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Doctor Who: Adventures in Lockdown

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Darkness Never Prevails. While staying home was a vital safety measure in 2020, the freedom of the TARDIS remained a dream that drew many - allowing them to roam the cosmos in search of distraction, reassurance and adventure. Now some of the finest TV Doctor Who writers come together with gifted illustrators in this very special short story collection in support of BBC Chil Darkness Never Prevails. While staying home was a vital safety measure in 2020, the freedom of the TARDIS remained a dream that drew many - allowing them to roam the cosmos in search of distraction, reassurance and adventure. Now some of the finest TV Doctor Who writers come together with gifted illustrators in this very special short story collection in support of BBC Children in Need. Current and former showrunners - Chris Chibnall Russell T Davies and Steven Moffat - present exciting adventures for the Doctor conceived in confinement, alongside brand new fiction from Neil Gaiman, Mark Gatiss and Vinay Patel. Also featuring work from Chris Riddell, Joy Wilkinson, Paul Cornell, Sonia Leong, Sophie Cowdrey, Mike Collins and many more, Adventures in Lockdown is a book for any Doctor Who fan in your life, stories that will send your heart spinning wildly through time and space... £2.25 from every copy sold in the UK of Doctor Who: Adventures in Lockdown will benefit Children in Need (registered charity number 802052 in England & Wales and SC039557 in Scotland)


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Darkness Never Prevails. While staying home was a vital safety measure in 2020, the freedom of the TARDIS remained a dream that drew many - allowing them to roam the cosmos in search of distraction, reassurance and adventure. Now some of the finest TV Doctor Who writers come together with gifted illustrators in this very special short story collection in support of BBC Chil Darkness Never Prevails. While staying home was a vital safety measure in 2020, the freedom of the TARDIS remained a dream that drew many - allowing them to roam the cosmos in search of distraction, reassurance and adventure. Now some of the finest TV Doctor Who writers come together with gifted illustrators in this very special short story collection in support of BBC Children in Need. Current and former showrunners - Chris Chibnall Russell T Davies and Steven Moffat - present exciting adventures for the Doctor conceived in confinement, alongside brand new fiction from Neil Gaiman, Mark Gatiss and Vinay Patel. Also featuring work from Chris Riddell, Joy Wilkinson, Paul Cornell, Sonia Leong, Sophie Cowdrey, Mike Collins and many more, Adventures in Lockdown is a book for any Doctor Who fan in your life, stories that will send your heart spinning wildly through time and space... £2.25 from every copy sold in the UK of Doctor Who: Adventures in Lockdown will benefit Children in Need (registered charity number 802052 in England & Wales and SC039557 in Scotland)

30 review for Doctor Who: Adventures in Lockdown

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    ”Remember, you will get through this. And things will be all right. Even if they look uncertain. Even if you’re worried. Darkness never prevails.” - The Doctor. An apt quote from our favourite Time Lord to sum up this year as a whole. The lockdowns have been tricky for so many of us, but we will be okay in the end and are (most importantly) keeping each other safe. This is a lovely collection of short Doctor Who stories accompanied by some great artwork. It features tales by the three NuWho showru ”Remember, you will get through this. And things will be all right. Even if they look uncertain. Even if you’re worried. Darkness never prevails.” - The Doctor. An apt quote from our favourite Time Lord to sum up this year as a whole. The lockdowns have been tricky for so many of us, but we will be okay in the end and are (most importantly) keeping each other safe. This is a lovely collection of short Doctor Who stories accompanied by some great artwork. It features tales by the three NuWho showrunners (Russell T Davis, Steven Moffat and Chris Chibnall) plus two of my favourite writers Neil Gaiman and Mark Gatiss - who have of course written for Who many times before. Gaiman’s story about the Corsair alone is what made me rate this collection 4 stars overall. Moffat’s story ”The Tales Of The Umpty Ums” was another highlight for me, as the twist in the tale slowly unravels and it ends so completely differently to what you first would imagine. Russell T Davis’ ”Doctor Who and The Time War” was published on the DW website earlier this year but it was great to read again. It’s nice to see what Davis’ ideas for the end of the Time War are, as it was supposed to be part of the 50th anniversary before he knew Moffat had a plan regarding the Eight Doctor and regeneration (the War Doctor!!). It is followed up by his sequel to his first episode of Who - ”Rose” which I believe had also been published online earlier in the year. It makes me nostalgic for his era, as that’s when I first became a fan of the show properly as a child (was always aware of Classic Who from my parents). This is an incredibly quick read, but well worth it, especially as some of the proceeds go towards the BBC’s Children In Need charity.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ken

