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The Art of Death

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London's latest art installation is a real killer . . . An underground artist leaves three glass cabinets in Trafalgar Square that contain a gruesome installation: the corpses of three homeless men. With the artist promising more to follow, newly-promoted Detective Inspector Grace Archer and her caustic DS, Harry Quinn, must race against time to follow what few clues have London's latest art installation is a real killer . . . An underground artist leaves three glass cabinets in Trafalgar Square that contain a gruesome installation: the corpses of three homeless men. With the artist promising more to follow, newly-promoted Detective Inspector Grace Archer and her caustic DS, Harry Quinn, must race against time to follow what few clues have been left by a savvy killer. As more bodies are exhibited at London landmarks and live streamed on social media, Archer and Quinn's pursuit of the elusive killer becomes a desperate search. But when Archer discovers that the killer might be closer than she originally thought - she realises that he has his sights set firmly on her . . . He is creating a masterpiece. And she will be the star of his show.


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London's latest art installation is a real killer . . . An underground artist leaves three glass cabinets in Trafalgar Square that contain a gruesome installation: the corpses of three homeless men. With the artist promising more to follow, newly-promoted Detective Inspector Grace Archer and her caustic DS, Harry Quinn, must race against time to follow what few clues have London's latest art installation is a real killer . . . An underground artist leaves three glass cabinets in Trafalgar Square that contain a gruesome installation: the corpses of three homeless men. With the artist promising more to follow, newly-promoted Detective Inspector Grace Archer and her caustic DS, Harry Quinn, must race against time to follow what few clues have been left by a savvy killer. As more bodies are exhibited at London landmarks and live streamed on social media, Archer and Quinn's pursuit of the elusive killer becomes a desperate search. But when Archer discovers that the killer might be closer than she originally thought - she realises that he has his sights set firmly on her . . . He is creating a masterpiece. And she will be the star of his show.

30 review for The Art of Death

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ceecee

    4+ stars A creepy watcher that sends shivers up your spine is observing the customers in a London cafe and making notes about them which extends beyond the boundaries of the norm. DI Grace Archer, newly promoted to work at the Charing Cross station, is one of them. Shortly after this an ‘art’ installation known as The Forsaken by @nonymous disrupts her first day with far reaching results and consequences. Well, this book starts with a bang rather than a whimper and hooks you in from the get go. I 4+ stars A creepy watcher that sends shivers up your spine is observing the customers in a London cafe and making notes about them which extends beyond the boundaries of the norm. DI Grace Archer, newly promoted to work at the Charing Cross station, is one of them. Shortly after this an ‘art’ installation known as The Forsaken by @nonymous disrupts her first day with far reaching results and consequences. Well, this book starts with a bang rather than a whimper and hooks you in from the get go. It’s a dark, murderous, shockingly inventive tale with a twisted killer with a perverted attitude to what constitutes art. He is as elusive and anonymous as Banks but with a macabre, immoral and brutal brand of ‘art’. Yes, it’s very gritty but thankfully the author gives just enough information for you to get the picture. The case deepens with further installations appearing and challenging and misdirecting the police team. The investigation team is an interesting mixed bag which adds another element to the storyline which much of that being from Grace’s perspective. She has a backstory that haunts her to this day and which becomes an intrinsic part of the plot. Grace is extremely likeable, relatable, intuitive and shows great kindness to her ailing grandfather. Her sidekick DS Harry Quinn is a very good character too, there’s the usual arrogant idiot who thinks he’s better than he actually is in DI Hicks and the boss is icy DCI Clare Pierce who thaws a bit by the end of the novel. I so hope this is the beginning of a series because there is much to praise in this crime novel and I want to read more about them in future. The conclusion is exciting, gripping and an extremely tense race against time. I did identify the killer but the twists the author throws in are good misdirection! Overall, a good, well written crime mystery with a good plot. There are elements of suspense and several creative jaw droppers. I like what the author says towards the end of the novel about the impact of crime on victims and its lasting legacy which is thought provoking. This is a page turner from start to finish which I recommend to fans of the genre. With thanks to NetGalley and Bonnier Books/Zaffre for the arc for an honest review.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alan Cotterell

    My thanks to NetGalley for giving me the chance to read an ARC in exchange for my honest opinion. Overall, I enjoyed The Art of Death which is an inventive take on the serial killer genre. I have read 2 previous books, about artists and serial killers one was terrible, the other brilliant like this one. Each of them did have their own angle on the basic premise. This is mainly told from newly promoted DI Grace Archer’s point of view, which is interspersed with sections on the victims’ lives in t My thanks to NetGalley for giving me the chance to read an ARC in exchange for my honest opinion. Overall, I enjoyed The Art of Death which is an inventive take on the serial killer genre. I have read 2 previous books, about artists and serial killers one was terrible, the other brilliant like this one. Each of them did have their own angle on the basic premise. This is mainly told from newly promoted DI Grace Archer’s point of view, which is interspersed with sections on the victims’ lives in the lead up to their deaths and some chapters told from the killer’s POV, these help to ensure the tension never waivers. It is very worrying how easily the killer lures his victims in, through social media and dating apps. Just off to check my privacy settings. The victims’ stories are a little repetitive but illustrate how easy it is to take advantage of lonely people. I really liked the investigation, which seems to me to be well run and as organised as it could be, when constantly having to react to unknown. DI Archer’s team is a mixed bunch that works well. She is extremely likeable, intuitive and relatable, with an interesting back story. DS Harry Quinn also has an interesting back story. The other DI – Hicks is one of those detectives that thinks he is a lot better than he is. The DCI Clare Pierce, who is not very welcoming to DI Archer at first but thaws out a little and there is hint of some history. Then there is Klara Clarke, they are an unusual character with many technical and analytical talents! Overall a great inventive story with a good plot that is well written. There are elements of suspense and multiple twists and turns. I did identify the killer fairy early on, but there were enough twists and misdirection’s to make me doubt my decision. I hope this is the beginning of a series, as there is much to praise in this crime novel, and I want to read more about the characters in future. A thrilling and satisfying read, many thanks to David Fennell

