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Black Sci-Fi Short Stories

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"With topics ranging from slavery to space travel, the impressive breadth of this anthology makes for a well-rounded survey. Readers, writers, and scholars alike will find great value here." — Publishers Weekly Starred Review A deluxe edition of new writing and neglected perspectives. Dystopia, apocalypse, gene-splicing, cloning and colonization are explored here by new "With topics ranging from slavery to space travel, the impressive breadth of this anthology makes for a well-rounded survey. Readers, writers, and scholars alike will find great value here." — Publishers Weekly Starred Review A deluxe edition of new writing and neglected perspectives. Dystopia, apocalypse, gene-splicing, cloning and colonization are explored here by new authors and combined with proto-sci-fi and speculative writing of an older tradition (by W.E.B. Du Bois, Martin R. Delany, Sutton E. Griggs, Pauline Hopkins and Edward Johnson) whose first-hand experience of slavery and denial created their living dystopia. With a foreword by Alex Award-winning novelist Temi Oh, an introduction by Dr. Sandra M. Grayson, author of Visions of the Third Millennium: Black Science Fiction Novelists Write the Future (2003), and invaluable promotion and editorial support from Tia Ross and the Black Writers Collective and more, this latest offering in the Flame Tree Gothic fantasy series focuses on an area of science fiction which has not received the attention it deserves. Many of the themes in Sci-fi reveal the world as it is to others, show us how to improve it, and give voice to the many different expressions of a future for humankind. The Flame Tree Gothic Fantasy, Classic Stories and Epic Tales collections bring together the entire range of myth, folklore and modern short fiction. Highlighting the roots of suspense, supernatural, science fiction and mystery stories, the books in Flame Tree Collections series are beautifully presented, perfect as a gift and offer a lifetime of reading pleasure. Table of Contents: An Empty, Hollow Interview by James Beamon The Comet by W.E.B. Du Bois Élan Vital by K. Tempest Bradford The Orb by Tara Campbell Blake, or The Huts of America by Martin R. Delany The Floating City of Pengimbang by Michelle F. Goddard The New Colossuses by Harambee K. Grey-Sun Imperium in Imperio by Sutton E. Griggs Seven Thieves by Emmalia Harrington Of One Blood: Or, The Hidden Self by Pauline Hopkins Space Traitors by Walidah Imarisha The Line of Demarcation by Patty Nicole Johnson Light Ahead for the Negro by Edward Johnson e-race by Russell Nichols Giant Steps by Russell Nichols Almost Too Good to Be True by Temi Oh You May Run On by Megan Pindling Suffering Inside, But Still I Soar by Sylvie Soul The Pox Party by Lyle Stiles The Regression Test by Wole Talabi


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"With topics ranging from slavery to space travel, the impressive breadth of this anthology makes for a well-rounded survey. Readers, writers, and scholars alike will find great value here." — Publishers Weekly Starred Review A deluxe edition of new writing and neglected perspectives. Dystopia, apocalypse, gene-splicing, cloning and colonization are explored here by new "With topics ranging from slavery to space travel, the impressive breadth of this anthology makes for a well-rounded survey. Readers, writers, and scholars alike will find great value here." — Publishers Weekly Starred Review A deluxe edition of new writing and neglected perspectives. Dystopia, apocalypse, gene-splicing, cloning and colonization are explored here by new authors and combined with proto-sci-fi and speculative writing of an older tradition (by W.E.B. Du Bois, Martin R. Delany, Sutton E. Griggs, Pauline Hopkins and Edward Johnson) whose first-hand experience of slavery and denial created their living dystopia. With a foreword by Alex Award-winning novelist Temi Oh, an introduction by Dr. Sandra M. Grayson, author of Visions of the Third Millennium: Black Science Fiction Novelists Write the Future (2003), and invaluable promotion and editorial support from Tia Ross and the Black Writers Collective and more, this latest offering in the Flame Tree Gothic fantasy series focuses on an area of science fiction which has not received the attention it deserves. Many of the themes in Sci-fi reveal the world as it is to others, show us how to improve it, and give voice to the many different expressions of a future for humankind. The Flame Tree Gothic Fantasy, Classic Stories and Epic Tales collections bring together the entire range of myth, folklore and modern short fiction. Highlighting the roots of suspense, supernatural, science fiction and mystery stories, the books in Flame Tree Collections series are beautifully presented, perfect as a gift and offer a lifetime of reading pleasure. Table of Contents: An Empty, Hollow Interview by James Beamon The Comet by W.E.B. Du Bois Élan Vital by K. Tempest Bradford The Orb by Tara Campbell Blake, or The Huts of America by Martin R. Delany The Floating City of Pengimbang by Michelle F. Goddard The New Colossuses by Harambee K. Grey-Sun Imperium in Imperio by Sutton E. Griggs Seven Thieves by Emmalia Harrington Of One Blood: Or, The Hidden Self by Pauline Hopkins Space Traitors by Walidah Imarisha The Line of Demarcation by Patty Nicole Johnson Light Ahead for the Negro by Edward Johnson e-race by Russell Nichols Giant Steps by Russell Nichols Almost Too Good to Be True by Temi Oh You May Run On by Megan Pindling Suffering Inside, But Still I Soar by Sylvie Soul The Pox Party by Lyle Stiles The Regression Test by Wole Talabi

