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Star Wars The High Republic: Race to Crashpoint Tower

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Another exciting story in the #1 New York Times best-selling series! The Republic Fair is coming! Visitors from all over the galaxy are traveling to the planet Valo for a massive, awe-inspiring festival celebrating the Republic. While his fellow Valons prepare for the fair, Jedi Padawan Ram Jomaram is hiding out in his favorite place: a dingy garage filled with mechani Another exciting story in the #1 New York Times best-selling series! The Republic Fair is coming! Visitors from all over the galaxy are traveling to the planet Valo for a massive, awe-inspiring festival celebrating the Republic. While his fellow Valons prepare for the fair, Jedi Padawan Ram Jomaram is hiding out in his favorite place: a dingy garage filled with mechanical parts and tools. But when a security alarm goes off on the nearby hilltop nicknamed Crashpoint Peak, he ventures out with his trusty droid V-18 to investigate. There he discovers that someone has knocked out Valo’s communications tower—a frightening sign that Valo, and the Republic Fair, are in danger. Sure enough, as Ram races to warn the Jedi, the dreaded Nihil unleash a surprise attack! It’s up to Ram to face down the enemy at Crashpoint Tower and send a call for help to the Republic. Luckily, he’s about to get some assistance from unexpected new friends… Don't miss all of the Star Wars: The High Republic adventures!


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Another exciting story in the #1 New York Times best-selling series! The Republic Fair is coming! Visitors from all over the galaxy are traveling to the planet Valo for a massive, awe-inspiring festival celebrating the Republic. While his fellow Valons prepare for the fair, Jedi Padawan Ram Jomaram is hiding out in his favorite place: a dingy garage filled with mechani Another exciting story in the #1 New York Times best-selling series! The Republic Fair is coming! Visitors from all over the galaxy are traveling to the planet Valo for a massive, awe-inspiring festival celebrating the Republic. While his fellow Valons prepare for the fair, Jedi Padawan Ram Jomaram is hiding out in his favorite place: a dingy garage filled with mechanical parts and tools. But when a security alarm goes off on the nearby hilltop nicknamed Crashpoint Peak, he ventures out with his trusty droid V-18 to investigate. There he discovers that someone has knocked out Valo’s communications tower—a frightening sign that Valo, and the Republic Fair, are in danger. Sure enough, as Ram races to warn the Jedi, the dreaded Nihil unleash a surprise attack! It’s up to Ram to face down the enemy at Crashpoint Tower and send a call for help to the Republic. Luckily, he’s about to get some assistance from unexpected new friends… Don't miss all of the Star Wars: The High Republic adventures!

30 review for Star Wars The High Republic: Race to Crashpoint Tower

  1. 4 out of 5

    megs_bookrack

    Race to Crashpoint Tower is another fantastic Junior Star Wars novel set within the era of the High Republic; the golden age of the Jedi. The recently released High Republic books all take place around the time of a galaxy-wide event known as the Great Disaster. This catastrophic event caused chaos as ships were launched out of hyperspace, moons were destroyed and a great amount of debris was left in the aftermath. To put it in timeline perspective, these High Republic novels predate all previous Race to Crashpoint Tower is another fantastic Junior Star Wars novel set within the era of the High Republic; the golden age of the Jedi. The recently released High Republic books all take place around the time of a galaxy-wide event known as the Great Disaster. This catastrophic event caused chaos as ships were launched out of hyperspace, moons were destroyed and a great amount of debris was left in the aftermath. To put it in timeline perspective, these High Republic novels predate all previously released Star Wars Canon materials. This story is set on the planet of Valo, following the Great Disaster, where a Republic Fair is about to take place. Jedi Padawan, Ram Jamoram, is working diligently in his garage when a security alarm sounds from the communication center known as Crashpoint Tower. Ram sets out with his trusty droid, V-18, to investigate. Once there he discovers the tower has purposefully been tampered with; blocking all communications. Nihil sabotage! Now Ram must try to warn the Jedi and seek help as the planet comes under siege. With the galaxy teetering between balance and chaos, can order be restored? Luckily, another young Jedi Padawan arrives from off-planet, Lula, and she joins Ram as they try to repair the comms in order to notify the Republic they're under attack. They hope Starlight will then send reinforcements. The Nihil raiders also have new allies, other dark force beings from the wider galaxy, raising the stakes and the difficulty level of Ram and Lula's mission significantly. This was such a fun story. I loved seeing the connections between this and the other stories within the new High Republic materials. There was even some character crossover, as one of my favorite characters from A Test of Courage advised on this mission. As always with the Junior Canon novels, I found this to be easy to follow, fast-paced, funny and an excellent introduction to the belief system of the Jedi and the workings of the galaxy in general. I am really glad I had a chance to read this one. The audiobook is incredible, as the Star Wars audiobooks always include great narration and fun sound effects. Thank you so much to the publisher, Disney LucasFilms Press, for providing me with the audiobook of this to read and review. It was a ton of fun and I cannot wait for the next releases in the High Republic content!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alexandra Elend Wolf

    “He was a Jedi Padawan, and he was apparently the only one around to deal with this. It was his duty, even if he would’ve rather spent the rest of the night tinkering.” This was a fine enough story. I'm not wild over it or anything but I definitely had fun. First thing first, the concept of this book was really interesting to me. The fact that it is a side story from The Rising Storm and we just get to see how something came to happen was nice and, honestly, I liked it. I was curious wh “He was a Jedi Padawan, and he was apparently the only one around to deal with this. It was his duty, even if he would’ve rather spent the rest of the night tinkering.” This was a fine enough story. I'm not wild over it or anything but I definitely had fun. First thing first, the concept of this book was really interesting to me. The fact that it is a side story from The Rising Storm and we just get to see how something came to happen was nice and, honestly, I liked it. I was curious when it all went down in the previous book and I was not disappointed over it. I just, well, I struggle to understand why this needed to be a different book? It would have fitted quite neatly with, what I am calling, the main book; it wouldn't have been weird or out place or anything. My only guesses are that they didn't want the book to be that long or that they wanted to keep it focused on the characters from Light of the Jedi. If the idea was to keep the worlds from colliding too harshly in the previous book I must say that I found it really cool and nice here. And I would also have thought so before. “They moved like they were extensions of the same person – not a word exchanged.” Still, it isn't enough of an issue that it diminished my enjoyment of the story. Because it was a fun story. It had quite a bit of action and the relatable, quirky characters you'll expect from a middle-grade book to a T. Bringing characters from The High Republic Adventures comics series as well as from A Test of Courage was a really fun move. Their interactions were nice and I really liked their chemistry. Everything is moving so fast that we have just enough time to expend a bit with Lula and Ram, our main characters, and I would have loved to see more of Vernestra only because I love her so much. It is a book for quite a young audience though and both main characters do a great job of exploring the story. “Being a Jedi is about balance. Balance of the Force within you, the Force in the wider world. Balance of the Force as it flows through us.” As I said, the story is pretty action-packed, but we still have some time for reflection and philosophizing... which was a little weird. The ideas were certainly fun and I liked them. They were relatable, which I think is what you must want to go for. But, and this is a big but, they also made no sense at all? I don't know if it was jsut the phrasing of them, but I found myself, sure, understanding them but also having no clue what it meant. They kind of seemed like a sausage of words that are supposed to have meaning when strung together but really don't. Nevertheles, it was weird. There were other sentiments that made a little more sense but anything that resembled life-altering advice was just weirdly phrased. Worst of all, they would be repeated over and over again only enhancing the weirdness. Really, that's probably my biggest issue with the whole book, the writing style. It just... it never clicked with me and I found it weird. I've read Daniel José Older's comics, I love them really, and I feel like he just didn't know how to translate these characters he has worked on in that format to a solely written one. “Padawans learned the forms, memorized each step, and honored their lightsabers as a part of themselves, and in doing so, they walked the path of every Jedi before them, and every Jedi yet to come.” Overall, weird writing aside, I enjoyed this book and had great fun. I would still re-read it, if merely for that one really big piece of information we are given. That makes it all totally worth it. Not that the rest wasn't fine as well, but, yeah. Whatever comes next will be fun for sure and I'm really looking forward to it. “Because I care about life. And the light. I’d save them because it’s the right thing to do.” _____________ Well, this was definitely a fun little adventure. Admittedly, most of this was just that, a nice and fun adventure, but the little tidbits of information were nice! RTC. _____________ Alright, initially I wasn't sure why this book as well as The Rising Storm had been released the same day but now I think I know and, well, I like the idea. It seems short and sweet which is something I want from it and like, it's just gonna be a bit of fun after the ending of its companion book. I'm ready for some of it. Whatever the case that this ends up being, I know that I will have fun seeing these new characters because, at this point, I have a bit of blind trust in The High Republic content. Just a smidge.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Read more: https://www.friendsoftheforcepod.com/... Race to Crashpoint Tower sports a slim frame, coming in at just about 200 pages, but it packs a big punch! In this second installment of The High Republic’s middle-grade offerings, Daniel José Older gives us a story starring Ram Jomaram, a Jedi Padawan on Valo, where the Republic Fair is set to be held. Ram’s talents lie not with combat, but in mechanics, and he soon realizes that that local comms tower (aka Crashpoint Tower) is broken! On Ram's Read more: https://www.friendsoftheforcepod.com/... Race to Crashpoint Tower sports a slim frame, coming in at just about 200 pages, but it packs a big punch! In this second installment of The High Republic’s middle-grade offerings, Daniel José Older gives us a story starring Ram Jomaram, a Jedi Padawan on Valo, where the Republic Fair is set to be held. Ram’s talents lie not with combat, but in mechanics, and he soon realizes that that local comms tower (aka Crashpoint Tower) is broken! On Ram's mission to fix the comms, the threat becomes much larger, leaving him with more of an adventure than he bargained for. Older’s writing is wildly funny and action-packed. Readers will immediately fall in love with the characters of this story: there's our hero Ram Jomaram, the tiny bonbraks of his workshop, and, of course, his droid V-18. In addition to these new characters, we also see the return of Vernestra Rwoh from Justina Ireland’s A Test of Courage as well as Lula Talisola from the High Republic Adventures comics, also authored by Older. Older weaves all these stories together with a mastery, making their coming together feel natural and necessary. We also get to see more of the villains that we were introduced to in the Wave 1 stories, which are, without a doubt, some of my favorite moments in this book! Race to Crashpoint Tower feels like a true sequel but still maintains its accessibility for readers who just want to hop into The High Republic during this wave of stories or who haven’t read all the materials of Wave 1. It’s a really fun ride and one that feels appropriate for middle-grade aged readers and older readers alike. Don’t sleep on this one just because it's written with younger readers in mind!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