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    The Art of Death by David Fennell is a chilling, macabre debut, and an excellent start to a new police procedural series involving D.I. Grace Archer and DS harry Quinn. It’s newly promoted D.I. Grace Archer first day at Charing cross Police station and she thought she would have a quite first day. But she is called to some art exhibits that have been left in a public area for all the world to see by anonymous artist. The exhibit is also been streamed online on social media to get the reaction of The Art of Death by David Fennell is a chilling, macabre debut, and an excellent start to a new police procedural series involving D.I. Grace Archer and DS harry Quinn. It’s newly promoted D.I. Grace Archer first day at Charing cross Police station and she thought she would have a quite first day. But she is called to some art exhibits that have been left in a public area for all the world to see by anonymous artist. The exhibit is also been streamed online on social media to get the reaction of his audience and he tells them there are more to come. No one saw who put them there they just appeared out of nowhere. At first glance they just look mannequins in glass cases but when you look closer, they are bodies of dead men floating in formaldehyde. Later, they find out they are bodies of three homeless men that have disappeared in the last couple of weeks. DI Archer has big case on her hands. Not only worried about the case but, she also wants to make a good impression to her new boss and colleagues. Thankyou Bonnier for a copy of this book. This is a gory and dark police procedural which a unique storyline. If you don’t like a gory storyline this isn’t for you. I really enjoyed this, and I can’t wait to see how the series develops. 5 stars from me.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ellie Spencer

    Rounded down from 4.5 stars ⭐️ This is exactly the kind of thriller I have been craving recently. When I first read the premise of this book I was desperate to get my hands on it, and it did not disappoint! The Art of Death follows DI Grace Archer and DS Harry Quinn as they race to capture a serial killer before they kill again. The killer is displaying their victims as works of ‘art’ in glass cases. They have their sights set on Grace as their next art instalment. David Fennell’s writing and stor Rounded down from 4.5 stars ⭐️ This is exactly the kind of thriller I have been craving recently. When I first read the premise of this book I was desperate to get my hands on it, and it did not disappoint! The Art of Death follows DI Grace Archer and DS Harry Quinn as they race to capture a serial killer before they kill again. The killer is displaying their victims as works of ‘art’ in glass cases. They have their sights set on Grace as their next art instalment. David Fennell’s writing and storytelling is fast paced and leaves you on the edge of your seat. The premise of the book fascinated me, and it was even better than I had been hoping for! I started to become really invested in the lives of Quinn and Archer, and I am really hoping that this book ends up being part of a series that follows these characters. The book was written so well, I often felt like I was watching it all play out around me; which was both haunting and enticing. I am an avid thriller fan, but I have never read anything quite like this. It will definitely stay with me. The only reason I didn’t give it the full 5 stars, was because the reveal of the killer didn’t come as a surprise to me, so there wasn’t a huge ‘wow’ moment. However, the ending was chilling none the less! I will now be watching with bated breath to see what Fennell does next!! I would absolutely recommend this book to any thriller fans! It is a must read!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jerecho

    Something to read, but not quite...

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alayne Emmett

    This was such a creepy book that it gave me goosebumps!!! I loved it, what a great read so well written but with dark undertones. It was an easy quick read and I was sorry to finish it. My thanks to Netgalley and the publishers for giving me the opportunity to read this book in return for an honest review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mandy White (mandylovestoread)

    The Art of Death is a dark and pretty messed up police procedural that will have you checking your social media privacy settings. This killer is smart and always seems to be one step ahead of the police, and the public can’t get it enough of it online. It starts with a shocking scene... and it is only the beginning....3 glass cabinets have been left in the middle of Trafalgar Square, a new art installation. But on closer inspection, inside are the bodies of 3 homeless men. DI Grace Archer is sent The Art of Death is a dark and pretty messed up police procedural that will have you checking your social media privacy settings. This killer is smart and always seems to be one step ahead of the police, and the public can’t get it enough of it online. It starts with a shocking scene... and it is only the beginning....3 glass cabinets have been left in the middle of Trafalgar Square, a new art installation. But on closer inspection, inside are the bodies of 3 homeless men. DI Grace Archer is sent to investigate on her first day at her new station. Wanting to make a good impression she throws herself into the case with her new partner, Harry Quinn. They are sent on a wild trip around London, trying to stop this maniac before he strikes again. If you like descriptive murder scenes and out there crimes, this is the book for you. It is a clever and unique story that hooked me in from the start. Thanks to Allen and Unwin for sending this one to me. It is out now

