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How Do You Fight a Horse-Sized Duck?: Secrets to Succeeding at Interview Mind Games and Getting the Job You Want

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Learn how to succeed at interview mind games and win job offers at A‑list companies, with more than eighty difficult and devious questions, puzzles, and brain teasers Each year about 28 million Americans begin a search for a new job. Many more live in the age of the permanent job search, their online profiles eternally awaiting a better offer. Job seekers are more mobile an Learn how to succeed at interview mind games and win job offers at A‑list companies, with more than eighty difficult and devious questions, puzzles, and brain teasers Each year about 28 million Americans begin a search for a new job. Many more live in the age of the permanent job search, their online profiles eternally awaiting a better offer. Job seekers are more mobile and better informed than ever, aspiring to work for employers offering an appealing culture, a robust menu of perks, and opportunities for personal fulfillment and advancement. The result is that millions of applications stream to the handful of companies that regularly top listings of the best companies to work for: Apple, Netflix, Amazon, Alphabet, Disney, SpaceX, Oracle, Pricewaterhouse-Coopers, and others. Tesla has received as many as 200 applications for each open position. How do selective employers choose which people to hire? It’s through interviews asking uniquely demanding questions testing imagination, persistence, and creativity, like:    Can an astronaut throw a baseball so it hits Earth?    If you had $2,000, how would you double it in 24 hours?    How is a milk carton like a plane seat?    Chicken McNuggets come in boxes of 6, 9, and 20. What’s the largest number of McNuggets that McDonald’s can’t sell you?    How many dogs in the world have the exact same number of hairs? How Do You Fight a Horse-Sized Duck? explores the new world of interviewing at A-list employers. It reveals more than eighty notoriously challenging interview questions and supplies both answers and a general strategy for creative problem-solving.


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Learn how to succeed at interview mind games and win job offers at A‑list companies, with more than eighty difficult and devious questions, puzzles, and brain teasers Each year about 28 million Americans begin a search for a new job. Many more live in the age of the permanent job search, their online profiles eternally awaiting a better offer. Job seekers are more mobile an Learn how to succeed at interview mind games and win job offers at A‑list companies, with more than eighty difficult and devious questions, puzzles, and brain teasers Each year about 28 million Americans begin a search for a new job. Many more live in the age of the permanent job search, their online profiles eternally awaiting a better offer. Job seekers are more mobile and better informed than ever, aspiring to work for employers offering an appealing culture, a robust menu of perks, and opportunities for personal fulfillment and advancement. The result is that millions of applications stream to the handful of companies that regularly top listings of the best companies to work for: Apple, Netflix, Amazon, Alphabet, Disney, SpaceX, Oracle, Pricewaterhouse-Coopers, and others. Tesla has received as many as 200 applications for each open position. How do selective employers choose which people to hire? It’s through interviews asking uniquely demanding questions testing imagination, persistence, and creativity, like:    Can an astronaut throw a baseball so it hits Earth?    If you had $2,000, how would you double it in 24 hours?    How is a milk carton like a plane seat?    Chicken McNuggets come in boxes of 6, 9, and 20. What’s the largest number of McNuggets that McDonald’s can’t sell you?    How many dogs in the world have the exact same number of hairs? How Do You Fight a Horse-Sized Duck? explores the new world of interviewing at A-list employers. It reveals more than eighty notoriously challenging interview questions and supplies both answers and a general strategy for creative problem-solving.

43 review for How Do You Fight a Horse-Sized Duck?: Secrets to Succeeding at Interview Mind Games and Getting the Job You Want

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tracey Allen at Carpe Librum