52 review for Black Sci-Fi Short Stories

  1. 4 out of 5

    •《vi》•

    This book contains an assembly of stories which are futuristic and show a dark vision of a future that could await us. At the same time it still touches topics that are more than present nowadays which makes the scenarios somehiw scarily realistic. I would recommend this for everyone that is too exhausted to read a long book at the moment. It is easy to read some stories, stop in between and pick the book back up a few days later. Although the topics grasp the truth and some very serious questio This book contains an assembly of stories which are futuristic and show a dark vision of a future that could await us. At the same time it still touches topics that are more than present nowadays which makes the scenarios somehiw scarily realistic. I would recommend this for everyone that is too exhausted to read a long book at the moment. It is easy to read some stories, stop in between and pick the book back up a few days later. Although the topics grasp the truth and some very serious questions about the human race. This book is not just entertaining, it holds fundamental issues and their possible future for humanity. A very interesting read!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Zoe's Human

    Showcasing the work of Black authors, this impressive collection of speculative fiction has original publication dates from 1859 to 2021. The modern fiction is, without exception, good with far too many excellent stories to list off. The classic fiction, however, is a bit more challenging. The pieces published closest to the American Civil War have the tendency towards didacticism that was prominent in the era, which can be wearing. However, their historical significance is not to be underestima Showcasing the work of Black authors, this impressive collection of speculative fiction has original publication dates from 1859 to 2021. The modern fiction is, without exception, good with far too many excellent stories to list off. The classic fiction, however, is a bit more challenging. The pieces published closest to the American Civil War have the tendency towards didacticism that was prominent in the era, which can be wearing. However, their historical significance is not to be underestimated, and they offer a fascinating insight into some of the perspectives of the time. The stand-out star of those pieces is W. E. B. Du Bois' "The Comet" which is timeless in the way of classics, though most sadly so. I would strongly recommend reading Dr. Sandra Grayson's insightful Introduction as an Afterword. I consider her essay to be well worth your time; however, it does contain spoilers. Stories An Empty, Hollow InterviewJames Beamon 4.5 stars The Comet W.E.B. Du Bois 5 stars Élan Vital K. Tempest Bradford 5 stars The Orb Tara Campbell 4.5 stars Blake, or The Huts of America Martin R. Delany 1 star The Floating City of Pengimbang Michelle F. Goddard 3 stars The New Colossuses Harambee K. Grey-Sun 4 stars Imperium in Imperio Sutton E. Griggs 4 stars Seven Thieves Emmalia Harrington 3 stars Of One Blood: Or, The Hidden Self Pauline Hopkins 2 stars Space Traitors Walidah Imarisha 3 stars The Line of Demarcation Patty Nicole Johnson 5 stars Light Ahead for the Negro Edward Johnson 2 stars e-race Russell Nichols 3 stars Giant Steps Russell Nichols 4 stars Almost Too Good to Be True Temi Oh 4 stars You May Run On Megan Pindling 4 stars Suffering Inside, But Still I Soar Sylvie Soul 4 stars The Pox Party Lyle Stiles 3.5 stars The Regression Test Wole Talabi 5 stars I received a complimentary advanced copy via Netgalley. I thank all involved for this opportunity.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Graciella Delgado