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    The Art of Death is David Fennell's debut serial killer thriller and one of the most scintillating and exciting crime novels of the past year. It follows DI Grace Archer and DS Harry Quinn of the Metropolitan Police as they race to capture a deranged serial killer before he kills again. It begins with the unnamed killer entering the Lumberyard Cafe on the corner of Upper St Martin's Lane and Tower Street, knowing there's only an hour to go until the show starts. He appears to be watching and sta The Art of Death is David Fennell's debut serial killer thriller and one of the most scintillating and exciting crime novels of the past year. It follows DI Grace Archer and DS Harry Quinn of the Metropolitan Police as they race to capture a deranged serial killer before he kills again. It begins with the unnamed killer entering the Lumberyard Cafe on the corner of Upper St Martin's Lane and Tower Street, knowing there's only an hour to go until the show starts. He appears to be watching and stalking the whereabouts of Elaine Kelly who is chatting with a friend. She is his muse and his next exhibit only she doesn't know it yet. He also scouts for other "artworks" including Vietnamese barista Chau Ho whose Facebook page he trawls through. The stalker has been cat-fishing Elaine for 5 weeks - communicating, flirting and generally chitchatting online with her. If only she knew how dangerous he is. It's Grace's first day in her new job as DI at Charing Cross Police Station after she exposed now ex-DI Andy Rees for his part in corruption; he was swiftly arrested and sent down. Her first case in her new position sees Archer and Quinn called out to commissioned street art pieces for the Lord Mayor's show. There has been a complaint by the show director that 3 of the pieces are obscene and should be removed immediately. They head to Trafalgar Square to see what all the fuss is about. The installation is of 3 glass cabinets each 6 feet tall, filled with liquid and one seems to contain a life-like effigy of a naked man wearing a long scruffy coat, calmly floating in the water. The hands of the men are extended and cupped as if they are begging. Deeply disturbing, to say the least. It's no wonder there's a crowd gathering. Another cabinet holds a man with a tattooed torso. Faded blue skulls are inked onto the chest. His neck is ringed with thick purple bruises. Lifeless grey eyes stare over the heads of the crowd. Archer quickly realises she knows him - it's Billy Perrin. It's then everyone understands that this isn’t some weird artistic effigy. These men are dead. As more bodies and exhibits pop up all over the city Grace certainly has her hands full trying to catch a ruthless and highly intelligent killer. This is a compulsive, scintillating and deeply unsettling read and a book I devoured in a few hours. It's wickedly twisty, deliciously dark and completely macabre right from the outset. With twist after twist the intensity and suspense builds while Archer and Quinn desperately try to stop the murders. This is a real page-turner and the forensics and police procedures added extra interest to the plot. Grace is a believable and relatable character and her new partnership with DS Harry Quinn is brilliantly played out. This was everything I want in a thriller and then some. Highly recommended.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Milosnikksiazkowy

    I’ve truly enjoyed this read. The author created the most horrifying murdered that I’ve never read about before and even though you might think that the storyline is like no other - the serial killer himself is a very interesting character. Throughout the book you keep on thinking who would that be? For most of the book I didn’t know who it was and when I was about 50/60 pages from the end this is when we are all of a sudden finding out who this individual is. Truly loved it and I definitely recom I’ve truly enjoyed this read. The author created the most horrifying murdered that I’ve never read about before and even though you might think that the storyline is like no other - the serial killer himself is a very interesting character. Throughout the book you keep on thinking who would that be? For most of the book I didn’t know who it was and when I was about 50/60 pages from the end this is when we are all of a sudden finding out who this individual is. Truly loved it and I definitely recommend you reading it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Tomasso

    I would like to thank Netgalley and Bonnier Books UK for an advance copy of The Art of Death, the first novel to feature DI Grace Archer and DS Harry Quinn of The Met. On Grace’s first day at Charing Cross station she is called out to an art installation which has three dead bodies floating in formaldehyde, each in their own case. The killer is streaming his “art” online and promising more installations so Grace is immediately under pressure, especially when it becomes clear that the killer is in I would like to thank Netgalley and Bonnier Books UK for an advance copy of The Art of Death, the first novel to feature DI Grace Archer and DS Harry Quinn of The Met. On Grace’s first day at Charing Cross station she is called out to an art installation which has three dead bodies floating in formaldehyde, each in their own case. The killer is streaming his “art” online and promising more installations so Grace is immediately under pressure, especially when it becomes clear that the killer is interested in her personally. I enjoyed The Art of Death which is an imaginative take on the serial killer genre, full of twists and turns, but not really straying from the norms. The novel is mostly told from Grace’s point of view but there are sections on the victims’ lives in the lead up to their deaths and the odd thought and action from the unnamed killer. The various victims’ stories are largely repetitive and only serve to illustrate how easy it is to take advantage of lonely people. The killer is your average run of the mill psychopath so no new insights there, but I really liked the investigation, which seems to me to be well run and organised to the extent that it can be when reacting to the unknowable, i.e. what the killer will do next. The devil is in the detail, the petty politics and grievances, the character differences and the culture on the one hand and the leads that go nowhere, the determined application of technology and interviewing on the other. I think it is great. I must admit that my heart sank when I read about Grace’s backstory as it is extremely busy, full of trauma and designed to engender mistrust with her colleagues. Fortunately it colours the narrative rather than being a focal point. I admire the author’s self restraint in this. The Art of the Dead is a good read that I have no hesitation in recommending.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Natalie Mackay

    I received a free copy of this book from Readers First in exchange for an honest review. I finished this book in one sitting, with only eating dinner breaking my stride. The book had it all, a decent backstory for the main characters, plenty of action, mystery and red herrings and of course, good old fashioned murder. The book was clever in so many ways, and although I was initially worried it would become run of the mill and predictable - as sometimes books of this genre do - it surprised me, t I received a free copy of this book from Readers First in exchange for an honest review. I finished this book in one sitting, with only eating dinner breaking my stride. The book had it all, a decent backstory for the main characters, plenty of action, mystery and red herrings and of course, good old fashioned murder. The book was clever in so many ways, and although I was initially worried it would become run of the mill and predictable - as sometimes books of this genre do - it surprised me, the story is not simply one of murder. The murders, suspense and intrigue, whilst not new, are executed very well and with a modern flair. The writing style was punchy, we are given short insights into past experiences, but the full story is only revealed at the end. The storyline is also similarly fast paced, we jump from crime scene to crime scene essentially, and this is probably the reason I couldn’t wait to finish the story - afraid I’d miss something. The book is an excellent introduction into the characters and makes me interested in reading more.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Mary Lou

