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30 review for Sour Milk: A Short, Sharp Horror Shock

  1. 5 out of 5

    Louie Matos The Mustache

    True life horror usually cuts deepest, and Sour Milk by Morgan Delaney cuts deep! The book amounts to short story length and involves child abuse at an orphanage that seeks to dehumanize and demean its youthful charges. Trigger warning for child, sexual abuse, and the murder of children. This is a hard read, but not so original that the constant reader will not have seen this before. I give points for the disturbing storyline, but not so much for originality. This is not a tepid narrative. There True life horror usually cuts deepest, and Sour Milk by Morgan Delaney cuts deep! The book amounts to short story length and involves child abuse at an orphanage that seeks to dehumanize and demean its youthful charges. Trigger warning for child, sexual abuse, and the murder of children. This is a hard read, but not so original that the constant reader will not have seen this before. I give points for the disturbing storyline, but not so much for originality. This is not a tepid narrative. There is some shock and outrage, but I believe it to be a middle of the road piece.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sea Caummisar

    This is one tough read due to the nature of child abuse. It was still interesting. A crazy lady running an orphanage, giving all boys the same name, same name for all the girls. That was kinda confusing, but not too bad. One phrase kept popping up, several times ( I only highlighted it a couple times). I have no clue as to what it means. Overall,, for a short it's a decent story This is one tough read due to the nature of child abuse. It was still interesting. A crazy lady running an orphanage, giving all boys the same name, same name for all the girls. That was kinda confusing, but not too bad. One phrase kept popping up, several times ( I only highlighted it a couple times). I have no clue as to what it means. Overall,, for a short it's a decent story

  3. 4 out of 5

    Victor Vilestone

    The author made the children’s home sound like a mini concentration camp, and to the unfortunate souls that had to reside in one, it probably felt like it too. The writing style was a little weird, or perhaps that was just me, but the book was still enjoyable. I managed to download this for free off Amazon and it’s worth a read if you get a chance.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Carey

    But why? And also what?!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Levine