    *Thank you Flame Tree Press for sending me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review* Wow. As someone who grew up loving The Twilight Zone, I adored this collection of short stories. With a wide range of writing styles and messages from pieces across various decades and writers, 'Black Sci Fi Short Stories' explores superpowers, cults worshipping a mysterious orb, the apocalypse, reanimating the dead, aliens coming to rescue the victims of white supremacy, and so, SO much more. The sto *Thank you Flame Tree Press for sending me an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review* Wow. As someone who grew up loving The Twilight Zone, I adored this collection of short stories. With a wide range of writing styles and messages from pieces across various decades and writers, 'Black Sci Fi Short Stories' explores superpowers, cults worshipping a mysterious orb, the apocalypse, reanimating the dead, aliens coming to rescue the victims of white supremacy, and so, SO much more. The stories vary in length, with one short story finishing up in 3 pages while another takes up 20, but the themes it has you sit with hit hard every time. This collection of all Black authors leaves a mix of race-centered messages alongside stories that don't mention race at all and just happen to be stories written by a Black creative. There were numerous times I finished a story and closed the book to stare at my wall before going back to re-read it all again.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Monri

    Anthology rate: 2.5⭐ This anthology caught my attention due to the combination of themes such as; apocalyptic worlds and dystopia and biotechnology integration; cloning, etc. In a nutshell, everything I like. As in every anthology, I'll make a short review for each story mentioning what I liked and what didn't work for me. Personally, I didn't like this anthology so much, I thought it would have a more futuristic approach but it wasn't like that, also the sci-fi theme was almost non-existent. Anthology rate: 2.5⭐ This anthology caught my attention due to the combination of themes such as; apocalyptic worlds and dystopia and biotechnology integration; cloning, etc. In a nutshell, everything I like. As in every anthology, I'll make a short review for each story mentioning what I liked and what didn't work for me. Personally, I didn't like this anthology so much, I thought it would have a more futuristic approach but it wasn't like that, also the sci-fi theme was almost non-existent. An Empty, Hollow Interview by James Beamon 3⭐ It was a good take on genetic recombination but the story was a little boring, it would be interesting to read a book on that subject because of the potential it has. Being a short story it's obvious that the concept will be difficult to express, however, I think the goal was clearly understood. The Comet by W.E.B. Du Bois 1⭐ The plot sounded interesting but it was just confusing, a man and a woman are the only ones in New York after a paranormal phenomenon happened and they all disappeared, honestly the story didn't have a specific objective and it was difficult to follow, especially that ending ruined it. Élan Vital by K. Tempest Bradford 4⭐ This story was very interesting, it's about how in the future you can revive the dead to be with them a little more, of course, it's not permanent and has its limits, our protagonist risks them to talk to her mother who died of cancer, the story is very cute and sad, I really liked especially the ending, I would love to read more about this world. The Orb by Tara Campbell DNF The start was a bit slow and it couldn't grab my attention. Blake, or The Huts of America by Martin R. Delany DNF I read till 50% and let me tell you that this story is very long, the plot is interesting but it didn't catch my attention, also the writing was strange given the time it takes place. I can personally see many people liking this story but it wasn't for me. The Floating City of Pengimbang by Michelle F. Goddard 3⭐ The story was interesting and the world was creative, but I felt that it didn't have a very clear objective, even so, it was a good story that I would like to