    I'm not really sure how to rate this collection of stories that were created during the first U.K. lockdown. On the one hand it's great that all the contributions have been pulled together in one volume, as all the tales were written for the fans to enjoy for free they're all relatively short and sweet. The tweetalongs were a really nice touch and added a real sense of community to help fans to connect during the spring shutdown. Many of the stories selected had these accompanying prologues and add I'm not really sure how to rate this collection of stories that were created during the first U.K. lockdown. On the one hand it's great that all the contributions have been pulled together in one volume, as all the tales were written for the fans to enjoy for free they're all relatively short and sweet. The tweetalongs were a really nice touch and added a real sense of community to help fans to connect during the spring shutdown. Many of the stories selected had these accompanying prologues and additional scenes simultaneously released. Reading them in isolation doesn't quite have the same impact. I'm glad that a portion of the sales will go to Children in Need, whilst this could serve as a nice reminded of something positive to come out of 2020.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Bill Lynas

    Considering the wealth of talent from the world of Doctor Who I expected these short stories to be much better. There are a few good ones, but a lot of them are mediocre at best. At least sales of the book helped raise money for the BBC Children In Need appeal, so it wasn't a total loss. Considering the wealth of talent from the world of Doctor Who I expected these short stories to be much better. There are a few good ones, but a lot of them are mediocre at best. At least sales of the book helped raise money for the BBC Children In Need appeal, so it wasn't a total loss.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kandice

    Wonderful! Not only did I get more tales of my beloved Doctor, but the proceeds go to charity, so it's a win-win. Most of these tales were of Jodi's Doctor, Thirteen, and she was written in a lovely way, by each author that wrote one of her stories. She is kind and feeling and that was made abundantly clear on the page. But there were also appearance from Eccleston's Nine, Smith's Eleven and Tennant's Ten. There was even a mention of a ginger Doctor! Whoo hoo! My secret (not anymore) is that Rupe Wonderful! Not only did I get more tales of my beloved Doctor, but the proceeds go to charity, so it's a win-win. Most of these tales were of Jodi's Doctor, Thirteen, and she was written in a lovely way, by each author that wrote one of her stories. She is kind and feeling and that was made abundantly clear on the page. But there were also appearance from Eccleston's Nine, Smith's Eleven and Tennant's Ten. There was even a mention of a ginger Doctor! Whoo hoo! My secret (not anymore) is that Rupert Grint will be the ginger Doctor. One can hope...

  5. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Page

    A mixed bag of stories, all quite short but if you want a short story collection that you can dip in and out of this is really quite good. The tales by Steven Moffat, Neil Gaiman and Russell T Davies are the best for me and full of imagination and a sense of fun. This is for charity too so it’s worth picking up just don’t expect it to take you long to finish.

  6. 5 out of 5

    The Post Monument

    A Message from the Doctor - 4 stars Things She Thought While Falling - 3 stars The Terror of the Umpty Ums - 4 stars Doctor Who and The Time War - 3.5 stars Revenge of the Nestene - 3 stars Rory’s Story - 3.5 stars One Virtue, and a Thousand Crimes - 3.5 stars The Simple Things - 3 stars The Tourist - 3 stars Press Play - 4 stars The Shadow Passes - 3 stars Shadow of a Doubt - 2.5 stars Shadow in the Mirror - 4 stars Fellow Traveller - 4.5 stars Listen - 3.5 stars The Secret of Novice Hame - 4.5 stars Overall - A Message from the Doctor - 4 stars Things She Thought While Falling - 3 stars The Terror of the Umpty Ums - 4 stars Doctor Who and The Time War - 3.5 stars Revenge of the Nestene - 3 stars Rory’s Story - 3.5 stars One Virtue, and a Thousand Crimes - 3.5 stars The Simple Things - 3 stars The Tourist - 3 stars Press Play - 4 stars The Shadow Passes - 3 stars Shadow of a Doubt - 2.5 stars Shadow in the Mirror - 4 stars Fellow Traveller - 4.5 stars Listen - 3.5 stars The Secret of Novice Hame - 4.5 stars Overall - 3.5 stars