    It must be very difficult to launch an eye- catching crime procedural in a crowded genre, but David Fennell has done it with his excellent debut The Art of Death. DI Grace Archer has a troubled history and a new job. Heading a reluctant team, she has her work cut out when the bodies start piling up on her first day. Nothing new here maybe, but the writer steers a hefty team through the maze of a mass of victims with confidence. The action is dark and clammy and on the right side of gory, while the It must be very difficult to launch an eye- catching crime procedural in a crowded genre, but David Fennell has done it with his excellent debut The Art of Death. DI Grace Archer has a troubled history and a new job. Heading a reluctant team, she has her work cut out when the bodies start piling up on her first day. Nothing new here maybe, but the writer steers a hefty team through the maze of a mass of victims with confidence. The action is dark and clammy and on the right side of gory, while the police teamwork the way you imagine they would (more or less) in real life. I really wanted to like this one and I absolutely loved it. With thanks to Netgalley and Bonnier Books UK

  13. 5 out of 5

    Liz Barnsley

    Honestly not a huge fan of this one. A lot of that is about me rather than about the book which will probably be very popular. It is an excellent premise and an easy entertaining read with a level of gruesome that will appeal to a wide range of readers. However for me it lacked depth of character and despite it obviously being an unrealistic plot I like it when it feels real. I didn't get that from this. The actions of the main characters didn't feel likely at any point. Chalk this one up to wron Honestly not a huge fan of this one. A lot of that is about me rather than about the book which will probably be very popular. It is an excellent premise and an easy entertaining read with a level of gruesome that will appeal to a wide range of readers. However for me it lacked depth of character and despite it obviously being an unrealistic plot I like it when it feels real. I didn't get that from this. The actions of the main characters didn't feel likely at any point. Chalk this one up to wrong book for this reader. Moving on...

  14. 4 out of 5

    Susan Hampson

    What a cracking debut. Now I had heard of live art, but this is the other extreme as a psycho artist displays the people which he has killed as exhibits that everyone can see. The works of art have titles, the first three victims are homeless, called “The Forsaken”, and he streamed it online @nonymous. These are not by any means random killings, and they certainly aren’t the last. Oh wow, if you are a little squeamish then walk away if not then you are in for a brutal and heart-pounding few hours What a cracking debut. Now I had heard of live art, but this is the other extreme as a psycho artist displays the people which he has killed as exhibits that everyone can see. The works of art have titles, the first three victims are homeless, called “The Forsaken”, and he streamed it online @nonymous. These are not by any means random killings, and they certainly aren’t the last. Oh wow, if you are a little squeamish then walk away if not then you are in for a brutal and heart-pounding few hours. Although this was Grace Archer’s first day as a DI, this case already had that make or break feel about it. The pace is like lightening and the story complex but it is all put together in such a way that each display makes it unforgettable. Grace is a complex character herself with a team that comes across like water and oil, but it works. This nut job has a finale in mind that could have easily made this a memorable stand-alone but ……….. I am looking forward to more from this author who has created a very likeable DI that you can’t help but get behind. I wish to thank Net Galley and the publisher for an e-copy of this book which I have reviewed honestly.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jen (shitbookreviews.com)

    I used to read a lot of crime/thriller stuff as a kid for two reasons: 1. It felt rebellious reading things that would give you the creeps 2. I could nab my mum’s books and not have to pay for them Yet as an adult who’s currently surviving my way through a shitty pandemic, I found myself drifting over to YA in an attempt to avoid doom and gloom when it came to reading. That was until I noticed The Art of Death listed as Goldsboro’s February book option and I was like allllllright you have my attent I used to read a lot of crime/thriller stuff as a kid for two reasons: 1. It felt rebellious reading things that would give you the creeps 2. I could nab my mum’s books and not have to pay for them Yet as an adult who’s currently surviving my way through a shitty pandemic, I found myself drifting over to YA in an attempt to avoid doom and gloom when it came to reading. That was until I noticed The Art of Death listed as Goldsboro’s February book option and I was like allllllright you have my attention once again. BEFORE WE GET STARTED – this book has some trigger warnings that I’d feel like an ass not bringing to your attention: murder (obvs), violence, catfishing, transphobia and confinement (minor). If any of those are triggers for you, I’d probably avoid. Cool, so if you’re here for the TL;DR, sorry for making you wait: ✨ London without the shitting pandemic sweeping through it ✨ One badass woman Detective Inspector fighting through her own traumas to stop other people going through equally traumatic shit ✨ An artist who will murder (literally) for their art Interested? Good because you probably should be. Grace Archer. Oh Gracie. How I wish to wrap you up in a warm, heated blanket and become your new best friend. A recently appointed (like the first day on the job kinda recent) DI, Grace swans on into her new office to glares, makes pals with DS Harvey Quinn and before you know it, they’re off viewing some nice art installation in Trafalgar Square. Except the art is a triple homicide of homeless men. Your murderous pal LOVES having their work seen. So, naturally, they live stream all of it through social media which spreads like bloody wildfire. So who is this person? Kinda part of the book, dear reader, but let me tell you this – some chapters are from their perspective. And it’s creepy as fuck because it’s horrifically relatable / gives me the heebie-jeebies. This book goes fast. Do not blink or you will miss something important and you’ll find yourself questioning what just happened. A wee caveat on that – this ain’t no bad thing. Promise. It’s only weakness? It just didn’t suck me into the world as much as I would like. Would I read another one from the same series? Hell yes. Should you read this at night? Hell no because my dreams are easily infiltrated. Don’t make the same mistake as I did. Grace and Harry (Garry) take over the world. Sign me up.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chandni