see more developed definitely. The New Colossuses by Harambee K. Gray-Sun 2⭐ This was a rare story in all the expressions of the word, I feel like it was difficult to understand. At first, it grabbed me because the beginning was incredible but as I read the story it progressed quite peculiarly (weird), I feel that the length was very short and therefore it wasn't easy to handle. Imperium in Empire by Sutton E. Griggs 2.5⭐ Another longer story than I expected, I personally didn't like it, because it's rare that I like historical plots, but the message and the writing are very good and create a harmonious story that is worth reading. I must say that it has many exhausting descriptions, we don't need to know every detail of a person or a room, that made me quite stressed especially at the beginning. Seven Thieves by Emmalia Harrington 1⭐ Honestly, it was very boring and I didn't have a specific objective, the writing was confusing just like the plot. Of One Blood Or, The Hidden Self by Pauline Hopkins 3.5⭐ The plot was interesting, it had a bit of everything, the characters are charming and the theme is very good, I really liked it. This is another of the long stories in the book, so it's easy to connect with the story and get into it. Space Traitors by Walidah Imarisha 2⭐ This cannot be a more American book because it would be impossible, I love the subject of aliens and it caught my attention, but like the American society immediately stopped being science fiction and became something political. It had a lot of potentials and given the way it ended I suppose it will be a book, I'm honestly not interested in reading it. Seven Thieves by Emmalia Harrington 1⭐ It was honestly very boring and it didn't have a specific objective, the writing was confusing just like the plot. Of One Blood Or, The Hidden Self by Pauline Hopkins 3.5⭐ The plot was interesting, it had a bit of everything, the characters were charming and the theme was very good, I really liked it. This is another of the long stories in the book, so it's easy to connect with the story and get into it. Space Traitors by Walidah Imarisha 2⭐ This cannot be a more American book because it would be impossible, I love the subject of aliens and it caught my attention, but like the American society immediately stopped being science fiction and became political, way too political. It had a lot of potentials and given the way it ended I suppose it will be a book, that I'm honestly not interested in reading it. The Line of Demarcation by Patty Nicole Johnson 2⭐ I think this is the beginning of a book as a preview, it caught me but it was very fast and, although the world and plot sound very interesting they aren't explained properly, I would have to read a book about it to give a final opinion. Light Ahead for the Negro by Edward Johnson DNF. It failed to catch my attention and it was boring, this is another of the long stories in the anthology. e-race by Russell Nichols 1⭐ The world sounds interesting but the writing was kind of weird in some instances. The plot was boring and the main character too obnoxious, I really didn't like it. Giant Steps by Russell Nichols 2⭐ This story was better than the previous one, but again the writing is somewhat strange and it was quite confusing, I liked the main character more but I didn't feel that it had a specific objective. Almost Too Good to Be True by Temi Oh 2.5⭐ The story is kind of cute, but it doesn't have a specific purpose and the writing is kind of weird, it caught me but it could have been better. You May Run On by Megan Pindling 2.5⭐ This was the most interesting story in terms of subject matter, but the writing was a bit odd in some instances. Personally, I found it boring and at first it didn't have a clear objective. Suffering Inside, But Still I Soar by Sylvie Soul 3⭐ I think this is the plot that has entertained me the most and that it finally follows the sci-fi theme. Although unfortunately, the writing was horrible and the protagonist not pleasant. My thanks to all the authors, Flame Tree Publishing, and NetGalley for the opportunity to get this ARC for an unbiased review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Munch