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jo Anderson

    Adventures in Lockdown is a collection of short Doctor Who stories, most of which originated online earlier this year as parts of lockdown projects, hence the name. The stories are all highly enjoyable in my opinion and there are some really imaginative ideas in there, with Steven Moffat's 'The Terror of the Umpty Ums' and Neil Gaiman's 'One Virtue, and a Thousand Crimes' (the latter is one of three new stories written for this book) being particular highlights. Arguably the biggest flaw with th Adventures in Lockdown is a collection of short Doctor Who stories, most of which originated online earlier this year as parts of lockdown projects, hence the name. The stories are all highly enjoyable in my opinion and there are some really imaginative ideas in there, with Steven Moffat's 'The Terror of the Umpty Ums' and Neil Gaiman's 'One Virtue, and a Thousand Crimes' (the latter is one of three new stories written for this book) being particular highlights. Arguably the biggest flaw with this book is something that many people (myself included, to be honest) will see as a positive, which is that a lot of the stories lean quite heavily on fairly obscure continuity references, to the extent that I can imagine most children who read this book will be baffled by much of it. Some of these references are subtle, but other stories are direct follow-ups to specific TV episodes from years ago (decades ago, in one case). There's even an appearance from Bernice Summerfield in Paul Cornell's very short 'Shadow of a Doubt' - not that you'd know it if you haven't seen the YouTube video in which that story first appeared, because it's written in first-person without any obvious clues as to who the narrator is. Also, 'Rory's Story' by Neil Gaiman is presented in the form of the script, complete with notes addressed to Arthur Darvill, that was used when filming the YouTube version of it, but this is barely explained in the book, so this choice of format might be quite confusing to anyone who's not aware of the YouTube video. Casual viewers might prefer to read one of the full-length Doctor Who novels, then, which tend to be more approachable than this anthology. But if you know your Strax from your Drax, chances are you'll love Adventures in Lockdown. Yes, it's very short and most of the stories are available online for free, but the three new stories and the new illustrations are great, and some of the proceeds go to Children in Need, so it's well worth the price if you ask me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mikey

    So far when I’ve read an anthology I like to do a kind of short general review and then look at each story individually, but in this instance I’ll just do the first - partly because I didn’t take any notes this time round because I’d read the majority when it was initially posted online. But, aye, 2020’s been a weird one, but all things considered it’s been pretty good on the Doctor Who front, as Chris Chibnall decided that we needed the Doctor more than ever, and Emily Cook’s watchalongs regular So far when I’ve read an anthology I like to do a kind of short general review and then look at each story individually, but in this instance I’ll just do the first - partly because I didn’t take any notes this time round because I’d read the majority when it was initially posted online. But, aye, 2020’s been a weird one, but all things considered it’s been pretty good on the Doctor Who front, as Chris Chibnall decided that we needed the Doctor more than ever, and Emily Cook’s watchalongs regularly brought a large group of Who fans together to watch and discuss a bunch of old favourites, with some of the cast and crew joined in on the experience too, including many of the writers who contributed new stories that have found themselves gathered here. Along with these are stories originally published on the BBC website thanks to Chibnall reaching out to Who writers old and new, and also a few stories completely original to this book’s release. All in all, this book is a great mix of characters and themes, with a hopeful opening message from the Thirteenth Doctor to kick things off. It’s a lovely wee collection, and it’s been for a good cause! My only disappointment is Farewell, Sarah Jane not appearing here in some form but I’d have to imagine it’s probably a minefield as far as the rights are concerned. But that’s not enough of an issue for me to warrant scoring this any less!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    Had to order this book shipped from the UK as it wasn't available in Canada, but fortunately Waterstones was able to ship internationally. It's a very short collection, theoretically of 16 short stories but some can't really be called that - a two page introduction, or a poem, for example. Authors include three New Who showrunners (Russell T Davis, Steven Moffat and Chris Chibnall) as well as Who episode writers Neil Gaiman and Mark Gatiss. They're all written with the 13th doctor (Jodie Whittak Had to order this book shipped from the UK as it wasn't available in Canada, but fortunately Waterstones was able to ship internationally. It's a very short collection, theoretically of 16 short stories but some can't really be called that - a two page introduction, or a poem, for example. Authors include three New Who showrunners (Russell T Davis, Steven Moffat and Chris Chibnall) as well as Who episode writers Neil Gaiman and Mark Gatiss. They're all written with the 13th doctor (Jodie Whittaker) as the Doctor and generally do a pretty good job of getting her "voice" right, however they're wildly varied in their apparent target audience. Some seem to be aimed at very young fans who probably don't even remember another Doctor; while others seem to reference such obscure points of classic Who lore that even someone who grew up watching Tom Baker in the 80s didn't catch all the references. Some are good (is Neil Gaiman ever NOT good?) and some are fairly meh. They're also accompanied by a series of generally charming illustrations. Proceeds from the book go to support the Children In Need charity so I don't begrudge spending the money, but overall I'm a little disappointed there wasn't more to the book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nikos Dunno