    The second wave of The High Republic is here, kicking off with Race to Crashpoint Tower by Daniel José Older and The Rising Storm by Cavan Scott. Race to Crashpoint Tower, the follow-up to A Test of Courage by Justina Ireland, is geared toward a middle-grade audience (ages 8-12), but contains enough action to keep readers of all ages engaged. It also fits in nicely with The Rising Storm, as the events of both books take place concurrently. Race to Crashpoint Tower takes place on the planet Valo a The second wave of The High Republic is here, kicking off with Race to Crashpoint Tower by Daniel José Older and The Rising Storm by Cavan Scott. Race to Crashpoint Tower, the follow-up to A Test of Courage by Justina Ireland, is geared toward a middle-grade audience (ages 8-12), but contains enough action to keep readers of all ages engaged. It also fits in nicely with The Rising Storm, as the events of both books take place concurrently. Race to Crashpoint Tower takes place on the planet Valo as the Republic Fair is getting underway, celebrating the unity and strength of the Republic. Just about one year previously, the galaxy was reeling from ‘The Great Disaster’ and attacks from a mysterious group of vicious pirates known as the Nihil. Time and the apparent defeat of the Nihil has allowed the Republic to move on, and Chancellor Lina Soh hopes the Republic Fair will mark this new time of peace. Crashpoint Tower follows Jedi Padawan Ram Jomaram, who should be helping prepare for the Republic Fair but instead is working on repairing a broken speeder, is notified by the droid V-18 of an issue at the communications tower that has tripped a security alert. As Ram decides to go investigate he soon discovers there are Nihil on Valo. Suddenly the situation has become more dire, and Ram knows he must get the comms up and running so Starlight Beacon can be alerted and help can be summoned. Along the way, Ram is joined by the droid V-18, who gets an unusual upgrade, the diminutive and mechanically-inclined Bonbraks, and Jedi Padawan Lula Talisola and Force-sensitive Zeen Mrala, characters introduced in IDW’s The High Republic Adventures. As if the Nihil presence on Valo wasn’t bad enough, soon Ram and his cohorts find out the Drengir — sentient and voracious plants (although I’m still not sure about plants as a threat, but suspension of disbelief really helps) — are also on Valo. Soon Ram and his friends must take on the Drengir threat while the Republic Fair is under attack by the Nihil. Race to Crashpoint Tower is an exciting read and, and the title suggests, moves very fast. Which can be either good or bad, depending on how much time you like to spend with a story. Of course, adults have to keep in mind it’s written with a younger audience in mind so it’s meant to move at a quicker pace. Crashpoint Tower dovetails in a wonderful way with Cavan Scott’s The Rising Storm, which would be beneficial to have read first. (I didn’t and wish I had.) Since the stories take place simultaneously, and some characters do cross over between the two books, by reading both you’re getting a wider perspective of the events on Valo. Author Daniel José Older has crafted a fun tale with Race to Crashpoint Tower, one with humor, peril, and a healthy dose of adventure. Rating: 4/5 Thank you to Disney Lucasfilm Press for providing an uncorrected galley proof for review purposes.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jay DeMoir

    2.5 stars. Though not as strong as “A Test of Courage”, this entry into the High Republic Era was still fun. I felt the characterization was under developed but it was enough to understand the characters. I wish there’d been a tad bit more development but also, as a middle grades book I get it. However, test of courage was well rounded and developed so I won’t use that as an excuse. P.S.- This one links closely to The Rising Storm by Cavan Scott

  6. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Graham

    Not sure why people leave ratings before a book is even out, but I’m helping this one with a five star instead of all the pre-hate. I’ll update when I’ve read it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kelvin

    Not as good as Justine Ireland's High Republic novel Compared to Justine Ireland's Middle-Grade novel, this one was just all right. This novel was written in a way that readers at 8 to 12 would be engaged with but enough to keep adults turning the pages too. This book is heavy on the action, especially at the end. I like the first half of the book more due to Older giving detail to the characters and their quirks and motivations. He also introduces and reintroduces a lot of characters from this e Not as good as Justine Ireland's High Republic novel Compared to Justine Ireland's Middle-Grade novel, this one was just all right. This novel was written in a way that readers at 8 to 12 would be engaged with but enough to keep adults turning the pages too. This book is heavy on the action, especially at the end. I like the first half of the book more due to Older giving detail to the characters and their quirks and motivations. He also introduces and reintroduces a lot of characters from this era in Star Wars. The last 50% was straight up nonstop action. I did like some aspects of the action that went down, especially when (view spoiler)[The Drengir show up (hide spoiler)] other than that, the Nihil are just a cartoonish biker gang with nothing else to offer. These guys are straight out of every generic bad guy movie you've ever seen. I'm nowhere near a fan of them or their involvement with fighting the Jedi and the Republic but so far, after everything I've seen about them, the Nihil haven't done anything that surprises me yet. In the end, this was a Middle-Grade book to the core, and it's easily forgettable once you finish reading it. I felt that the ending was rushed but it does end without a cliffhanger, so the story itself stands on its own. You do not have to be familiar with the other High Republic novels to get into this one. Each one can be read in whichever order you choose.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Blue Milk Mama