    I have a background in HR and still offer interview coaching services, so when I saw Bloomsbury were publishing a book about interview questions, I requested a review copy right away. How Do You Fight a Horse-Sized Duck? And Other Perplexing Puzzles from the Toughest Interviews in the World by William Poundstone offers a comprehensive look at the evolution of the interview, including: psychometric testing, behavioural interview questions, work sampling, personality testing, video and group inter I have a background in HR and still offer interview coaching services, so when I saw Bloomsbury were publishing a book about interview questions, I requested a review copy right away. How Do You Fight a Horse-Sized Duck? And Other Perplexing Puzzles from the Toughest Interviews in the World by William Poundstone offers a comprehensive look at the evolution of the interview, including: psychometric testing, behavioural interview questions, work sampling, personality testing, video and group interviews. Employers always strive to employ interview techniques that are most predictive of job performance by a potential candidate, and many of the logic puzzles and brain teasers posed by companies such as Apple, Amazon and Google are an attempt to gain insight into the problem-solving abilities and creative thinking styles demonstrated by job seekers. The author then goes on to present a whole heap of interview questions used by some well known US companies, as well as providing a working knowledge of the answers and a solid explanation of how a candidate should go about answering these types of questions. "A hammer and a nail cost $1.10, and the hammer costs one dollar more than the nail. How much does the nail cost?" Page 111* At times, reading How Do You Fight a Horse-Sized Duck? by William Poundstone was akin to reading a maths or statistics text book, and I expect it will be most useful to the dedicated job seeker looking for some insight and keen to prepare for any eventuality. Those readers would do well to check out another book I read on the topic this year, #EntryLevelBoss: a 9-step guide for finding a job you like (and actually getting hired to do it) by Alexa Shoen. "For what it's worth, a 2013 study by David Comer Kidd and Emanuele Castano reported that reading literary fiction improved performance on an emotional intelligence test that included recognition of facial expressions. It's possible that reading about richly realized fictional characters primes readers to be more attuned to clues about other people's emotions." Page 107 Book lovers already know that reading every day builds vocabulary, improves comprehension, enhances brain connectivity and emotional intelligence, but it's always nice to see this recognised in other areas of science and study. From what I can tell, How Do You Fight a Horse-Sized Duck? seems to be an up to date account of the job seeker's experience in America informed by the accounts of job seekers who have applied for roles with these top tier organisations. I suspect that here in Australia, we are yet to encounter these interview puzzlers on a regular basis, but if the US job market has taught us anything with the increasing popularity of recorded job interview videos, this will soon follow. How Do You Fight a Horse-Sized Duck? is a good read and I enjoyed putting some of these questions to my husband. *Feel free to send me your answer and I'll let you know if you were right or not! * Copy courtesy of Bloomsbury Australia *

  2. 4 out of 5

    Florent Diverchy

    Don't take the audiobook I took the audiobook. It's ok for the first (interesting) part about the history of job interview. For the accumulation of puzzles, you realize that you would have been better with the book version, a piece of paper and a pencil, try to solve them by yourself. So in the end I was bored by the unending succession of puzzle, but it is certainly my fault. Sorry William. Don't take the audiobook I took the audiobook. It's ok for the first (interesting) part about the history of job interview. For the accumulation of puzzles, you realize that you would have been better with the book version, a piece of paper and a pencil, try to solve them by yourself. So in the end I was bored by the unending succession of puzzle, but it is certainly my fault. Sorry William.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Mikhail Filatov

    This book a sequel to "How would you move Mount Fuji". First part, with an overview of the history of interviewing (starting from Thomas Edison questionnaire) is quite interesting. The second part contains a lot of puzzles. Not bad, but not really applicable to Software engineering anymore, where most companies switched from puzzles to LeetCode. This book a sequel to "How would you move Mount Fuji". First part, with an overview of the history of interviewing (starting from Thomas Edison questionnaire) is quite interesting. The second part contains a lot of puzzles. Not bad, but not really applicable to Software engineering anymore, where most companies switched from puzzles to LeetCode.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Hodgson

    I preferred the first section with the history of hiring. These modern games were interesting, and I had no idea interviews were moving in this direction. This book will give some tricks so that if you need to interview you are less surprised. All interviews are flawed but hard to believe job offers now come down to weird little riddles like when Bilbo meets Gollum.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Isley Forrester

    The teen swiped this book and is re-reading it. Evidently I will never get to read. I got 2 thumbs up when I asked how the book was rated.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Qi Jian

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Taylor

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tobias J

  9. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Goodridge

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jorge

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

  12. 4 out of 5

    Beverly Hallfrisch

  13. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Lemieux

  14. 5 out of 5

    David Droppo

  15. 4 out of 5

    Petrucha

  16. 5 out of 5

    Katarina

  17. 4 out of 5

    V

  18. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  19. 5 out of 5

    Micielle

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bailey S.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Gerhart

  22. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ahmed

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kye Cantey

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christine

  25. 4 out of 5

    amy

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

  28. 4 out of 5

    Bettye Short

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bill Schlott

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mbk

  31. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

  32. 5 out of 5

    Margo

  33. 5 out of 5

    Maryam

  34. 5 out of 5

    Dayna

  35. 5 out of 5

    Tim Ryan

  36. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Wallace

  37. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

  38. 5 out of 5

    Wendy Phung

  39. 5 out of 5

    Liz Miller

  40. 5 out of 5

    Pat

  41. 5 out of 5

    Joan

  42. 5 out of 5

    Lori Bennett

  43. 4 out of 5

    ProudMom

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