Hot Best Seller

Stone Fruit

Availability: Ready to download

Bron and Ray are a queer couple who enjoy their role as the fun weirdo aunties to Ray’s niece, six-year-old Nessie. Their playdates are little oases of wildness, joy, and ease in all three of their lives, which ping-pong between familial tensions and deep-seated personal stumbling blocks. As their emotional intimacy erodes, Ray and Bron isolate from each other and attempt Bron and Ray are a queer couple who enjoy their role as the fun weirdo aunties to Ray’s niece, six-year-old Nessie. Their playdates are little oases of wildness, joy, and ease in all three of their lives, which ping-pong between familial tensions and deep-seated personal stumbling blocks. As their emotional intimacy erodes, Ray and Bron isolate from each other and attempt to repair their broken family ties — Ray with her overworked, resentful single-mother sister and Bron with her religious teenage sister who doesn’t fully grasp the complexities of gender identity. Taking a leap of faith, each opens up and learns they have more in common with their siblings than they ever knew. At turns joyful and heartbreaking, Stone Fruit reveals through intimately naturalistic dialog and blue-hued watercolor how painful it can be to truly become vulnerable to your loved ones — and how fulfilling it is to be finally understood for who you are. Lee Lai is one of the most exciting new voices to break into the comics medium and she has created one of the truly sophisticated graphic novel debuts in recent memory.


Compare

Bron and Ray are a queer couple who enjoy their role as the fun weirdo aunties to Ray’s niece, six-year-old Nessie. Their playdates are little oases of wildness, joy, and ease in all three of their lives, which ping-pong between familial tensions and deep-seated personal stumbling blocks. As their emotional intimacy erodes, Ray and Bron isolate from each other and attempt Bron and Ray are a queer couple who enjoy their role as the fun weirdo aunties to Ray’s niece, six-year-old Nessie. Their playdates are little oases of wildness, joy, and ease in all three of their lives, which ping-pong between familial tensions and deep-seated personal stumbling blocks. As their emotional intimacy erodes, Ray and Bron isolate from each other and attempt to repair their broken family ties — Ray with her overworked, resentful single-mother sister and Bron with her religious teenage sister who doesn’t fully grasp the complexities of gender identity. Taking a leap of faith, each opens up and learns they have more in common with their siblings than they ever knew. At turns joyful and heartbreaking, Stone Fruit reveals through intimately naturalistic dialog and blue-hued watercolor how painful it can be to truly become vulnerable to your loved ones — and how fulfilling it is to be finally understood for who you are. Lee Lai is one of the most exciting new voices to break into the comics medium and she has created one of the truly sophisticated graphic novel debuts in recent memory.

30 review for Stone Fruit

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nenia ✨ I yeet my books back and forth ✨ Campbell

    Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest This is a very strange graphic novel and I didn't really like the art style but it fit the story, which made it easier to appreciate once I started to get a better sense of the characters. I think the best comparison that I can really think of is the TV show, Bojack Horseman. STONE FRUIT is a book about messy (and sometimes toxic) relationships and mental health and LGBT+ issues and family and parenting and all of this other stuff, only Instagram || Twitter || Facebook || Amazon || Pinterest This is a very strange graphic novel and I didn't really like the art style but it fit the story, which made it easier to appreciate once I started to get a better sense of the characters. I think the best comparison that I can really think of is the TV show, Bojack Horseman. STONE FRUIT is a book about messy (and sometimes toxic) relationships and mental health and LGBT+ issues and family and parenting and all of this other stuff, only there's no gloss here. When Rachel and Bron are playing with Rachel's niece, the author chose to draw them as, like, spirit-like monsters to capture the feral nature of child's play. This serves as an interesting juxtaposition to the more grounded adult storylines, such as Bron going back to reconnect with her Christian family members that she left after coming out as trans, or Rachel trying to build her relationship with her single mother sister who is stressed and worried that all of her issues are keeping her from being a good/fun parent. This isn't the happiest story in the world, but it isn't sad, either. It just feels like a serious slice-of-life drama about figuring out your life as an adult and trying to salvage you can from relationships that aren't perfect. Thanks to the publisher for sending me a copy in exchange for an honest review! 3.5 stars