    When I first read the premise of this novel, I was immediately hooked. I love serial killer books and this one seemed especially promising since the killer was so blatant about his actions. I also liked the character of the intrepid young DI who was responsible for catching him with her supportive partner. Unfortunately, this book let me down in a lot of ways. Generally, DI Grace Archer was a great character. She's a bit standoffish, but she's good at her job, dedicated to solving the case, and a When I first read the premise of this novel, I was immediately hooked. I love serial killer books and this one seemed especially promising since the killer was so blatant about his actions. I also liked the character of the intrepid young DI who was responsible for catching him with her supportive partner. Unfortunately, this book let me down in a lot of ways. Generally, DI Grace Archer was a great character. She's a bit standoffish, but she's good at her job, dedicated to solving the case, and all her relationships with her peers and the ones in her personal life were written very authentically. My problem was that she came from a tragic backstory that was hinted at, but never expanded. I understand this might be information that will be revealed in future novels, but it was very frustrating to have so many unanswered questions. My second major problem with this novel was with the plot. I guessed who the killer was as soon as he was introduced, and I could even guess what the red herrings were going to be and how they would be thrown in throughout the novel. A lot of it was just so expected and there was nothing unique about the book. The killer also ended up being really disappointing because you never felt any connection to the victims. Perhaps future novels in this series will solve these problems, but overall, I found myself quite disappointed.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte

    Loved this book as it was such a unique storyline compared to the generic murder mystery books I read. The chapters being narrated from different characters perspectives was fantastic. We saw not only chapters being narrated by the police, but also victims and the murderer themselves. Every time a chapter was from a new character's perspective there was immediate suspense as to whether this was going to be the killers next victim. When the killer was revealed it was totally unexpected but I do s Loved this book as it was such a unique storyline compared to the generic murder mystery books I read. The chapters being narrated from different characters perspectives was fantastic. We saw not only chapters being narrated by the police, but also victims and the murderer themselves. Every time a chapter was from a new character's perspective there was immediate suspense as to whether this was going to be the killers next victim. When the killer was revealed it was totally unexpected but I do still have unanswered questions as to why they did it.... My only small criticism is that there were a lot of characters being introduced throughout the book. Every character was relevant, however if they are going to be talked about again after not be talked about for quite a while in the book, it would be useful for them to be reintroduced, as I sometimes forgot who these characters were. I loved the moral message in this book too! Be careful of what you post online because you do not know who is watching you!!!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Feed The Crime

    4.5 stars rounded up Oh boy what a debut, I flew through this book really fast. What really stood out here is the character development. Our main character is the newly appointed DI Grace Archer, she has a troubled past which we are given just a small insight creating enough intrigue for me to see her as a real person. She is thrown into the grizzly case before she even takes a seat at her desk in a new police force, she finds herself relying on her new partner and only ally DS Quinn, who I also r 4.5 stars rounded up Oh boy what a debut, I flew through this book really fast. What really stood out here is the character development. Our main character is the newly appointed DI Grace Archer, she has a troubled past which we are given just a small insight creating enough intrigue for me to see her as a real person. She is thrown into the grizzly case before she even takes a seat at her desk in a new police force, she finds herself relying on her new partner and only ally DS Quinn, who I also really enjoyed and felt connected to. You can read the rest of my review here: https://feedthecrime.wordpress.com/20...

  19. 5 out of 5

    Julie Lacey

    This is a great start to what I hope will be a series of books. DI Grace Archer moves to Charing Cross in London, though she’s not welcomed by all. Her first day sees her dropped into a multiple murder investigation where the bodies have been put on display, as if they are a piece of art. As others have said, it is quite obvious who the murderer is from quite early on, but it is interesting following the investigation as they track him down and get tricked by red herrings along the way. A great re This is a great start to what I hope will be a series of books. DI Grace Archer moves to Charing Cross in London, though she’s not welcomed by all. Her first day sees her dropped into a multiple murder investigation where the bodies have been put on display, as if they are a piece of art. As others have said, it is quite obvious who the murderer is from quite early on, but it is interesting following the investigation as they track him down and get tricked by red herrings along the way. A great read. Thanks to Bonnier Books UK and NetGalley for the opportunity to read this book.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dee Darby

    Wow, what an opener of a book this is! Brilliant from start to finish. It’s very reminiscent of Chris Carter or M J Aldridge books so if you like those you’ll definitely like these. I did figure out the killer pretty early on but there were a few curveballs that kept me guessing even after I’d figured it out. Really can’t wait for the next instalment!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mandy