    I would have given it a lower score had the subject matter been different or if it didn't include a couple of stories from favourite writers. I have to admit though that most of the stories left me feeling a bit uninterested. It seemed as if they were written around a not so exciting plot twist or in a way where the Doctor is a hidden character and not the actual protagonist. I would have preferred something more straight forward. I would have given it a lower score had the subject matter been different or if it didn't include a couple of stories from favourite writers. I have to admit though that most of the stories left me feeling a bit uninterested. It seemed as if they were written around a not so exciting plot twist or in a way where the Doctor is a hidden character and not the actual protagonist. I would have preferred something more straight forward.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Kresal

    Collecting many of the stories written for the Doctor Who website and the Lockdown tweet-along, Adventures in Lockdown is fun and a brisk little anthology of Doctor Who fiction. There's an alternative end to the Time War from Russell T Davies, Neil Gaiman sharing an adventure for the roguish Corsair, Paul Cornell having Team TARDIS sheltering in place, and Steven Moffat's tale of a young boy and The Terror Of The Umpty Ums. There's also some new fiction, such as a poignant little tale from Mark Collecting many of the stories written for the Doctor Who website and the Lockdown tweet-along, Adventures in Lockdown is fun and a brisk little anthology of Doctor Who fiction. There's an alternative end to the Time War from Russell T Davies, Neil Gaiman sharing an adventure for the roguish Corsair, Paul Cornell having Team TARDIS sheltering in place, and Steven Moffat's tale of a young boy and The Terror Of The Umpty Ums. There's also some new fiction, such as a poignant little tale from Mark Gatiss featuring a reunion long sought by Doctor Who fans and some lovely artwork from a variety of illustrators. While some of the stories, such as Paul Cornell's pieces written for the Human Nature/Family of Blood tweet-along, lose something of their impact out of context, it's a fun slice of Whovian prose, and with proceeds going towards a good cause, well worth a fiver (or thereabouts).

  12. 5 out of 5

    PP9000

    This is a very enjoyable quick read. The authors really captured the voice & mannerisms of the 13th Doctor. Some of these stories are already available online but it's nice to have them in print form & this book is for charity so please go & buy it if you can! This is a very enjoyable quick read. The authors really captured the voice & mannerisms of the 13th Doctor. Some of these stories are already available online but it's nice to have them in print form & this book is for charity so please go & buy it if you can!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Book collector