    Race to Crashpoint Tower by Daniel José Older is the second middle grade novel in the new High Republic era of Star Wars… Padawan Ram Jamoram is happy living at the Jedi outpost on the planet Valo, where it’s quiet and predictable. He’s happiest when he’s alone tinkering with engines and electronics, but when things go horribly wrong at the Republic Fair will he be able to get to the comms tower, fix the problem and get word to Starlight Beacon? Ram’s Jedi Master Kantam Sy is fond of telling him: Race to Crashpoint Tower by Daniel José Older is the second middle grade novel in the new High Republic era of Star Wars… Padawan Ram Jamoram is happy living at the Jedi outpost on the planet Valo, where it’s quiet and predictable. He’s happiest when he’s alone tinkering with engines and electronics, but when things go horribly wrong at the Republic Fair will he be able to get to the comms tower, fix the problem and get word to Starlight Beacon? Ram’s Jedi Master Kantam Sy is fond of telling him: “You must see the whole for the whole, each part for the role it plays--not for what you want it to be, not for what you fear it to be. Just for what it is.” As Ram learns to play his part, he meets Padawan Lula Talisola and Force-sensitive Zeen Mrala who feature in IDW’s High Republic Adventures. Other familiar faces appear to guide and assist our young heroes, but ultimately, what happens is on their shoulders as they face imminent danger. Ram’s trusty sidekicks also include the tiny mechanically-inclined (and kindred spirit) Bonbraks and V-18, a droid who is about to get some serious upgrades! Older’s use of humour is absolutely on point, and young readers will delight in zany laugh out loud moments. This helps to balance the book’s darker themes. It’s not all United in Song exhibits, rycrit wraps and bantha milkshakes! Like its predecessor, A Test of Courage, this book is not afraid to toss its young protagonists head first into destruction and despair. They face both the evil Nihil marauders and the carnivorous, plant-like Drengir who are intent on destroying everything and everyone at the fair. The beautiful illustrations by Petur Antonsson are one of the highlights of the book. I adore the art style, and getting to see some of the characters and events is an absolute treat. The book itself is a fun, almost square size, easy to hold and is about 200 pages long. I’d recommend reading IDW’s High Republic Adventures before diving into this book. Can you read this book without having read about Lula and Zeen’s escapades first? Absolutely, Older provides a good amount of backstory so it remains accessible on its own. However, as with all of the High Republic, it certainly benefits from having read more in this interconnected universe. If you’re an adult reader wondering whether or not to delve into this book, I wouldn’t hesitate. This little book is expertly woven into the events that take place in Cavan Scott’s The Rising Storm, so definitely read that first. Then you’ll delight in learning even more about what happened during the Fair. I found myself wishing Crashpoint was just a little bit longer. The plot lines are well-crafted and come together at the end, but the conclusion feels a tad incomplete. However, on July 7th there is still issue six of the High Republic Adventures to look forward to, and hopefully more stories to come! As a mother of three and a former early childhood specialist, I highly recommend Race to Crashpoint Tower for younger readers. It’s a fun, fast-paced Star Wars adventure full of humour, a diverse cast of delightful characters and of course, light versus dark. I give it 4 out of 5 glasses of blue milk!

  9. 5 out of 5

    TheGeeksAttic

    Star Wars: Race to Crashpoint Tower was written by New York Times Bestselling Author, Daniel Jose Older. Older is also writing the Star Wars Adventures High Republic series. Summary: The Republic is getting ready to celebrate its accomplishments on the planet Valo, at the Republic Fair. Chancellor Soh will be present, along with many Jedi, to celebrate the unity and power of the Republic. A security alert reaches a young Padawan, Ram, there seems to be an issue at Crashpoint Tower (a communicati Star Wars: Race to Crashpoint Tower was written by New York Times Bestselling Author, Daniel Jose Older. Older is also writing the Star Wars Adventures High Republic series. Summary: The Republic is getting ready to celebrate its accomplishments on the planet Valo, at the Republic Fair. Chancellor Soh will be present, along with many Jedi, to celebrate the unity and power of the Republic. A security alert reaches a young Padawan, Ram, there seems to be an issue at Crashpoint Tower (a communications tower). Ram takes it upon himself to go check out the tower. It’s the Nihil! Ram does his best to fight them off, to see what it was they were doing to the tower. When Ram attempts to reach his master or any other Jedi to inform them of what he'd witnessed but he has no luck! Somehow, Ram must reach out to Starlight Beacon, to inform them that the Nihil have been spotted on Valo, and have tampered with the communications tower. Disaster strikes at the Republic Fair! Characters: Ram Jomaram is a Padawan in Lonisa City on the planet Valo. He loves tinkering with machinery, breaking them down, understanding how they work, and putting them back together. His love and understanding of machines, such as droids, speeders, etc. really helps him attune to the force. He’s a peaceful young man with hopes of remaining on the quiet and peaceful Valo. He's slightly fearful and a intimidated by the thought of battle. However, he knows fear is all in the mind, he just needs to learn to control himself. Lula Talisola, from the High Republic Adventures comic series plays a large roll in this book! She knows that her attachment to things and people are a great weakness. Not only is her attachment a weakness, but she fears it could bring her down, into darker places of the force. Lula wants to break away from her attachments, it's the only way she could possibly achieve her life long goal of becoming one of the greatest Jedi Masters. Vernestra Rowh becomes somewhat of a mentor to Lula, helping her through this emotional set back. OVERALL THOUGHTS: Race to Crashpoint Tower was pretty good! I wasn't a big fan of Older's previous Star Wars book, Last Shot. But my dislike for that story, will stay with that book, not the author. I open each book with an open mind, ready for adventure. I'm pleased to say I enjoyed this story. The event that takes place in this book is one that, once again, knocks the galaxy off its feet. The execution of this event was a little muddled down, but after I let it marinate in my brain for a bit, it's better off that way. After all, this is a kids book and shouldn't be graphic, besides, the event on Valo is the primary focus of the adult novel, The Rising Storm, I recommend reading that book before this one to get a better understand of what's happening on Valo. This story doesn't focus too much on all that is happening during the tragedy. It's focused on certain characters being pushed to their limits, and the tasks they needed to accomplish to help resolve the tragedy at hand. I only have a few issues with the story, mostly with the dialogue. Some of the names of people and creatures are far too goofy. The Nihil are a vicious bunch, but the other villains that show up, the Drengir, are just far to silly to be taken serious. However, it is a book designed for kids, so it's fine, the Drengir are a decent fit for this age group. It's quite fun to see familiar characters from the other books and comics weave through the multiple stories in the High Republic era. In this young reader book, we have several characters and locations that make an appearance, and they're handled so well. I really enjoy how the characters each have a personal conflict or set back that they must overcome. The challenges they face are both interesting and risky. I highly recommend reading The Rising Storm by Cavan Scott before diving into this book. Race to Crashpoint Tower is a fun junior reader book, and it reads really fast. Rating: This book receives a B+

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Race to Crashpoint Tower, being a junior novel, didn’t release with the same level of expectations as a book like The Rising Storm. When will we ever learn to not underestimate Star Wars junior novels? This book was brilliantly written by Daniel José Older, incorporating elements from all over the second wave of the High Republic as well as characters from his comic series, The High Republic Adventures. Reading The Rising Storm without reading this book doesn’t give you the whole story: Race to Race to Crashpoint Tower, being a junior novel, didn’t release with the same level of expectations as a book like The Rising Storm. When will we ever learn to not underestimate Star Wars junior novels? This book was brilliantly written by Daniel José Older, incorporating elements from all over the second wave of the High Republic as well as characters from his comic series, The High Republic Adventures. Reading The Rising Storm without reading this book doesn’t give you the whole story: Race to Crashpoint Tower contains some absolutely essential information regarding the events at the Republic Fair. And not only was the plot exciting and tied in well to its adult novel counterpart, the story flowed beautifully with quieter moments between characters. Don’t sleep on this book just because of its target audience: Race to Crashpoint Tower is a phenomenal read with more great High Republic lore.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Patricia