    This was a fast paced twisty thriller and I flew through it! I love a good thriller and this definitely delivered. The ideas were very clever and the characters very well written, from the main characters to all the side characters.There was a lot of thought put in to the smaller details and the plot and it wove together very well. I loved DI Grace Archer, I loved her passion to the job and learning more about her as her background story was revealed. I didn’t guess the killer, and thought the r This was a fast paced twisty thriller and I flew through it! I love a good thriller and this definitely delivered. The ideas were very clever and the characters very well written, from the main characters to all the side characters.There was a lot of thought put in to the smaller details and the plot and it wove together very well. I loved DI Grace Archer, I loved her passion to the job and learning more about her as her background story was revealed. I didn’t guess the killer, and thought the reveal was great. I also loved the ending and thought it set the pace very well for more books in this series, which I will definitely be looking out for.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jules

    Gruesome, tense, fast-paced, genuinely palpitation-inducing! Brilliant! Hope there’s more coming!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    This was a fabulous start to what promises to a really good new police procedural series featuring the indomitable DI Grace Archer. The book starts at one heck of a pace when Grace on her first day in her new job is plunged straight into a gruesome case of a serial killer who likes to pose his victims as works of art. Facing quite a lot of resentment from some members of her team Grace not only has to deal with that but also more bodies being found and again posed in a macabre way. There is a lo This was a fabulous start to what promises to a really good new police procedural series featuring the indomitable DI Grace Archer. The book starts at one heck of a pace when Grace on her first day in her new job is plunged straight into a gruesome case of a serial killer who likes to pose his victims as works of art. Facing quite a lot of resentment from some members of her team Grace not only has to deal with that but also more bodies being found and again posed in a macabre way. There is a lot going on in this book and lot of back story also and this really added to just how much I enjoyed the read and I am looking forward to finding out more of Grace who I really liked and also the other members of her team and I have a feeling that this is going to be one of my favourite series. The writing was excellent and the plot line was complex, never predictable and really kept me on my toes till the end, all in all a thrilling and satisfying read, many thanks to David Fennell it was a blast ! My thanks also to NetGalley and Bonnier Books UK, Zaffre for giving me the chance to read the ARC in exchange for my honest opinion.

  24. 5 out of 5

    caroline

    Oh my goodness. This was intense and you could tell it was setting up for a series, there is so much more that I want to know about the detectives in the book more of their back story. Yes there was a complicated back story of the main character - how much could happen to her - the boyfriend was a bit over the top. (my only criticism of an otherwise brilliant book). Yes it did remind me of other authors, for me it reminded my of W L Knightly, but that was not a bad thing. I stayed up late to fini Oh my goodness. This was intense and you could tell it was setting up for a series, there is so much more that I want to know about the detectives in the book more of their back story. Yes there was a complicated back story of the main character - how much could happen to her - the boyfriend was a bit over the top. (my only criticism of an otherwise brilliant book). Yes it did remind me of other authors, for me it reminded my of W L Knightly, but that was not a bad thing. I stayed up late to finish this book as I just had to know how it got resolved -yes I did work out the killer but I think we were supposed to, so that didn't matter. I was given an advance copy by Netgalley and the publlishers in exchange for an honest review which I have done.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Thank you to NetGalley, the publisher and author for this ARC. David Fennell is a new author to me and I thought the premise of the book looked like my kind of read. I thought this book had an excellent, cleverly thought out plot line and I was drawn in to the story right from the start. I liked the authors writing style, and that the story was told through different characters. I found the book to be very engaging and it held my attention all the way through. DI Grace Archer is a likeable, beli Thank you to NetGalley, the publisher and author for this ARC. David Fennell is a new author to me and I thought the premise of the book looked like my kind of read. I thought this book had an excellent, cleverly thought out plot line and I was drawn in to the story right from the start. I liked the authors writing style, and that the story was told through different characters. I found the book to be very engaging and it held my attention all the way through. DI Grace Archer is a likeable, believable and interesting character with a good background story. She starts a new job and on her first day has 3 murders to investigate, as well as a missing person case. I enjoyed reading of her working relationship with her DS, and the little glimpses into her home and personal life. The book had many twists in it, the murder investigation becomes a race against time and it raced to a thrilling conclusion. . I hope there is a second book featuring these characters and I would definitely read it. Overall a good, enjoyable, well written book that was full of suspense. 4 stars

