Maddie's character. Maddie doesn't seem to push people away or avoid friendships, rather their absence feels like more of an omission on the part of the writers. The main antagonist is Khan, now the president of the (entire) world, however, his scope and breadth of interest seems to locate entirely in New York City. Khan is a villainous villainy villain with no redeeming qualities who murders people for sport and at the slightest provocation. This "world" only seems to exist in New York City. Never do we get a sense of the world outside its boundaries. The result is that the world feels empty. There are very few specifics regarding the New York City of the future, except that most people live in poverty and filth while a small few rich people don't. So how exactly does the economy work? If goods and food are nearly impossible to get, only the rich can afford cars, etc--how exactly are the rich enriching themselves? How does this society function? Little thought seems to have gone into the world-building. There are no flourishes of future technology. The police are all inhuman, sadistic thugs who like to brutalize animals for sport when not murdering and raping citizens. Which begs the question: why wouldn't this novel take place in the original 1930's New York on the heels of the Depression and the rise of Naziism overseas? All of the social and political themes exist in this setting like so much low-hanging fruit. Instead, this "future" assaults us with heavy-handed episodes of citizens standing in food lines for fourteen hours, only to be turned away at the last minute. The Shadow goes into public domain in a few years, so perhaps the powers that be at Conde Nast decided to reinvent the Shadow in a way that they could perpetuate the copyright? In any case, the attempt to update the franchise by adding YA tropes strips The Shadow of its grounding elements and waters down the characters to the point where they seem indistinguishable from the myriad YA characters with superpowers. Most frustrating is that all Conde Nast had to do was give Joe R Lansdale a call and ask, "May we please have a Shadow novel?" and he would have delivered them the best Shadow novel ever written.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jamespc

    Deeply disappointing.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Todd Glaeser

    I’m not quite sure why the negativity about this new book. Maybe it’s because Patterson comes out with a new book seemingly every week. Maybe it isn’t “their“ Shadow. But even from the start, there wasn’t one Shadow. The radio character was different than the pulp novels. Heck even the pulp character changed over the course of hundreds of novels. There have been dozens of comic books Shadows. Patterson brings The Shadow into a new future. Margo is also there. New look. New powers. I had fun. Ther I’m not quite sure why the negativity about this new book. Maybe it’s because Patterson comes out with a new book seemingly every week. Maybe it isn’t “their“ Shadow. But even from the start, there wasn’t one Shadow. The radio character was different than the pulp novels. Heck even the pulp character changed over the course of hundreds of novels. There have been dozens of comic books Shadows. Patterson brings The Shadow into a new future. Margo is also there. New look. New powers. I had fun. There are dozens of different Shadows if this one isn’t for you.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Glen

    Anyone who had anything to do with novel should be ashamed of themselves. James Patterson should fined, if not imprisoned for this. Every corner is cut. Every shortcut is taken. Every Cliche is shown like a used car. This is simply pathetic. If I coulda, I'da given it no stars. Anyone who had anything to do with novel should be ashamed of themselves. James Patterson should fined, if not imprisoned for this. Every corner is cut. Every shortcut is taken. Every Cliche is shown like a used car. This is simply pathetic. If I coulda, I'da given it no stars.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    It is not about The Shadow at all because (1) this character has almost nothing to do with the classic character and (2) the story is about the new Mary Sue viewpoint character. Plot holes abound. Internal logic is rare. A writer who invents new superpowers for these characters does not know they didn’t need those powers in the first place, has no clue what ever made the stories work. This Shadow never owned a hat (even though just about every man in the 1930s wore hats), shoots lightning from hi It is not about The Shadow at all because (1) this character has almost nothing to do with the classic character and (2) the story is about the new Mary Sue viewpoint character. Plot holes abound. Internal logic is rare. A writer who invents new superpowers for these characters does not know they didn’t need those powers in the first place, has no clue what ever made the stories work. This Shadow never owned a hat (even though just about every man in the 1930s wore hats), shoots lightning from his hands, and transforms into an cat. Minor quibbles? More like they reflect the story's general disdain for anything that made the character The Shadow in the first place. A cat. He turns into a cat. And the viewpoint character turns the story into YA. The slogan, “Crime has a new enemy,” fits her, not The Shadow. The book is about her. Do not read this. Read one of the 300+ originals or more recent graphic novel versions instead. Matt Wagner, Michael Uslan, and (though a little less recent) Dennis O’Neil knew what lurks in the heart of The Shadow stories.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Bill Riggs

