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Rabbits

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Conspiracies abound in this surreal and yet all-too-real technothriller in which a deadly underground alternate reality game might just be altering reality itself, set in the same world as the popular Rabbits podcast. It's an average work day. You've been wrapped up in a task, and you check the clock when you come up for air--4:44 pm. You go to check your email, and 44 unre Conspiracies abound in this surreal and yet all-too-real technothriller in which a deadly underground alternate reality game might just be altering reality itself, set in the same world as the popular Rabbits podcast. It's an average work day. You've been wrapped up in a task, and you check the clock when you come up for air--4:44 pm. You go to check your email, and 44 unread messages have built up. With a shock, you realize it is April 4th--4/4. And when you get in your car to drive home, your odometer reads 44,444. Coincidence? Or have you just seen the edge of a rabbit hole? Rabbits is a mysterious alternate reality game so vast it uses our global reality as its canvas. Since the game first started in 1959, ten iterations have appeared and nine winners have been declared. Their identities are unknown. So is their reward, which is whispered to be NSA or CIA recruitment, vast wealth, immortality, or perhaps even the key to unlocking the secrets of the universe itself. But the deeper you get, the more deadly the game becomes. Players have died in the past--and the body count is rising. And now the eleventh round is about to begin. Enter K--a Rabbits obsessive who has been trying to find a way into the game for years. That path opens when K is approached by billionaire Alan Scarpio, the alleged winner of the sixth iteration. Scarpio says that something has gone wrong with the game and that K needs to fix it before Eleven starts or the whole world will pay the price. Five days later, Scarpio is declared missing. Two weeks after that, K blows the deadline and Eleven begins. And suddenly, the fate of the entire universe is at stake.


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Conspiracies abound in this surreal and yet all-too-real technothriller in which a deadly underground alternate reality game might just be altering reality itself, set in the same world as the popular Rabbits podcast. It's an average work day. You've been wrapped up in a task, and you check the clock when you come up for air--4:44 pm. You go to check your email, and 44 unre Conspiracies abound in this surreal and yet all-too-real technothriller in which a deadly underground alternate reality game might just be altering reality itself, set in the same world as the popular Rabbits podcast. It's an average work day. You've been wrapped up in a task, and you check the clock when you come up for air--4:44 pm. You go to check your email, and 44 unread messages have built up. With a shock, you realize it is April 4th--4/4. And when you get in your car to drive home, your odometer reads 44,444. Coincidence? Or have you just seen the edge of a rabbit hole? Rabbits is a mysterious alternate reality game so vast it uses our global reality as its canvas. Since the game first started in 1959, ten iterations have appeared and nine winners have been declared. Their identities are unknown. So is their reward, which is whispered to be NSA or CIA recruitment, vast wealth, immortality, or perhaps even the key to unlocking the secrets of the universe itself. But the deeper you get, the more deadly the game becomes. Players have died in the past--and the body count is rising. And now the eleventh round is about to begin. Enter K--a Rabbits obsessive who has been trying to find a way into the game for years. That path opens when K is approached by billionaire Alan Scarpio, the alleged winner of the sixth iteration. Scarpio says that something has gone wrong with the game and that K needs to fix it before Eleven starts or the whole world will pay the price. Five days later, Scarpio is declared missing. Two weeks after that, K blows the deadline and Eleven begins. And suddenly, the fate of the entire universe is at stake.

30 review for Rabbits

  1. 4 out of 5

    MarilynW

    There is a podcast called Rabbits that preceded the writing of this book. I haven't listened to the podcast (yet) but I bet it would have made this story even more assessible to me. I've loved RPGs over the years although I'm not all that familiar with the early games. Still, I understood most of what was going on in this book although I'd probably fail at describing it very well. I won't even try to describe much of this story because it would give things away. And anyway, no one is supposed to There is a podcast called Rabbits that preceded the writing of this book. I haven't listened to the podcast (yet) but I bet it would have made this story even more assessible to me. I've loved RPGs over the years although I'm not all that familiar with the early games. Still, I understood most of what was going on in this book although I'd probably fail at describing it very well. I won't even try to describe much of this story because it would give things away. And anyway, no one is supposed to talk about the game. Doing so could lead to injury, death, or disappearing forever! The game is Rabbits (you didn't hear me say that). If I were in the book, I'd be among most of the world who never noticed Rabbits or the things that could lead some special folks to nosing around and getting addicted and enmeshed in the game. K has always been different. He's been aware of patterns and connections in all parts of life and his parents even fostered that talent in him. He also had eidetic memory, which allows him to see past what might seem like coincidences in the sights, sounds, and happenings around us. Because of his talents, he's hardwired to find his way into Rabbits and the more he's warned off the game the more he wants to know about it.  K's has friends who are trying to figure out this game too but a few of them drop by the way side one way or another. At times his friend Chloe wants him to quit having anything to do with the game but then something will happen and she's hot on the trail of it again...making it easy for K to not give up the chase. There is a lot of mention of old songs, old computers, old games, old movies, and old books but getting close to the game seems to cause an alternate reality and what K once knew as fact becomes fuzzy or just plain wrong. This story will take you down a deep rabbit hole...ha ha...and there is a chance no one will make it out. All of existence may be at stake if K can't fix what is wrong with this game that might not even exist. Is K crazy or is reality changing right in front of him? You can also experience the world of Rabbits through the podcast. https://www.rabbitspodcast.com/ Publication: June 8, 2021 Thank you to Random House Publishing Group - Ballantine/Del Rey and NetGalley for this ARC.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    "Rabbits" is a book for those who couldn't get enough of the tv series Lost, the tv series Stranger Things, or Ursula Le Guin's Lathe Of Heaven. Forget it's a debut novel cause it's spectacular. It takes the world of computer gaming combines it with drifting between multiverses and throws in cults, conspiracies, blackouts, deadly fog, and coincidences that may just be more than coincidences. Is it just a game or is it about saving the world before it's too late? One of the great things here is th "Rabbits" is a book for those who couldn't get enough of the tv series Lost, the tv series Stranger Things, or Ursula Le Guin's Lathe Of Heaven. Forget it's a debut novel cause it's spectacular. It takes the world of computer gaming combines it with drifting between multiverses and throws in cults, conspiracies, blackouts, deadly fog, and coincidences that may just be more than coincidences. Is it just a game or is it about saving the world before it's too late? One of the great things here is that like the lead character K. (And yeah it's just K.) you, the reader, are never sure where this cosmic chess match is going to take you next. On one hand, you get a handful of retro hipsters who hang around arcades and like to play on the dark web via their tor browsers. But, there's this mysterious game, which like Fight Club you are never supposed to talk about, and it's a game of following patterns and finding coincidences, following the clues. But, you've been warned that something's wrong with the game and players are disappearing, even well-known multi-billionaires. At what point is it real and at what point merely a game with reality as you know it being the stakes? It's not possible to say enough good things about this ultra-absorbing novel. Maybe you just need to wait till the next iteration of the game begins. That is, if it's not too late.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Blaine

