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30 review for A Study in Crimson: Sherlock Holmes: 1942

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bill Lynas

    There are so many Sherlock Holmes stories around these days that it's hard to find the few good ones amongst the huge amount of rubbish. Thankfully, once in a while, I find one like A Study in Crimson that doesn't make me give up on it after two chapters. Robert J Harris sets his novel in 1942 using the Basil Rathbone version of Holmes from the films & a very acceptable Watson, though not based on the bunglig Nigel Bruce screen creation. The first half of the story sets the scene with a Jack the There are so many Sherlock Holmes stories around these days that it's hard to find the few good ones amongst the huge amount of rubbish. Thankfully, once in a while, I find one like A Study in Crimson that doesn't make me give up on it after two chapters. Robert J Harris sets his novel in 1942 using the Basil Rathbone version of Holmes from the films & a very acceptable Watson, though not based on the bunglig Nigel Bruce screen creation. The first half of the story sets the scene with a Jack the Ripper style killer, but it's the second half where the story really livens up. The World War 2 setting gives the reader a new slant on the literary Holmes & his background. London remains in balckout to prevent night time bombing raids & gives a perfect cover for the deranged killer to despatch his victims. This novel may not be the best Holmes story ever, but it's a solidly entertaining start to my reading for 2021.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Gram

    Unlike most Sherlock Holmes pastiches, this version is based upon the actor Basil Rathbone who played Holmes in a series of films from 1939 to 1946 with Nigel Bruce as Dr Watson. The story is set in wartime London with a blackout still in force to help prevent attacks by the Luftwaffe. After returning from solving the mystery of a missing scientist in Scotland, Inspector Lestrade calls on Holmes with news of a murderer calling himself Crimson Jack. Holmes and Watson are joined by a female American Unlike most Sherlock Holmes pastiches, this version is based upon the actor Basil Rathbone who played Holmes in a series of films from 1939 to 1946 with Nigel Bruce as Dr Watson. The story is set in wartime London with a blackout still in force to help prevent attacks by the Luftwaffe. After returning from solving the mystery of a missing scientist in Scotland, Inspector Lestrade calls on Holmes with news of a murderer calling himself Crimson Jack. Holmes and Watson are joined by a female American journalist, Gail Preston, as they hunt down the man responsible for murders similar to those carried out in 1888 by Britain's most infamous killer, Jack The Ripper. Along the way, Holmes reveals the identity of Jack The Ripper one of whose descendants becomes a suspect in their current investigation and tells Watson of his time working for British Intelligence during the First World War. There's even some romantic interest for Dr Watson as he falls for the charms of the feisty Gail Preston and Sherlock's brother Mycroft also makes an appearance, letting him know that the Government would not be upset if the case of Crimson Jack never reaches the courts. Along the way there are stories within the main story and nods to the dozen films in which Basil Rathbone played Sherlock Holmes. All in all in all this is a fun read, but probably not for Conan Doyle purists.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cya_all_day_dream_about_books

    Sherlock Holmes has always fascinated every generation ever since Sir Arthur Conan Doyle introduced us to his detective. Inspired by the films of so and so of the 40s era, Robert Harris has come up with a literary detective fiction involving Sherlock Holmes and his companion Dr. Watson in a case set during the peak World War II era. The novel opens up when Holmes is called to solve the case of a scientist disappeared mysteriously who’s been working on a top secret project involved with the war. Sherlock Holmes has always fascinated every generation ever since Sir Arthur Conan Doyle introduced us to his detective. Inspired by the films of so and so of the 40s era, Robert Harris has come up with a literary detective fiction involving Sherlock Holmes and his companion Dr. Watson in a case set during the peak World War II era. The novel opens up when Holmes is called to solve the case of a scientist disappeared mysteriously who’s been working on a top secret project involved with the war. Holmes is quick to solve the case and is on return journey. The story has been written from POV of Watson. A brief history of their life has been narrated briefly touching how Homes became a consulting detective which he he is at the time of the events of the story. Upon their return to London, Holmes is asked to aide the investigation of two similar murders, which then turns out to be the work of a serial killer on the loose, who’s on a killing spree on the blacked out streets of London during WWII. It seems that a shadow from the last has emerged who’s up to these ghastly killings, but wasn’t he supposed to be dead? Or is someone impersonating this infamous personality of Jack the Ripper, whose notoriety shook London years ago with brutal killings on it’s streets at night. I’ve found that there are a lot of novels based on Sherlock Holmes that churn out mysteries that seem boring to the reader. This book has chosen a premise that’ll intrigue the reader- the return of the heinous crimes in line with Jack the Ripper, during blackout in London during air raided in wwii. I liked the meaningful titles given to each chapter. This is a decent read but nothing compares to the original by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maine Colonial