    I was sent an arc of this book via NetGalley in exchange for a honest review. I always find it hard to rate and review short story collections, they are nearly always a bit hit and miss for me. Thankfully there was a good number of hits in this collection. My absolute favourites were (in order of when they appeared in the book): The Comet Elan Vital The Orb The Floating City of Pengimbang (I'd love a full length novel of this) The New Colossuses The Line of Demarcation e-race Suffering Inside, But Still I was sent an arc of this book via NetGalley in exchange for a honest review. I always find it hard to rate and review short story collections, they are nearly always a bit hit and miss for me. Thankfully there was a good number of hits in this collection. My absolute favourites were (in order of when they appeared in the book): The Comet Elan Vital The Orb The Floating City of Pengimbang (I'd love a full length novel of this) The New Colossuses The Line of Demarcation e-race Suffering Inside, But Still I Soar I found the more modern stories easier to get into since I've never been good at reading older/classic fiction and they were much longer than some of the others. They are however an important inclusion, the collection wouldn't be the same without them. The introduction is also a must read, it traces the history of Black science fiction and the importance of getting it more of the mainstream attention that it deserves. Overall I really enjoyed this collection and I highly recommend it to all sci-fi fans.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sherron

    An anthology of stories by black writers. The stories’ settings cover quite a timespan—from the days of slavery and oppression to super heroes and the distant future. Likewise, the stories were published over a one hundred year timespan. Most entries are short stories, but three are more like novella length. Across the board, all stories are well-written. Some stories got in and opened up my heart, yet other stories confused me with their symbols and imagery. An introduction combined with an app An anthology of stories by black writers. The stories’ settings cover quite a timespan—from the days of slavery and oppression to super heroes and the distant future. Likewise, the stories were published over a one hundred year timespan. Most entries are short stories, but three are more like novella length. Across the board, all stories are well-written. Some stories got in and opened up my heart, yet other stories confused me with their symbols and imagery. An introduction combined with an appendix of these writers.provides some welcome and extremely interesting—humorous, impressive, and endearing—biographical information. The book notes the use of original language in any reprinted stories, and it does not Bowdlerize offensive racial slurs. Several stories stand out to me for a variety of reasons. Two stories are notable because of their fierce, lyrical yet steadfast, prose, which both happen to feature the relationship of two black females forced into slavery: You May Run On by Megan Pindling tells the story of a pregnant slave who gave birth to her daughter in a nearby river. In this story, the river represents not only the traditional female psyche, but also a wild yearning for freedom so visceral it can be touched, a character as an ally and a comforter, and as a symbol of movement, it plays a central role in their striving for freedom. Seven Thieves by Emmalia Harrington, which also depicts conditions of enslavement, is set in a community rife with a highly contagious air-borne disease (like COVID-19 on steroids, like the plague). One woman, the practical one, is weary, run down and achy after giving so much of her time and health to create a beloved antimicrobial cleanser called Seven Thieves (vinegar plus seven herbs). Her companion, the unfailing giver, risks her own freedom while serving as a midwife. Through their actions to support each other and their community, these women epitomize truly remarkable love and charity. A third story depicting a loving relationship between two black women is “The Line of Demarcation” by Patty Nicole Johnson. One sister is employed as a product picker for a giant warehouse similar to Amazon dot com, where working conditions require speed and “loyalty.” The warehouse worker earns a “reward” that will enable her to work faster and double her salary. She uses her salary to help her sister buy insulin, and that sister helps her in return. Oh.... Just what IS that company reward? Hmm, just replace your arms with cybernetic prosthetics..They have a handy-dandy telescoping feature so you can reach merchandise out of reach that typically requires a ladder. Now doesn’t that sound awesome?Oh we didn’t warn you it would be excruciating? Oopsie. I can see both sisters self-sacrificing for each other, but I’m not fully understanding the cybernetics, unless simply as metaphorically becoming machines, I.e. less than human. Another story, “Space Traitors” by Walidah Imarisha starts with a note saying it’s a reply to Derrick Bell’s short story “Space Traders.” (c1992) I wasn’t enamored with the rationale of the traitor aliens, who come for justice, not peace. The aliens will salve those who have suffered, and in return the recipients must travel with the aliens for eight years to save other sufferers. Sounds to me like those aliens have some kinda fishy pyramid scheme going on. I highly recommend an online search for Bell’s story, Derrick Bell was a black law school professor at Harvard, and this story he wrote reflects his insightful scholarship. It is a logical, tightly packed nugget of economics, race, and sociological satire, which apparently incensed prominent white people—such as US Judge Alex (who incidentally began his life as survivor of discrimination himself at a Jewish concentration camp, and who resigned his career in 2017 as a result of multiple sexual abuse accusations during the #MeToo movement. (Wikipedia) Is it ever possible for the abused to avoid becoming the abuser themselves? I think Derrick Bell‘s life serves as a admirable role model. Thank you NetGalley for this peek at an ARC.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    I received an ARC copy of this book on netgalley. I really loved this book. I am a big fan of all things Sci-Fi and as I've gotten older I've been more intentional about trying to find more Black Sci-Fi authors. This collection of short stories begins by introducing Black science fiction to the reader and tracing the history of the genre. It discusses how science fiction has been 'hostile' towards Black people and how Black people begin to conceptualize Black Sci-Fi. I enjoyed the reading of this I received an ARC copy of this book on netgalley. I really loved this book. I am a big fan of all things Sci-Fi and as I've gotten older I've been more intentional about trying to find more Black Sci-Fi authors. This collection of short stories begins by introducing Black science fiction to the reader and tracing the history of the genre. It discusses how science fiction has been 'hostile' towards Black people and how Black people begin to conceptualize Black Sci-Fi. I enjoyed the reading of this introduction and tracing of history as much as the reading the short stories. The collection includes stories by a variety of authors across time and I truly appreciate being introduced to varied Black Sci-Fi authors in addition to reading their stories. I had no idea that W.E.B. Du Bois had written Sci-Fi. This is an excellent collection and I look forward to adding the physical book to my bookshelf when it is available.

