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Catalyst Gate

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In the final book of this explosive Philip K. Dick Award-nominated space opera, the universe is under threat and an ancient alien intelligence threatens to bring humanity down - unless Major Sanda Greeve and her crew can stop it . . . The code has been cracked. The secrets of the Casimir gates have been revealed. But humanity still isn't safe. The alien intelligence known a In the final book of this explosive Philip K. Dick Award-nominated space opera, the universe is under threat and an ancient alien intelligence threatens to bring humanity down - unless Major Sanda Greeve and her crew can stop it . . . The code has been cracked. The secrets of the Casimir gates have been revealed. But humanity still isn't safe. The alien intelligence known as Rainier and her clones are still out there, hell-bent on its destruction. And only Sanda can stop them. With the universe's most powerful ship under her command and some of the most skilled hackers, fighters and spies on her team, it will still take everything she has to find the key to taking down an immortal enemy with seemingly limitless bodies, resources and power.


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In the final book of this explosive Philip K. Dick Award-nominated space opera, the universe is under threat and an ancient alien intelligence threatens to bring humanity down - unless Major Sanda Greeve and her crew can stop it . . . The code has been cracked. The secrets of the Casimir gates have been revealed. But humanity still isn't safe. The alien intelligence known a In the final book of this explosive Philip K. Dick Award-nominated space opera, the universe is under threat and an ancient alien intelligence threatens to bring humanity down - unless Major Sanda Greeve and her crew can stop it . . . The code has been cracked. The secrets of the Casimir gates have been revealed. But humanity still isn't safe. The alien intelligence known as Rainier and her clones are still out there, hell-bent on its destruction. And only Sanda can stop them. With the universe's most powerful ship under her command and some of the most skilled hackers, fighters and spies on her team, it will still take everything she has to find the key to taking down an immortal enemy with seemingly limitless bodies, resources and power.

30 review for Catalyst Gate

  1. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    There’s a lot of things that makes this series great, but what stands out most is its balancing act. I usually prefer a character-first story, with the plot and world-building backing that up. Megan O’Keefe has hit the sweet spot with Catalyst Gate – and the entire Protectorate trilogy, really – by delivering equal amounts of awesome characters, ‘holy-shit!’ plot reveals, and ‘whooooaaa, coooolll’ events that ultimately brings this space opera into blockbuster territory. Commander Sanda Greeve, h There’s a lot of things that makes this series great, but what stands out most is its balancing act. I usually prefer a character-first story, with the plot and world-building backing that up. Megan O’Keefe has hit the sweet spot with Catalyst Gate – and the entire Protectorate trilogy, really – by delivering equal amounts of awesome characters, ‘holy-shit!’ plot reveals, and ‘whooooaaa, coooolll’ events that ultimately brings this space opera into blockbuster territory. Commander Sanda Greeve, her sundry crew of universal misfits and her AI friend Bero are back on board The Light with the sole purpose of bringing down Rainier, the alien tech/human hybrid bent on humanity’s destruction. Sanda’s brother Biran, now vaulted into a powerful leadership position within the High Protectorate, is trying to root out Rainier’s evil from within the populace, while tracing these events back to the source. Tomas the former spy is struggling to find direction with his new-found, unshackled identity, but is still driven by emotions from which he cannot escape. And Jules Valentine – well, Jules being Jules, single-minded as ever – “easy to lose everything you love, when you’ve only ever loved one thing” – continues to be the universal wild card, a bent cog in the machine that could save or destroy everything. Usually both. Always both. There’s a lot going on. And there’s a lot of ends to tie up. Plot-wise, the end of the story is incredibly exciting, with some hugely satisfying developments in its final acts. There’s a bomb-drop that’s been slowly percolating since book one that finally rears its head, and it is awesome. The major characters finish their arcs in compelling fashion, and the universe is much different than how it started. However, I was hoping to see some more A to B development from the supporting cast. Although we spent time with some great supporting characters, like those on The Light and one or two in the Protectorate – they weren’t given much room to grow. It might be asking too much from a book with so much space dedicated to several POVs, but I found myself wondering if Nox, Arden, and even Bero changed much from the beginning to the end of their arcs. Catalyst Gate ends a trilogy that I gave high marks to across the board. I really loved this story. O’Keefe’s writing moves at a blistering pace. There’s a protagonist with disability, several LGBTQ+ relationships, and traumatic challenges to overcome. Wild ideas, cool tech, wonderful representation, and suspenseful as hell -- an easy recommendation for anyone looking for a grand adventure in the stars. 9.0 / 10

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    *copy from Netgalley in exchange for a review* So, let's talk about Catalyst Gate. It’s the conclusion of Megan O’Keefe’s absolutely cracking Protectorate space opera series. I’ve had a great time in the universe of the Protectorate, with its twists and turns, deep secrets and complex characterisation. And this book, this book raises the already very high bar. If you’re one for worldbuilding, you’ve come to the right place. O’Keefe expands her intricate, intriguing space, filled with mysteries an *copy from Netgalley in exchange for a review* So, let's talk about Catalyst Gate. It’s the conclusion of Megan O’Keefe’s absolutely cracking Protectorate space opera series. I’ve had a great time in the universe of the Protectorate, with its twists and turns, deep secrets and complex characterisation. And this book, this book raises the already very high bar. If you’re one for worldbuilding, you’ve come to the right place. O’Keefe expands her intricate, intriguing space, filled with mysteries and old atrocities. What was once a universe defined by the gates one uses to get from place to place the lines of travel, is blown open, in terms of both geography and history. The space we see here is something new, unexplored, in both the physical and temporal case.And each piece of the universe is part of the puzzle, each interlocking part helping to reveal a greater whole, while revelling in its own details of wonder and terror. O’Keefe gives us a humanity which has reached out to the stars. But a humanity whose old wounds and old grudges are part of what defines them. And that’s true too, of the force we see moving against them. Rainier, the creature-that-was-an-AI, is also a fish swimming in a sea of missing gods. Because this is a universe which was not always ours. And even those parts that were, the world we came from, the cradle of us all, hides its own secrets. This is a universe filled with deep secrets, deep magic, wonder, and hidden blades. It’s a universe which has space for something other than us in it, and one where the fire of humanity can both gutter and inspire. I won’t spoil it (and that’s going to be a theme of this review), but there’s revelations about the setting which turn everything up to now on its head (again), and make you rethink everything you’ve read. And it’s still a vivid, beautiful, bloody, unknowable universe. The people share a depth and emotion with the world. They have a resonance, a humanity which you can feel in your bones. And Rainier, the not-exactly-AI, is something else. A broken horror in borrowed clothes, straining against a leash. Both the people and the Other are whole, and real. Not always nice, no not at all. Not always charming, no, not at all. But filled with passionate intensity and love and comfort, and revenge and horror and everything that makes us feel that we’re something other than vehicles for our impulses. These characters, two books in, you can feel their moods. You can understand what you think their goals to be. You can try to understand the rest, to see the cloaked motives of masked truths. But, to be a bit less poetic about it, you’ll do it because the people on the page will grab hold of you, take you by the hand and make you care about them - from the wounded, vicious AI to the troubled survivor of a planetary slum, and from there to the family of fathers and siblings, deep in their affection and unflinching in their duty. They’re people. And because they’re people, you’ll care about them. Live with them, die with them, cry and laugh and love and live alongside them, as this chapter of their life, as this series, draws to a close. And they’re characters that capture the intimacy and beauty of humanity, as well as our stupidity and cruelty, and the alien and the unknowable that shifts outside our experience is drawn onto the page with skill and wonder in equal measure. I don’t want to be this vague, I don’t, but this book. This book is willing to turn on a dime and smash your expectations, of people, places and events. I dare not plumb the depths in case I give something away. Because the plot is a thing of joy. A precision work of narrative. It works. It compels your attention, it refuses to let you stop reading. Each word in a sentence in a page in a chapter carries meaning and truth and moments where you just want to express your surprise, loudly. I, personally, used expletives. You’re probably reading this coming off the revelations from the first two books in the series. I can promise you that they are easily overshadowed by things here. And on a narrative level, the story is compelling, intriguing and perfectly paced; a page turner which will keep you reading long, long into the night. And, if you’re wondering: yes. The ending is a wonder. It’s cathartic and smart and warm and, well, exactly what the series needed. This book is the series ending we deserve, the ending we needed, and it’s brilliant. Go pick it up, right now.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Katy