    This story was so cute! I wish we would have gotten a bit more time with the characters, especially the lead Ram, though. He went through compelling character development but the pace was extremely fast, so I would have loved to read a few more chapters! Some aspects of the story also made me go "huh? reeeally?" but I suppose I need to have a higher suspension of disbelief tolerance for middle grade books as I'm certainly not their target audience. But still, even as an adult, this book was extr This story was so cute! I wish we would have gotten a bit more time with the characters, especially the lead Ram, though. He went through compelling character development but the pace was extremely fast, so I would have loved to read a few more chapters! Some aspects of the story also made me go "huh? reeeally?" but I suppose I need to have a higher suspension of disbelief tolerance for middle grade books as I'm certainly not their target audience. But still, even as an adult, this book was extremely enjoyable. What I absolutely loved was the crossover with The Rising Storm, as well as with DJO's The High Republic Adventures. And yay for non-binary representation!! If you love The High Republic, this little story has to be on your shelves!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Eric Linnell

    A fun ride!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Shannon McCarter

    After reading Last Shot from Older, I was so excited to see him back in the Star Wars Universe! Race to Crashpoint Tower takes place on the planet Valo, where two padawans must fix the comms tower before the Nhial destroy the peace and joy the Republic has built. By far, the best part about this book is it’s characters; full of personality and dimensions, these are the types of Jedi I have been dying to see! And it makes me want to go back and pick up the High Republic Adventures comic so I can After reading Last Shot from Older, I was so excited to see him back in the Star Wars Universe! Race to Crashpoint Tower takes place on the planet Valo, where two padawans must fix the comms tower before the Nhial destroy the peace and joy the Republic has built. By far, the best part about this book is it’s characters; full of personality and dimensions, these are the types of Jedi I have been dying to see! And it makes me want to go back and pick up the High Republic Adventures comic so I can see where some of them got their start (but you can definitely start here!) I do wish we could have gotten more time with a few characters, as the book was mostly action heavy, and I do think it might be better to read this after The Rising Storm if you are planning to read both. But overall, I absolutely adored this and can’t wait to see the adventure continue! 4.5/5

  14. 5 out of 5

    Arezou

    Star Wars is a lot of things. It’s full of action. It’s got big emotions and a lot of heart. It has characters that are relatable and that stand the test of time. Race to Crashpoint Tower by Daniel José Older has all of these things, but it also has something most Star Wars just doesn’t: it is laugh-out-loud funny. I’m serious. I’m not the type to laugh at something if I’m reading it or watching it by myself. And yet, by the time I got to the end of this book, I had actual tears in my eyes - the Star Wars is a lot of things. It’s full of action. It’s got big emotions and a lot of heart. It has characters that are relatable and that stand the test of time. Race to Crashpoint Tower by Daniel José Older has all of these things, but it also has something most Star Wars just doesn’t: it is laugh-out-loud funny. I’m serious. I’m not the type to laugh at something if I’m reading it or watching it by myself. And yet, by the time I got to the end of this book, I had actual tears in my eyes - the good kind, thankfully. I shouldn’t have been so surprised. Daniel José Older has brought his characteristic kind of funny to the GFFA before, with 2018’s Last Shot and the more recent (and relevant) Star Wars: The High Republic Adventures comic series for IDW. Race to Crashpoint Tower pulls off the remarkable feat of being inextricably linked to both the IDW High Republic Adventures series, and to The Rising Storm and yet somehow functions perfectly as a standalone novel for younger readers - and older readers too. See again: me with tears in my eyes. [READ FULL SPOILER-FREE REVIEW: https://thegeekywaffle.com/home/2021/...] Special thank you to Lucasfilm and Disney Publishing for an advance copy of this book for review purposes.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    Overall, the story is interesting as a companion piece to The Rising Storm, but I found the narrative moved along much too quickly, which made it difficult to connect with the characters, especially the lead, Ram. There are neat insights and revelations and it's interesting to see events from The Rising Storm happen from a different point of view (heh). I'd say this book is better suited for kids (the target demo) and perhaps even those who may not be the strongest of readers. For the full revie Overall, the story is interesting as a companion piece to The Rising Storm, but I found the narrative moved along much too quickly, which made it difficult to connect with the characters, especially the lead, Ram. There are neat insights and revelations and it's interesting to see events from The Rising Storm happen from a different point of view (heh). I'd say this book is better suited for kids (the target demo) and perhaps even those who may not be the strongest of readers. For the full review, check out my thoughts here! :https://screenhub.blog/2021/05/31/sta...

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nicole

    Daniel Jose Older proves once again why he's one of the best Star Wars writers currently on the roster. His mastery of the balance between the absolutely crazy shenanigans and deep, heartfelt feelings of the galaxy far, far away shines in this book, which is--appropriately--all about finding balance. Daniel Jose Older proves once again why he's one of the best Star Wars writers currently on the roster. His mastery of the balance between the absolutely crazy shenanigans and deep, heartfelt feelings of the galaxy far, far away shines in this book, which is--appropriately--all about finding balance.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Brad

    The High Republic is back and packed full of laughs, adventure, and an unforgettable coming-of-age story to kick off a new wave of stories. Race to Crashpoint Tower is Daniel José Older’s first time dabbling in Star Wars's middle-grade genre, and he does not miss by any means. This next set of High Republic stories focuses on the Republic Fair, revered as a symbol of unity, on the planet Valo; but when things can go wrong in a galaxy full of dangerous adversaries, they will go wrong. I have a ba The High Republic is back and packed full of laughs, adventure, and an unforgettable coming-of-age story to kick off a new wave of stories. Race to Crashpoint Tower is Daniel José Older’s first time dabbling in Star Wars's middle-grade genre, and he does not miss by any means. This next set of High Republic stories focuses on the Republic Fair, revered as a symbol of unity, on the planet Valo; but when things can go wrong in a galaxy full of dangerous adversaries, they will go wrong. I have a bad feeling about this, indeed. You'll be introduced to Ram Jomaram, a mechanical-minded Jedi Padawan who finds comfort in understanding what makes things tick and how he can improve them — this is best depicted with his hilariously witty droid V-18, who will definitely steal the hearts and minds of anyone who picks up this book. Race to Crashpoint Tower also has the best Star Wars ingredients baked into it when it comes to the traditional hero's journey. Ram's mission ultimately comes down to how easily he can break out of his comfort zone, which readers of any age can relate to. What I appreciate most about Race to Crashpoint Tower is how easily Older integrates his The High Republic Adventures comic storyline featuring Lula Talisola, who appears alongside Ram on the cover. It's a testament to both the ambition and confidence of the High Republic team to weave all these stories together without fault and make the journey as a reader feel worthwhile and necessary. Race to Crashpoint Tower is an excellent way to kick off your newest reading adventures in the High Republic. It's a perfectly timed pick-me-up story with lots of drama, some thought-provoking ideas about what it means to be a Jedi, and authentic characters that you understand inside and out. Plus, it will leave you hurting from laughter. What more can you ask from a Star Wars book?