    Well this is a blessed relief in these lockdown days. This short story collection runs to 182 pages and features some brilliant artwork. There are 16 stories some of which first appeared as part of various projects during the first lockdown. I saw some of those on the official BBC doctor who website but due to migraines I don't like reading off screens for long periods so I'd hoped we'd get a collection and here it is. The first story is essentially the script of Jodie's lockdown message release Well this is a blessed relief in these lockdown days. This short story collection runs to 182 pages and features some brilliant artwork. There are 16 stories some of which first appeared as part of various projects during the first lockdown. I saw some of those on the official BBC doctor who website but due to migraines I don't like reading off screens for long periods so I'd hoped we'd get a collection and here it is. The first story is essentially the script of Jodie's lockdown message released shortly after the March lockdown began in the UK. The stories that follow are quick, generally well written and a lot of fun. Special mention to Chris chibnall's woman who fell to earth prequel, Russell t. Davies abandoned time war short story and to mark gatiss' story. The rest were good as well. Released in aid of children in need this is a fun read and all in a good cause. A great book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    For the most part, those Pollyannas trying to find any positives in the utter awfulness of the Event drive me potty. But aside from Staged, my one concession is that it did 2020's Doctor Who output a world of good. After another woeful Chibnall season, fan Emily Cook's organising a series of watchalongs of older stories spurred the writers of those to contribute various sidebars, deleted scenes and epilogues, some of which were then acted out by the relevant returning cast members, and all of wh For the most part, those Pollyannas trying to find any positives in the utter awfulness of the Event drive me potty. But aside from Staged, my one concession is that it did 2020's Doctor Who output a world of good. After another woeful Chibnall season, fan Emily Cook's organising a series of watchalongs of older stories spurred the writers of those to contribute various sidebars, deleted scenes and epilogues, some of which were then acted out by the relevant returning cast members, and all of which went some way to getting the taste of The Timeless Child out of one's mouth. This volume collects those pieces, together with three new ones, of which the highlight is undoubtedly Neil Gaiman (with Chris Riddell art!) showing us a little more of the Corsair. Does it add a further complication to a part of the Doctor's backstory which was already quite busy? Yeah, but it's worth it. Plus, all those lovely pieces from Davies, Moffat, Cornell and more, reminding us of what now seem very distant times when watching Doctor Who could be funny, moving, inspiring, instead of a leaden obligation. Because this is, more than ever, a fallen world, Chibnall is of course here too, not least with the Doctor's opening message: "Remember, you will get through this. And things will be all right. Even if they look uncertain. Even if you’re worried. Darkness never prevails.” Which is deeply debatable even in Whoniverse terms, let alone regarding our own far darker world – though in one of my favourite of the reprinted pieces here, The Terror Of The Umpty Ums, Moffat once again pulls his wonderful trick of erasing the border between the two just enough to let some hope seep through. Pete McTighe manages something similar in Press Play, reminding us that however bad the world (and indeed, the current show) may be, at least we always have the old episodes. Well, most of them, and bless him, he even works that in. The volume concludes with Rusty's heartbreaking revisit to Novice Hame... And then just to spoil it all, they whack a drawing of a CyberTimeLord at the end.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Adam Chamberlain

    "We're all stories in the end. But do you know what a story is? It's an idea. And do you know what an idea is? It's a thought so big and so clever it can outlive you. It can fly out of your head, and into other people's. Like I'm in your head, right now. Keeping you right. Never cruel, never cowardly. Always the Doctor." A short story anthology of varying quality. At its best, it contains some engaging tales that focus on resilience against adversity and solace in difficult times. It's the contri "We're all stories in the end. But do you know what a story is? It's an idea. And do you know what an idea is? It's a thought so big and so clever it can outlive you. It can fly out of your head, and into other people's. Like I'm in your head, right now. Keeping you right. Never cruel, never cowardly. Always the Doctor." A short story anthology of varying quality. At its best, it contains some engaging tales that focus on resilience against adversity and solace in difficult times. It's the contributions from Russell T. Davies, Steven Moffat, Neil Gaiman, and Mark Gatiss that make this a worthwhile, meaningful volume.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tiina

    This was a beautiful collection. Alone, most of these stories weren't much, but in their context, they gave us courage to face the year 2020 with its lockdowns and quarantines. Here are some comforting words: "Listen to the science. And listen to the doctors, right? They've got your back. Stay strong, stay positive." "For now, she was happily distracted with the gift that Susan had left behind: and endless supply of stories; a comfort blanket of fond memories and old friends. And a reminder. That This was a beautiful collection. Alone, most of these stories weren't much, but in their context, they gave us courage to face the year 2020 with its lockdowns and quarantines. Here are some comforting words: "Listen to the science. And listen to the doctors, right? They've got your back. Stay strong, stay positive." "For now, she was happily distracted with the gift that Susan had left behind: and endless supply of stories; a comfort blanket of fond memories and old friends. And a reminder. That she was never ever alone." "In the midst of death", she said, so gently that only Yaz could hear it, "we are in life. Together."