    this book was basically perfect T_T also i think we can all agree bero and tomas is the true love story of this series - serving enemies to partners excellence ((view spoiler)[also also tomas spacing himself once a week when sander was gone was so sad T____T (hide spoiler)] ) this book was basically perfect T_T also i think we can all agree bero and tomas is the true love story of this series - serving enemies to partners excellence ((view spoiler)[also also tomas spacing himself once a week when sander was gone was so sad T____T (hide spoiler)] )

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Successfully concluding a trilogy is always tricky, and I adored The Protectorate series as a whole, so although there were some parts in this instalment where I found myself less engaged (perhaps because of the sheer amount of action crammed into this book's pages) this was overall a satisfying conclusion. I feel like there is still potential for more stories from this universe - but maybe that's just because I love these characters so much. I re-read Velocity Weapon and Chaos Vector before divi Successfully concluding a trilogy is always tricky, and I adored The Protectorate series as a whole, so although there were some parts in this instalment where I found myself less engaged (perhaps because of the sheer amount of action crammed into this book's pages) this was overall a satisfying conclusion. I feel like there is still potential for more stories from this universe - but maybe that's just because I love these characters so much. I re-read Velocity Weapon and Chaos Vector before diving into this, and I found Catalyst Gate to be a lot more twisty than its predecessors. I tend to be drawn into a narrative by characters, rather than plot, and so it's possible that this is what made me less "all in" for this part. However, this factor could also make this someone else's favourite instalment of the series. I can definitely see myself re-reading this series as a whole, again, in the future. 4.5 rounded up to 5. Thanks to Orbit and Edelweiss for the ARC.

  5. 4 out of 5

    MadProfessah

    Catalyst Gate by Megan O’Keefe is the third book in The Protectorate trilogy, following Velocity Weapon and Chaos Vector. The entire trilogy is an amazing, action-packed, space opera story featuring a diverse set of multifaceted characters that exist in a complicated, engaging story that provokes thoughts about the nature of intelligent life, the possible future trajectories of human civilization and the emotional stakes of personal attachments. The central characters in the Protectorate series a Catalyst Gate by Megan O’Keefe is the third book in The Protectorate trilogy, following Velocity Weapon and Chaos Vector. The entire trilogy is an amazing, action-packed, space opera story featuring a diverse set of multifaceted characters that exist in a complicated, engaging story that provokes thoughts about the nature of intelligent life, the possible future trajectories of human civilization and the emotional stakes of personal attachments. The central characters in the Protectorate series are Biran Greeve and Sanda Greeve, brother and sister, who are both citizens of Prime, a galaxy-spanning human civilization. Sanda is in the military and is also the captain of one of the most amazing spaceships known to mankind, inhabited by an artificial intelligence named The Light of Berossus (more commonly known as Bero). Biran is a Keeper of Prime, which means that he contains a chip in his head which contains access to Prime’s greatest secret: the technology to the Gates which facilitate interstellar travel between various Prime star systems. By the time we get to the third book in the series, Catalyst Gate, the plot has developed to a point where Sanda and Biran are in two very different places, both literally and figuratively. Biran has been named Speaker of Prime and is a member of the High Protectorate, a body akin to an Executive Committee of Keepers who run the government of Prime. In that capacity Biran is dealing with the aftermath of the discovery that Prime’s Casimir gates were not invented by the revered founder of Prime Inventive, Alexandra Halston, a few centuries before, but were basically reverse engineered from alien technology. Because of a flaw Halston made when she initially engineered the Casimir gates on their initial startup use the gates have been releasing deadly radiation into the star systems they facilitate human travel to, basically sterilizing them of all multi-cellular organisms, which explains why in hundreds of years humans have never encountered any other intelligent alien life. What’s a little weird (and frankly a little unbelievable) is that humans have not been finding any Earth-like planets either in the star systems that they have colonized to date. All of Prime’s citizens live below huge pressurized domes, generally on large asteroids or rocky, geologically stable planets which for some reason work best with the Gates. The entire subject of how the gates work and any science or technology associated with space travel in any way is highly classified and only Keepers are allowed to have any access to it. O’Keefe does an excellent job of depicting this and other cultural aspects of Prime society in convincing fashion. Her worldbuilding is on par with the very best in SFF. Sanda, who is a Commander in the Prime military and due to the events in Velocity Weapon and Chaos Vector has control of the most advanced ship in the known Universe. She and her crew, which consists of a motley but capable group of folks that are trying to locate Rainier Lavaux, the person responsible for a heinous and deadly biowarfare attack on Prime citizens who has openly stated her genocidal intentions towards humanity. Sanda’s crew includes Tomas Cepko, the double (or triple?) agent who loves her; Arden Wyke, the non-binary computer super-hacker; and Nox, an ex-soldier cum mercenary who used to date one of Sanda’s dads; Min Liao, a scientist/medical doctor who inadvertently helped Lavaux accomplish her attack; and two other people who help maintain the ship. If this seems like a large cast, it is. But O’Keefe skillfully deploys them and I never felt confused or overwhelmed. O’Keefe’s writing has numerous strengths: she describes action well, and she also uses it to forward the plot effectively. Additionally, she does an exceptional job of incorporating diverse characteristics and identities into her characters which makes them interesting and relatable without being precious. The Protectorate trilogy is an excellent example of how she’s able to do all this while maintaining within the genre conventions of military space opera, which is quite an impressive feat. Although this series is complete and I am sad to not spend any more time with Sanda and Biran Greeve I am very curious and interested to read what O’Keefe will write in the future.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Traveling Cloak