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    One of my favorite of the year, that so far, as 6/12/21, includes this shortlist: The Secret to Superhuman Strength, Alison Bechdel Friend of the Devil, Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips The Begging Chart, Keiler Roberts Fictional Father, Joe Ollman Stone Fruit, Lee Lai A first graphic novel about a queer couple, Bron and Ray, who are the aunties of Ray's niece Nessie. Not much in the way of "plot" really happens in this long form work: Bron, who may be trans--in that there is a reference to to this by Ra One of my favorite of the year, that so far, as 6/12/21, includes this shortlist: The Secret to Superhuman Strength, Alison Bechdel Friend of the Devil, Ed Brubaker and Sean Phillips The Begging Chart, Keiler Roberts Fictional Father, Joe Ollman Stone Fruit, Lee Lai A first graphic novel about a queer couple, Bron and Ray, who are the aunties of Ray's niece Nessie. Not much in the way of "plot" really happens in this long form work: Bron, who may be trans--in that there is a reference to to this by Ray--is confused about who/what she is; she loves her family, or at least some of her past with them, but her conservative parents are unrelenting, and religious. She leaves Ray and goes home to see if this might again be where she best fits, but her parents have their lives and they can't comprehend what/who Bron is. She aligns herself with her younger sister Grace, and goes to youth group at church with her, but somehow, nothing seems quite right. Except with joyful, free Nessie, who just is as she is, which may be the way Bron was when she was her age. The sparkplug in the story is Nessie, a kid--imaginative, playful, and surprisingly insightful about all the angst and sadness swirling around her. When Bron is gone Ray reconnects a bit with her (own) sister, but Ray also learns to kinda let go with Nessie, be in that joyful space a bit. All these folks are private people who can't easily articulate what they feel or need, but the wonder here is Lee Lai's capturing of subtle expression with her pen, mostly black and white, with some gouache backgrounds. And then periodically when Ray and Bron are with magical Nessie, they turn into creatures. No explanation, just magic, imagination, magical realism, beyond language. I might say it is comics for those new to comics who really are most comfortable with literary fiction, but you can't do what Lai does except in comics. It most reminds me in this reliance on images of Jillian and Mariko Tamaki's This One Summer where so little seems to happen on the surface but then so so much happens if you slow down and just take your time with each and every panel. Breathe when you read comics like this. Comics as meditation! The line work is subtly expressive, and there's so much restraint, reminding me also in different ways of the careful work of Craig Thompson (Blankets, especially, but also touches of fantasy in Goodbye, Chunky Rice). In the acknowledgments she mentions Tommi Parrish, but I also thought of the work of Isabel Greenburg who works hard in her work also on women and relationships, though grounded more in mythology. But some of the drawing reminded me of Greenburg, too. Stone Fruit is for the most part straight up realism, taking a close look at women in relationships, how hard it can be to understand each other and ourselves. I (think I) have never read Leslie Fineburg's groundbreaking lesbian/trans Stone Butch Blues, but from what I know about it, Stone Fruit seems to be very much in conversation with it. This is, again, one of the best graphic novels of the year, with real anguish and love and joy in it. Do yourself a favor and read it, savoring it.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    A slow-burn, lives-of-quiet-desperation relationship drama that starts with Ray and Bron literally running like wolves in the wild while babysitting Ray's niece, but then metaphorically stepping into the trap of unresolved family baggage and finding themselves gnawing their legs off to be free. Melancholy and painful, but enthralling all the same. A slow-burn, lives-of-quiet-desperation relationship drama that starts with Ray and Bron literally running like wolves in the wild while babysitting Ray's niece, but then metaphorically stepping into the trap of unresolved family baggage and finding themselves gnawing their legs off to be free. Melancholy and painful, but enthralling all the same.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sunny

    Taylor Swift songs: seven, right where you left me, ivy

  5. 5 out of 5

    Danika at The Lesbrary

    The strength of this graphic novel was the same reason I had trouble getting into it: it’s painfully relatable. It’s about the messiness of everyday queerness. Ray and Bron tried to build an ideal life together, but they couldn’t outrun the underlying issues of living in a transphobic heterosexist world, especially when they formed the foundation of your early life. There are no easy answers, just humans tentatively reaching out to each other, finding both hurt and comfort. (In case you missed it The strength of this graphic novel was the same reason I had trouble getting into it: it’s painfully relatable. It’s about the messiness of everyday queerness. Ray and Bron tried to build an ideal life together, but they couldn’t outrun the underlying issues of living in a transphobic heterosexist world, especially when they formed the foundation of your early life. There are no easy answers, just humans tentatively reaching out to each other, finding both hurt and comfort. (In case you missed it: this has a trans main character! It's still so rare to find books with queer trans women main characters.)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jaclyn Hillis