    No pattern hidden in the wet gray-brown cobblestones, no clues in the number of rungs that made up each of the fire escape ladders, no hidden messages in the graffiti spray-painted on the brick walls and dumpsters that lined the alley. ... “That’s what’s happening to the multiverse? It’s becoming one giant, super-unstable, decoherent wave?”Thanks to NetGalley and Random House Publishing Group for sending me an ARC of Rabbits in exchange for an honest review. Rabbits is being marketed for fans of B No pattern hidden in the wet gray-brown cobblestones, no clues in the number of rungs that made up each of the fire escape ladders, no hidden messages in the graffiti spray-painted on the brick walls and dumpsters that lined the alley. ... “That’s what’s happening to the multiverse? It’s becoming one giant, super-unstable, decoherent wave?”Thanks to NetGalley and Random House Publishing Group for sending me an ARC of Rabbits in exchange for an honest review. Rabbits is being marketed for fans of Blake Crouch, Ernest Cline, and Black Mirror. While I am a fan of all three (even if I was disappointed by Ready Player Two), this novel just didn’t work for me at all. Rabbits is a difficult novel to describe. There’s allegedly an underground game called Rabbits that takes place in the real world from time to time right under everyone else’s noses. There aren’t any formal rules or structure to the game, but if you start noticing odd coincidences (the same number appearing again and again around you) or discrepancies (a building that you’re sure used to have two windows now has three) around you, you can follow those clues and find ... other clues. And if you get to the end of this string of clues then you’ll win ... a prize, maybe, no one’s really sure. The game is believed to be dangerous to play, but when a former winner turns up and tells our narrator, K, that he has to fix the game or the whole world may be destroyed, K and his would-be girlfriend Chloe try to “Win the Game, Save the World” (an actual chapter title). And that’s pretty much it. I mean, other characters get involved and K has a backstory. But the plot is basically just K and Chloe talking, then noticing something weird, following it for a while, stopping, then noticing something else weird, lather, rinse, repeat. The book honestly could have been 200 shorter or 200 pages longer without any real difference to the story—it just seemed to be a matter of how long the author felt like telling the story. Compounding the problem of the repetition was the unreality of it all. If you never really know what’s real and what’s not, it’s very difficult to become invested in or attached to any of the characters. While the Baader-Meinhof phenomenon and Mandela effect discussions were interesting, the happenings here were extreme to the point of absurdity. If a friend of yours in real life started telling you that they were seeing connections between unrelated events the way K and Chloe do, you would call to get them psychological help. Rabbits is set in the same world Mr. Miles created in a 2017 podcast. The publisher says you don’t have to be familiar with the podcast to enjoy the book. Perhaps, but all I can say is I wasn’t familiar with that podcast and I unfortunately didn’t enjoy the book. If you really liked the podcast, I guess I’d say give the novel a try. Otherwise, I can’t recommend it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Tadiana ✩Night Owl☽