  26. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    I love discovering new authors and David Fennell is certainly a new author for me. I read that his work is being compared to the work of Chris Carter and M. W. Craven and as I am a huge fan of both authors, I instinctively knew that I was going to love ‘The Art Of Death’. To say that I loved ‘The Art Of Death’ is an understatement- I flipping well adored reading ‘The Art Of Death’ but more about that in a bit. I loved the character of Detective Inspector Grace Archer and I warmed to her from the I love discovering new authors and David Fennell is certainly a new author for me. I read that his work is being compared to the work of Chris Carter and M. W. Craven and as I am a huge fan of both authors, I instinctively knew that I was going to love ‘The Art Of Death’. To say that I loved ‘The Art Of Death’ is an understatement- I flipping well adored reading ‘The Art Of Death’ but more about that in a bit. I loved the character of Detective Inspector Grace Archer and I warmed to her from the start. It didn’t take me long to view Grace as a friend. She is a dedicated police officer, who is rising through the ranks. Grace was promoted from the rank of Detective Sergeant to the rank of Detective Inspector and when we first meet her she is heading for her first posting as a Detective Inspector. There is a bit of trouble on the horizon as it turns out that she had a hand in unseating the previous occupant of the post. I won’t go too far into what happens as I would hate to spoil the book for anybody else. Grace certainly has courage in spades and she isn’t easily fazed, which are two qualities which she certainly needs given the level of animosity she faces. It soon becomes clear that she has been through some pretty tough stuff in her personal life, which affects her to this day. Grace is a determined, courageous, hard working, loyal, kind and compassionate young lady and I am sure that she will go far. The fact that David’s work is being compared to the work of two of my favourite authors, was enough to grab my attention and draw me in. As soon as I started to read, I knew that I wouldn’t be able to put this book down. That is exactly what happened too. I was so intrigued by the horror of the murders and by the motive of the perpetrator that I had to keep reading. The book wasn’t glued to my hand but it might as well have been because it travelled everywhere with me. I simply couldn’t bear to miss a single second of the story in case I missed a vital clue or a twist. The more of the book I read, the more I wanted to read and the quicker the pages seemed to turn. All too quickly I reached the end of the story and I had to say farewell to Grace Archer. I had real trouble believing that ‘The Art Of Death’ was the author’s debut crime novel. The author has a polished and confident writing style that makes the reader feel as though they are an active participant in the story. That’s how I felt at any rate. I have to say that this is one of those debut novels that will stay fresh in my mind for a long while to come, especially as the murderer chooses to display his victims in an unusual fashion. For me, ‘The Art Of Death’ was perfectly paced. The story hit the ground running and maintained a fast pace throughout. Reading ‘The Art Of Death’ felt like being on one seriously scary and unpredictable rollercoaster ride with more twists, turns and surprises than you would find on a ‘Snakes & Ladders’ board. Just when you thought that you could take a moment to gather your thoughts, let your heart rate settle and reclaim your stomach then off the action would go again. I found ‘The Art Of Death’ to be a tense, dramatic, chilling read, which held my attention throughout and had me on the edge of my seat throughout. In short, I absolutely, totally and utterly loved reading ‘The Art Of Death’ and I strongly recommend that you read it. It’s still early in 2021 but I can confidently say that ‘The Art Of Death’ will be one of my top reads of 2021. I can’t wait to read more from David Fennell in the future. Here’s hoping that we don’t have too long to wait. The score on the Ginger Book Geek board is a very well deserved 5* out of 5*.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Hall

    Mediocre serial killer thriller that required finessing with a lead detective with a wildly OTT backstory. The Art of Death is a pretty run-of-the-mill serial killer thriller set in London and introduces newly promoted thirty-year-old DI Grace Archer as she prepares to start her first day at Charing Cross Police Station, where she is due to replace the detective she arrested for corruption. Prepared to face hostility from boss, DCI Clare Pierce, who was in a relationship with the corrupt cop, Gra Mediocre serial killer thriller that required finessing with a lead detective with a wildly OTT backstory. The Art of Death is a pretty run-of-the-mill serial killer thriller set in London and introduces newly promoted thirty-year-old DI Grace Archer as she prepares to start her first day at Charing Cross Police Station, where she is due to replace the detective she arrested for corruption. Prepared to face hostility from boss, DCI Clare Pierce, who was in a relationship with the corrupt cop, Grace’s first day is a baptism of fire that begins when she and DS Harry Quinn are called to a grotesque art installation outside a central London landmark. Confronted by the corpses of three homeless men floating in glass vitrines of formaldehyde, all being live streamed on social media, it is the latest work of an incognito artist who calls himself @nonymous. With more ‘exhibits’ in the same vein promised to follow in quick succession Grace is immediately on the back foot with a muckraking tabloid journalist eager to expose her own brush with death in childhood. DI Grace Archer’s backstory is wildly over-the-top and unbelievable (specifically that at the age of twelve she escaped from and became the sole survivor of a child serial killer) and Fennell elaborates extensively on it to the point where it intrudes on the investigation and the book begins to feel all about Grace facing down a second serial killer. Together with the implausibility that she would have been immediately drafted into the position of the detective she had arrested, and expected to report to DCI Pierce, it is not the most auspicious start to the book. However DI Grace Archer and sardonic DS Harry Quinn make an agreeable team despite Archer initially ruffling a few feathers by demanding to lead the investigation and parachuting in transsexual NCA analyst, friend and tech whizz, Klara Clark. There were early signs of a rapport developing between this trio who all have seem to have a solid work ethic and sense of humour which bodes well for future outings, with bigoted DI Rodney Hicks keen to undermine Grace and take the lead in the investigation. The novel is narrated in the third person and largely told from the perspective of Grace with the exception of interludes that follow @nonymous and the lives of his intended victims prior to falling into his clutches. The investigation is largely reactive due to the quick succession in which further exhibits appear meaning there is precious little opportunity to even begin identifying possible future targets. The results mostly come by way of Clark’s deft scrutiny of CCTV and monitoring of ANPR cameras, not making for a particularly exciting case. The novel itself cracks along at a decent pace and whilst suspension of disbelief is pretty much standard with every serial killer novel, with The Art of Death it is a necessity with laughably gory deaths, fantastical staging and a hefty body count. Whilst it’s obviously nigh on impossible to bring anything new to the serial killer thriller genre I was disappointed at how cliché-ridden and hackneyed The Art of Death felt even down to what seems to be the now de rigueur method of selecting victims via social media. The perpetrator isn’t particularly well disguised and, along with his obvious intention to target DI Grace Archer, the reveal is very little of a surprise. Overall a solid read but not one that left me particularly excited about future outings from DI Grace Archer or offerings from David Fennell.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Despite have over 400 pages, I absolutely flew through The Art of Death. It's a compelling, tense and intriguing thriller with such a twisted premise and populated with a cast of well formed characters. Set in central London, the story opens as a mysterious figure enters a small cafe. It is clear that this guy wants more than a cup of artisan coffee. He's on a mission, his mind is cluttered with artistic and creative ideas and just like most artists, he finds the subjects for his masterpieces in Despite have over 400 pages, I absolutely flew through The Art of Death. It's a compelling, tense and intriguing thriller with such a twisted premise and populated with a cast of well formed characters. Set in central London, the story opens as a mysterious figure enters a small cafe. It is clear that this guy wants more than a cup of artisan coffee. He's on a mission, his mind is cluttered with artistic and creative ideas and just like most artists, he finds the subjects for his masterpieces in everyday life. However, this is no ordinary artist. He's cold-blooded, very intelligent and determined killer. Not only will he kill for his art, he will ensure that the residents of London, and the world beyond experiences it too. The first installation appears in Trafalgar Square, early one morning. Three large glass cabinets containing the body of a homeless man in each one. This is just the beginning of the work of the artist who will be known as @nonymous. Detective Grace Archer heads up the investigation. She's new in the job, and is well known within the Charing Cross Police Station due to her previous work at another station. Most of her team regard her with suspicion, some really hate her, but her sidekick and partner on the investigation, DS Harry Quinn has her back. This is an incredible pairing of two extremely well thought out characters. Both are flawed, both have tragedy in their past and both struggle to deal with their issues. However, they are both determined to crack this case, often putting themselves in danger in order to get their man. As @nonymous unveils more of his works across London, the pressure on Archer and Quinn increases. Archer finds herself linked more closely to the case than she had expected, which only leads to more difficulties for her and the team. The Art of Death is a chilling, creepy and tense thriller. I adored the London setting; I miss visiting St Martin's Lane and other central points in the city and enjoyed the familiarity of these settings. At times it is really unsettling; the murderous art installations are so well described and the author gives enough back story of each victim to allow the reader to become really invested in them. It's extremely relevant and up-to-date, with the power and danger that is Social Media platforms playing a central role to the ease in which the victims are snared. Great storytelling with a killer who is superbly drawn. Totally gripping, twisty, dark and layered. I'm really looking forward to reading more from this talented and imaginative author.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Leigh