    Catalyst Gate is the third and final installment in Megan E. O’Keefe’s The Protectorate series. This is a highly-anticipated release for many, and that is especially true for fans of the space opera trilogy who are looking for the story to end with a bang. If you read no more of this review, know this: to say it went out with a bang would be an understatement. I try to be particularly discerning with final books of series that I have loved; meaning, I actively look for cause not to give it them a Catalyst Gate is the third and final installment in Megan E. O’Keefe’s The Protectorate series. This is a highly-anticipated release for many, and that is especially true for fans of the space opera trilogy who are looking for the story to end with a bang. If you read no more of this review, know this: to say it went out with a bang would be an understatement. I try to be particularly discerning with final books of series that I have loved; meaning, I actively look for cause not to give it them a perfect rating. My reasoning for this is that it is the best way to keep myself objective; having already enjoyed the rest of the series, it is human nature to want the finale to be good. So, in order to keep my review balanced, I read with an intent to find something about which I can be critical. In that way, I know I am keeping myself honest. But, honestly, I have nothing to complain about with this one. The opposite is true; in fact, I have so much to gush about, which I will try to do without revealing too much about the story. I have two objectives for this review: tell you have fabulous the book is and not spoil anything of substance, one of those goals being easier than the other. In any case, that is exactly what I plan to do. ‘My name is Bero. I do not agree with your sentiments.’ What is good about Catalyst Gate is the consistency. The characters that have been here from the beginning persist in their phenomenal roles. Bero. Sanda. Tomas. Biran. Rainier. Okonkwo. Jules. Nox. The list goes on and on, with the point being that the character set has not changed all that much, and I love that. In the course of three books and 1,500+ pages every single one has grown into their role and had their place in the story (and my heart )affirmed. Secrets have been revealed and pasts explored, but every one of them basically stays true to their own. I love that because it has allowed me to grow fonder of each one by the page. I have definitely become invested in all of their fates at this point. ‘Hah,’ Nox said. ‘Got the fuckers, did you, B?’ ‘I continue to be the most effective weapon in the known universe.’ Another good thing is the constant action. Pack some extra O2 in your suit because O’Keefe throws you out of an airlock does not allow you to come in for air. But, again, no surprise there as that has been a staple of this series from the very first page of Velocity Weapon. That is what makes it impossible to put down (I broke my self-imposed page restriction every day) is the fact that the story never stops, never even slows, is always accelerating at a breakneck pace. Thrusters at full blast, ready to jump at a moment’s notice. The unceasing need to know what happens next is a huge driver of the story, and it makes for a book that is undeniable. ‘Play nice, now, and we will break a few bones later.’ ‘Delayed satisfaction. I can work with that.’ But what makes Catalyst Gate great is the complexity. I thought the first two books had layers (you can read my review of Chaos Vector – book 2 in the series – here), but they were nothing compared to this, the final book in the set. It’s a wormhole, wrapped in a warp gate, inside a supernova. There are so many threads to follow, all intertwined in one big space-timey mesh that it becomes almost impossible to tell where one begins and the next one ends. And that might be my favorite thing about the book (and the series, overall): O’Keefe’s relentless, unforgiving labyrinthian storylines. The author does not go easy on readers, and I am so happy to see it. There is so much to be fleshed out in this story, and O’Keefe accomplishes that in her own way: unapologetically. So, be on your toes, because it gets DEEP quick around these parts. Bring your own shovel and flashlight. We have established the good and the great of the thing, but I am not stopping there. What makes Catalyst Gate (and The Protectorate Series as a whole) phenomenal is how incredibly well it all comes together. There are so many moving parts and plot twists that at times it was not easy to see a situation where the disparate pieces are connected, and, yet, O’Keefe puts a bow on things in seemingly effortless fashion. By “things” I mean every aspect of the story: the characters and their complicated relationships, past and present behavior and decisions, technology old and new, action and inaction of governing bodies, etc. The list goes on and on, and there are too many “aha!” and “oh yeah!” moments to count. In the end, Catalyst Gate is one of those books that I was so happy to read but so sad to finish. The Protectorate Series has kept me on edge from the first to the last, and that is the biggest compliment I can give. This book gets my highest recommendation.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Denise

    4.5. I’ve been totally engaged in this trilogy- except for the convoluted plot twists at about 80% or so. Ended very satisfactorily though. Someone else on GR noted that the author dies a nice job balancing world building, characterization and plot. I totally agree!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    4.5 stars Some incredible moments and a fitting end to a fun series... Review to follow.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Maddalena