    2.5 stars. Rabbits is a real-world, highly secretive game, with a massive prize at stake. It's been going since about 1959 (maybe much longer? no one is quite sure) and there have been ten iterations of it so far. The ability to observe and follow up on patterns in everything around you is critical, as is a knowledge of 70's and 80's tech and videogames. (Sounding a little familiar?) Rabbits has always been an edgy and dangerous game, but now as the 11th game is starting, people are disappearing 2.5 stars. Rabbits is a real-world, highly secretive game, with a massive prize at stake. It's been going since about 1959 (maybe much longer? no one is quite sure) and there have been ten iterations of it so far. The ability to observe and follow up on patterns in everything around you is critical, as is a knowledge of 70's and 80's tech and videogames. (Sounding a little familiar?) Rabbits has always been an edgy and dangerous game, but now as the 11th game is starting, people are disappearing and dying right and left. Our main character, K, has been a fan of Rabbits for years. A famous player in the game finds K and tells him he needs to fix the game or the whole world will pay a terrible price ... then promptly disappears. And now it looks like the nature of reality itself may be being affected by the game. K and his gaming friend/love interest Chloe keep getting told to stop playing the game or they'll die ... but it's really hard to let it go. If you loved Ready Player One you might really enjoy this. I was only so-so on Ready Player One, and I think this book has other issues that one didn't - it's disjointed (seriously, it jumps around in really bizarre ways, part of the whole "what is real?" element to the plot), characterization is slim, and the answers in the end left me dissatisfied. But if you like the idea of following up on obscure game clues and doing it in a real world setting, with lots of geeky details, you may really enjoy it. Full review to come. Thanks to the publisher for the ARC! Content advisory: Tons of F-bombs.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    If I didn't already have a spirit animal, I'd probably insist that my spirit animal is NOW, ABSOLUTELY, a rabbit. But not those squeezable fluffy creatures. Oh, no. I mean the kind of rabbit that Neo sees in a tattoo in the Matrix, or the one Alice chases, or the kind of toothy monster that fits into that comfortable zone between a Lovecraft story and the monster from Monty Python's Holy Grail. So, wait, what the hell does this have to do with the novel? I'm trying to tell you! This is my spirit a If I didn't already have a spirit animal, I'd probably insist that my spirit animal is NOW, ABSOLUTELY, a rabbit. But not those squeezable fluffy creatures. Oh, no. I mean the kind of rabbit that Neo sees in a tattoo in the Matrix, or the one Alice chases, or the kind of toothy monster that fits into that comfortable zone between a Lovecraft story and the monster from Monty Python's Holy Grail. So, wait, what the hell does this have to do with the novel? I'm trying to tell you! This is my spirit animal! A million nearly perfect references to MY outlook, MY worldview, from Donnie Darko to Persona to Dragon's Lair to D&D but twist all these into deeply paranoiac versions that are actually just intense patter recognition systems on speed. Look for the clues. Hell, this is like Fincher's The Game but impressively MORE funded, MORE involved, and deeper than anyone could have imagined. It's THAT kind of novel. And I LOVE it. It's a geek paradise. Designed for obsessives, OCD, intensely intellectual gamers who define themselves by a simple tenet of "What is out of place here?" Only, the gameboard is the whole damn world and your own memory and, eventually, your sanity. This was satisfying from start to finish. It was MADE for me. Maybe that makes me a bit crazy, but the RIDE was totally worth it. I'm sure Jeff Goldblum would approve. Follow the Rabbit, people. :)

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shannara

    I can’t write a review on this right now!!!! My brain has been turned to absolute mush!!!! Like exploded by the complicated awesomeness of this book. Full rtc!! Okay, I think I’ve sorted out my brain, fluffed it back up after it was blown away by this book!!!! It kind of reminded me of Blake Crouch’s Recursion, but with video games, coffee, and clues. This kept my interest throughout, but I’ll admit I felt dumb for a huge portion of this story. I just felt like I had no idea what was going on!!!! I can’t write a review on this right now!!!! My brain has been turned to absolute mush!!!! Like exploded by the complicated awesomeness of this book. Full rtc!! Okay, I think I’ve sorted out my brain, fluffed it back up after it was blown away by this book!!!! It kind of reminded me of Blake Crouch’s Recursion, but with video games, coffee, and clues. This kept my interest throughout, but I’ll admit I felt dumb for a huge portion of this story. I just felt like I had no idea what was going on!!!! All I knew was that I liked it!!! Trying to follow along with each clue was impossible, but such fun!! K was the best protagonist and his memory and crazy journey through this book were just like a car accident. I could not stop staring!! K’s friends were great additions and just about everyone who made an appearance in this was important. There were no wasted words. And small quoted mild spoiler here…this is quite possibly my most favorite sentence ever, (view spoiler)[ “As we ran across the street, Chloe reached out and grabbed my hand—and, for just a moment, I felt like I was living in a normal world, like Chloe and I were a regular couple running across a street in the rain toward a warm table in a cozy bistro, not a couple of game-obsessed lunatics rushing toward a porn shop basement in order to ask a crossbow-wielding shut-in to help us win a deadly game that might be the only thing keeping the multiverse together.” (hide spoiler)] I seriously recommend this to science fiction lovers, vintage video game lovers, Blake Crouch fans, and those who like a book to take your brain and shake it up a bit. This was some intense good fun. Thank you so much to NetGalley, Random House Publishing Group- Ballantine, and Terry Miles for allowing me to read this for my honest and unbiased opinion. Sooo good!!!! Check out my cover pics and other reviews on my blog @ https://shannarareads.com/?p=543 Thanks!!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    4 stars Let me start by saying that I am not a gamer, I have no interest in games and have never heard of Rabbits or the podcast. To give some context, my gaming resume includes some Pitfall and Pac Man as a child, some Super Mario Bros and Tetris as a teen and some sporadic Wii bowling as an adult. However, I requested Rabbits because I have been digging this new-ish (at least to me) genre of alternate reality sci-fi or sci-fi lite, as I like to refer to it (think Dark Matter, Recursion, Evelyn H 4 stars Let me start by saying that I am not a gamer, I have no interest in games and have never heard of Rabbits or the podcast. To give some context, my gaming resume includes some Pitfall and Pac Man as a child, some Super Mario Bros and Tetris as a teen and some sporadic Wii bowling as an adult. However, I requested Rabbits because I have been digging this new-ish (at least to me) genre of alternate reality sci-fi or sci-fi lite, as I like to refer to it (think Dark Matter, Recursion, Evelyn Hardcastle). And let me tell you, Rabbits did not disappoint! Sure, there were quite a few times that the technical gaming aspect was over my head and plenty of “what in the heck am I reading?” moments, but this book DELIVERS. The pacing was great and I was completely captivated by K and his quest to fix / win “the game”. It did take me a few chapters to really get into the story, but once I was hooked, I could not put this book down. About halfway through the book, the pace really ramped up and I could not turn the pages fast enough. If you can get past (or through) the gaming aspect and the technicalities, I would highly recommend this book to anyone who enjoys books where things are not what they seem, alternate reality settings and even time travel. Thank you to Random House for my copy of this book via NetGalley