    Yes, I got this from Amazon for free. Where to start…? It was described as a short, SHARP, horror story. How did sharp play into the story? Otherwise, yes, it was short. Horror? Not so much. I think because I was so confused throughout the story as to what the beep was going on, any “horror-ness” or scary aspects just didn’t happen. How this story ended up with so many high ratings baffles me. Maybe it’s because I’m an in-depth reader, whether I want to be or not, so any mistakes or inconsistenc Yes, I got this from Amazon for free. Where to start…? It was described as a short, SHARP, horror story. How did sharp play into the story? Otherwise, yes, it was short. Horror? Not so much. I think because I was so confused throughout the story as to what the beep was going on, any “horror-ness” or scary aspects just didn’t happen. How this story ended up with so many high ratings baffles me. Maybe it’s because I’m an in-depth reader, whether I want to be or not, so any mistakes or inconsistencies, questionable areas stand out to me like a sore thumb. Overall, I think the idea was interesting but the execution was poorly done. If this book was edited, I’d be surprised. There were a lot of mistakes. And not just relating to grammar, punctuation, spacing, etc., there were several scenes that were confusing. The point of view was out of this world. I’m mean it was all over the place. There was no consistency whatsoever. The reader would follow one character in one sentence, then the POV would change to a different character in the next. That is poor writing! It makes it harder for the reader to connect with the characters. If the story is plot-driven, then it’s fine to have multiple POV’s going from one character to the next in the same scene. If it’s character-driven, as is the case here, keep one POV per scene. There was the “&hellip” that kept popping up in dialogue throughout the story. I’m guessing this was relating to a formatting issue, shmaybe? I honestly have no clue. But that weirdness would replace other words and oftentimes leave me unsure as to what the character was saying. There were some strangely phrased sentences/descriptions or incorrect words used like, “He had a black belt around his waist.” Then “He could see that Gareth wasn’t wearing a belt either.” Sorry but Lee should have been able to tell whether it was a belt or not from the beginning, no matter which direction Gareth was facing. If he was wearing an apron, where was the bow to tie it? That should have been the number clue as to what he was wearing. You don’t use bows to tie belts, much less tie a belt period. Also during this time, Gareth was on all fours cleaning the floor naked. The line “The apron was pushed out in front of him” would suggest Gareth had a hard-on, to some degree. But if he was scared of Mr. Leonard and Miss Dunn, how/why would that be if he wasn’t even being touched? Or the more “calmer” incorrectly phrased sentence like, “Every surface needed to be cleaned and dusted.” Wouldn’t you dust first? Just saying. There’s a specific order one should follow. Or “They slammed open the room.” There were some random scene breaks. When the scene is taking place with the same characters in the same setting, why would you include a scene break? An instance where dialogue from two separate characters was not separated. So it went from one talking, some narrative, then the second character talking with no spacing in between. There were two instances when Miss Leonard was used instead of Miss Dunn. There were instances where the wrong tense was used, “A fire blazed in the fireplace and a breeze blew under the door DRIED Lee’s eyes.” Or “The night was cold and Gareth pushed some of the bags under the door to stop the DRAUGHT.” Most of the questions/comments I have that follow are related to how confusing this story was in certain areas. The most confusing part was relating to Mr. Leonard and Miss Dunn. I felt the author wanted the reader to think they were separate entities, but at the same time, he had me thinking it was they were the same crazy person. Confusion City! It’s like if Mr. Leonard, although described as being a dummy/mannequin made out of rubber and wood, weren’t alive, why would the kids be scared of him? I don’t know. Plus, the couple that visited saw him and it was “declared” he wasn’t real. If it was Miss Dunn dressing as “Mr. Leonard” the entire time, instead of just near the end, that wouldn’t make sense either because towards the end after Miss Dunn is killed, Mr. Leonard is still there. Plus, there was a specific scene in which Miss Dunn put on Mr. Leonard’s clothes and seemed to keep them on the rest of the story. I don’t know. If they were the same person, why would the kids act as though they were two different entities? I don’t know. Miss Dunn ended up repeatedly beating Lee because he wouldn’t answer her when she called him. She’d be looking at him, him looking at her and sit quietly. WHY? Why would you let someone beat the crap out of you, leaving black swollen eyes and missing teeth, on a regular basis? That whole “He had tricked her. Insubordination” scene went over my head. Some of the kids were talking about running away as though Miss Dunn weren’t standing in the doorway. Yet, there was nothing about her having heard them…strangely. Why were the kids not punished after beating on Miss Dunn? That made no sense to me considering she seemed to enjoy beating them. The idea that an orphanage is being run without any kids having ever been adopted from it seems very questionable. I get this is fiction and all but yeah… How did she get the money required to run it? Near the end Miss Dunn had the kids standing up overnight as punishment. “They weren’t allowed back in before classes (like they’re outside still) the next day but had to remain standing at their desks (or are they somehow inside now?), shivering and sniffling. This was a confusing scene because they’d been outside, no mention of going back in, yet the way it was described doesn’t tell me either way. But, the main point here was that it was April and the weather was chillier than normal, YET somehow all the kids end up getting sick, very quickly, and not with just some sniffles. They all have a really bad cough. That was hard to believe. Did I mention this story was confusing? What about the scene when Lee snuck in during Gareth’s detention with Miss Dunn? He handed a pillow to Lee, who slid away from Miss Dunn, somehow without her noticing (even though it sounded like they were having sex). When it was “in place” (whatever that meant, please don’t say it was to replace Gareth? LOL), they head to the bedroom door and lock her and Mr. Leonard inside. What was the purpose of the pillow? How did Miss Dunn not react immediately when Gareth moved off her? No sense! Miss Dunn locked the kids inside the “Sick Room” aka shed. For whatever reason when Lee had previously been inside, there was no mention of it smelling like feces. I wouldn’t have even used the word “feces” there because it made it sound like actual crap was in the shed. Yes, there were fertilizer bags, but fertilizer smells different from a person or animal who has just freshly taken a crap. Anyway, with them altogether, there was a strong smell of it. “The Smell in the Sick Room grew worse.” Not likely, if it was cold and getting colder, the smell would be clearing up and/or getting better. It was cold in the shed because they ended up using all these empty fertilizer bags to cover themselves with. Why were there so many empty bags? Previously the reader had been told the shed’s door was rotted, so why not break it down? Gareth ended up digging a hole in the center of the shed’s floor. There was no description as to how large the shed was, but if he ended up uncovering six bodies, it just doesn’t work for me. Was he digging to make the hole wider? Or deeper? Common sense would say deeper, as in to dig out of the shed, but with that many bodies essentially below him, preventing him from continuing, how had he not stepped on any of them? Again, no sense. When Lee first arrived at the orphanage, I was under the impression he was young, yet by the end, he was teaching the other kids….