    Like a dope, I thought this was written by the Robert Harris who wrote some of my favorite novels, like Fatherland, Enigma and An Officer and a Spy. Sure, it seemed a bit far afield from his usual, but he does write pretty broadly, and so many people have had a go with a Sherlock Holmes story. That’s my excuse, anyway. Despite my mistake, I was happy to give the story a try. I read a lot of novels set in London during World War II, and I always liked the Basil Rathbone movies, which inspired this Like a dope, I thought this was written by the Robert Harris who wrote some of my favorite novels, like Fatherland, Enigma and An Officer and a Spy. Sure, it seemed a bit far afield from his usual, but he does write pretty broadly, and so many people have had a go with a Sherlock Holmes story. That’s my excuse, anyway. Despite my mistake, I was happy to give the story a try. I read a lot of novels set in London during World War II, and I always liked the Basil Rathbone movies, which inspired this book. It’s a little bit strange the way the story jumps around, starting with a very brief case in Scotland, then back to London for the new case, then a flashback of a sort as Holmes talks about the original Ripper cases and his decision as to who Jack the Ripper was, then another chapter describing Holmes’s experiences during World War I. It’s as if Harris had several ideas for a Sherlock Holmes novel and decided to use them all in the same book. Despite the disjointed segues, the story is entertaining, even though the identity of the perpetrator is easy to figure out. If you’re in the mood for a quick, light Holmes story, this could hit the spot.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Michael Ritchie

    I enjoy Sherlock Holmes pastiches more than I do the original Doyle stories, and I love the Fox and Universal Holmes movies of the 30s and 40s, so I assumed I would like this book which, so the author claims, was inspired by the Universal films which had Holmes and Watson operating in the present, that is to say, the time in which they were filmed. Unfortunately, I was less than enthused about this novel. Aside from being set in London during WWII (and a handful of minor references to the movies I enjoy Sherlock Holmes pastiches more than I do the original Doyle stories, and I love the Fox and Universal Holmes movies of the 30s and 40s, so I assumed I would like this book which, so the author claims, was inspired by the Universal films which had Holmes and Watson operating in the present, that is to say, the time in which they were filmed. Unfortunately, I was less than enthused about this novel. Aside from being set in London during WWII (and a handful of minor references to the movies), the Holmes and Watson here bear little resemblance to the characters played by Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce, and not even that much to the original characters. Several times in the films, Holmes is presented in disguise to fool both Watson and the audience; here, he dons disguises but we don't see him in them, we just hear that he did. This Holmes is not nearly as moody as Rathbone, and Watson is not a bumbling doofus like Nigel Bruce played him--which frankly is OK with me as Bruce does wear one on sometimes. In other words, if you're hoping for some Basil Rathbone fan-fiction sort of pastiche, you'll be disappointed. The main story involves a Jack the Ripper copycat killer loose on the dark streets of blacked-out wartime London. The identity of the killer is fairly obvious, partly because there are so few real suspects, but the motive for the killings is surprisingly weak. The climactic fight is carried out well, and Watson is given a nearly-romantic female interest which is fun. Though the writing style is fine, the construction of the narrative feels almost amateurish, and the blackout atmosphere could be conjured up with more detail. I'm not sorry to have read it, but I doubt I would read more by this author.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Diane Hernandez