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas Eames

    I'm biased, because a good friend of mine wrote this book, but I loved it. Haruki Murkami meets Ready Player One! I'm biased, because a good friend of mine wrote this book, but I loved it. Haruki Murkami meets Ready Player One!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

    Rabbits follows K., someone who has become obsessed with seeking out and discovering patterns and connections throughout their day-to-day life. A few years ago, they discovered an almost alternate reality style game played in secret amongst a select few. Very little information is available about the game, but its roots run deep in both culture and time. K. is approached by Alan Scarpio, a somewhat reclusive billionaire believed to be one of the winners of a past iteration of Rabbits. Over a plat Rabbits follows K., someone who has become obsessed with seeking out and discovering patterns and connections throughout their day-to-day life. A few years ago, they discovered an almost alternate reality style game played in secret amongst a select few. Very little information is available about the game, but its roots run deep in both culture and time. K. is approached by Alan Scarpio, a somewhat reclusive billionaire believed to be one of the winners of a past iteration of Rabbits. Over a plate of pie in a Seattle diner, Scarpio tells K. that something is wrong with the game, that he needs K.’s help to fix it. Before he can explain, Scarpio is interrupted by a phone call and abruptly leaves. The next day, Scarpio is reported missing leaving K. to pick up the ball and run. Based on a podcast of the same name, Rabbits has achieved a certain level of notoriety through its compelling first season. Author and podcast creator, Terry Miles, launched a Kickstarter to fund a potential follow-up but with the fundraising coming up short, a book became the next logical medium. The original podcast flew under my radar and was one I’d not heard of before I was approached by the publisher with a review copy, so I was going into this one blind. I would say within the first 10% of this book, I experienced Ready Player One vibes and quickly began to worry that I was getting myself into an Ernest Cline-esque 80s geek reference extravaganza, which is not something I ever want to experience again. Thankfully, the geeky pop-culture stuff is merely window-dressing although it does appear to be ham-fisted at times. The plot here is a hell of a lot deeper than I expected. Once it’s revealed what the purpose of the Rabbits game is and what is really happening under the surface, I was ready for the story to hit the next gear, but it never really does. It began to feel clunky and almost too expansive. I felt I couldn’t establish a connection with the story because even three-quarters of the way in, we’re introducing new layers and characters. I felt the urgency at which K. had to put things right was at odds with the general pacing of the narrative. It all became very tedious leaving me struggling to maintain my attention. I also didn’t care much for K. nor the other main character of Chloe. Chloe felt especially thin and seemingly existed as a love-interest/sounding board for K.’s detective work, who at the best of times was barely tolerable. I didn’t feel the slightest chemistry between the two compared to what I felt the author had been trying to portray. I swear, if I ever have to hear the exchange, “Are you OK?” followed by “I’m fine” again, it will be too soon. I can appreciate what the author is going for here because stories about anomalies in reality and multi-verses are certainly a favorite of mine, but I felt maybe this was a tad too ambitious. I think we could have lost maybe one hundred pages here and tightened things up thus allowing a much stronger story.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Carrie

    Rabbits by Terry Miles is a science fiction fantasy that is supposed to be thrilling, but more on that later. In this one there is an underground game that has been running for years but things are taking a turn for the worst. K has been a long time fan of the Rabbits game and wants nothing but to get into it himself. The game is on it’s 10th running when one night K runs into Scarpio who is rumored to have won a previous version himself. Scarpio tells K that he needs to look into issues with Rab Rabbits by Terry Miles is a science fiction fantasy that is supposed to be thrilling, but more on that later. In this one there is an underground game that has been running for years but things are taking a turn for the worst. K has been a long time fan of the Rabbits game and wants nothing but to get into it himself. The game is on it’s 10th running when one night K runs into Scarpio who is rumored to have won a previous version himself. Scarpio tells K that he needs to look into issues with Rabbits before the 11th version begins and the fate of the world is in K’s hands. However, shortly after speaking with Scarpio K finds that the mysterious former player has gone missing. As time ticks my K is at a loss as what he needs to do and before he knows it the 11th game of Rabbits is beginning. K begins to notice clues around him though as he begins to play the game himself. Ok, some of my favorite books I’ve read have been science fiction gaming fantasies, I mean Ready Player One anyone?? Rabbits for me however was not anything like those books that I’ve devoured in the past as the “game” in this one was just our main character fumbling around here and there looking for clues then it would stall with an alternate reality reset moment. There are times the story seemed like it would get engaging but then it just stalled out again and for me this one took three days to trudge through when I can normally read a book in a couple hours. There are those that love this one but I just wasn’t one of them as it seemed slow and choppy with a not so exciting ending to me. I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley. For more reviews please visit https://carriesbookreviews.com/