  8. 4 out of 5

    2TReads

    Bringing a collection like this into the canon is a way in which readers of Black science fiction can draw threads of similarity between style and voice of writers past and present. It is a way to interrogate form and see what ideas and how they relayed have evolved or remained the same. What is mirrored and what is foremagined. These trace the times in which the authors lived and how they drew inspiration from within their own time but also looked forward and imagined what the world could become Bringing a collection like this into the canon is a way in which readers of Black science fiction can draw threads of similarity between style and voice of writers past and present. It is a way to interrogate form and see what ideas and how they relayed have evolved or remained the same. What is mirrored and what is foremagined. These trace the times in which the authors lived and how they drew inspiration from within their own time but also looked forward and imagined what the world could become and what we could become beyond the world and systems we exist within. As with any anthology there are stories that captured the attention, left an imprint and engaged the reader with the creativity and breadth of ideas that were conceptualized and related. All these stories contained some influence of identity and place of the writers and was evident in the prose and dialogue between characters.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    A collection of short stories focusing on sci-fi. There were some great stories, my favorite was The Orb by Tara Campbell. Three of the stories by Delany, Griggs and Hopkins were not short stories as they had twenty plus chapters. ARC provided by the publisher via Netgalley.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Black Sci-fi short stories was a great mix of short stories that a lot of people may not have been exposed to. I liked almost all of them and they were a good read. However I will say that anyone who doesn't want to be exposed to slurs or offensive language, this book has them. It's a part of the life of the authors. Read the foreword and the introduction. They help give some context to the stories for anyone who may feel a little lost stepping in. I will say that it's long but it's an anthology Black Sci-fi short stories was a great mix of short stories that a lot of people may not have been exposed to. I liked almost all of them and they were a good read. However I will say that anyone who doesn't want to be exposed to slurs or offensive language, this book has them. It's a part of the life of the authors. Read the foreword and the introduction. They help give some context to the stories for anyone who may feel a little lost stepping in. I will say that it's long but it's an anthology so of course it is. You can skip to whichever story you want and I will say that they are all solid. I think a lot of people need to read these stories. If you're a fan of sci-fi and Black writers, or just good writers, this is an amazing anthology.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Terence Eden