    Terrible cover. Interesting premise though. The Shadow, a mysterious crime fighter from the 1930’s, is ambushed by his archenemy Shiwan Khan. Awakening in a dystopian future 150 years later he finds Khan is alive and well still plotting evil. Khan’s ultimate objective is somewhat underwhelming. This is not the original Shadow from the pulps or the radio shows or the movies, Patterson has changed quite a bit but at the same time he has kept a lot of the qualities and attributes the made the chara Terrible cover. Interesting premise though. The Shadow, a mysterious crime fighter from the 1930’s, is ambushed by his archenemy Shiwan Khan. Awakening in a dystopian future 150 years later he finds Khan is alive and well still plotting evil. Khan’s ultimate objective is somewhat underwhelming. This is not the original Shadow from the pulps or the radio shows or the movies, Patterson has changed quite a bit but at the same time he has kept a lot of the qualities and attributes the made the character so appealing and interesting.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Laura Rash

    I LOVED THIS BOOK! I pictured this whole book in a black and white movie! A cross between an old movie, an apocalyptic story and superhero powers that made for an action packed tale that I DID NOT want to end! Loved loved loved it!!!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Brown

    Decent book. I'm not a fan of the future/post-apocalyptic type stuff though. I wasn't sure how this one was going to play out but I got an audio version of it so I figured why not. I liked all the main characters ESPECIALLY the dog! I was about to quit the book when I thought he was murdered! Dogs are a lot smarter than most give them credit for so I'm glad it was showcased in this. I did feel like this book had a little bit of the Witch & Wizard series. Certain things would happen that would Decent book. I'm not a fan of the future/post-apocalyptic type stuff though. I wasn't sure how this one was going to play out but I got an audio version of it so I figured why not. I liked all the main characters ESPECIALLY the dog! I was about to quit the book when I thought he was murdered! Dogs are a lot smarter than most give them credit for so I'm glad it was showcased in this. I did feel like this book had a little bit of the Witch & Wizard series. Certain things would happen that would make those books pop into my head. I am VERY happy this is a standalone. I don't need any more series to read! But really, I would read it if there was a sequel. Adding in: I was reading other reviews and I had no idea that The Shadow was an actual comic series! I'm glad I'd never heard of it because it seems like this book sucks for fans of it.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Roger

    If there were truth in advertising, The Shadow by James Patterson and Brian Sitts would have been called Generic Dystopian Adventure. Looking for Lamont Cranston? Seeking the Shadow? Then don't read this book. Yes I know what the title says but the Master of Darkness is not really here. Yes there is a character with the same name but really what we are witnessing here is the rape and exploitation of an intellectual property for fun and profit (minus the fun part) that has been in existence since If there were truth in advertising, The Shadow by James Patterson and Brian Sitts would have been called Generic Dystopian Adventure. Looking for Lamont Cranston? Seeking the Shadow? Then don't read this book. Yes I know what the title says but the Master of Darkness is not really here. Yes there is a character with the same name but really what we are witnessing here is the rape and exploitation of an intellectual property for fun and profit (minus the fun part) that has been in existence since 1931. Sadly this will be a lot of people's only exposure to the character, which is really heartbreaking. Anything that made the character unique has been erased. Some gripes (SPOILERS AHEAD): The Shadow CANNOT turn invisible, throw lightning or fireballs, or change shape. Why are any of his abilities suddenly inheritable? To borrow a phrase from Philip Jose Farmer, The Shadow thought the only good crook was a dead crook, and he made sure the streets of New York were littered with good crooks. We still have Margo Lane but any of his other former operatives like Burbank or Harry Vincent fall by the wayside without so much as a nod. (END SPOILERS.) I feel this book totally disrespects the character. I regret there is not a half star rating I can give it but at least I checked this out from the library so I did not put any money in the corporate coffers. They don't deserve my money, or yours.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Paul Hollis

    Yes, I know Patterson doesn't really write his co-authored books anymore, but he's a guilty pleasure of mine. His books are usually entertaining popcorn thrillers but this one is probably the worst thing he's published under his name. It's a generic ya dystopian book with all the usual tropes, spunky teen girl main character, evil leaders with The Shadow thrown in the mix. The Shadow is woken up after 150 years in a coma like state, in the year 2087(ok) meets up with our main character and is pr Yes, I know Patterson doesn't really write his co-authored books anymore, but he's a guilty pleasure of mine. His books are usually entertaining popcorn thrillers but this one is probably the worst thing he's published under his name. It's a generic ya dystopian book with all the usual tropes, spunky teen girl main character, evil leaders with The Shadow thrown in the mix. The Shadow is woken up after 150 years in a coma like state, in the year 2087(ok) meets up with our main character and is pretty much a supporting player. Every other chapeter there's a new super power that suddenly appears: invisibility, fireballs, lightning strikes and The Shadow is now a shape shifter! (ok,WTF). The villian is staright out of Falsh Gordon, the characters are one-dimensional, everything is so generic and bad. Patterson has succeded into turning a classic character into a joke.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Donnap

    I was hoping for a better read, This was just so different from any other books by Patterson, I was disappointed.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paxton Holley