    Stone Fruit by Lee Lai is a story about Ray and Bron, a queer couple, and their niece Nessie. They go on magical adventures together twice a week. Ray has a complicated relationship with her sister Amanda who doesn’t really take to Bron being around Nessie. At first, Ray seems to only put up with her sister because she wants to be a part of Nessie’s life, and so does Bron. Bron hasn’t talked to her family in over five years because they can’t seem to accept her for who she is. They are the type Stone Fruit by Lee Lai is a story about Ray and Bron, a queer couple, and their niece Nessie. They go on magical adventures together twice a week. Ray has a complicated relationship with her sister Amanda who doesn’t really take to Bron being around Nessie. At first, Ray seems to only put up with her sister because she wants to be a part of Nessie’s life, and so does Bron. Bron hasn’t talked to her family in over five years because they can’t seem to accept her for who she is. They are the type of family that thinks Bron’s “problem” can be fixed by group therapy and going to church. Bron is trans and the first thing she needs is acceptance. There is a lot left unspoken about how these frayed relationships are affecting their mental health and their own relationship. Ray wants to make Bron feel better, but she know she can’t and it’s just something Bron needs to figure out on her own time. It was a beautiful and messy and complicated story. My favorite character was Nessie — so adventurous, pure, accepting, and wholesome — at only six years old. I can only hope my niece is like her. CW: transphobia, mental illness

  7. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    I really appreciated Stone Fruit's depth - I relate to both Ray and Bron, and this was a nuanced portrayal of a queer relationship. Nessie was also so cute - all of the supporting characters were interesting, even at the points when you hated them. I really appreciated Stone Fruit's depth - I relate to both Ray and Bron, and this was a nuanced portrayal of a queer relationship. Nessie was also so cute - all of the supporting characters were interesting, even at the points when you hated them.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Bailey Ashbaker

    This book is for the sad gays who love found family tropes. The illustrations are beautiful as well.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Laura Sackton

    Read my full review of this book in my newsletter: https://booksandbakes.substack.com/p/... I reread this a few months after reading it for the first time (for a review) and wow, it was even better the second time around. This graphic novel is absolutely stunning--visually, thematically, emotionally. It's a beautiful story about family, sisterhood, parenting, queerness. It's quiet, sad, and ordinary in a way that really got into my heart. As in, Lai captures the cadences of ordinary queer life in Read my full review of this book in my newsletter: https://booksandbakes.substack.com/p/... I reread this a few months after reading it for the first time (for a review) and wow, it was even better the second time around. This graphic novel is absolutely stunning--visually, thematically, emotionally. It's a beautiful story about family, sisterhood, parenting, queerness. It's quiet, sad, and ordinary in a way that really got into my heart. As in, Lai captures the cadences of ordinary queer life in a really lovely way. But the art is what took my breath away. I just wanted to stare at it forever. There's so much going on in every panel, but it's...subtle. There's a way the art flows with the story that's just magical. One thing I love about graphic novels is how they can say things that words can't, necessarily. And this book is a brilliant example of that. I love books about queer found family but I really loved the way this engages with family of origin, and the blurry lines between found family and the family you're born into. It's a messy story about messy relationships, and it felt...expansive. One of those books that, when it's over, it feels like the story has just opened the door for a hundred more stories. Big recommend.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Bogart

    Absolutely one of the most beautiful, painful, heartfelt graphic novels I've read in years. Absolutely one of the most beautiful, painful, heartfelt graphic novels I've read in years.

  11. 4 out of 5

    rachel ~ trans rights are human rights

    oof. this one is sad. sad and real and hopeful. the art is absolutely gorgeous, and i love the scenes in the park. the characters are excellent and feel real, fully dimensional humans. highly recommend this one!!