    “It is September 1942 and, in the blacked-out streets of London, the game is once more afoot.”—from A Study of Crimson Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce’s World War II version of Holmes and Watson return in an all new mystery. A scientist goes missing at a remote Scottish castle while working on a secret project for the British government. Holmes must find her before the Germans do. After solving that crime in record time, Jack the Ripper, or his copycat, has reappeared. “Mr. Holmes, there is a word “It is September 1942 and, in the blacked-out streets of London, the game is once more afoot.”—from A Study of Crimson Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce’s World War II version of Holmes and Watson return in an all new mystery. A scientist goes missing at a remote Scottish castle while working on a secret project for the British government. Holmes must find her before the Germans do. After solving that crime in record time, Jack the Ripper, or his copycat, has reappeared. “Mr. Holmes, there is a word which, as a scientist, I hesitate to use, but this whole affair is—on the surface of it—quite impossible.” I loved the WWII-era version of the famous duo, so I was looking forward to a new tale. And I wasn’t disappointed! The tone of the book is perfect. The descriptions set the scene as clearly as watching a movie. The characters’ voices sound so much like the movie that I actually heard them in my head speaking in Rathbone and Bruce’s accents while reading the book. The mystery was intriguing and kept my interest throughout. If you are Holmes’ fan and are okay with the updating to the WWII years, I guarantee you will enjoy this book as much as I did. A Study in Crimson deserves 5 stars and is a favorite! Don’t miss it! Thanks to Pegasus Crime and NetGalley for a copy in exchange for my honest review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Timothy L. Howard

    Disappointing overall This book is well written and has some interesting plot features and characters. Nevertheless, I found it rather less than exciting. It perhaps does resemble some of the old Basil Rathbone films — I have seen most of them, although none recently — but by the same token it reads almost like a film script turned to prose. It seems rather thin and shallow overall. As a confirmed Sherlockian and a student of the Canon, I was hoping for more. Holmes’ reasoning at several points i Disappointing overall This book is well written and has some interesting plot features and characters. Nevertheless, I found it rather less than exciting. It perhaps does resemble some of the old Basil Rathbone films — I have seen most of them, although none recently — but by the same token it reads almost like a film script turned to prose. It seems rather thin and shallow overall. As a confirmed Sherlockian and a student of the Canon, I was hoping for more. Holmes’ reasoning at several points in the case seems very unlike that of the original character. Also, if you’re looking for a mystery set in WW II London, there are better ones — some of the Inspector Troy books by John Lawton, for example. I note that several other reviewers enjoyed this book wholeheartedly, but if you’re looking for a cracking good Holmes story in the true spirit of the originals, this probably won’t satisfy you.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    Subtitled, Sherlock Holmes 1942, this puts Holmes in a Basil Rathbone homage, Holmes and Watson both early 50ish and survivors of WWI. The plot has a killer recreating the Jack the Ripper killings 50 years after the actual event and Holmes is tasked by his Government adviser brother, Mycroft, to find the murderer with Lestrade and others assisting or blundering. The solution when it comes is very Holmesian. However, it wasn’t entirely convincing, the American reporter, Gail, for one, just feelin Subtitled, Sherlock Holmes 1942, this puts Holmes in a Basil Rathbone homage, Holmes and Watson both early 50ish and survivors of WWI. The plot has a killer recreating the Jack the Ripper killings 50 years after the actual event and Holmes is tasked by his Government adviser brother, Mycroft, to find the murderer with Lestrade and others assisting or blundering. The solution when it comes is very Holmesian. However, it wasn’t entirely convincing, the American reporter, Gail, for one, just feeling a little "off" as a character and the ease of certain conveniences during wartime, such as the ready availability of cabs, another aspect which didn't quite feel right but as pastiches go this was well-written and involving.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Maxie Froelicher