    This is a delightful collection of short stories. It starts with a scholarly introduction to the history of Black Sci-Fi. And, for once, Black isn’t just limited to mean “African American”. We get a panoply of authors – both modern and historic. Some of the historic stories – especially W. E. B. Du Bois’ The Comet – are wonderful. A hundred year old sci-fi that is still as relevant today as it was then Others, are less so. Some of the stories are framed as “proto-science-fiction” – but they’re rea This is a delightful collection of short stories. It starts with a scholarly introduction to the history of Black Sci-Fi. And, for once, Black isn’t just limited to mean “African American”. We get a panoply of authors – both modern and historic. Some of the historic stories – especially W. E. B. Du Bois’ The Comet – are wonderful. A hundred year old sci-fi that is still as relevant today as it was then Others, are less so. Some of the stories are framed as “proto-science-fiction” – but they’re really alternate history stories. That’s fine, but they’re probably really only interesting if you’re intimately familiar with the history of the USA. As the publisher mentions, the “historical nature of the classic text” means there is a lot of outdated and potentially offensive language. And, while it does make for an uncomfortable experience, I found it particularly difficult to read some of the Antebellum South slang: “Come ole man, yeh got mautch? light sum dem shavens dah, quick. Ah cah fine de chile heah on dis bed!” said Mammy Judy, on entering the hut and feeling about in the dark for little Joe. “Ailcey, wat yeh done wid de chile?” Which, to a 21st Century Englishman, makes for a perplexing read! Perhaps the most interesting historical sci-fi in the collection is 1904’s “Light Ahead for the Negro” by Edward A. Johnson – the first African-American member of the New York state legislature. The story is a thinly veiled political manifesto for how to bring about a socialist utopia in the USA, as told by a time-traveller to the distant year of 2006. Some of its predictions are amazing, and some are just depressing – often within the same paragraph: His private secretary came in and seated himself at a phonographic typewriter which took down the words in shorthand, typewrote them on a sheet for preservation in the office, and at the same time sent the letter by telephone to its destination. But my surprise was awakened by the fact that this private secretary was a Negro; not full black, but mixed blood – in color, between an Indian and a Chinaman. I ascertained from this young man that it was now “quite common” for Southern white men of large affairs to employ Negroes for higher positions in their offices, counting rooms, and stores. (They had a precedent for this in the custom of the Romans, who used their educated Greek slaves in this way.) He also told me that the matter of social equality was not mentioned. He naturally associated with his own people. He simply wanted to do his work faithfully, and neither expected nor asked to sit by his employer’s fireside. In a word, he showed that to give the Negro an education need not necessarily “turn his head.” The human mind can conceive of wondrous inventions – but is limited in social revolutions by its native paradigm. The modern stories were much more my speed. An excellent mix of adventure and excitement. Some of them are in the creepy-Lovecraftian style, others are terrifying glimpses into the future. A great collection to dip in and out of.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    A mostly solid collection of short stories. There's a nice mix, and you're likely to find a new author to follow along the way. Many sci-fi anthology fans are likely to enjoy this one. Thanks very much for the ARC for review!! A mostly solid collection of short stories. There's a nice mix, and you're likely to find a new author to follow along the way. Many sci-fi anthology fans are likely to enjoy this one. Thanks very much for the ARC for review!!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Hammel

    Overall, this collection is a must read for any science fiction lover looking to educate themselves on the history of the genre and diversify their reading. The science fiction label within the collection is all encompassing and broad, including alternate history stories and stories that have just a *dash* of sci fi. Personally, I didn't mind at all, but it's something to note going in. The foreword by Temi Oh was EXCELLENT. "Our job as science-fiction writers is to keep eyes trained on the future. Overall, this collection is a must read for any science fiction lover looking to educate themselves on the history of the genre and diversify their reading. The science fiction label within the collection is all encompassing and broad, including alternate history stories and stories that have just a *dash* of sci fi. Personally, I didn't mind at all, but it's something to note going in. The foreword by Temi Oh was EXCELLENT. "Our job as science-fiction writers is to keep eyes trained on the future. To shout like prophets, to return with solemn cautions or glad tidings. To fill everyone's hearts with hope. It's not always easy to conceive of the future." (Foreword by Temi Oh) The introduction is highly informative. There are a few longer stories within the collection that are historical and were a bit challenging for me. It's hard to analyze and get through as an individual reader - but would be very interesting in a classroom. I definitely understand why these stories were included and agree that they belong in the collection, but casual readers be warned. Nonetheless, there are TONS of short stories in this collection that are perfect for the casual reader. My favorite stories included: An Empty, Hollow Interview by James Beamon The Comet by W.E.B. Du Bois Élan Vital by K. Tempest Bradford The Orb by Tara Campbell The Line of Demarcation by Patty Nicole Johnson Almost Too Good to Be True by Temi Oh The Regression Test by Wole Talabi Thank you to Flame Tree Publishing and Netgalley for providing me with this eARC in exchange for an honest review.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tasmin Bradshaw

    A great collection of stories. Like most of these types of books. You have some short stories that stand out. And ones that really don't. But all in all this was a good collection. And fun to read. It's nice to get a chance to read some stories by some Authors I've never heard of. A great collection of stories. Like most of these types of books. You have some short stories that stand out. And ones that really don't. But all in all this was a good collection. And fun to read. It's nice to get a chance to read some stories by some Authors I've never heard of.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Angela Maher