  12. 4 out of 5

    LuccaCeleste

    3.5 This was hitting a little too close to home for me! What I loved about this book: Trans main character Interesting art style Queer story What I didn’t really like: Boring Did not really end in a way, which some books can pull off, but this book couldn’t Overall, I did enjoy this, but I wouldn’t read it again, and I probably would not recommend it to most people! Still something that I think needed to be made though, as we do not usually get many mundane, slice of life stories about trans women and 3.5 This was hitting a little too close to home for me! What I loved about this book: Trans main character Interesting art style Queer story What I didn’t really like: Boring Did not really end in a way, which some books can pull off, but this book couldn’t Overall, I did enjoy this, but I wouldn’t read it again, and I probably would not recommend it to most people! Still something that I think needed to be made though, as we do not usually get many mundane, slice of life stories about trans women and queer people.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Hannah C

    Did I just read this start to finish on my lunch break? You bet. The art is vivid and sparing at the same time, which matches the emotional pace of the narrative. I found so much to relate to in the characters. I felt like I met them in real life. This is really just so well done.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    sad, melancholic, relationships, family, lgbt, children, emotions, mental health great depiction of the inter-workings of relationships, love the monster-like 'feral' art style to show characters in a free/playful state. I unfortunately became confused by Bron's identity. Ray at some point mentions that Bron is trans, and Bron's father avoids gendered language at one point. Bron's birth name is Bronwyn, which is feminine, and the name Bron is masculine. Ray uses she/her pronouns when talking abou sad, melancholic, relationships, family, lgbt, children, emotions, mental health great depiction of the inter-workings of relationships, love the monster-like 'feral' art style to show characters in a free/playful state. I unfortunately became confused by Bron's identity. Ray at some point mentions that Bron is trans, and Bron's father avoids gendered language at one point. Bron's birth name is Bronwyn, which is feminine, and the name Bron is masculine. Ray uses she/her pronouns when talking about Bron, which leads me to believe either Bron is nonbinary (with pronouns of the she/they/he variety) or Ray is not using the proper pronouns. I really wish that was clearer. My husband is a trans man, so if I'm confused....what's going on?? Other than that, lovely (but kinda sad) graphic novel.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Arango

    Can we talk about adult graphic novels? Because seriously, lately they've been breaking my heart 😂😭 STONE FRUIT, which explores intimacy in queer romantic & familial relationships, is truly excellent, though I'd recommend it more for a sad rainy day than one where you feel like you have everything together 😬. It's got: 🍑 Queer Aunties 🍑 Trans Rep 🍑 A Painful Breakup 🍑 Sister Relationships 🍑 Parenting As Aunties 🍑 Mental Health Struggles 🍑 Playing Pretend STONE FRUIT is a quiet and intricate story tha Can we talk about adult graphic novels? Because seriously, lately they've been breaking my heart 😂😭 STONE FRUIT, which explores intimacy in queer romantic & familial relationships, is truly excellent, though I'd recommend it more for a sad rainy day than one where you feel like you have everything together 😬. It's got: 🍑 Queer Aunties 🍑 Trans Rep 🍑 A Painful Breakup 🍑 Sister Relationships 🍑 Parenting As Aunties 🍑 Mental Health Struggles 🍑 Playing Pretend STONE FRUIT is a quiet and intricate story that gave me similar vibes to This One Summer (Tamaki) and Are You Listening? (Walden), so if you liked those YAs and want a more adult story, this one is for you.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cy

    kind of painfully real. bit of a downer. but unflinchingly honest. i loved how the faces and bodies of the characters changed when they were playing pretend with nessie. the artwork does a great job of capturing that sense of magical play that comes naturally to children.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    A slice of life. I read the description on the back of the book after reading and it summed it up pretty well. I read this without really knowing what it was about except that it included queerness and I kind of recommend reading it that way. If you’re looking for a feel good book, thjs might not be it however if you’re looking for observing complex people then take the time to meet Auntie Ray, Auntie Bron, Amanda, and Nessie.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Teddy