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I received an Advanced Readers Copy of this book from the publisher through Edelwiess+, thank you so much! A Study In Crimson takes place in 1942, in London in the middle of the blackout. This seems to be a perfect time for a grandiose crime to be committed, and committed it was. Following the same dates as Jack the Ripper, the mysterious Crimson Jack (hence, A Study In Crimson, a play on the title A Study In Scarlet) cuts his way through two innocent women. It’s up to Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Watson I received an Advanced Readers Copy of this book from the publisher through Edelwiess+, thank you so much! A Study In Crimson takes place in 1942, in London in the middle of the blackout. This seems to be a perfect time for a grandiose crime to be committed, and committed it was. Following the same dates as Jack the Ripper, the mysterious Crimson Jack (hence, A Study In Crimson, a play on the title A Study In Scarlet) cuts his way through two innocent women. It’s up to Sherlock Holmes, Dr. Watson, and the American reporter Abigail Preston to figure out who’s behind the murders before he completes the set and disappears once again into the shadows of wartime London. I really liked this setting for a Sherlock Holmes novel, and I absolutely loved how the author tied World War I, known in the novel as The Great War, into both Watson and Holmes’ backstories. Holmes working as a spy with his knack for disguises and ability to worm his way into situations felt perfect to me, and it even helped to humanise him. There was even the mention of a woman he fell for, something I’m usually very against as it’s usually just thrown in the story for romance reasons, but it did more for his character than I thought it would. Following that, Holmes felt VERY human in this novel, acknowledging his own weaknesses and deferring to others when he knew they had more information than him about certain points. Some versions of Sherlock I’ve read are too perfect and all too willing to brush aside anything they don’t deem worthy at the time. This version of Holmes made sure to at least listen to everything before filtering out non essential bits of information. Another thing I really liked was the twist, or, twists. First, being able to track down that it was a German spy, really the only explanation that made sense due to the circumstances, and then being one of the team that was trying to track down the murderer. Having the killer be a spy called back to Holmes’ own experiences, and connected him even more to the case, and the trope of the killer inserting himself in investigations is often talked about, but rarely used in my opinion. All in all, I loved this book. It’s a 4.5 stars for me, and I highly encouraged everyone to give it a try as soon as possible. I think many people will be as delighted by Gail Preston as I was.

  10. 5 out of 5

    M. K. French

    In 1942 London, a killer known as "Crimson Jack" is copying the famous Jack The Ripper murders of 1888. Scotland Yard turns to Sherlock Holmes and his friend Watson to determine the identity of the killer before he kills again. A Study in Crimson styles itself after the classic Holmes movies of the 1940s starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce. Imagine the classic Victorian stories transported to the '40s, you have the feel of this novel. Watson is still the one telling the story from his point o In 1942 London, a killer known as "Crimson Jack" is copying the famous Jack The Ripper murders of 1888. Scotland Yard turns to Sherlock Holmes and his friend Watson to determine the identity of the killer before he kills again. A Study in Crimson styles itself after the classic Holmes movies of the 1940s starring Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce. Imagine the classic Victorian stories transported to the '40s, you have the feel of this novel. Watson is still the one telling the story from his point of view, with accents written out and an initial mystery that Sherlock solves to "prove" once again how quickly he can solve crimes taking in the minor details that others miss as well as the acceptable social mores of the time. From the initial crime he solves, Sherlock returns to Baker Street and is drawn into the main story we're looking for. The story progresses at a pace similar to that of Doyle's works, with some musing from Watson about his former married life, the war, how the destitute still need police protection, and that there is always a need for "more soldiers in the war against crime." Mycroft still works for the government, this time for the war effort, and shows off as much as Sherlock does in additional asides that are tangential to the main story. Transposing them all to the '40s is very well done, keeping the core of the characters the same and altering backgrounds just in the most minor of details. What seems at first to be asides that have nothing to do with the main story with Crimson Jack does ultimately give the details needed to solve the crime. Sherlock works well in this time period, using his knowledge of many subjects, proper behaviors expected of the English, and history to unravel the clues. Overall, it's a fun addition to the Holmes collective.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Larry