  6. 5 out of 5

    bookmunkie

    Everything about "Sharp Horror Shock" is wrong. It's like the author had some semi-cool ideas but not the gumption to flesh them out. The Kindle edition also has a formatting error where there are "&hellip"s all over the place rather than elipses. Everything about "Sharp Horror Shock" is wrong. It's like the author had some semi-cool ideas but not the gumption to flesh them out. The Kindle edition also has a formatting error where there are "&hellip"s all over the place rather than elipses.

  7. 5 out of 5

    VICKI HERBERT

    The Mysterious Mr Leonard... No spoilers. 5 stars. What a suspenseful little tale this was and for once a good ending... In the early 1900s Lee's parents died and he was sent to Lambs of our Lord Children's Home where he quickly learned... ... the children were fed boiled and salted potatoes with watery milk that had gone off while their headmistress Miss Dunn ate sweet jam from jars kept in her room... ... the children bathed in icy cold water... and their Miss Dunn called all the children either I The Mysterious Mr Leonard... No spoilers. 5 stars. What a suspenseful little tale this was and for once a good ending... In the early 1900s Lee's parents died and he was sent to Lambs of our Lord Children's Home where he quickly learned... ... the children were fed boiled and salted potatoes with watery milk that had gone off while their headmistress Miss Dunn ate sweet jam from jars kept in her room... ... the children bathed in icy cold water... and their Miss Dunn called all the children either Ivan (for boys) or Anna (for girls)... ... Miss Dunn was fond of using the metre-stick on the hands of those needing discipline... ... and for those hard cases she favored detention (boys only) in her private apartment late into the night... Miss Dunn had an assistant, Mr Leonard, a mannequin who wore a suit and boots... but sometimes, especially during detention, Miss Dunn would wear the pants and boots while... ... a naked Mr Leonard would watch the punishment meted out while he kept watch at the door for prying children's eyes... One night the orphans stole Miss Dunn's keys and tried to run away but the mysterious Mr Leonard came loping across lawn and stopped the escape... This was a tense story about abused orphans that thankfully ended well or I wouldn't be recommending it because I don't like child abuse real or imagined... and that spooky mannequin Mr Leonard could give one nightmares!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gabriella

    Very dark! This is a tale that will drag at your heartstrings in a way but also really shows the horror of abuse as well as the institutionalisation that allows it to happen. The dark nature of the power crazed and those who become so disillusioned it was scary. There was always the wait for something to happen, a shoe to drop. I am glad for the ending as it allows a chance for the darkness to be overwritten but never forgotten.

  9. 5 out of 5

    MrsIcarusPain

    Short story not about Cows I thought the story would gave something to do with Cows but it doesn't. Lots of child abuse with implied sexual abuse so trigger warning on that. It was a little confusing at first that the antagonist was forcing everyone to have the same name but I adjusted. Not the horror I'm using to reading but it had a good pace and gave away just enough for you to ponder about certain back stories. Short story not about Cows I thought the story would gave something to do with Cows but it doesn't. Lots of child abuse with implied sexual abuse so trigger warning on that. It was a little confusing at first that the antagonist was forcing everyone to have the same name but I adjusted. Not the horror I'm using to reading but it had a good pace and gave away just enough for you to ponder about certain back stories.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Jenkins Ortiz Cerrillo

    This book, though fictional, was written with the intent of giving the reader a glimpse into the child and sex abuse that occurred in orphanages. I've always had a derogatory picture of what orphanages must have been like and this short read only fed my beliefs. This book, though fictional, was written with the intent of giving the reader a glimpse into the child and sex abuse that occurred in orphanages. I've always had a derogatory picture of what orphanages must have been like and this short read only fed my beliefs.

  11. 4 out of 5

    William Mc Callum

    Horror reading 📚 A will written horror shocking thriller novella with interesting will developed characters. The story line is violent with punishment and death. I would recommend this novella to anyone looking for something new. Enjoy reading 2021😈

  12. 4 out of 5

    James

  13. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Brown

  14. 5 out of 5

    Barry Richards

  15. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Boyer

  16. 4 out of 5

    Randa sperling

  17. 4 out of 5

    Adam

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Anderson

  19. 5 out of 5

    MARY ELAINE LANDRUM

  20. 4 out of 5

    shannon

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rochelle Pelfrey

  22. 5 out of 5

    rox rhodes

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sassy Sedusa

  24. 5 out of 5

    Beverly slatcher

  25. 5 out of 5

    Trina

  26. 5 out of 5

    Barbara Andrews

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rosina

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lacyladyuchotmail.Com

  29. 5 out of 5

    Becks

  30. 5 out of 5

    Breanna

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