    4.5 stars ME??? CRYING????? It's more likely than you think!!!! But wow, this weird little book was magnificent & I absolutely adored it. Highly recommend. 4.5 stars ME??? CRYING????? It's more likely than you think!!!! But wow, this weird little book was magnificent & I absolutely adored it. Highly recommend.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Beautiful story about the nuances of interdependence. I love all of the characters. The art is gorgeous, Lai definitely has a recognizable style.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    An uncomfortably honest examination of the dissolution of a relationship, mental health issues, and family shit.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    This was beautiful in every sense of the word - it was both moving and emotionally honest, but visually gorgeous too. I found the artwork to be really engaging (though I realise this is very much a question of personal taste). I also loved the muted colour palette, which worked really well for this quiet but raw story. There are some weighty issues dealt with here, but it always feels completely authentic. Despite this being very character-driven, I found I couldn't put it down. I can see myself This was beautiful in every sense of the word - it was both moving and emotionally honest, but visually gorgeous too. I found the artwork to be really engaging (though I realise this is very much a question of personal taste). I also loved the muted colour palette, which worked really well for this quiet but raw story. There are some weighty issues dealt with here, but it always feels completely authentic. Despite this being very character-driven, I found I couldn't put it down. I can see myself revisiting Stone Fruit, and that's not something I often do with graphic novels. Thank you to Fantagraphics and Edelweiss for the ARC.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Romany

    Heartbreakingly beautiful. But such sadness.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    A devastating, powerful graphic novel about two women, Bron and Ray, who care for a cool kid Nessie, and their respective siblings/families. Lai deftly interweaves Bron and Roy's relationship arc with the individual backgrounds of their families, revealing the character's insecurities, internal thoughts, and longings. In the book launch for this project, Lai mentioned that she took a screenwriting course in the process of making Stone Fruit, and it shows in the character's embodied, realistic di A devastating, powerful graphic novel about two women, Bron and Ray, who care for a cool kid Nessie, and their respective siblings/families. Lai deftly interweaves Bron and Roy's relationship arc with the individual backgrounds of their families, revealing the character's insecurities, internal thoughts, and longings. In the book launch for this project, Lai mentioned that she took a screenwriting course in the process of making Stone Fruit, and it shows in the character's embodied, realistic dialogue, as well as how details from their lives and past are revealed naturally and gradually. In addition to engrossing relationship/family stories, the book's art is truly exceptional. Lai's hand-painted gouache panels are full of both detail and feeling, she manages to compose so much within the book's palette of black and cool blues. She varies between more spare linework for flashback sequences and fully-illustrated backgrounds for context/emotional beats, and these two styles play off each other effectively. This graphic novel packs an emotional punch and is beautiful to behold. I would recommend it to people who've never read a comic before, and people who love comics, and everyone in between.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Marte Olsen

    I got this on Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review! 3.5 stars! Okay, so I really enjoyed this! It's a good and realistic portrayal of mental health, complicated family dynamics/relationships (loving someone / wanting a relationship with them but also understanding that they are bad for you in some ways. Also, realizing that you don't really understand your family), realistic imperfect relationships, how a family can feel complete with a child in their lives even if it isn't theirs and so muc I got this on Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review! 3.5 stars! Okay, so I really enjoyed this! It's a good and realistic portrayal of mental health, complicated family dynamics/relationships (loving someone / wanting a relationship with them but also understanding that they are bad for you in some ways. Also, realizing that you don't really understand your family), realistic imperfect relationships, how a family can feel complete with a child in their lives even if it isn't theirs and so much more! I also really enjoy any graphic novel that has great body positivity and show normal, realistic bodies being bodies!!! Only thing I wished for this was that is spent more time on the families and the relationships between them! Also wished we saw more flashbacks than we did! Overall a really good graphic novel!!!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Samantha Shain

