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1637: No Peace Beyond the Line

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THE BATTLE FOR THE NEW WORLD IS A FIGHT TO THE FINISH! A NEW RING OF FIRE NOVEL BY BEST-SELLING WRITING TEAM ERIC FLINT AND CHARLES E. GANNON A New Day in the New World It’s 1637 in the Caribbean. Commander Eddie Cantrell and his ally and friend Admiral Martin Tromp start it off with some nasty surprises for Spain, whose centuries-long exploitation and rapine of the New Worl THE BATTLE FOR THE NEW WORLD IS A FIGHT TO THE FINISH! A NEW RING OF FIRE NOVEL BY BEST-SELLING WRITING TEAM ERIC FLINT AND CHARLES E. GANNON A New Day in the New World It’s 1637 in the Caribbean. Commander Eddie Cantrell and his ally and friend Admiral Martin Tromp start it off with some nasty surprises for Spain, whose centuries-long exploitation and rapine of the New World has run unchecked. Until now. Yet life goes on in the Caribbean. Relationships among the allied Dutch, Swedes, Germans, up-timers, and even Irish mercenaries continue to evolve and deepen. New friendships must be forged with the native peoples, who will not only shape the colonists’ future in the Caribbean, but will also decide whether they will be given access to a Louisiana oilfield that could change the balance of power. But for now, the only oil Imperial Spain knows about is the crude pouring out of the Allies’ pumps on Trinidad—which threatens its interests in both the New and the Old Worlds. So, following in the footsteps of the conquistadors, the empire’s commanders are resolved to show that they do not take threats lightly or lying down. Indeed, their historical reaction is to respond with overwhelming—and often genocidal—force. The battle for the New World has not merely begun; it is a fight to the finish.


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THE BATTLE FOR THE NEW WORLD IS A FIGHT TO THE FINISH! A NEW RING OF FIRE NOVEL BY BEST-SELLING WRITING TEAM ERIC FLINT AND CHARLES E. GANNON A New Day in the New World It’s 1637 in the Caribbean. Commander Eddie Cantrell and his ally and friend Admiral Martin Tromp start it off with some nasty surprises for Spain, whose centuries-long exploitation and rapine of the New Worl THE BATTLE FOR THE NEW WORLD IS A FIGHT TO THE FINISH! A NEW RING OF FIRE NOVEL BY BEST-SELLING WRITING TEAM ERIC FLINT AND CHARLES E. GANNON A New Day in the New World It’s 1637 in the Caribbean. Commander Eddie Cantrell and his ally and friend Admiral Martin Tromp start it off with some nasty surprises for Spain, whose centuries-long exploitation and rapine of the New World has run unchecked. Until now. Yet life goes on in the Caribbean. Relationships among the allied Dutch, Swedes, Germans, up-timers, and even Irish mercenaries continue to evolve and deepen. New friendships must be forged with the native peoples, who will not only shape the colonists’ future in the Caribbean, but will also decide whether they will be given access to a Louisiana oilfield that could change the balance of power. But for now, the only oil Imperial Spain knows about is the crude pouring out of the Allies’ pumps on Trinidad—which threatens its interests in both the New and the Old Worlds. So, following in the footsteps of the conquistadors, the empire’s commanders are resolved to show that they do not take threats lightly or lying down. Indeed, their historical reaction is to respond with overwhelming—and often genocidal—force. The battle for the New World has not merely begun; it is a fight to the finish.

30 review for 1637: No Peace Beyond the Line

  1. 5 out of 5

    Debrac2014

    I enjoyed it much more than the previous 1636 story with Eddie! Good story line!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    A very good installment in this epic series.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    If fantasy books could be a beach read :-)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Maurynne Maxwell

    First of all, kudos to the West Virginians & Christians for taking on the issue of slavery; that's one focus of this part of the series. I know that it's believed that half the folks reading this series are fascinated by the battle tactics, strategy, and implementation, and all the glorious technical details of retrofitting modern tech to that of the 1600s. I have less and less patience for those particular details, since I'm more interested in storytelling. (Does Baen's Bar no longer exist for First of all, kudos to the West Virginians & Christians for taking on the issue of slavery; that's one focus of this part of the series. I know that it's believed that half the folks reading this series are fascinated by the battle tactics, strategy, and implementation, and all the glorious technical details of retrofitting modern tech to that of the 1600s. I have less and less patience for those particular details, since I'm more interested in storytelling. (Does Baen's Bar no longer exist for those discussions?) I quit buying the books several years ago because of the cost-effectiveness of skipping those pages, and now I'm considering not asking the library to buy them either. I wish that weren't true. This is a great series in concept and used to be better in execution. Good editors could fix these issues.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Allen McDonnell

    Another fine addition Another fine addition to the 1632 series this time meshing the further adventures of Lord Hugh O'Donnell chief of the Irish Wild Geese and Eddie Cantrell uptime spouse of the Danish Kings Daughter. Another fine addition Another fine addition to the 1632 series this time meshing the further adventures of Lord Hugh O'Donnell chief of the Irish Wild Geese and Eddie Cantrell uptime spouse of the Danish Kings Daughter.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ron Nurmi