    I received this novel from Orbit Books through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review: my thanks to both of them for this opportunity. I imagine that the beginning of any story must be a difficult time, with ideas crowding on the writer’s mind and clamoring for release, but I also believe that bringing it to a close must be equally trying, if one wants to tie up all the narrative threads in a satisfactory way for creator and readers alike: Megan O’Keefe managed to do so very well, and in a b I received this novel from Orbit Books through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review: my thanks to both of them for this opportunity. I imagine that the beginning of any story must be a difficult time, with ideas crowding on the writer’s mind and clamoring for release, but I also believe that bringing it to a close must be equally trying, if one wants to tie up all the narrative threads in a satisfactory way for creator and readers alike: Megan O’Keefe managed to do so very well, and in a breath-stopping, compelling way. What started as a more personal journey in the first book of the trilogy, Velocity Weapon, which focused on the main character Sanda Greeve and her discoveries aboard the AI-driven ship Light of Berossus, then turned into a system-wide menace in the second installment, Chaos Vector, to be ultimately expanded into the threat of galactic annihilation in this conclusive volume of the trilogy, one that I once again hope will be optioned for a TV series by some enlightened network executives, if such creatures exist, because this story deserves to be enjoyed in both mediums, and it possesses every quality to turn into a visually stunning, story-intense show. In the final book of the saga we find all of the people we got to know along the way, and can enjoy their expanded characterization and the huge twists and revelations that keep coming at them, and at the readers, with a relentless pace that still manages to offer a cohesive, engaging story never missing its focus despite the complex interweaving of its many narrative threads. While Megan O’Keefe keeps faithful to the structure of the three main POVs employed until now - Sanda, her brother Biran and Jules Valentine - she still finds a way to flesh out the secondary characters with depth and facets that add layers to the story and make you care for them quite deeply, and it hardly matters whether these characters are actual people or not, because Bero - the A.I. entity who is Sanda’s major ally - comes across as a delightful personality, capable of both great determination as well as subtle humor. What was hinted at before and becomes dramatically clear in Catalyst Gate is that humanity, despite its amazing progress, has not evolved beyond its own self-centeredness and petty squabbles, that reaching for the stars and expanding its civilization there has not cured them of the need to conquer without thinking about possible consequences: once the danger threatening mankind is revealed as the repercussion of an act of extreme hubris, I kept thinking about a sentence in Tolkien’s LOTR about the Dwarves “delving too greedily and too deep” and therefore releasing their own nemesis. The scourge that humans unleashed is the main element driving the story here, and it does so through a series of interconnected threads that impart an almost impossible acceleration to it: more than once I felt the need to stop and come up for air, trying to distance myself a little from the constant adrenaline surge of the action, but I could not stop for long because the story kept attracting me like a powerful magnet. It’s amazing to understand, in the end, how the past and the present are closely tied, how the glimpses of humanity’s road to the stars connect with the events in the current timeline, and there are some quite harrowing, edge-of-your-seat moments as the various characters try to piece together those revelations from that past with the dangers of the present, all the while dealing with their own problems - and secrets. Yes, because there are still many truths still to be revealed in Catalyst Gate: if you thought that all the jaw-dropping surprises had been used up in the previous books, well, think again, because there are quite a few still in store for you. And some will prove to be more than unexpected… Characters are still shining as brightly as in the previous installments, from Biran who finds himself having to step into his position with the kind of strength and hard resolve that seemed far from his personality; to former spy Tomas, who is still trying to understand his place in the world and the direction his newfound emancipation must take, but knows for certain where his loyalty must lie; to Bero, once the captive A.I. on the ship Light of Berossus and now a powerful player in the galactic milieu, yet one possessed with a delightfully childish glee about its skills (“I continue to be the most effective weapon in the known universe”). Nor are the secondary players forgotten here, particularly where Sanda’s motley crew is concerned: Megan O’Keefe took these disparate individuals and turned them into one of the most engaging, most enjoyable fictional found families I ever encountered, one whose banter - even in the face of possible destruction - offers welcome rays of light in a very dark, very troublesome background. And of course Sanda: I connected with this character from day one, admiring her resilience and her no-nonsense approach to problems, even physical ones, like the loss of one leg which has been affecting her from the very start and served to showcase her attitude and personality quite effectively. Sanda is indeed the perfect modern heroine, one who can both kick ass and be affectionate and caring toward her families - the one she started with and the one she built around her. The perfect balance between human frailties and courage, the way she can face even the most desperate situation with tenacity and determination have been the best feature in Sanda Greeve, and those that made this series quite special besides its enthralling core story. As I said at the start of this review, bringing a saga of such magnitude as The Protectorate to its close might hold its own pitfalls, but Megan O’Keefe proved to be a very skillful weaver here, always keeping a tight control on her creature and delivering an end that is both satisfactory and emotionally appealing. If you are looking for a compelling space opera series with depth and substance, you need look no further. Originally posted at SPACE and SORCERY BLOG

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    SPOILER ALERT A somewhat unsatisfying ending to this trilogy. The first book was very good, the second, pretty good and this one is just, well, ok. The manifold story lines are interesting. The characters are what I'd expect from such a large developed universe: some are very well fleshed out and others, less so. The character arcs are somewhat muddy, as the Sanda and Biran don't really have one, in spite of all that has happened to them. At the end of the third book they are essentially exactly t SPOILER ALERT A somewhat unsatisfying ending to this trilogy. The first book was very good, the second, pretty good and this one is just, well, ok. The manifold story lines are interesting. The characters are what I'd expect from such a large developed universe: some are very well fleshed out and others, less so. The character arcs are somewhat muddy, as the Sanda and Biran don't really have one, in spite of all that has happened to them. At the end of the third book they are essentially exactly the same people, albeit a little more experienced and cynical, that they were at the beginning of the first book. Jules had more of an arc than any of the other characters, and the rest of the secondary players are essentially one-dimensional and static throughout three books. The text started out somewhat clunky, as if the author was having difficulty finding the pace and voice of story. Ultimately this improved, and the last 3/4 of the book flowed much better. The main problems I had with this story are: 1. The 'surprise twist' regarding the make up of the main character, plus she gets a 'pass' from the alien mind she encountered and stays enhanced when most everyone else is just back to being a boring old Human meat bag. Yes, I know it was foreshadowed in all three books, but I still think it's out of place and takes a great deal away from an otherwise excellent character. It is an example of the 'god-in-human-form' cliche that is very tiring. Can a simple, normal human ever accomplish any great and terrible feat without having to become some sort of enhanced or god-like persona? With a disappointing 'happy ending' to boot? 2. The 'deus-ex-machina' solution to the mammoth threat to humanity. This is also a tired cliche, perhaps even more so than the first I mentioned, even for science fiction, and I'm sad to see it used here in an otherwise solid trilogy. Is Humanity ever going to be able to pull together and defeat a massive enemy on their own, no matter that the enemy is so overwhelming and the chances of success are almost zero? Does an advanced alien intelligence or two, no matter how ambivalent or hostile they are to Humanity, always have to do the heavy lifting? The muddled conclusion to the Icarion problem is a huge letdown to an interesting, if not fully explored, enemy. It is too fast, too easy and not believable that they would fall apart and be overwhelmed that easily after the decompression event. Overall I'm slightly disappointed in this third book. Many other reviews have been more positive, and people genuinely seemed to like it, so perhaps it is a matter of my personal taste in story telling. I will continue to read this author and look forward to her future works.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jake is Reading

    Okay, it’s tricky writing a spoiler-free review of a sequel at the best of times, but Megan O’Keefe has made it impossible with Catalyst Gate, the conclusion of The Protectorate trilogy. Unexpected plot twists have essentially become O’Keefe’s callsign, with all three books in this series delivering WTF moments every other chapter. So, as with my reviews of Velocity Weapon and Chaos Vector, I’m not even going to discuss the plot for fear of spoiling the fun. I recommend reading this series withou Okay, it’s tricky writing a spoiler-free review of a sequel at the best of times, but Megan O’Keefe has made it impossible with Catalyst Gate, the conclusion of The Protectorate trilogy. Unexpected plot twists have essentially become O’Keefe’s callsign, with all three books in this series delivering WTF moments every other chapter. So, as with my reviews of Velocity Weapon and Chaos Vector, I’m not even going to discuss the plot for fear of spoiling the fun. I recommend reading this series without even looking at the back cover. The Protectorate is a fast-paced sci-fi adventure driven by action and intrigue while still allowing time for plenty of feels. It checks all of my SF boxes along the way (sentient spaceships, politics, mysterious space technology, queer characters and found family), making it one of my favourite series out there.Catalyst Gate was no exception to this, keeping up the pace and big plot moments in a way that makes The Protectorate feel more like a serialised novel than a trilogy. The ending is as epic and satisfying as you would expect, having come to trust O'Keefe in the pilot's chair. And–holy strong female lead, Batman–Sanda is such a memorable character. In fact, I love all the characters and their various, complicated relationships. If you've already read Velocity Weapon and Chaos Vector, you won't be disappointed with Catalyst Gate (although if you have a terrible memory like me, a quick re-read of books one and two won't hurt). If you're yet to start this series, I can't recommend it enough! That's all I can say. Thanks to the publisher for a copy of the book in exchange for an honest review! Trigger warnings: bodily harm, brainwashing, death, emotional trauma, self-harm, torture