    Sherlock Holmes has tangled with Jack the Ripper before, though not in the canon and not in the twentieth century. The preponderance of argument points to Holmes having been born in the late 1850s (and Watson three years earlier). So Holmes tracked the original Ripper in several novels (and at least one movie) set in the 1880s. Harris pushes his birth to the late 1880s and sets him in motion against a descendant of the Ripper during World War II (1942, specifically). Watson and Lestrade (and Mrs Sherlock Holmes has tangled with Jack the Ripper before, though not in the canon and not in the twentieth century. The preponderance of argument points to Holmes having been born in the late 1850s (and Watson three years earlier). So Holmes tracked the original Ripper in several novels (and at least one movie) set in the 1880s. Harris pushes his birth to the late 1880s and sets him in motion against a descendant of the Ripper during World War II (1942, specifically). Watson and Lestrade (and Mrs. Hudson, of course), too. Victorian fog (which I prefer) gets replaced by the threat of Nazi attacks. I recall that Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce seemed to have detected during World War II. A good Holmes story isn't bound by time and place (Larry Millett has Holmes come to North America, and Edmund Aubrey has him deal with JFK's murder in Dallas in 1963 without mentioning anything about his birth or longevity). So the question is, is this a good Holmes story. Well, Holmes solves the original Ripper murders to his own satisfaction (Henry Carvel as the murderer), and granted that point all else follows. My four stars are more like 3 1/2 stars, but the very aura of Holmes generates points for me, so I may be too generous.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    What a tour de force! I would expect no less of a Sherlock Holmes novel based on the 1940's WWII film series starring Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes and Nigel Bruce as Dr. Watson! I, too, had thoroughly enjoyed those films (I was able to find all 12 Universal Studios films in one massive DVD set). I had not even realized that Mr. Rathbone & Mr. Bruce had also done a series of Sherlock Holmes stories radio broadcasts! So, it is 1942 London after the Blitz but the blackout is still in force b What a tour de force! I would expect no less of a Sherlock Holmes novel based on the 1940's WWII film series starring Basil Rathbone as Sherlock Holmes and Nigel Bruce as Dr. Watson! I, too, had thoroughly enjoyed those films (I was able to find all 12 Universal Studios films in one massive DVD set). I had not even realized that Mr. Rathbone & Mr. Bruce had also done a series of Sherlock Holmes stories radio broadcasts! So, it is 1942 London after the Blitz but the blackout is still in force because if London DID turn its lights back on surely those Nazi bombers would return to finish the job of leveling London! Crimson Jack is killing women (seemingly Jack the Ripper Returned) and daring the police to stop him! Author Robert J. Harris gives us the feel and flavor of Arthur Conan Doyle transported to the 1940’s & WWII! Highly recommended for mystery fans, plenty of action and derring-do and filled with challenges that only the mighty Sherlock Holmes himself can hope to solve in time!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Susan Van Kirk

    It is 1942 during the Blitz in London, and Harris has moved his mystery about a copycat Jack the Ripper to this period to pay homage to the old black-and-white movies about Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, played by Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce and set in the 1940s. This time someone is killing women and copying the work of the 1888 Jack the Ripper. There is much to like, including the nostalgia of Londoners facing the Blitz and Dr. Watson reminiscing about his now deceased wife. Even Mycroft H It is 1942 during the Blitz in London, and Harris has moved his mystery about a copycat Jack the Ripper to this period to pay homage to the old black-and-white movies about Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, played by Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce and set in the 1940s. This time someone is killing women and copying the work of the 1888 Jack the Ripper. There is much to like, including the nostalgia of Londoners facing the Blitz and Dr. Watson reminiscing about his now deceased wife. Even Mycroft Holmes has a cameo. For me, however, there is too little suspense to keep me interested. The clever deductive reasoning of Holmes, which we so admire, is hardly evident, and the killer is predictable. The background and context was interesting, the plot not so much.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michael Brown