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dannii Elle

    A game has been played in secret for decades. Those who compete do so under pseudonyms and without any real understanding of the stakes or what is awarded to the winner. Some rumour that your wildest dreams will be granted and others that it is a form of CIA recruitment. The game has no name but amongst its disciples it has been awarded the name of Rabbits. Follow the clues and explore the Wonderland it leads you to. Inception meets Ready Player One in this mind-bending and uniquely-constructed r A game has been played in secret for decades. Those who compete do so under pseudonyms and without any real understanding of the stakes or what is awarded to the winner. Some rumour that your wildest dreams will be granted and others that it is a form of CIA recruitment. The game has no name but amongst its disciples it has been awarded the name of Rabbits. Follow the clues and explore the Wonderland it leads you to. Inception meets Ready Player One in this mind-bending and uniquely-constructed read. I was quickly enamoured with the story, even when my understanding was very minimal. It took almost the entire novel for me to get to grips with all that was occurring and even then I was left with many questions and a furrowed brow. I did not dislike the novel for that, though. In fact, it felt like part of its charm. This was a read hard to categorise, devoid of sure footing for its readers, with an abundance of untrustworthy characters, and in a setting that could never be trusted for remaining where it was meant to. It only made sense that any sense truth would be hard fought for and also come with its own air of mystery and a potential, double-sided, duplicitous nature too. I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Thank you to the author, Terry Miles, and the publisher, Macmillan, for this opportunity.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shana

    I really liked the Rabbits podcast, so I was excited to receive an advanced copy of this book through NetGalley. I was not disappointed--this book was an insane thrill ride, and I mean insane in the best way possible. If you like the podcast, you'll definitely like the book. If you're not familiar with the podcast but you're fascinated by the Mandela effect, mysterious games, weird coincidences, or the possibility of alternate realities, you'll probably like this book. Be prepared to, at times, I really liked the Rabbits podcast, so I was excited to receive an advanced copy of this book through NetGalley. I was not disappointed--this book was an insane thrill ride, and I mean insane in the best way possible. If you like the podcast, you'll definitely like the book. If you're not familiar with the podcast but you're fascinated by the Mandela effect, mysterious games, weird coincidences, or the possibility of alternate realities, you'll probably like this book. Be prepared to, at times, be confused or creeped out when reading this, but it's definitely worth it!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    I received a gifted advance reader copy of this book to read in exchange for an honest review via blackcrow PR and the publishers. Rabbits is a secret game (your not supposed to talk about it) that if spoken about can lead to injury, death or result I you disappearing never to be seen again! The main character we meet is K. She is a gamer who notices patterns in things and great at following coincidences. She has a group of gaming friends who begun to help her figure out the game and access it. Th I received a gifted advance reader copy of this book to read in exchange for an honest review via blackcrow PR and the publishers. Rabbits is a secret game (your not supposed to talk about it) that if spoken about can lead to injury, death or result I you disappearing never to be seen again! The main character we meet is K. She is a gamer who notices patterns in things and great at following coincidences. She has a group of gaming friends who begun to help her figure out the game and access it. The feeling of falling down a 'rabbit hole' occurred at times with this book - in a good way! I loved the mention of old computer games, equipment, consoles, songs, games and general things from the 80s throughout this book. This book took me back to my childhood in many ways. This book has you questioning what is reality and what is not. This book will such you in (or down the rabbit hole) and keep you turning the pages quicker and quicker to find out what will happen next, what is real and make you question what is out there! Fans of Stranger Things, Black Mirror or Lost will love this book!!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bam cooks the books ;-)

    'The Door is Open.' For gamers, this is the invitation to start the mysterious game Rabbits--an obscure underground alternate reality game. You have to follow coincidences and find a pattern. It is rumored that thousands of people have died while playing the game over the years, maybe as far back as 1959 or even earlier. Who knows? And now version eleven seems to be starting...and it may be the end of the world as we know it. Set in Seattle, Washington (where else??), the main character who goes 'The Door is Open.' For gamers, this is the invitation to start the mysterious game Rabbits--an obscure underground alternate reality game. You have to follow coincidences and find a pattern. It is rumored that thousands of people have died while playing the game over the years, maybe as far back as 1959 or even earlier. Who knows? And now version eleven seems to be starting...and it may be the end of the world as we know it. Set in Seattle, Washington (where else??), the main character who goes by the letter K, has lived practically his whole life immersed in the game, one way or another. After a recent talk on the game at the Arcade, he is approached by a man who may be the winner of a past iteration of the game, who warns him that 'something is wrong with the game and if we don't fix it before the next iteration begins, we're all well and truly f---ed.' So begins a crazy odyssey for K and his friends that occasionally crosses over into other dimensions or realities. K is warned, 'There are facts, lines, patterns, and laws beneath the world you recognize.' I wanted to like this story much more than I did but as I read, it began to feel pretty repetitive--like teens on a scavenger hunt with a little woo-woo spookiness thrown in. I don't know, maybe I just wasn't the right receptive audience. After all, I stopped playing games with Tetris. I received an arc of this book from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. I appreciate the opportunity.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Whitney Jamimah