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Oatsvall

    A fun side-story to go along with the adult book, introducing a new character and already known characters from the comics. There were also some interesting implications with one group of villains that I’m excited for the authors to explore more in the future of the series. I’m so ready for more High Republic stories ASAP!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kai Charles(Fiction State Of Mind)

    This story takes place in the midst of the events of The Rising Storm. We first meet Ram in an encounter with Ty Yorrick and this story gives us the start of Ram's journey. I love everything about this story! Though it is aimed towards younger readers there is no watering down of the danger or threats Ram faces as he leaves his comfort zone to help save his city. Ram's companions for this journey are Lula and Zeen from the High Republic Adventures. Older does an amazing job giving us insight int This story takes place in the midst of the events of The Rising Storm. We first meet Ram in an encounter with Ty Yorrick and this story gives us the start of Ram's journey. I love everything about this story! Though it is aimed towards younger readers there is no watering down of the danger or threats Ram faces as he leaves his comfort zone to help save his city. Ram's companions for this journey are Lula and Zeen from the High Republic Adventures. Older does an amazing job giving us insight into Lula and Ram's internal thoughts as they confront their greatest fears in the face of the Nihil and another deadly force. A fantastic read with hints in the finale that we may be seeing Ram again soon!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jaime K

    I went into this book with a bit of trepidation because I haven't liked Older's work in the past. So I first rolls my eyes at the massive amount of exclamation marks and juvenile thinking (waahhh Vernestra's so young I'll never match up, wah)...before reminding myself that this is a MG book so of course the language and grammar will be simplified. With that, I feel that Older writes children's stories better than adult ones because once I reverted to a childlike mindset, I was able to sink into I went into this book with a bit of trepidation because I haven't liked Older's work in the past. So I first rolls my eyes at the massive amount of exclamation marks and juvenile thinking (waahhh Vernestra's so young I'll never match up, wah)...before reminding myself that this is a MG book so of course the language and grammar will be simplified. With that, I feel that Older writes children's stories better than adult ones because once I reverted to a childlike mindset, I was able to sink into the book fairly well. What I also like is the aesthetics. This is set up exactly like A Test of Courage, and that continuity of how the books are structured is something I hope to see at the YA and A levels, as well as in phase 2. Padawan Ram Jomaram is very much like Anakin Skywalker in how he is attuned to machinery. He also experiences with the Force and technology. It's cute, and a neat visual as to what Anakin could have been had he grown up a Jedi. His master is Kunpar, but he is only mentioned which bothers me a bit. Like most children's and YA books, this kind of erases most of the adults; instead a droid V-18 is essentially Ram's chaperone the entire time. I'm tired of droids taking a lead for whatever reason. This is especially true with V-18, and it is the most irritating thing with the book: - "Sheesh, man!" (Ch 1) - "COMING THROUGH! WOOT WOOT!" (Ch 13) Anyway, Ram is a Valon Jedi, meaning his ways are going to differ a bit from those brought up in the core areas. Padawan Lula makes a mental note of this later. She and her Force sensitive friend Zeen are with Lula's master Kantam Sy on Zeen's homeworld Trymant IV to determine the destruction the Nihil left behind. (side note: It wasn't until I was almost done with this that I learned Lula and Zeen are from one of the comics subseries. One thing that I like about THR series is that it's okay if you don't consume all the media, as anyone brought in from another source/thread/subseries is woven in and broadly explained well. I honestly just thought this was a bit of an info dump like with Light of the Jedi). They get a message from Vernestra Rwoh about the Nihil raiders. Then the adults Zeen grew up around act like children. "Kill them! You're Jedi dogs!" and then the leader goes "Back inside, my insolent children," to them. It's just unnecessary and definitely could have been phrased better. It's inane, even for a children's book. Another inane word to be in a Star Wars book: "doodads" (Ch 7) I feel like a lot with the Nihil is glossed over which at first left me feeling fuzzy headed about what was even going on before I realized I'm supposed to feel that way [as an adult] because this is a children's book. I still feel like I missed a lot of the story somehow but I still enjoyed it. I think I was too focused on what the Nihil were actually doing, which prevented me from retaining most of what I read. Ram realizes the Nihil have come to Valo, and tries to mind trick a security guard. The errors with that are hilariously realistic. Any other time we've seen someone try mental manipulation, it's either failed entirely or gone perfect. But of course that must be rare, and weird things are bound to happen. I really enjoyed that scene. Regarding attachments, Lula has a great conversation with Vernestra about what it means to 'be attached' to something in a detrimental way. Jedi of course understand that sentient beings are sentient due to how they feel and emote; but attachments mean being selfish and not actually loving. Would you let someone live if it meant not seeing them again? Would you fight for the life of an enemy because of their sentience? Or will you do what it takes to keep someone close to you because you can't bear the thought of losing them? I had a conversation about Anakin's attachment to Padmé with some students at the end of this past school year, and Older sums up those conversations very well. Ram gets a message out that makes it to Vernestra, Lula, and Zeen, so they all end up together on Valo. There, he explains that "Crashpoint Tower" is what locals call the place where people like to practice speeder maneuvers...which don't always end well. They all learn that not only were the Nihil never defeated, but they were biding their time to wreak destruction through the galaxy. It's pretty awful what they do (though again, as mentioned above, it's glossed over a lot). Oh, and Drengir are there, but the way in which they're introduced definitely made me think of Vongforming a planet. The twist at the end with the Drengir is extremely interesting.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Paul Viebranz

    Star Wars: The High Republic - Race to Crashpoint Tower by Daniel José Older is the second middle-grade novel in the sprawling High Republic publishing franchise. It takes place in the second wave of storytelling, concurrently with the adult novel The Rising Storm by Cavan Scott, and is as much an extension of Older's own ongoing comic series, IDW's The High Republic Adventures, as it is a sequel to the previous middle-grade novel, A Test of Courage by Justina Ireland. As in The Rising Storm, ch Star Wars: The High Republic - Race to Crashpoint Tower by Daniel José Older is the second middle-grade novel in the sprawling High Republic publishing franchise. It takes place in the second wave of storytelling, concurrently with the adult novel The Rising Storm by Cavan Scott, and is as much an extension of Older's own ongoing comic series, IDW's The High Republic Adventures, as it is a sequel to the previous middle-grade novel, A Test of Courage by Justina Ireland. As in The Rising Storm, characters and plot threads from all of the existing High Republic material come into play here, from the aforementioned works to Marvel's ongoing High Republic comic series by Cavan Scott, Charles Soule's adult novel Light of the Jedi, and the YA novel Into the Dark by Claudia Gray. This interconnectivity is immensely satisfying to somebody like me who is keeping up with all of the stories as they're released, but I think each is well-suited to its medium and intended audience, and could be enjoyed on its own merits. So, Race to Crashpoint Tower follows all-new character Ram Jamoram, a Padawan on the planet Valo, and another Padawan, Lula Talisola, one of the two leads from Older's Adventures comics. Ram is a welcome oddity in the Jedi Order, an awkward young kid who is much more at home working on engines or droids than he is training with his lightsaber, or interfacing with other people. Introducing Jedi who fall outside the mold set by the Prequels is an ongoing thing in the High Republic stories, and not only do I love most of these oddball characters personally, but I find that it is both a wonderful message for younger readers especially, but also a bittersweet foreshadowing of the Clone Wars era-- SOMETHING must happen to the Jedi that they're all so similar, and so dogmatic, two centuries after the High Republic. In Crashpoint Tower, Ram needs to step outside his comfort zone to warn the Jedi, and the galaxy at large, about an imminent threat from the dastardly Nihil. Lula, meanwhile, is very much the young Jedi we know from Adventures: highly capable but full of self-doubt nonetheless. Again, this is a perfect character for younger readers, showing that no matter how confident somebody may appear, it's just as likely they're very unsure of themselves. It's dedication and perseverance that matter, not just raw talent. This book rollicks along at a breakneck pace, right alongside the events of The Rising Storm. The Republic Fair on Valo is under siege by the Nihil, and Older wastes very little time getting into the action. I found that the pacing kept me wanting to read more, and the weaving in of plot threads and characters from other High Republic books (like the Drengir from Into the Dark and the Marvel comics, Vernestra Rwoh from A Test of Courage, Ty Yorrick from The Rising Storm, and so on) was all done organically, and, again, felt very satisfying in how it painted a fuller picture of the Republic Fair, and fleshed out new and existing characters in simple but meaningful ways. This is the eleventh Star Wars middle grade novel I've read in the new canon (shoutout to the Jedi Apprentice series by Jude Watson!), after the four Journey to the Force Awakens tie-ins (Smuggler's Run, The Weapon of a Jedi, Moving Target, and Before the Awakening), The Last Jedi: Cobalt Squadron, The Mighty Chewbacca in the Forest of Fear, Guardians of the Whills, The Legends of Luke Skywalker, Spark of the Resistance, and of course A Test of Courage. I have to say, this is far and away the best one. It felt like it had the most meaningful story, the most engaging characters, and it was actually very genuinely funny, eliciting several laughs out loud throughout. Most of those books are just fine, but quite forgettable, perhaps with the exceptions of Mighty Chewbacca (because it's Chewie, and it felt a lot like an Indiana Jones adventure) and Legends of Luke Skywalker (because that was an anthology with a few very interesting stories). Both A Test of Courage and Race to Crashpoint Tower feel like important parts of a larger picture, not inconsequential tie-ins with frustratingly low stakes. (Again, to be fair, none of these were awful books, but the two High Republic books prove that you can tell an engaging and meaningful story within this age range.) Having been disappointed by some of Older's Star Wars work in the past, I've been incredibly pleasantly surprised with his ongoing comic, and now this middle-grade book. I would highly recommend Race to Crashpoint Tower to anybody interested in the High Republic series, and I would suggest reading it AFTER The Rising Storm (if you're reading that one).