    A heartbreaking, evocative, and memorable read with beautiful illustrations, unconventional frames, and a mood that carried through the emotional fluctuations of the book. It’s not often that a book makes me cry! The restraint the author used in the sections about Bron’s waspy family was masterful. I have so much compassion for Ray. The saddest thing is two people who can’t make each other happy!!! Lee Lai surfaced many intersecting themes and political undertones without being overly didactic o A heartbreaking, evocative, and memorable read with beautiful illustrations, unconventional frames, and a mood that carried through the emotional fluctuations of the book. It’s not often that a book makes me cry! The restraint the author used in the sections about Bron’s waspy family was masterful. I have so much compassion for Ray. The saddest thing is two people who can’t make each other happy!!! Lee Lai surfaced many intersecting themes and political undertones without being overly didactic or relying on stereotypes. I think she’s a visionary literary and artistic presence and I can’t wait to follow her career.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    This is another story of difficulties in a romantic relationship, and the story is good. In this case, the women are lesbians, and they have to deal with one of the woman's sister and that sister's difficulty dealing with that relationship. There are issues of perceived homophobia, misunderstandings, resentments, and more. The art, however, is, well, weird. It works somewhat, especially where characters are letting themselves run free. The art is somewhat crude which pretty much eliminates facial This is another story of difficulties in a romantic relationship, and the story is good. In this case, the women are lesbians, and they have to deal with one of the woman's sister and that sister's difficulty dealing with that relationship. There are issues of perceived homophobia, misunderstandings, resentments, and more. The art, however, is, well, weird. It works somewhat, especially where characters are letting themselves run free. The art is somewhat crude which pretty much eliminates facial expressions. I think some people might dislike this book for that reason. I had difficulty at first. I never liked it, I just became used to it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    I think this is a realistic portrayal of not-perfect relationships both romantic and familial. Ray and Bron are struggling with heaviness both inside and outside of their relationship. Neither get along with their families and Bron's struggle with mental illness and feelings of not being accepted, puts a strain on their 5 year relationship. The ending feels unsatisfying and open-ended, which I think perfectly reflects that not all stories can be wrapped up neatly with a little bow. 3.5/5 ARC provi I think this is a realistic portrayal of not-perfect relationships both romantic and familial. Ray and Bron are struggling with heaviness both inside and outside of their relationship. Neither get along with their families and Bron's struggle with mental illness and feelings of not being accepted, puts a strain on their 5 year relationship. The ending feels unsatisfying and open-ended, which I think perfectly reflects that not all stories can be wrapped up neatly with a little bow. 3.5/5 ARC provided by edelweiss for an honest review.

  28. 5 out of 5

    TJ

    Wow, this is such a raw story. I appreciate it for feeling so honest. The quiet moments between two characters are just beautiful. The relationships, both romantic and familial, are fantastically explored and they feel so real. I was intrigued by the monstrous forms portrayed throughout the book, and I think I half understood what was being conveyed through them, but they were a bit too vague for me overall. And the lack of emotional resolution, specifically between Bron and her family, left me Wow, this is such a raw story. I appreciate it for feeling so honest. The quiet moments between two characters are just beautiful. The relationships, both romantic and familial, are fantastically explored and they feel so real. I was intrigued by the monstrous forms portrayed throughout the book, and I think I half understood what was being conveyed through them, but they were a bit too vague for me overall. And the lack of emotional resolution, specifically between Bron and her family, left me feeling a bit unsatisfied— but sometimes that’s life. 4.5/5 stars

  29. 4 out of 5

    dusty pigeon

    A beautiful study of intricacies within human relationships. The characters are so fleshed out and believable: from the hyper energetic 6-year-old Nessie to Bron's traditionalist Christian family, all the clashing and intertwining points of view and experiences create a compelling storyline. Lee Lai explores a difficult stage of a relationship in such a mature and complex way. "Stone Fruit" is a great (and emotional) read, combining Lee Lai's unique drawings and important observations about relat A beautiful study of intricacies within human relationships. The characters are so fleshed out and believable: from the hyper energetic 6-year-old Nessie to Bron's traditionalist Christian family, all the clashing and intertwining points of view and experiences create a compelling storyline. Lee Lai explores a difficult stage of a relationship in such a mature and complex way. "Stone Fruit" is a great (and emotional) read, combining Lee Lai's unique drawings and important observations about relationships, growth and confrontation of childlike and adult perspectives.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Breena Nuñez

    All of the characters really pulled me into this world Lee Lai created. I was already enthralled by Lai's gorgeous line work from seeing her posts on Instagram, but to hold a book in my hands and see panels coming to live with touches of gouache made the reading experience feel so ethereal and poetic. The visual language developed for the feeling of being free/liberated through the shapeshifting main characters into feral beasts was the sprinkle of magic that made this story so interesting to me All of the characters really pulled me into this world Lee Lai created. I was already enthralled by Lai's gorgeous line work from seeing her posts on Instagram, but to hold a book in my hands and see panels coming to live with touches of gouache made the reading experience feel so ethereal and poetic. The visual language developed for the feeling of being free/liberated through the shapeshifting main characters into feral beasts was the sprinkle of magic that made this story so interesting to me.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.