    Another Jack the Ripper tale. This one set in 1942 with WWII and spies. The films by Universal had Holmes and Watson in the 1940s. The author has chosen to use that period for this book. While the writing is good, the flashbacks interesting, the plotting makes sense it still has a forced aspect at times. The flashbacks are more filler than really needed. That and once again having the Ripper link is a bit much and there is only so much that can be stretched with it if there is no real push to upd Another Jack the Ripper tale. This one set in 1942 with WWII and spies. The films by Universal had Holmes and Watson in the 1940s. The author has chosen to use that period for this book. While the writing is good, the flashbacks interesting, the plotting makes sense it still has a forced aspect at times. The flashbacks are more filler than really needed. That and once again having the Ripper link is a bit much and there is only so much that can be stretched with it if there is no real push to update the killings/horrors. Most secondary characters could be better presented and used to add to the suspense.

  15. 4 out of 5

    East Greenbush Community Library

    Sherlock Holmes and the game is afoot but in World War II London rather that Arthur Conan Doyle's Victorian London. However, neither Holmes nor war weary London can totally escape the Victorian trappings. Holmes is called to the scene of a grisly murder (actually the second of its type) which bears eerie resemblance to the crimes of Jack the Ripper including method, date, and an autograph Crimson Jack. Can Holmes, Watson, Holmes' brother, Mycroft and a feisty female reporter prevent more heinous Sherlock Holmes and the game is afoot but in World War II London rather that Arthur Conan Doyle's Victorian London. However, neither Holmes nor war weary London can totally escape the Victorian trappings. Holmes is called to the scene of a grisly murder (actually the second of its type) which bears eerie resemblance to the crimes of Jack the Ripper including method, date, and an autograph Crimson Jack. Can Holmes, Watson, Holmes' brother, Mycroft and a feisty female reporter prevent more heinous murders?

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    I'm familiar with Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, despite never having read a single book. There is something about the offstandish Holmes and sidekick Watson that draws you in to the story line. The story is set in the middle of WWII Holmes and Watson need to figure out who the copy cat Ripper is and end his reign of terror before he completes his diabolical cycle. This novel had me guessing until the very end. I'm familiar with Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson, despite never having read a single book. There is something about the offstandish Holmes and sidekick Watson that draws you in to the story line. The story is set in the middle of WWII Holmes and Watson need to figure out who the copy cat Ripper is and end his reign of terror before he completes his diabolical cycle. This novel had me guessing until the very end.

  17. 4 out of 5

    John Shaw

    While I did love the Basil Rathbone & Nigel Bruce Sherlock Holmes series of movies when I was young And there is a great deal of nostalgia of them for me This new book attempting to re create that dynamic falls quite short of the mark I do realise as grown adult that those movies were very far from the original, they were so much fun as a young person But sadly this book does not capture any of that youthful joy.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Cindy Ladensack

    Always a danger with Holmes pastiches in taking the characters in unbelievable directions, but this one stays admirably true to the spirit and sensibility of the originals while still updating them for the WW2 setting. Nice little mystery too (although I had an inkling of the solution early; perhaps a bit too much foreshadowing). My only minor quibble was with the American reporter who, while colorful, veered a bit too much into Annie Oakley territory at times.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Paula Cohen