  22. 5 out of 5

    Saimi Korhonen

    ”But Jedi weren’t supposed to have attatchments, even to the past, even to a simpler, safer life. If this was the time she’d been born into, she would face it with everything she had. It was the only choice.” 3,5/5! Race to Crashpoint Tower is the second middle grade novel in the High Republic saga and takes place at the same time as The Rising Storm, during the Republic Fair on Valo. Ram Jomaram is a young padawan who wants nothing more than to just hang out in his garage building and fixing thin ”But Jedi weren’t supposed to have attatchments, even to the past, even to a simpler, safer life. If this was the time she’d been born into, she would face it with everything she had. It was the only choice.” 3,5/5! Race to Crashpoint Tower is the second middle grade novel in the High Republic saga and takes place at the same time as The Rising Storm, during the Republic Fair on Valo. Ram Jomaram is a young padawan who wants nothing more than to just hang out in his garage building and fixing things, but when disaster strikes the fair, he is swept up into a grand adventure alongside padawan Lula Talisola and Zeen, a force sensitive girl who is not a jedi. Together they face off marauders and beasts, as well as their own fears and insecurities. Race to Crashpoint Tower was a super fun and quick read. It complements the Rising Storm very well, and reading them back to back in a span of a few days was a lot of fun and felt very rewarding. I really like Daniel José Older's writing and I love how he embraces the weird and silly aspects of Star Wars in all his works - his tone and way of storytelling works so wonderfully with middle grade. Ram Jomaram is a precious boy and I really liked him. I definitely relate to characters like him – characters who do not dream big or want to achieve greatness and are happiest just going about their day just doing what they love to do – more than I do to the more heroic, ambitious and adventurous lead characters SW has. But that's not to say that I don't love, say, Lula Talisola, who is all about wanting to become great and powerful and wise. She is also such a lovely character, and this book made me like her - and Zeen - even more than I already did. The trio of Ram, Lula and Zeen was such a joy to follow. I liked the friendships that were formed in this story and how the already established friendships - such as Lula and Zeen's - were deepened and explored even further. I also loved how Daniel José Older wrote about what being a Jedi really means and how he explored the complex relationship Jedi have with their emotions. They are taught to not get attached to things and all that, but as Lula says in this book, she can't help but form them - as can't any Jedi. I love the conversation between Lula and Vernestra - another character I love, and a character who is such a good counterpart to Lula's (their meeting was so great!) - about emotions, feelings, love and attachments, and how those are not inherently bad or destructive things. A Jedi can love and care - they must - but they cannot allow themselves to be selfish with that love and care. It's a great moment, and such a wonderful moment for Lula's development. One thing I also find fascinating is seeing these galactic events and disasters from kids' point of views. These are padawans who never thought they would actually live through something like this and for whom combat training has only ever been about traditions and hypotheticals. It's fascinating - and sometimes quite sad - to see these kids realise that their lives are changing and that they can't control any of that. It's a common theme with all the Jedi of the High Republic, one that I really like, but seeing it through the eyes of kids and teens is especially impactful. However, despite this book being a lot of fun and me really enjoying the characters and the themes discussed in the book, I don't think the storyline itself was particularly memorable, which is why I've decided to give this book 3,5/5 stars. I also think the book could've been a bit longer and more in depth with its characters, like A Test of Courage was. I would still happily recommend you read it, though. It's not the best High Republic novel, but it is definitely still a worthwhile read with some amazing stuff in it!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Zakri Edwards

    Book 2 of The High Republic Middle Reader Books - See bottom of review for suggested High Republic Reading Timeline Review for NetGalley ARC Race to Crashpoint Tower written by Daniel José Older was written for middle readers, ages 8-12, and it is set in the High Republic Era of the Star Wars Universe following the events of "The Great Disaster" around 200 years before the The Phantom Menace. This book is preceeded by A Test of Courage and The High Republic Adventures. If the readers are avid Star Book 2 of The High Republic Middle Reader Books - See bottom of review for suggested High Republic Reading Timeline Review for NetGalley ARC Race to Crashpoint Tower written by Daniel José Older was written for middle readers, ages 8-12, and it is set in the High Republic Era of the Star Wars Universe following the events of "The Great Disaster" around 200 years before the The Phantom Menace. This book is preceeded by A Test of Courage and The High Republic Adventures. If the readers are avid Star Wars fans who must read everything in an order, it should follow The Rising Storm. (See suggested reading order below) This book in the series follows Padawan Ram Jomaram and his droid V-18 on the planet Valo as the Valons prepare for the arrival of visitors for the Republic Fair. It has many cameo appearances from the other High Republic publications, and as with all THR stories, there is an attack by the Nihil and even Drengir. Ram seems to be the only one who recognizes the threat, and it becomes his responsibility to notify the Starlight Beacon and call for reinforcements before all chaos ensues. For middle readers, this is a fantastic story. It is fast-paced and straightforward, the characters are well developed, and the villains are to be feared without causing pre-teen nightmares. For those who have read the other THR stories, they will be pleased by Older's use of known characters and the way he overlaps them into the meta-narrative. The High Republic Suggested Reading Timeline: - Starlight: Go Together, Part 1 by Charles Soule (SW Insider 199 Short Story) - Light of the Jedi by Charles Soule - The High Republic (Marvel) 1 - Starlight: Go Together, Part 2 by Charles Soule (SW Insider 200 Short Story) - A Test of Courage by Justina Ireland - Into the Dark by Claudia Gray - The High Republic (Marvel) 2-6 - The High Republic Adventures (IDW) 1-5 - Starlight: First Duty, Parts 1 and 2 by Cavan Scott (SW Insider 201-202 Short Story) - Starlight: Hidden Danger by Justina Ireland (SW Insider 203 Short Story) - The Rising Storm by Cavan Scott - Race to Crashpoint Tower by Daniel José Older