    There are some really good stories in here, but this is not a book of short stories, as the title suggests. Four of the older tales are novel, or at least novella length, and as a result take up well over half of the book. The remainder are actual short stories, and nicely varied, although some I would have categorised as fantasy, or under the more broad definition of speculative fiction. I do enjoy anthologies that showcase stories from different eras, but the long, older stories in this just do There are some really good stories in here, but this is not a book of short stories, as the title suggests. Four of the older tales are novel, or at least novella length, and as a result take up well over half of the book. The remainder are actual short stories, and nicely varied, although some I would have categorised as fantasy, or under the more broad definition of speculative fiction. I do enjoy anthologies that showcase stories from different eras, but the long, older stories in this just don't fit. I'm not denying their importance in Black speculative fiction, but they're too long. They're also harder to read than the contemporary pieces, and at least some take a long time to get to any sci-fi or speculative content. Overall, fans of sci-fi and/or speculative fiction will find satisfying content within this book. There are some wonderfully original pieces. But, I feel a little cheated. It's just a tiny taste of what's out there. An anthology with this number of pages should have so many more short stories. Those stories are out there. To use four pieces way too long to be considered 'short' has denied a lot of stories a place in what should be an important doorway into Black sci-fi short fiction.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    This collection of short, sci-fi stories is a wonderful reminder (that shouldn't be needed in this day and age) of what we miss out on when we choose to ignore, undervalue, and/or dismiss part of humanity. I loved every single story and the talent of the authors in this collection cannot be denied. "Black Sci-Fi Short Stories" is a great celebration of the genre that shouldn't be missed by any serious fan. My thanks to the authors, publisher, and NetGalley. This review was written voluntarily an This collection of short, sci-fi stories is a wonderful reminder (that shouldn't be needed in this day and age) of what we miss out on when we choose to ignore, undervalue, and/or dismiss part of humanity. I loved every single story and the talent of the authors in this collection cannot be denied. "Black Sci-Fi Short Stories" is a great celebration of the genre that shouldn't be missed by any serious fan. My thanks to the authors, publisher, and NetGalley. This review was written voluntarily and is entirely my own, unbiased, opinion.

  17. 5 out of 5

    David

    Sci-Fi... maybe, but with most of the stories centered around slavery, ownership or oppression the sci-fi feel was missing. Of the shorts that did have a good concept in the wide realm of sci-fi, the endings didn't stick. Many, if not most, left me wondering what happened. Why did the story just stop without conclusion. I had hoped to find something great here. I love Sci-Fi and rarely pay attention to race, nationality or gender or the authors. I just want a good stories, regardless of who write Sci-Fi... maybe, but with most of the stories centered around slavery, ownership or oppression the sci-fi feel was missing. Of the shorts that did have a good concept in the wide realm of sci-fi, the endings didn't stick. Many, if not most, left me wondering what happened. Why did the story just stop without conclusion. I had hoped to find something great here. I love Sci-Fi and rarely pay attention to race, nationality or gender or the authors. I just want a good stories, regardless of who writes them.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This was a super interesting collection. I loved all the modern short stories. The classic short stories were longer, and more difficult to read, but I really enjoyed looking at the sci-fi of the past.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Eva

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Smith

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca | Velvet Opus

  22. 4 out of 5

    Preeya Ratnalikar

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Bradshaw

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

  25. 5 out of 5

    Eimer

  26. 4 out of 5

    Leili V.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

  28. 4 out of 5

    Laur (Define Bookish)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Bia

  30. 5 out of 5

    Phoenix

  31. 5 out of 5

    Su

  32. 4 out of 5

    Héctor Hernández

  33. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  34. 4 out of 5

    Guy

  35. 4 out of 5

    Alex Boatfield

  36. 5 out of 5

    Emily

  37. 5 out of 5

    deutschlek

  38. 4 out of 5

    Phoenix

  39. 5 out of 5

    Andrea

  40. 4 out of 5

    Shannon ✨

  41. 5 out of 5

    Sinahmarie (allthestoriestotell)

  42. 5 out of 5

    Salma19 (High Lady of the Dawn Court)

  43. 4 out of 5

    Ginger

  44. 5 out of 5

    Grace

  45. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Richardson

  46. 5 out of 5

    K2G

  47. 4 out of 5

    Nóra Ugron

  48. 4 out of 5

    Brandi Tyiska-Hawkins

  49. 4 out of 5

    Manuela Amiouny

  50. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

  51. 4 out of 5

    DanisBib

  52. 5 out of 5

    Jeanenne

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