    I feel like I've been running into unnecessarily long books lately. Now, this book wasn't really all that long actually but considering the page count to things that actually happened here were in a large discrepancy with each other. Those who have a feeling for my tastes also know that I am typically a character driven reader so I don't mind a meandering book if there is a lot of character development and moments in those quiet times in the book but this book wasn't character driven. This book I feel like I've been running into unnecessarily long books lately. Now, this book wasn't really all that long actually but considering the page count to things that actually happened here were in a large discrepancy with each other. Those who have a feeling for my tastes also know that I am typically a character driven reader so I don't mind a meandering book if there is a lot of character development and moments in those quiet times in the book but this book wasn't character driven. This book was written in about as of a heavy plot driven style as they come. BUT. Still, nothing happened. Strange huh? Keeping it spoiler free, the characters kept running into these "clues" over and over. In fact, the majority of the book was our main character, K walking around the Seattle area discovering clues forever and ever. What's even better? The clues really had no bearing on the final outcome of the story. There are many many authors that are SPECTACULAR at weaving all these tidbits into the final showdown but Miles, sadly, did not do that here in Rabbits, not even close. the majority of the book just felt like unnecessary and boring filler. I got so bored just following K around as she discovered more discrepancies and fainted 10000000 times. I was about to DNF it and I really wish I had now, it didn't get better, just like it usually never does. Why can most of us readers never listen to our DNF gut? I am giving this book 2 stars instead of 1 because the beginning was intriguing. I see a lot of good reviews for this book too though so take my review as you will. This book reads a lot like an action movie so if you like that style this might work for you.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lily

    2.5/5 3am book review time. I listened to Rabbits a couple of years ago so I was excited to be approved for this ARC. As someone who participated in several alternate reality games back when they were more popular, the ARG-inspired flavor of this book was veeery appealing to me. And while reading it, I could tell the author appreciated them as much as I do. I think Terry Miles and I could be buds. We both seem to like creepy, mysterious, is-this-real-or-not? types of stories that are right on the 2.5/5 3am book review time. I listened to Rabbits a couple of years ago so I was excited to be approved for this ARC. As someone who participated in several alternate reality games back when they were more popular, the ARG-inspired flavor of this book was veeery appealing to me. And while reading it, I could tell the author appreciated them as much as I do. I think Terry Miles and I could be buds. We both seem to like creepy, mysterious, is-this-real-or-not? types of stories that are right on the edge of fiction and reality. Overall, I did enjoy the story of Rabbits. I'm a sucker for scary things that deal with technology and the internet, and there were a few moments I found really exciting. I think it's a unique idea, and I found myself googling some of the things in the book to see if they were actually real or not (some were, some weren't). I think Rabbits would make for a great movie or TV series, maybe. Or even a graphic novel! I wasn't sure who the target audience of the book was really meant to be. I figured this kind of book would be written for people like me who are generally kinda nerdy, but it felt like the writing kind of held my hand and explained things to me when it was unnecessary. There were some "show don't tell" issues for sure. The way that pop culture and video games were discussed made me think of Ready Player One and I honestly wasn't feeling emotionally prepared to face that kind of 80s music and retrogaming supremacy again. I'm not sure if it was just me becoming more invested, but about halfway through the book it felt like the writing suddenly got better and this became much less of an issue. I love good, human-like characters and unfortunately I found the ones in this book lacking. I didn't understand what motivated them, I thought their reactions to things were unrealistic, and I frequently got mad at them for not understanding what was going on. Even when wild, dangerous things were happening in the story, the characters' reactions were so flat that it was like there were no real consequences to anything. I couldn't really worry about the characters or get emotionally involved with the story because it was all like "oh, that happened. I'm sad. Okay, next thing." On the topic of characters, K is described as being "neurodivergent" but this only really manifests in him having an obsession with patterns. I think his character would have been deeper and more interesting had this impacted his personality and decisions more. Also I'm just going to throw in that I found it strange that race and skin color were only brought up for POC characters. Like, one random dude was described as being a Persian man before he even said anything. How'd the main character even know he was Persian? And the character's presence was so extremely brief that being Persian had nothing to do with anything at all so I was just thrown off by the description. I'm going to briefly talk about the ending, but I won't spoil it. Skip this paragraph if you don't like ending talk. I found it hard to get through the last bit of the book. Toward the end, I realized there was a ton of plot that was unresolved that would have to be wrapped up in a short amount of time. I was right, it felt like it was crammed in there. It made the twists and conclusion especially unsatisfying. I wish I could get my grubby paws in there and edit and restructure this book. I really do like the story (hence rounding the 2.5 to a 3 instead of a 2), but there were too many things keeping me from loving it. But would I read another book by this author? Sure, I think he can improve. Speaking of which, I might be willing to sell an organ for a The Black Tapes novel.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nikki "The Crazie Betty" V.