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rob Frampton

    There's often a touch of melancholy to The Doctor, and that's reflected in many of these stories of endings and completions. There's humour here, too, as the last of the Autons takes on a new form, and even a silly story for Hammers fans, but any book called 'Adventures in Lockdown' is inevitably going to have a degree of seriousness to it. Best of all, though, this slim collection benefits Children in Need, so you should buy it for that alone. There's often a touch of melancholy to The Doctor, and that's reflected in many of these stories of endings and completions. There's humour here, too, as the last of the Autons takes on a new form, and even a silly story for Hammers fans, but any book called 'Adventures in Lockdown' is inevitably going to have a degree of seriousness to it. Best of all, though, this slim collection benefits Children in Need, so you should buy it for that alone.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    I bought it mostly because of the charity aspect, since half of these stories had been made available online at the start of the lockdown. The collection is a mixed bag, as it usually is with this sort of collection, but I particularly appreciated Gaiman's Corsair story and Gatiss' Fellow Traveller. I bought it mostly because of the charity aspect, since half of these stories had been made available online at the start of the lockdown. The collection is a mixed bag, as it usually is with this sort of collection, but I particularly appreciated Gaiman's Corsair story and Gatiss' Fellow Traveller.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Peter Archie Guthrie

    Very good book As a huge fan of doctor who I really enjoyed this book. Especially the last story about novice hame the cat bun from new earth and gridlock. Lots of connections to new and old who. Found it humorous that Boris Johnson could be an auton. Not named but implied of course. I read it in one sitting i am pleased too see money going to children in need.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Daisy Robyn

    "In the midst of death" she said, so gently that only Yaz could hear it, "we are in life together". A lovely little collection of stories from the Whoniverse. It was very entertaining and I love all the different authors inputs, ideas and snapshits that really add to the already loved characters. "In the midst of death" she said, so gently that only Yaz could hear it, "we are in life together". A lovely little collection of stories from the Whoniverse. It was very entertaining and I love all the different authors inputs, ideas and snapshits that really add to the already loved characters.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I loved Jodie Whittaker's reassuring lockdown speech as the Thirteenth Doctor. Was it aimed at kids? Obviously. Did it make me feel better too? I'm not ashamed to say it did. The script for that speech is included in this little collection, which also features short stories and snippets from other Doctor Who-related writers. It's a Children in Need endeavor too and I had a lot of fun reading it. I loved Jodie Whittaker's reassuring lockdown speech as the Thirteenth Doctor. Was it aimed at kids? Obviously. Did it make me feel better too? I'm not ashamed to say it did. The script for that speech is included in this little collection, which also features short stories and snippets from other Doctor Who-related writers. It's a Children in Need endeavor too and I had a lot of fun reading it.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lauren Williams

    The perfect pick-me-up read for Doctor Who fans of all ages; just what we need in these times. I think we all must remember the Doctor's wise words: 'These are the dark times. But they don't sustain. Darkness never sustains even though sometimes it feels like it might.' The perfect pick-me-up read for Doctor Who fans of all ages; just what we need in these times. I think we all must remember the Doctor's wise words: 'These are the dark times. But they don't sustain. Darkness never sustains even though sometimes it feels like it might.'

  23. 5 out of 5

    Neil Fulwood

    Giving every evidence of being hastily cobbled together, this anthology is fun but uneven. Some of the stories are clearly aimed at the Doctor’s younger fans, while others are oblique or abstract, relying on a lifetime’s immersion in Whovian lore on the reader’s part.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Bill Boswell

    A mixed bag of Doctor Who short stories but an enjoyable read whilst waiting for the Christmas special Plus buying the book helps Children in Need

  25. 4 out of 5

    Keef

    A good compilation of both released and unreleased lockdown stories, and it's for charity, so that's a winner. A good compilation of both released and unreleased lockdown stories, and it's for charity, so that's a winner.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    A great way to spend an afternoon, some uplifting stories of hope and triumph. Some odd snippets of scripts and poetry. But, it is what it is, a way of giving young whovians hope.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Harry Gorman

    I didn't think much of this collection beside some decent contributions by Vinay Patel, Mark Gatiss and, in particular, Paul Cornell. I didn't think much of this collection beside some decent contributions by Vinay Patel, Mark Gatiss and, in particular, Paul Cornell.

  28. 4 out of 5

    James Hynes

    Getting 4 stars for Cornell's beautiful trilogy of short stories Getting 4 stars for Cornell's beautiful trilogy of short stories

  29. 5 out of 5

    PRL

    It's a book of Doctor Who related short stories. What's not to love? It's a book of Doctor Who related short stories. What's not to love?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Evan

    Just a peaceful and lovely bunch of short stories that helped me feel a bit of calm in these troubled earthly times. Something simple in the midst of a complicated era. Lovely.

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