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jon Zuckerman

    Yet another level-up in quality, the mastery of the characters and their motivations and relationships really shines in this one! To be honest I'm still not sure the entire Jules storyline was worth the amount of pages spent talking about her; it had a good conclusion but that might be about it. Also, I have no idea what happened in the last 50 pages lol, there was 20 pages at the end to cover the events but I still don't get it and I don't think I ever will. I feel like that happened in the sec Yet another level-up in quality, the mastery of the characters and their motivations and relationships really shines in this one! To be honest I'm still not sure the entire Jules storyline was worth the amount of pages spent talking about her; it had a good conclusion but that might be about it. Also, I have no idea what happened in the last 50 pages lol, there was 20 pages at the end to cover the events but I still don't get it and I don't think I ever will. I feel like that happened in the second book too. Oh well, still good!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Emmanuel

    There’s a lot to unpack in this review as I read all 3 books in the series one after another over the past couple of weeks. And it feels like I just read a 1600-page book, as it definitely appears like it was carefully crafted and planned that way. There were a few slower moments in the second book—definitely on purpose—but in the end, I loved it through and through. The plot is spread out over several components throughout the series (and concluded in Catalyst Gate) and if you enjoy chapter ends There’s a lot to unpack in this review as I read all 3 books in the series one after another over the past couple of weeks. And it feels like I just read a 1600-page book, as it definitely appears like it was carefully crafted and planned that way. There were a few slower moments in the second book—definitely on purpose—but in the end, I loved it through and through. The plot is spread out over several components throughout the series (and concluded in Catalyst Gate) and if you enjoy chapter ends that pushes you over the edge (“What?”), then you’ll be served. You experience politics, mostly through the eyes of Sanda’s brother Biran as he blossoms into a leader in the Keepers’s world. Also, we have Sanda—the main character—who throws us left and right through a sequence of events starting with her and a sentient ship in the first book all the way to godlike forces derived from ancient aliens and technology. As a Sci-Fi narrative, the Protectorate series delivers all the parts you expect in this type of novel. We also get an extensive supporting cast of characters without a single person having the same skills, personality and behaviours...and they all strategically fill a role in the overarching trilogy...and I simply loved it! In the initial chapters, each character got their introduction and I couldn’t quite grasp their role in the larger scheme of things, but eventually it all made sense. The trilogy is thoroughly planned and delivers on all cylinders. And the series presented a history and world building that connected to our present—and showed how we could evolve—if the elements presented in these stories were our reality. Absolutely logical and believable. So if you didn’t get my passion for Megan O’Keefe’s books in this review; I truly enjoyed them and looking forward to read more from her. In conclusion, if you’re looking for a space-opera trilogy, filled with tension-driven scenes, politics, tech to fill a 30th century gadget magazine, Catalyst Gate and The Protectorate series is a must Sci-Fi read.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Tas

    Read this review and other Science Fiction/Fantasy book reviews at The Quill to Live Earlier this year I re-read Velocity Weapon(VW) to prepare for the final book in the The Protectorate Trilogy by Megan O’Keefe. I have avoided spoilers (except for one in the synopsis, so you can just skip that if you want to avoid it) so that you feel comfortable learning about the series. Needless to say, I am now a big fan of the trilogy and will proselytize it to anyone looking for a good ride. Megan O’Keefe’ Read this review and other Science Fiction/Fantasy book reviews at The Quill to Live Earlier this year I re-read Velocity Weapon(VW) to prepare for the final book in the The Protectorate Trilogy by Megan O’Keefe. I have avoided spoilers (except for one in the synopsis, so you can just skip that if you want to avoid it) so that you feel comfortable learning about the series. Needless to say, I am now a big fan of the trilogy and will proselytize it to anyone looking for a good ride. Megan O’Keefe’s The Protectorate Trilogy is a ferociously good time filled with fantastic characters and great worldbuilding that keeps the reader on the edge of their seat. Chaos Vector (CV) and Catalyst Gate (CG) take place following some pretty major revelations in the 250 page sprint that O’Keefe performs in Velocity Weapon. If book one was a smaller, more personalized conflict that revolved around a cold war, books two and three amp up the stakes to systemic and civilizational threats. Don’t worry, though, the deteriorating relations between Ada Prime and Icarion are still featured heavily, and play a major role within the characters’ lives. Sanda is off on her own, looking for answers after Bero - the digital being who populated the ship Light of the Berossus - has disappeared. Biran meanwhile dives ever deeper into the Keepers and tries his best to ease the incredibly high tensions between Ada Prime and Icarion before everything explodes in war. One of the more prominent features of VW was its fast-paced plot, filled with character and major reveals. O’Keefe does an astounding job of continuing that breakneck pace while pressing the gas pedal through the floor to another plane of existence. It’s applaudable enough that O’Keefe keeps the tension building and provides the reader with a great popcorn ride. However, I find it astounding that she was also able to keep delivering the twists and turns coming without anything ever going truly off the rails. It felt as if every chapter had something in store, some new piece of information waiting to be discovered that would change the course of the story. I can’t count how many times I chuckled to myself with a slight tinge of madness as O’Keefe pulled a 180 degree e-brake turn going 100 mph while looking me dead in the eye without flinching and then started driving backwards. On top of all that, each reveal felt interesting and slowly built out more of O’Keefe’s world. I don’t normally read for plot, but these books left me craving the next chapter, sending me into hours long reading holes, desperately needing to find out what happens next. Even a great plot needs good characters, and O’Keefe steps it up here again. Sanda and Biran were excellent in the first book, but even more interesting in the rest of the series. Sanda spent a lot of time in Velocity Weapon reacting to events as they happened to her. She had grit and determination but it’s easy to chalk it up to a survival instinct shaped by her military career. However, in CV and CG Sanda’s will is front and center. The first book was all set up for this side of her, and it shines through brightly. You can feel the choices she is about to make before making them, yet they still feel impactful. This was definitely fueled by O’Keefe’s ability to let you know how beaten down Sanda was while scraping the bottom of her energy reserves without Sanda herself knowing it. Reading Sanda’s side of the story was like watching the wires on a suspension bridge start to snap with an entire morning’s commute still on it. You just never knew when she was going to buckle, making each choice to push herself one more time that much harder to watch. Sanda is easily one of my favorite characters in science fiction now just because of how well she is portrayed, and how heartbreaking her story is. Biran is also still a joy, although he is less heavily featured in the next two books. Where VW had a very consistent back and forth between the perspectives, CV and CG had Biran sport his wilyness every three or four chapters. Luckily, O’Keefe is excellent at managing the pace, so I never felt devoid of Biran, but if you came for even more Biran than before, you may be disappointed. However, what the reader is exposed to is nothing short of thrilling. After having bet everything in the first book, he’s a man who has nothing to lose, and in a position to make things happen. His changes and what he learns through the books is quite the journey and I enjoyed every page of his. Besides the two main characters, the rest of the series is full of excellent side characters. Tomas Cepko makes his return and is just a pure delight. I mean his life is just absolutely awful, but he’s a great spy-type character that tends to throw a wrench in a lot of gears. Jules Valentine, who I had harped on previously, was an excellent addition to the rest of the series, and her journey is just even more painful. While I never fully related to her thinking and actions, O’Keefe was able to humanize her in many ways that made her constant bad decision making tough to watch. Her chapters no longer felt like a break in the action, and often gave a boost to the plot this time around. Her former companions Arden and Nox are an absolute blast and add a lot of fun and spontaneity to the action. I could go on and on, but it’s all just to say O’Keefe populated the world wonderfully with her characters, all with their own distinct personalities that fit into the story at just the right times. I don’t really know what else to say other than if you enjoyed Velocity Weapon, you’ll no doubt find the rest of the series more than worth your while. It’s a good time, with some heavy hitting moments character and plot wise. I wish Icarion was a little more fleshed out, but in the end it didn’t bother me that much. While I felt tired of the constant revealing at the end of the first book, it only galvanized me through the rest of the series. I only wish I could say more about these books without giving anything away. I can only say read these books. They’re fun, exciting, dangerous, endearing and at times heartbreaking, but you won’t regret it. Rating: Chaos Vector - 9.0/10 Catalyst Gate - 9.0/10 The Protectorate Trilogy 9.0/10 -Alex