    Is it possible to loath a book just as much as you adore it? That was Rabbits for me. Rabbits is a game. But not just any game. It is secret and underground. And sometimes dangerous and life-threatening. You won’t know what you have to do to win and you don’t know what the prize is while you’re playing. Find the signs, follow the clues, win the game, save the world. Is the book sci-fi? Is it fantasy? Does the MC, K, have a mental disorder? I can’t answer any of these questions. Following K has he Is it possible to loath a book just as much as you adore it? That was Rabbits for me. Rabbits is a game. But not just any game. It is secret and underground. And sometimes dangerous and life-threatening. You won’t know what you have to do to win and you don’t know what the prize is while you’re playing. Find the signs, follow the clues, win the game, save the world. Is the book sci-fi? Is it fantasy? Does the MC, K, have a mental disorder? I can’t answer any of these questions. Following K has he played the game was SO SO interesting and I found myself obsessing over the game right along with K. As the book goes on, the components of the game become more and more confusing. Is K even playing the game anymore or is he driving himself insane? You’ll have to read to find out. All of these things made me adore the book. But the ending of the book left a lot of things unanswered as K doesn’t know the answers so we as the readers never find the answers either. You will end the story without really knowing what happened. What was real and what was imagined. Omg, it was so good! I know this review basically does nothing except for ramble and tell you how I have no idea what the eff I just read but I just can’t say it enough how much this story drew me in and left me so completely engrossed that I might as well have been playing the game as well, I became so distracted from my own reality. If you love mind-bending, speculative fiction then I would give this a try. I finished reading this a week ago and it is still in my head. I’m still thinking about the craziness and trying to make sense of so much. I’ll definitely be re-reading this again in the future. Releases June 8, 2021 Received from Random House Publishing via Netgalley

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    This book is based in a world created by the author in his podcast of the same name. If you are familiar with it then you will likely enjoy this book. If not, you may still enjoy it, possibly to the point of subscribing to the podcast. Or not. Because it’s kinda weird. “Rabbits” is an amalgam of stream of consciousness, horror, sci-fi, fantasy, and thriller. You have to be paying attention all the time or you’ll miss a crucial detail. There are many references to pop culture, both past and prese This book is based in a world created by the author in his podcast of the same name. If you are familiar with it then you will likely enjoy this book. If not, you may still enjoy it, possibly to the point of subscribing to the podcast. Or not. Because it’s kinda weird. “Rabbits” is an amalgam of stream of consciousness, horror, sci-fi, fantasy, and thriller. You have to be paying attention all the time or you’ll miss a crucial detail. There are many references to pop culture, both past and present, that figure prominently in the tale. If you consider yourself a nerd, this one is right up your alley. I’m giving it a solid 4 stars for innovation and effectively transmitting what the characters are feeling. The dialog was good and things made sense within the given framework. I want to thank Del Rey via Netgalley for this ARC. All opinions shared in this review are my own.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lou Jacobs