    Super-duper!! I finished it in two days - it is un-put-downable! It moves like a bullet train, the characters are incredibly well-drawn, the writing is fluent and colorful, the ambiance is turn-of-the 20th Century and very accurate (I'm a lover of all things Victorian), and the story is a nail-biter. And the author leaves the reader on the hook for a sequel. Please don't let us down, Mr. Harris -- I so want to see the next installment! Super-duper!! I finished it in two days - it is un-put-downable! It moves like a bullet train, the characters are incredibly well-drawn, the writing is fluent and colorful, the ambiance is turn-of-the 20th Century and very accurate (I'm a lover of all things Victorian), and the story is a nail-biter. And the author leaves the reader on the hook for a sequel. Please don't let us down, Mr. Harris -- I so want to see the next installment!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sue Burden

    Written very much in the style of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The story, good, drawing back to a classic Victorian crime. But that was part of my difficulty. In my mind I am thinking in Victorian England. If you liked Basil Rathbone's Holmes, you will love this setting. Overall enjoyable and worth reading. Written very much in the style of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. The story, good, drawing back to a classic Victorian crime. But that was part of my difficulty. In my mind I am thinking in Victorian England. If you liked Basil Rathbone's Holmes, you will love this setting. Overall enjoyable and worth reading.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alexis (hookedtobooks)

    Thank you Pegasus Books for the copy of this book. - Read if you like: historical mysteries and Sherlock Holmes stories. - This was a fun mystery that reimagines Sherlock Holmes in WW2 London, and he must solve the mystery of a person taking on the role of Jack the Ripper. I liked that Watson was the narrator for the book, and there was a fun cast of characters as Holmes and Watson try to find out who the killer is before they murder the same number of women that Jack the Ripper did! - CW: murder, dea Thank you Pegasus Books for the copy of this book. - Read if you like: historical mysteries and Sherlock Holmes stories. - This was a fun mystery that reimagines Sherlock Holmes in WW2 London, and he must solve the mystery of a person taking on the role of Jack the Ripper. I liked that Watson was the narrator for the book, and there was a fun cast of characters as Holmes and Watson try to find out who the killer is before they murder the same number of women that Jack the Ripper did! - CW: murder, death, violence against women, war, graphic descriptions.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sue Foster

    Very good book based on the basil rathbone Sherlock Holmes of the modern setting films. It has the same feel of those films. He has nicely updated them putting them in their late forties having served in WW1. In fact Holmes in this timeline was in British Intelligence and after 1918 then became a consulting Detective. Well written story .

  23. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    Enjoyable reading a revival of Sherlock Holmes, drawing on images of Basil Rathbone and Nigel Bruce from the 1940’s wartime movies. Voice of Fear was not in my collection, but most others were. Pure entertainment.

  24. 5 out of 5

    judith king

    I enjoyed this Sherlock Study I can't, however, give it a five-star rating. I declared to myself I know who Crimson Jack is within a page or two of meeting him. I was right & I don't think I'm that good a detective. I enjoyed this Sherlock Study I can't, however, give it a five-star rating. I declared to myself I know who Crimson Jack is within a page or two of meeting him. I was right & I don't think I'm that good a detective.

  25. 5 out of 5

    gwendalyn _books_

    If you’re a Sherlock homes fan this is perfect for you set during World War II in the 1940s

  26. 4 out of 5

    John Sexton

    Fast read. Fairly simple plot. Interesting Sherlock approach. Didn't find it nearly as gripping or thrilling as some of the author's other work which I have very much enjoyed. Fast read. Fairly simple plot. Interesting Sherlock approach. Didn't find it nearly as gripping or thrilling as some of the author's other work which I have very much enjoyed.

  27. 4 out of 5

    sylvia Dobbs

    Liked it. Remains faithful to the original. The first 3 chapters didn’t add anything to the rest though.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ira Smith

    A fun book which puts Holmes and Watson in 1942 wartime London, hot on the trail of a Jack the Ripper style murderer. Not for the Sherlock Holmes purists.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Gillian Wiseman

    Solidly enjoyable, fun, well-written, but utterly predictable.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michael Dunn

    utilizing jack the ripper is sooo lazy and unoriginal. outside of that gigantic flaw, it was a pretty good facsimile of a Sherlock Holmes story.

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