  15. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin G

    Humanity’s days are numbered. At least they are if Rainier gets her way. The strange entity would have wiped out the human race if Sanda and her crew hadn’t interfered, but Rainier isn’t going to let that be the end of the story. With her fingers in multiple factions across the galaxy, Rainier is poised to start turning groups against each other to burn everything down the old-fashioned way. But Sanda has a lead on something that might be the key to stopping Rainier once and for all – but only i Humanity’s days are numbered. At least they are if Rainier gets her way. The strange entity would have wiped out the human race if Sanda and her crew hadn’t interfered, but Rainier isn’t going to let that be the end of the story. With her fingers in multiple factions across the galaxy, Rainier is poised to start turning groups against each other to burn everything down the old-fashioned way. But Sanda has a lead on something that might be the key to stopping Rainier once and for all – but only if she can stay out of Rainer’s grasp long enough to find it and figure out how it works. CATALYST GATE is the smashing finale to a trilogy that was already poised to be one of my favorites of all time. Both VELOCITY WEAPON and CHAOS VECTOR were fantastic reads, and CATALYST GATE manages to follow them up with an adrenaline-pumping whirl of action, suspense, and twisty mysteries, mixing them all together into one satisfying finale. There were a lot of balls in the air at the end of CHAOS VECTOR, and O’Keefe catches them all and puts them to rest with ease. Answers about the gates, their origins, and humanity’s role are finally on the table, and it’s nice to see the payoff. One of the few quibbles I had was it occasionally felt like an absurd number of bad guys emerged at the eleventh hour, but in a final book that is trying to continuously up the stakes, that’s to be expected. Sanda, of course, is the star of this finale, the weary hero who keeps getting back up and taking on one insane task after another. She’s got a mission and she’s going to see it through, but she’ll be damned if she doesn’t get to be a sarcastic pain the entire way. Unsurprisingly, Tomas was my second favorite character – he broke my heart in CHAOS VECTOR and he continues to be a person trying to make sense of an increasingly bad hand of cards that life has dealt him. His trajectory continues to be a fascinating to watch, especially when I look back to his seemingly simple origins in VELOCITY WEAPON. Perhaps most surprising was the development of Biran into a worthy defender of the galaxy. Biran’s always been a bit of a weak link POV character. Part of the elite and secretive Keeper organization that guards the gate technology, Biran has been a bit naïve if goodhearted, always outmaneuvered because he’s not even aware there’s a game being played. But after fumbling around for the first few books, Biran finally grows up. He still is the kind of man who wants to give peace a chance first, but now he’s prepared to back up soft words with an iron hammer if someone goes against him. I found myself actually looking forward to his POV chapters for once, and I’m glad that he evolved into someone I could root for. A series as twisty as THE PROTECTORATE is always in danger of falling apart at the finish line, as the author scrambles to provide answers in a rush (answers they may or may not have thought of when beginning the series). CATALYST GATE, however, completely sticks the landing. It delivers a few last-minute twists to keep readers on their toes, but is ever-driving towards the finish line. If you’re a fan so far, you’ll be well rewarded; if you haven’t started the series yet, rest assured that it’s a journey well worth taking. Note: I was provided a free review copy by the publisher in exchange for my fair and honest review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Pile By the Bed