    Fennell introduces the reader to an absorbing protagonist in his debut thriller 'The Art of Death'. It's great when you become hooked into a new detective thriller and really connect with the lead characters. The opening investigation is led by DI Grace Archer and DS Harry Quinn, a confident 'side-kick' who's smart and shows the capacity for great loyalty as the book, and hopefully series, progresses. It's great we have some fully rounded characters to hook into, that are written with realism an Fennell introduces the reader to an absorbing protagonist in his debut thriller 'The Art of Death'. It's great when you become hooked into a new detective thriller and really connect with the lead characters. The opening investigation is led by DI Grace Archer and DS Harry Quinn, a confident 'side-kick' who's smart and shows the capacity for great loyalty as the book, and hopefully series, progresses. It's great we have some fully rounded characters to hook into, that are written with realism and have enough background depth to keep up the interest in their personal lives, despite the gruesome unfolding events of the murders they are investigating. Set in London, we are introduced to a new killer on its streets. This predator really resonates with our modern society, using social networks to hunt for prey. The detached, cold feel of the murderer is really striking through the opening pages and builds throughout the book. The reader is aware from early events that DI Archer will have a bigger part to play in the crimes, and the tension builds through the pages as we await what will happen. I really enjoyed the plotting and pace of this book; I must admit I guessed very early on who the guilty party was and where it was heading (I think reading crime novels for 30 years has helped, rather than a structural/plotting flaw by the author), so for me another plausible potential murderer would have been a useful red herring to get me off the scent. However, as all reading is a personal experience, this by no means deflates this novel. It's an impressive debut and I hope will lead to a new and exciting series featuring Archer and Quinn. A highly recommended debut crime thriller read. This creepy page-turner will pull you into a macabre world where the hunt for a killer consumes the pursers until the heart-stopping climax.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Adrian Scottow

    A contemporary thriller which rattles along at a furious pace featuring a macabre intersection of street art and modern fine art and a very menacing artist/serial killer who stalks modern day London. He is a horrific cross of Banksy, Damian Hirst and Jack the Ripper. His victims are transformed from base flesh and blood into art and the detective who has to stop him has her own secrets. I really enjoyed the premise, and the setting is instantly recognizable to any Londoner. The detective and the A contemporary thriller which rattles along at a furious pace featuring a macabre intersection of street art and modern fine art and a very menacing artist/serial killer who stalks modern day London. He is a horrific cross of Banksy, Damian Hirst and Jack the Ripper. His victims are transformed from base flesh and blood into art and the detective who has to stop him has her own secrets. I really enjoyed the premise, and the setting is instantly recognizable to any Londoner. The detective and the killer walk the same streets that we do and peer into the same dark alleys that we do too. The use of modern technology (Facebook, Instagram etc) both as the lure for the victims and then the means to distribute the art is well thought out and worrying – I will be checking my privacy settings again after I finish this review and will wonder who is watching me from the shadows. The lead detective Grace Archer is well-drawn, competent, and likeable and the whole of the Charing Cross police station feels very real – complete with office politics and plotting. After the first three bodies are found in 3 glass cases of formaldehyde in Trafalgar Square the tension builds as Grace investigates the crimes – and there are lots more murders and lots more displays. Which of the several suspects is the murderer? A toxic MP, a downtrodden journalist, one of the police or a suspected paedophile? The victims feel authentic – each with their everyday lives sketched out which makes the murders feel very real and very shocking. And with each murder the tension is ratcheted up further until a brilliant, breathless, and exciting climax. I can’t wait to see where David goes next with Grace Archer and her soft-spoken, but you suspect hard-as-nails Belfast sidekick, DS Harry Quinn.

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