    The story line continues in the 1632 series this time it is centered in the Caribbean we Eddie Cantrell is with the Dutch and Irish allies who are again confronted by the Spanish. You will need to read this book to see how the story line of 1632 is continued. If you want action you will find it here and if you want personal lives you will also find it here. It is well worth the read.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mark Hazen

    Naval warfare This was a great book, lots of naval warfare and good projections of how future information could be used. Ends with a cliff hanger. Some timing issues here and there but overall a good read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    I liked the attempts at character development in some of the traditionally supporting cast. The "bad guys" got a chance to be clever and innovative. (Not, of course, innovative enough to win. But still.) There were the usual collection of battles, which generally were kept interesting by not being excessively stretched out. Although this was a reasonably thick book, the fact that there are now several story threads going on in the Caribbean means that at the end of the book I felt like not as muc I liked the attempts at character development in some of the traditionally supporting cast. The "bad guys" got a chance to be clever and innovative. (Not, of course, innovative enough to win. But still.) There were the usual collection of battles, which generally were kept interesting by not being excessively stretched out. Although this was a reasonably thick book, the fact that there are now several story threads going on in the Caribbean means that at the end of the book I felt like not as much got resolved as I would have liked. If only Flint and Gannon could focus on this story line for a bit longer and churn out a couple more books it would really be satisfying. (Particularly since we're left with our primary protagonist in the region setting out on a new adventure in the last couple of pages.) Unfortunately, I suspect I won't see a sequel from either of these authors for some time. Anyway, if you're a fan of the series, I think you'll like this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Charles MacCracken

    Another well crafted story in the series. This one is almost two books in length and it keeps your interest. Good battle scenes and human interactions. The good guys take some losses, so it is not all one sided. CMac

  10. 5 out of 5

    Marsha Valance

    Nautical terminology & navigation calculations are a bit overwhelming, but it is an action-packed narrative of the USE/Danish/Dutch/Wild Geese forces battling the Spanish for control of the Caribbean.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Moe Lane

    Fun E-ARC. But it's an E-ARC, and part of a series, and by now it's expected that you're reading at least the main books of that series. Start from the beginning if you're interested, in other words. Fun E-ARC. But it's an E-ARC, and part of a series, and by now it's expected that you're reading at least the main books of that series. Start from the beginning if you're interested, in other words.

  12. 4 out of 5

    MAB LongBeach

    Another in the long-running 1632 series. Devotees of the series will want to read this. Fans of alternate-history naval fiction would probably enjoy it as well. No one else will care.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stan Morris

    Not Bad Better than most of the recent books in this series, but some of the dialogue is rather inane, and sometimes Eddie sounds like he's 12. I give it 3 1/2 stars Not Bad Better than most of the recent books in this series, but some of the dialogue is rather inane, and sometimes Eddie sounds like he's 12. I give it 3 1/2 stars

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kevin P

    I very much enjoyed this installment of the series. Significantly moved forward the activities in the Caribbean, and leaves some tantalizing threads that I'm looking forward to. Recommended! I very much enjoyed this installment of the series. Significantly moved forward the activities in the Caribbean, and leaves some tantalizing threads that I'm looking forward to. Recommended!

  15. 5 out of 5

    hCharles Obert

    The story continues to based on solid historical facts making it much more enjoyable read for me. In case you did not know, "the Line" is based on nter caetera ('Among other [works]') was a papal bull issued by Pope Alexander VI on the 4 May (quarto nonas maii) 1493, which granted to the Catholic Monarchs Ferdinand and Isabella (as sovereigns of Castile) all lands to the "west and south" of a pole-to-pole line 100 leagues west and south of any of the islands of the Azores or the Cape Verde island The story continues to based on solid historical facts making it much more enjoyable read for me. In case you did not know, "the Line" is based on nter caetera ('Among other [works]') was a papal bull issued by Pope Alexander VI on the 4 May (quarto nonas maii) 1493, which granted to the Catholic Monarchs Ferdinand and Isabella (as sovereigns of Castile) all lands to the "west and south" of a pole-to-pole line 100 leagues west and south of any of the islands of the Azores or the Cape Verde islands. (Wikipedia). Pretty arrogant if you ask me. I like the way that Eric Flint has a UMWA president reshape the Western hemisphere and continue to support this story in its' various aspects.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

  17. 4 out of 5

    Micheál Ó

  18. 5 out of 5

    Seth Dwyer-frazier

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn Baron

  20. 4 out of 5

    Guy Brown

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anton

  22. 5 out of 5

    Matt Pollicove

  23. 4 out of 5

    Richard

  24. 5 out of 5

    Richard Girten

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

  26. 5 out of 5

    John Lemke

  27. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

  28. 5 out of 5

    Charles Pierce

  29. 5 out of 5

    Phyllis Griffiths

  30. 4 out of 5

    Fearg

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