    This book is getting a lot of crap. It could have been a lot worse. This isn’t THE Shadow, it’s a reimagining of the concept of the Shadow. Lamont Cranston and Margo Lane exist. Lamont is the Shadow. He has some of his dark powers. And due to being poisoned, and an experimental cryogenic process, Lamont is thrust 150 years into the future. A kind of dystopian future. Where he teams up with a girl who has some familiar abilities to take down a tyrant. I liked it. It’s a fun, quick, read. I liked This book is getting a lot of crap. It could have been a lot worse. This isn’t THE Shadow, it’s a reimagining of the concept of the Shadow. Lamont Cranston and Margo Lane exist. Lamont is the Shadow. He has some of his dark powers. And due to being poisoned, and an experimental cryogenic process, Lamont is thrust 150 years into the future. A kind of dystopian future. Where he teams up with a girl who has some familiar abilities to take down a tyrant. I liked it. It’s a fun, quick, read. I liked Lamont and Margo. I would read more in this series.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Grady

    This is just unbelievably bad. I didn’t expect literature, but everything about this pulp-science fiction-dystopia feels clunky and unreal, including the plot (view spoiler)[to murder tens of thousands of people at once by feeding them poisoned meet pies (hide spoiler)] , the setting, (view spoiler)[New York in 2087 that is the seat of a ‘One World’ government with no sign that the rest of the world exists, (hide spoiler)] and hopelessly cliche characters. It isn’t thrilling, it isn’t funny, it is This is just unbelievably bad. I didn’t expect literature, but everything about this pulp-science fiction-dystopia feels clunky and unreal, including the plot (view spoiler)[to murder tens of thousands of people at once by feeding them poisoned meet pies (hide spoiler)] , the setting, (view spoiler)[New York in 2087 that is the seat of a ‘One World’ government with no sign that the rest of the world exists, (hide spoiler)] and hopelessly cliche characters. It isn’t thrilling, it isn’t funny, it isn’t romantic; it’s just bad.

  23. 5 out of 5

    J L NICOL

    Invisibility Rocks What a lovely story which takes you through 150 years in the blink of an eye, it fairly zips along which is par for the course with JP in the chair. It has all the hallmarks of a great book showing you that there are mysteries still to be told, ending with the baddie disappearing for future books maybe!! Recommended.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    Definetly not my normal type of book, but i was really surprised by how much i liked and it was a very quick read. based On The Shadow back in the day but now with special powers. Lots of family ties in this book, especially nice at the end how everything came full circle. i can see there being a 2nd one, there is definetly more story to tell.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mary Dirksen

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book started out great and captured my attention I was so excited to see where this story would go. As the story continued I got a little dissapointed. They had new powers at every turn right when they needed them and just by yelling into a microphone they saved everyone. It just seemed to easy and way over the top. I feel as though they could of spent more time on the connection aspect. The ending was ok

  26. 5 out of 5

    Eric Troup

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I wanted to like this book so much. I'm a huge fan of the Shadow, particularly the radio series. There are just too many changes. I honestly can't figure out what audience this book is for. There is such an effort to change almost everything about the Shadow ... from his time period to the extent of his powers, to the very nature of his very being ... I can't imagine many die-hard Shadow fans embracing this ... and if it's written with a younger audience in mind, they probably have no idea who T I wanted to like this book so much. I'm a huge fan of the Shadow, particularly the radio series. There are just too many changes. I honestly can't figure out what audience this book is for. There is such an effort to change almost everything about the Shadow ... from his time period to the extent of his powers, to the very nature of his very being ... I can't imagine many die-hard Shadow fans embracing this ... and if it's written with a younger audience in mind, they probably have no idea who The Shadow is in the first place ... so why use the character at all? As if all of that weren't enough, the book fluctuates between two narrative styles—one in third-person, past-tense, and the other in first-person present-tense. But these are a continuing narrative, which just makes the whole thing feel disjointed and sloppy. And the saddest part is that, because I _am such a huge Shadow fan, if a sequel is written, I'll probably read it. But maybe not. Despite great action and suspense writing, the overall story left a bad taste in my mouth. If you've never encountered The Shadow before, I half-heartedly recommend this book, because you have nothing to compare it to. Other than that, I just can't. Wish I could ... but no.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    This is a Y.A. novel - right? Though I'm certain with well written books like The Giver, Hunger Games, and Harry Potter, teens will probably have even more eye rolls than I did about this trainwreck. Don't waste your time or money. This is a Y.A. novel - right? Though I'm certain with well written books like The Giver, Hunger Games, and Harry Potter, teens will probably have even more eye rolls than I did about this trainwreck. Don't waste your time or money.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    Not very good. Disappointing.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dan Nelson

    Not good as a Shadow novel. Totally lame take on the 30s character. But it was okay by itself.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Rhode

    Not my favorite Patterson book, but yet I kept reading! It was past into future and good vs evil.

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