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mila

    The hyperspace disaster behind them, the Republic is ready to move forward with it's belief of peace and unity for a better galaxy. The Republic Fair, meant to be a great celebration and showcase of this message, is about to take place on Valo. The threat of the Nihil is thought to be over but security is upgraded to protect all the guests, including the Chancellor herself, Lina Soh. Jedi Padawan Ram Jomaram should be preparing with the others but instead has managed to step out to fix a broken The hyperspace disaster behind them, the Republic is ready to move forward with it's belief of peace and unity for a better galaxy. The Republic Fair, meant to be a great celebration and showcase of this message, is about to take place on Valo. The threat of the Nihil is thought to be over but security is upgraded to protect all the guests, including the Chancellor herself, Lina Soh. Jedi Padawan Ram Jomaram should be preparing with the others but instead has managed to step out to fix a broken security speeder. It is there droid V-18 finds Ram and informs him that the security alert has been tripped off at the comms tower and the comms themselves are now glitchy preventing him from calling to alert anyone. Ram sets off to investigate Crashpoint Tower where he runs into the dreaded Nihil. Things go from bad to worse when he is mistakenly apprehended by local security trying to warn the Republic of the attempted sabotage. With the help of some new friends investigating the Nihil, will Ram be able to deliver his warning? Originally, I'd planned to read The Rising Storm first to see where this story tied into it but when presented with the chance to listen to the audiobook I couldn't wait any longer. I'm happy to report Rase to Crashpoint Tower stands well on its own. It was an absolute thrill and pleasure to listen to. Usually not one for audiobooks, I really enjoyed Todd Haberkorn narration and found his voice was perfect for a middlegrade title such as this. The different voices were well done and the intro music added a fun flair to the experience. At about 3 hours and 20 minutes long, it's a title the whole family could enjoy together. Race To Crashpoint Tower is a fantastic addition to the High Republic and the best middlegrade Star Wars novel I've read in some time. Filled with action, high stakes, menacing villains, comedy, and a great cast of characters, this title brings everything great about The High Republic to the middlegrade audience. Whereas the first High Republic middlegrade title, A Test of Courage, didn't quite get to show us the villains of this era in full force, Crashpoint Tower does. This was a very welcome surprise as was the inclusion of characters from Daniel Jose Olders Star Wars The High Republic Adventures comic series. What I love most about this era of Star Wars is how everyone is able to follow along with novels ranging from middlegrade, teen, and adult, to comics, picture books, and even an upcoming manga title. This makes the series not only accessible to fans of all ages, but very rich in content as characters show up in different titles. Reading every title makes quite the satisfying experience and no title has proved that point better than Race to Crashpoint Tower. I would highly encourage any adult fan to give it a read! Thank you to NetGalley for providing a digital copy to review.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Lovitt

    The whole for the whole, each part for the role it plays. A mantra that Jedi Padawan Ram Jomaram keeps at the forefront of his mind as he finds himself in a race against time as he discovers the Nihil’s plans to crash the festivities at the Republic Fair. (READ MORE: https://yourmoneygeek.com/review-dani...) Race to Crashpoint Tower is a junior Star Wars novel, set just before the disastrous events of The Rising Storm on the planet Valo.  If Justina Ireland’s A Test of Courage was your favorite bo The whole for the whole, each part for the role it plays. A mantra that Jedi Padawan Ram Jomaram keeps at the forefront of his mind as he finds himself in a race against time as he discovers the Nihil’s plans to crash the festivities at the Republic Fair. (READ MORE: https://yourmoneygeek.com/review-dani...) Race to Crashpoint Tower is a junior Star Wars novel, set just before the disastrous events of The Rising Storm on the planet Valo.  If Justina Ireland’s A Test of Courage was your favorite book from the first phase of The High Republic, then you are bound to love Daniel José Older’s Race to Crashpoint Tower. With a cast composed primarily of Jedi Padawan, readers are treated to an adventure where the young characters are faced with serious situations and it makes for a truly fun read. We might even get to see a favorite from A Test of Courage in a new role.  For fans of IDW’s The High Republic Adventures comic series, we finally get to see our beloved heroines Lula and Zeen brought to life in a book! As much as I love seeing their misadventures in the monthly issues, there was something special about reading their points of view in Race to Crashpoint Tower.  The story is told in three parts centered around Ram and Lula’s points of view as they are thrown into the thick of things, fighting against not only the brutal Nihil assault but the fearsome and carnivorous Drengir. Yes, the very same Drengir we read about in Claudia Gray’s Into the Dark and seen in Cavan Scott’s Star Wars: The High Republic comic series at Marvel. I chuckled a number of times while reading the dialogue Older chose for the terrifying living — and hungry — plant.  One thing that I love about Daniel José Older’s Star Wars tales is that there is always a concentrated effort to usher in diversity while making it effortlessly genuine. He doesn’t draw a circle around it and point it out, he makes it as natural as it is in our day-to-day lives. These characters not only exist, but they are fully fleshed-out characters that play an important part in the story. It’s one of the strongest parts of The High Republic-era. At long last, there are Star Wars characters that fans can see themselves in and they’re not silent background characters — they’re actually the main characters! It warms my heart to know that so many of my friends are finally seeing themselves and their experiences brought to life in their favorite franchise.  You will not want to miss out on this High Republic-era novel. It’s fun, humorous, adventure-filled, filled with clever and endearing characters, and the perfect convergence of so many of the stories we’ve come to love over the past six months. 

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael Lee

    Star Wars The High Republic: Race to Crashpoint Tower is an awesome story full of action, adventure, good one liners, funny droids, Jedi, characters who have self doubt who grow to overcome those fears and more. I loved reading this book. It's a fast read that's full of intense action sequences that would translate so well into a film if this book was ever adapted into a cartoon or a movie. The opening scroll of this book should have began with the word, CHAOS! Similar to how the Revenge of the S Star Wars The High Republic: Race to Crashpoint Tower is an awesome story full of action, adventure, good one liners, funny droids, Jedi, characters who have self doubt who grow to overcome those fears and more. I loved reading this book. It's a fast read that's full of intense action sequences that would translate so well into a film if this book was ever adapted into a cartoon or a movie. The opening scroll of this book should have began with the word, CHAOS! Similar to how the Revenge of the Sith opening scroll began with the word, WAR! The battle that ensues at the end of this great Star wars The High Republic novel is pure chaos. There is a several chapters long battle between the Nihil, the Jedi, and a new villain the Drengir. This epic battle is beautifully written and has so many twists, turns, and problems to solve. The story is told from the points of view of several characters including the young Padawans Lula Talisola from IDW's Star Wars: The High Republic Adventures comics and Ram Jomaram. The friendship and bond that is growing between Lula Talisola and Zeen is something we see throughout the story. If you want to see more of their adventures please make sure you pickup the awesome Star Wars: The High Republic Adventures comics by IDW. Ram Jomaram is a reluctant Jedi and hero. At the start of Star Wars The High Republic Race to Crashpoint Tower he doesn't want to be a part of this growing conflict between the Nihil and the Jedi. Ram would be happy just tinkering with spare parts in a garage. As the story progresses we get to see him grow into a hero and a more confident Padawan. Ram Jomaram also has some very entertaining sidekicks, the Bonbraks and his droid V-18. This is Star Wars so this quirky droid and the Bokbraks have some of the best lines in the entire book. Vernestra Rwoh is also in this book. She is quickly becoming my favorite Jedi in the High Republic era. She has appeared in several of the the Star Wars The High Republic books. She keeps growing and becomes more confident as a young Jedi Knight. She even takes on a mentor role to Lula and Zeen which I enjoyed reading because all three characters learn from each other. The new villain in this story is the Drengir. I won't say anything about them other than they are awesome. If you are a G.I. Joe fan and remember the monster at Castle Destro, I think there is a lot of similarities between that monster and the Drengir, except the Drengir has a lot more personality. In short I high recommend reading Star Wars The High Republic: Race to Crashpoint Tower. It’s an awesome book. Trust in the Force. Stay awesome and keep reading!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    This dad read “Race to Crashpoint Tower” by Daniel José Older, this wave’s middle grade point of entry for younger readers. I must start off by saying I find this whole adult/YA/middle grade setup somewhat laughable. I get that the good folks at Disney/Del Rey are trying to find appropriate onramps for Star Wars readers of all ages but we all know what’s really going on: us adults are reading absolutely everything! Also, how confusing would it be for a middle grader to just read the books “for t This dad read “Race to Crashpoint Tower” by Daniel José Older, this wave’s middle grade point of entry for younger readers. I must start off by saying I find this whole adult/YA/middle grade setup somewhat laughable. I get that the good folks at Disney/Del Rey are trying to find appropriate onramps for Star Wars readers of all ages but we all know what’s really going on: us adults are reading absolutely everything! Also, how confusing would it be for a middle grader to just read the books “for them”? Every single High Republic story, which all stand on their own artistic merits, are connected and each author seems to be writing with the assumption that we’re all keeping up. So instead of calling it a “middle grade” book, I will simply refer to “Race to Crashpoint Tower” as the smaller, quicker-to-read novel that tells a cool side story on Valo and has some really cool illustrations thrown in. Thankfully that’s not all is has going for it! We’re introduced to Jedi Padawan Ram Jomaram, a teenager who loves spending his time with his droid pal V-18 tinkering in the garage. He and his master reside on the planter Valo which is preparing for the epic Republic Fair. Turns out the main comm tower for the planet, located at Crashpoint Tower, is glitchy and all other Jedi are busy with the fair so it’s up to Ram and V-18 to check things out. All definitely is not well and Ram makes it his personal mission to make sure the Jedi Order is alerted and the enemies defeated. What is really fun about “Crashpoint” is that it tells its own story while interconnecting to other High Republic works. The main connection point is obviously “The Rising Storm” as the narratives of both books happen concurrently but what was a real delight was having character’s from IDW’s “The High Republic Adventures” along for the ride too! Lula Talisola and Zeen Mrala are front and center and make great teammates with Ram – I can only hope this means we’ll be seeing them all again in future comics. Older seems like he’s having a blast – there’s plenty of comic relief mixed in with all the action and teenage emotions. His writing is vivid and blends the action/adventure with the human struggle beautifully. I also have to give a special shoutout to artist Peter Antonsson who made his High Rebulic debut earlier this year in Justina Ireland’s “A Test of Courage” – his work in “Crashpoint” is awesome! Del Rey can I get my request for “The Art of the High Republic” in now? I’ll also need a place to purchase some prints – thanks!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tabitha Page