    Megan O’Keefe’s motto for the third and final book of her Protectorate series, Catalyst Gate, seems to be “go big or go home”. She goes big and she delivers. O’Keefe’s contained and effective debut Velocity Weapon exploded outwards into a much larger and more complex universe in Chaos Vector but left plenty of questions and allegiances hanging. Catalyst Gate does its best to answer those questions (after posing some new ones), unmask various traitors or verify the goodness of some allies, and al Megan O’Keefe’s motto for the third and final book of her Protectorate series, Catalyst Gate, seems to be “go big or go home”. She goes big and she delivers. O’Keefe’s contained and effective debut Velocity Weapon exploded outwards into a much larger and more complex universe in Chaos Vector but left plenty of questions and allegiances hanging. Catalyst Gate does its best to answer those questions (after posing some new ones), unmask various traitors or verify the goodness of some allies, and all within a page-turning, do-or-die plot. Being the final book in a trilogy this review may contain spoilers for the first two volumes. If you love space opera and don’t want to be spoiled, go back and read those first. Catalyst Gate starts in the aftermath of Chaos Vector. Once again, there is no prelude or recap, readers are thrown into the action. And that action is once again split across three main characters. Sanda Greeve and her team of misfits aboard the intelligent space ship The Light pick up Nazca spy Tomas who has big secrets to reveal but can possibly help them in their fight against the alien Rainier; her brother Biran is trying to weed out Rainier clones from his ranks while also leading a critical mission but finds that Rainier’s conspiracy goes deeper than he imagined possible; and Jules is trying to make amends for launching a biological weapon that has brought an entire planet to its knees. The three stories will wind around each other, dropping both life-changing and galaxy-changing revelations along the way to resolution. There is a lot going on here but O’Keefe keeps a handle on it all, using her three-focus structure to set up a bunch of cliffhangers for her characters. The action is once again well handled but also balanced against great character work. Sanda herself is the same kick-arse, punch first ask questions later, risk taking hero she has ever been but increasingly desperate as time and options run out. Her team may have felt like they originally came out of science fiction found-family casting in Chaos Vector (the doctor, the tech-head, the ex-soldier, the spy with a heart of gold) but all emerge further from any thought of typecasting. Catalyst Gate is as good an end to this trilogy as fans could hope for. O’Keefe asnwers more questions about her universe and resolves the main mysteries but leaves plenty of uncertainty for the future. Whether or not O’Keefe ever returns to the universe of The Protectorate it is just exciting to wonder what she might deliver next.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Sifa Poulton

    CATALYST GATE is the final instalment in the Protectorate trilogy, a space opera with fast pacing, and an expansive world and plot as Sanda and her team try to stop the artificial intelligence bent on destroying humanity to rectify humanity's theft. As you'd expect from this series, there are lots of twists and turns, and the secrets of the past slowly come to light. I loved seeing the hints laid in the first two books, many of which just read as incidental lines at the time, pay off. So much has CATALYST GATE is the final instalment in the Protectorate trilogy, a space opera with fast pacing, and an expansive world and plot as Sanda and her team try to stop the artificial intelligence bent on destroying humanity to rectify humanity's theft. As you'd expect from this series, there are lots of twists and turns, and the secrets of the past slowly come to light. I loved seeing the hints laid in the first two books, many of which just read as incidental lines at the time, pay off. So much has been set up since the first book, in a very subtle way, and seeing it all come together was such a rewarding experience. It's hard to say much without spoilers, but I downed this book VERY fast, wanting to know how it all ended, how the characters survived - and who would die. Rannier is a very impressive and terrifying villain, given her capabilities, origin story, and what she can do not only to the human characters, but the AI ship Bero. Also Tomas is back with Sanda and they have a lot to work out, both together and about themselves personally. After his part of the story went dark at the end of CHAOS VECTOR, I was hoping he'd be much more integral this time and yes he was. Particularly after the reveal about him at the end of the previous book, which he had to work through. Yes, Jules is still my least favourite character, because she still feels very unconnected and important to the main plot for much of the book. She was at least important for the ending, so it did come together But, yeah, at least I was consistent with who I didn't enjoy as much as was hoping to get to the end of her chapters because my little quirk of wanting everyone to be deeply and continually linked to the character I deem the main (Sanda in this case) continues! The ending was interesting. I can completely see why the final few chapters happened, but me being me (a secret lover of tragedy) I felt that it did undo a bit of the emotional resonance of the previous chapters (the Tomas-Vladsen scene was one of my favourites in the whole book - a shocking amount of character depth and growth and healing in one.) However, the tone of the very final page pulled back to focus on the toll and loss, which felt very appropriate and poignant to end it not as a big victory but with that tragic element at the fore.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Steven Mastroyin

    More like 3.5. I found these to get a little more disappointing as they went on. One problem here is that the first twist of this series is so good and so well executed that I almost feel the other double crosses and who's who stuff feels weak compared to that. Or at least, to me it comes off as weak. Like a lot of sci-fi/fantasy, I also start to have real trouble with the idea of "create tension by limiting abilities, relieve tension by expanding them." Are our characters fundamentally human lik More like 3.5. I found these to get a little more disappointing as they went on. One problem here is that the first twist of this series is so good and so well executed that I almost feel the other double crosses and who's who stuff feels weak compared to that. Or at least, to me it comes off as weak. Like a lot of sci-fi/fantasy, I also start to have real trouble with the idea of "create tension by limiting abilities, relieve tension by expanding them." Are our characters fundamentally human like they are in the first book, or are they superheroes? As they become superheroes whose powers just appear when needed, I'll admit I was less interested in them. It's good fun, though I really feel badly that my favorite character from book one (Jules) ends up being mostly useless shallow redemption arc character whose actions don't really make a lot of sense. You could argue something about the psychology of obsession, and we don't have enough time with her particularly in the second book to make this compelling, it's just kind of touched on. I guess what I would say is that this was an awesome series when it was about the oppression of the state and whether the revolutionaries were actually in the right. I didn't enjoy it as much when the scope expanded.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Olivia

    O'Keefe gets straight into it with the third instalment of a trilogy that very much pulls no punches. It's a bit like Mass Effect, only you're not allowed medi-gel and that wouldn't fix the emotional ruination anyway. That said, I enjoyed Catalyst Gate a lot (though not as much as Velocity Weapon)- the action felt more focused, and I enjoyed the deeper dives into Jules and Biran, and the revelations about Rainier that made up the end of second act-beginning of third act bridge. However, by the ti O'Keefe gets straight into it with the third instalment of a trilogy that very much pulls no punches. It's a bit like Mass Effect, only you're not allowed medi-gel and that wouldn't fix the emotional ruination anyway. That said, I enjoyed Catalyst Gate a lot (though not as much as Velocity Weapon)- the action felt more focused, and I enjoyed the deeper dives into Jules and Biran, and the revelations about Rainier that made up the end of second act-beginning of third act bridge. However, by the time the book ended, I did feel as if there were one or two revelations too many. It was just a bit too much - I had begun to feel numb as Sanda, Biran, and Tomas were put through the physical and emotional wringer, and the beats began to not has as much impact as O'Keefe clearly wanted them to. Perhaps I'm too much of a weenie for this series. It was an excellent ending, anyway, and I'm very glad Sanda and Bero can rest now.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Anne Szlachcic

    This is the third book in a series and I would recommend reading the previous books first to fully understand the world building and characters. This is a thoroughly enjoyable read - full of twists and turns ( perhaps one or two too many) where secrets are slowly revealed . The action starts immediately in the aftermath of Chaos Vector - here is where reading the previous books first comes in - unless you are familiar with the books you would have a hard time understanding what is going on as the Aut This is the third book in a series and I would recommend reading the previous books first to fully understand the world building and characters. This is a thoroughly enjoyable read - full of twists and turns ( perhaps one or two too many) where secrets are slowly revealed . The action starts immediately in the aftermath of Chaos Vector - here is where reading the previous books first comes in - unless you are familiar with the books you would have a hard time understanding what is going on as the Author gives no overview at this time . The story is split between the three main characters with the Author managing to weave the storylines together to make an enjoyable whole , with revelations that are life changing for Sanda and her cohorts . I look forward to reading more by the Author - perhaps more in this Universe ! I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Anne Szlachcic