    “Because I care about life. And the light. I’d save them because it’s the right thing to do." Race To Crashpoint Tower, written by NYT best-selling author Daniel José Older is the 2nd middle-grade novel set in the new High Republic Era of Star Wars. In this novel, we are placed on the beautiful planet of Valo, where the Republic Fair is to be hosted. Race To Crashpoint Tower is a fast-paced book, with entertaining action, and with fun twists and turns to be excited for. This is a quick and fun bo “Because I care about life. And the light. I’d save them because it’s the right thing to do." Race To Crashpoint Tower, written by NYT best-selling author Daniel José Older is the 2nd middle-grade novel set in the new High Republic Era of Star Wars. In this novel, we are placed on the beautiful planet of Valo, where the Republic Fair is to be hosted. Race To Crashpoint Tower is a fast-paced book, with entertaining action, and with fun twists and turns to be excited for. This is a quick and fun book, and the adventure that we are taken on is a pleasure to read. Set simultaneously with the adult novel The Rising Storm, Race To Crashpoint Tower follows in its middle-grade predecessor (A Test Of Courage) in which we focus on a smaller set of younger characters during a slice of the main action and battle. These delightful characters are Ram Jomaram, who loves to work as a mechanic and fix up machinery, and the force helps him understand machines like droids or ships more than others could! Speaking of droids, his trusty V-18 and the cute and entertaining Bonbraks help bring light and humor to the story. Ram reminded me of a young Anakin Skywalker. Although not expecting (or wanting) to be involved in the action, Ram faces up to the challenge of fixing the broken comms tower, which the Jedi desperately need to be fixed after the Nihil sabotaged it! Secondly, we have Lula Talisola, the main character of Daniel José Older’s IDW High Republic Adventures comics. Although she stars in that, and it would be helpful to read at least the first issue to get more background on her, Older does a great job of understanding that and introducing her so that the audience won’t miss out on her backstory! (However if you can, that comic line is great and I highly recommend!) When we first see her, we feel the envy and self-doubt she has for herself, after hearing and seeing Jedi like Vernestra Rwoh, who happens to be 17 and already a fully-fledged Jedi Knight, and the youngest knight in generations. She even gets to interact with Vernestra, and their interactions are sweet and heartfelt, in which Vern acts as a role model and guides and comforts Lula. This was probably my favorite parts of the book for me. Lula’s goal is to be the best Jedi she can be, and as someone who is very ambitious herself, I can relate A LOT to Lula, and I think many younger readers will as well. We also see Lula’s closest friend, Zeen Mrala, who is force-sensitive, but was found too late to be trained in the ways of a Jedi (yet that doesn’t stop her), the way Lula and Zeen interact and act as a support system for one another is great! I can’t write this review and not mention the GORGEOUS illustrations from Petur Antonsson. They help bring the story to life, and aid the readers in picturing the scenes we are reading about. One of the main things I love about this Era is its connectivity to each other. Every book there are characters that interact with one another, and who overlap (such as Vern from ATOC appearing yet again in this book, and how Lula stars in both the IDW comics and Race to Crashpoint Tower!). Although that could hurt some readers experience if they aren’t reading every book, I just think it’s a great way for people to read more and feel excitement when a character they love makes a unexpected appearance. This helps make the High Republic era feel so much more fleshed out, especially with other media types (like movies and TV shows) not being represented (Unless? Maybe soon? Hopefully? Sign me up!) I cannot wait to read more of Lula, Zeen, Vernestra, and Ram in the other books during the next waves/phases. I give Race to Crashpoint Tower 4.5 stars! I would highly recommend and encourage the High Republic fans to not skip these middle-grade novels, and if you have children or you’re a younger reader, pick this one up, you won’t regret it!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sal Perales

    Welcome back to The High Republic! In Daniel José Older’s latest book we get all kinds of adventures and excitement that a Jedi may or may not crave! Like most younger reader books, the story is fast paced and action packed and (as Older promised) dinosaur filled! The new characters are dimensional and original which again, is something Older is great at. Original characters and storytelling! While this book is the shortest of the second wave of the first phase… or something… the book is packed f Welcome back to The High Republic! In Daniel José Older’s latest book we get all kinds of adventures and excitement that a Jedi may or may not crave! Like most younger reader books, the story is fast paced and action packed and (as Older promised) dinosaur filled! The new characters are dimensional and original which again, is something Older is great at. Original characters and storytelling! While this book is the shortest of the second wave of the first phase… or something… the book is packed full of Star Wars spirit, energy, and wackiness! And I love it. Daniel José Older is one of my FAVORITE authors because of his ability to give us such original characters! It’s so refreshing to see something unique in these timeless tales and that strength is definitely here in this book! This is a must-read for any High Republic fan of course, but I’d also add in the readers who stand outside of the norm. Ram is a Jedi who is different from all the other Jedi and watching him find his strength in that is powerful and empowering. Watching these young ones rise to the challenges before them is masterfully done and I can’t wait to see what else is in store for them. So kick back in your garage with your Bonbrak homies and check it out! Did I mention there’s a flying dinosaur?

  30. 4 out of 5

    Karen Cohn

    This was a quick, easy, and generally entertaining book. As a standalone book, it was fairly good; as a book in written the Star Wars universe it was somewhat lacking, in terms of connecting to the details of the genre. One of the Jedi masters has more than one Padawan and is also training a Force practitioner who was too old at the discovery of her ability to be officially trained; these are things that just don't happen in the Star Wars canon, and are therefore somewhat disconcerting to those This was a quick, easy, and generally entertaining book. As a standalone book, it was fairly good; as a book in written the Star Wars universe it was somewhat lacking, in terms of connecting to the details of the genre. One of the Jedi masters has more than one Padawan and is also training a Force practitioner who was too old at the discovery of her ability to be officially trained; these are things that just don't happen in the Star Wars canon, and are therefore somewhat disconcerting to those looking for books that fit the existing parameters. These issues aside, if you are not a stickler for details of the genre, this is a nice read. As with several other books published recently, this book is part of The High Republic subset, dealing with the attempts by the NIhil to overthrow the Republic by destroying hyperspace; as with all of the novels in this collection that I have read, this one has major characters who are all Padawan learners or very recently promoted Jedi Knights, which makes the stories more accessible and interesting to younger readers. Recommended for younger readers and those who don't mind canon inconsistencies.

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