    This is the third book in a series and I would recommend reading the previous books first to fully understand the world building and characters. This is a thoroughly enjoyable read - full of twists and turns ( perhaps one or two too many) where secrets are slowly revealed . The action starts immediately in the aftermath of Chaos Vector - here is where reading the previous books first comes in - unless you are familiar with the books you would have a hard time understanding what is going on as the Aut This is the third book in a series and I would recommend reading the previous books first to fully understand the world building and characters. This is a thoroughly enjoyable read - full of twists and turns ( perhaps one or two too many) where secrets are slowly revealed . The action starts immediately in the aftermath of Chaos Vector - here is where reading the previous books first comes in - unless you are familiar with the books you would have a hard time understanding what is going on as the Author gives no overview at this time . The story is split between the three main characters with the Author managing to weave the storylines together to make an enjoyable whole , with revelations that are life changing for Sanda and her cohorts . I look forward to reading more by the Author - perhaps more in this Universe ! I voluntarily read and reviewed an advanced copy of this book. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Frank Burns

    This series as a whole has been thoroughly enjoyable space opera. For me, it definitely peaked with the second book though. The first was a bit, learning to write a book (reflected in my review at the time) and this one had a vague sense of learning to land the ending of a trilogy. I do feel this last book kind of got away from her a bit as there were elements added at the end to make it all work that had not been seen until that point. There is nothing wrong with any of this as long as entertainm This series as a whole has been thoroughly enjoyable space opera. For me, it definitely peaked with the second book though. The first was a bit, learning to write a book (reflected in my review at the time) and this one had a vague sense of learning to land the ending of a trilogy. I do feel this last book kind of got away from her a bit as there were elements added at the end to make it all work that had not been seen until that point. There is nothing wrong with any of this as long as entertainment is delivered and it definitely was. I am also keen to see where she goes next. The whole series is a recommend.

  23. 5 out of 5

    The Man from DelMonte

    I have a particular problem with this kind of space opera in that despite it being set nearly four millennia in the future, everything is very recognisable. There are some added spaceships and blasters and some hi tech gizmos but otherwise it’s Americans In Space. Another issue is that despite potential humanity extinction events taking place in this corner of the settled galaxy, the powers that be seen content to leave it in the hands of a brother and sister. The ending is a little erratic with I have a particular problem with this kind of space opera in that despite it being set nearly four millennia in the future, everything is very recognisable. There are some added spaceships and blasters and some hi tech gizmos but otherwise it’s Americans In Space. Another issue is that despite potential humanity extinction events taking place in this corner of the settled galaxy, the powers that be seen content to leave it in the hands of a brother and sister. The ending is a little erratic with some quite big reveals and plot twists at the denouement. That said the author handles all the stands without ever looking as if she’s making it up on the hoof.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Brad Kirk

    A solid ending to a series that ended up better than I honestly expected. I bought Velocity Weapon on a whim and then let it and Chaos Vector sit on my shelf until this book was nearly out. For me, these books are the perfect blend of science and fiction. Not mind-numbingly bogged down in the nitty gritty details but not so skimpy on the details that it becomes unbelievable. Artwork on these covers is also awesome.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Melinda Mitchell

    A fitting end to a fast paced space thriller This book maneuvers gut-wrenching twists and turns with grace and speed, in a way where the reader's eyes light up at the right moment. All the foundational details in books 1 and 2 pay off in this fantastic ending to Sanda, Tomas, Brian, and Jules' storylines. It's an epic masterpiece of a sci-fi series in unveiling the truth that was hidden all along. A fitting end to a fast paced space thriller This book maneuvers gut-wrenching twists and turns with grace and speed, in a way where the reader's eyes light up at the right moment. All the foundational details in books 1 and 2 pay off in this fantastic ending to Sanda, Tomas, Brian, and Jules' storylines. It's an epic masterpiece of a sci-fi series in unveiling the truth that was hidden all along.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Galen Strickland

    I liked this, but not as much as the second book. Sometimes an author tries to do too much. There is enough exposition to have filled another trilogy, and the ending(s) reminded me a bit of Lord of the Rings. The faults have more to do with the execution and pacing rather than the plot itself, even though some of that plot could have been eliminated, and I would have preferred a switch as to the fate of two characters. http://templetongate.net/protectorate... I liked this, but not as much as the second book. Sometimes an author tries to do too much. There is enough exposition to have filled another trilogy, and the ending(s) reminded me a bit of Lord of the Rings. The faults have more to do with the execution and pacing rather than the plot itself, even though some of that plot could have been eliminated, and I would have preferred a switch as to the fate of two characters. http://templetongate.net/protectorate...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Sam Wesley

    Usually I skip the recaps that some books have at the beginning but when I started this book I wished it had one. The story picks up right where the previous book left off and I found myself struggling to catch up for a few chapters before my memory caught up. I enjoyed this book and trilogy and look forward to more from Megan O'Keefe. Usually I skip the recaps that some books have at the beginning but when I started this book I wished it had one. The story picks up right where the previous book left off and I found myself struggling to catch up for a few chapters before my memory caught up. I enjoyed this book and trilogy and look forward to more from Megan O'Keefe.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Troy

    This was an enjoyable conclusion to The Protectorate trilogy. While it didn't reach the heights of book two, it still brought a lot of what I love about this series. Strong characters, interesting world-building, and that "Mass Effect" feel. All in all, I liked the trilogy a lot and would recommend it to fans of space opera. This was an enjoyable conclusion to The Protectorate trilogy. While it didn't reach the heights of book two, it still brought a lot of what I love about this series. Strong characters, interesting world-building, and that "Mass Effect" feel. All in all, I liked the trilogy a lot and would recommend it to fans of space opera.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Simon

    Recent Reads: Catalyst Gate. The final part of Megan O'Keefe's Protectorate trilogy ramps up the action as the legacy of the spheres unfolds. Truth and lies bring guilt; can redemption follow? Intelligent space opera with one of my favourite AI characters. Our legacy of stars. Recent Reads: Catalyst Gate. The final part of Megan O'Keefe's Protectorate trilogy ramps up the action as the legacy of the spheres unfolds. Truth and lies bring guilt; can redemption follow? Intelligent space opera with one of my favourite AI characters. Our legacy of stars.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    Yes!! So good to read a trilogy with a great ending- not to mention rare- and this is it!! Great read from go to whoa. So start at book one with this author fellow space-junkie readers, and buckle in for a real adventure. I Highly recommend this series:))

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