    A surrealistic and trippy novel filled with references to popular culture, artificial intelligence, assorted weirdness , and the possible existence of a multiverses and alternative time streams. As you can see .... a plethora of themes resulting in one quirky read. Our main protagonist is simply known as "K" , who is obsessed with the game of Rabbits... it started the night his friend Annie Connors died in a head-on auto collision in a vehicle occupied by her sister, Emily and himself. He has pr A surrealistic and trippy novel filled with references to popular culture, artificial intelligence, assorted weirdness , and the possible existence of a multiverses and alternative time streams. As you can see .... a plethora of themes resulting in one quirky read. Our main protagonist is simply known as "K" , who is obsessed with the game of Rabbits... it started the night his friend Annie Connors died in a head-on auto collision in a vehicle occupied by her sister, Emily and himself. He has prided himself with his ability to see patterns and connections where others could not. In order to play Rabbits, connections and patterns observed lead to the discovery of clues, which propagates the game forward. The origin of the game appears to be ancient with the goal and purpose shrouded in secrecy with a complex series of uncertain rules. Game players start to disappear ... with the possibility they were killed. There have been ten iterations of the game ... with the beginning of the eleventh looming soon. K is approached by billionaire Scarpio who was a past winner and requests his aid in "fixing" the game before the new iteration begins ... otherwise dire and dangerous events will occur threatening the nature of our reality. Before a second meeting can occur the billionaire appears to disappear from existence. K and his girlfriend Chloe are thrust into a journey following bizarre clues, patterns, and coincidences, Suddenly they realize they are playing Rabbits and encountering a series of increasingly weird characters and situations. Miles succeeds in entertaining the reader with a twisted and complex narrative that is plot driven with plucky references to popular culture and mystifying phenomena .... such as false memories. Who hasn't heard of the Mandela effect. The conundrum of the nonexistent film "Shazaam" starring Sinbad the comedian .... or the false memory of the children's books ... Berenstain vs Berenstein Bears. Expect to consider the possibility of alternate time lines or dimensions. What is the goal of Winning the Game ... wealth, health, or even saving the World. This gem can certainly be devoured as a standalone novel. I have no knowledge of the Rabbit podcast but now will check it out to extend my adventure into fun and weirdness. Thanks to NetGalley and Random House/ Ballantine for providing an Uncorrected Proof in exchange for an honest review. ( at readersremains.com)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    3.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2021/06/15/... Wow, this one was real head trip, and I mean that in the best way possible. Rabbits is the kind of story that worms its way into your mind, and you find yourself mulling over it even days after you finish. Sometimes I still go back and forth between a 3 or a 4 star rating, depending on my mood, but as I’m sitting here typing out my review, I’m feeling right in the middle. This was a good book! But I won’t lie, it was als 3.5 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2021/06/15/... Wow, this one was real head trip, and I mean that in the best way possible. Rabbits is the kind of story that worms its way into your mind, and you find yourself mulling over it even days after you finish. Sometimes I still go back and forth between a 3 or a 4 star rating, depending on my mood, but as I’m sitting here typing out my review, I’m feeling right in the middle. This was a good book! But I won’t lie, it was also strange as hell. It’s not going to be for everyone. First a bit of background. In 2017, the author Terry Miles created a pseudo-documentary style podcast called Rabbits. I had not heard of it prior to reading this, but although it is set in the same world, not being familiar with the podcast will not hinder your understanding of the novel in any way. Nor would it help you, I suspect, though it may help prepare the reader for some of the story’s more idiosyncratic traits, such as its alternate reality gaming themes or heavy use of pop culture references. The book’s storyline focuses on “K”, a fan obsessed with the game Rabbits. Using the real world as a platform, players would seek out patterns and unlikely connections, following them down a particular path filled with more clues, ultimately ending in the fulfillment of the individual’s deepest desires. Once an iteration of the game has been won, another round will begin again. Like many Rabbits players, K has become completely addicted and can’t stop trying to find a way into the game. An opportunity presents itself, however, when our protagonist is approached by reclusive billionaire Alan Scarpio, who had reportedly won the sixth iteration. But what Scarpio actually wants to share is a dire warning. He believes Rabbits is corrupted and must be fixed before the next round, the eleventh, is to begin, or else the world as we know it will cease to exist. Together with close friend Chloe, K seeks to find out more about Scarpio’s claims, but before they can get far in their research, the billionaire is reported missing. The eleventh iteration begins as K and Chloe fail to learn what Scarpio was talking about. Like it or not, they are playing now. What happens next is something readers will have to find out for themselves if they choose to read this book. For one, I don’t want to accidentally spoil anything, and two, a lot of it simply gets too complicated and weird to describe. If you know about anything the nebulous nature and definition of ARGs, you might have some idea. In the real world, many media companies have employed them for marketing campaigns for movies, video games, etc. but in Rabbits, it is a secret underground hush-hush kind of situation, similar to Fight Club—outside the game’s ultra-exclusive circles, you don’t ever mention you’re playing or even acknowledge its existence. There is also a dangerous element, as rumor has it that the game has been around for decade, and many players have gone missing or lost their lives over the years trying to unravel its secrets. As we soon find out, some folks are also better equipped play Rabbits, giving them an edge. Being well-versed in pop culture and a gaming geek helps. If you are tech savvy, that is another advantage. Then there’s K, who is especially good at spotting patterns of coincidences and clues. The story explores this aspect later in the book, though by this point, things get so convoluted it’s difficult to trust our protagonist’s point-of-view, especially as it becomes increasingly unreliable. Thing is, I wouldn’t say the plot itself is too difficult to keep track of, but problems do arise when as time goes on and everything becomes more complex with memory lapses, alternate realities and the Mandela effect thrown in. There’s a sense of “anything goes” at this point, and needless to say, it’s incredibly frustrating to find yourself constantly questioning what you’ve read or wondering what the whole point is. So, should you read Rabbits? It is very difficult to say. If you followed the podcast, I would say, yes, of course. If you like books heavy on geek culture references, then maybe. If you’re intrigued by the premise, or perhaps you’re drawn to unique mind-bendingly weird books and are curious to see what the fuss is all about, I would give it a try. For the most part, I actually enjoyed myself quite a bit, at least until things kind of went off the rails towards the end. Like I said, it won’t be for everyone, but I can promise you one thing: it’ll never be boring.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Ruth (I need all the book boyfriends please)

    What do you know about the game? First, Big thank you to Netgalley and Random House Publishing for an advanced copy of this Marvelous book, Rabbits by Terry Miles. This story centers around a thirty-something adult named K. K does stand for an actual name but the reader unfortunately will not learn this bit of information although I have a few guesses. He has serious anxiety causing him to dissociate for periods of time, however, he also has an incredible knack for finding patterns in an amazing w What do you know about the game? First, Big thank you to Netgalley and Random House Publishing for an advanced copy of this Marvelous book, Rabbits by Terry Miles. This story centers around a thirty-something adult named K. K does stand for an actual name but the reader unfortunately will not learn this bit of information although I have a few guesses. He has serious anxiety causing him to dissociate for periods of time, however, he also has an incredible knack for finding patterns in an amazing way. This idea of not only finding patterns but following them to new "clues" is the basis of the game. This book is simply fascinating and mind-boggling to say the least. Full of intricate details that will lead the reader into all kinds of different directions. I thoroughly enjoyed this and highly recommend for fans of mind trip style books!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Karen’s Library

    There is an underground game that’s been around since at least the 1950’s. It’s called Rabbits and you aren’t allowed to talk about it. Ever. K, whose gender is never really revealed, has been obsessed with the game for all of her/his adult life. K is gifted with an eidetic memory and can find the patterns and connections between everything. From what I could gather, this is the objective of Rabbits. But… many people who’ve played the game have disappeared or died so it’s extremely dangerous. No There is an underground game that’s been around since at least the 1950’s. It’s called Rabbits and you aren’t allowed to talk about it. Ever. K, whose gender is never really revealed, has been obsessed with the game for all of her/his adult life. K is gifted with an eidetic memory and can find the patterns and connections between everything. From what I could gather, this is the objective of Rabbits. But… many people who’ve played the game have disappeared or died so it’s extremely dangerous. No one really knows who won the past 10 games or what they’d receive if they did win. For the first half of the book, I did ok keeping up with the story and premise. But somewhere in the last quarter of the book, I got completely lost and never recovered. The ending was good, but I’m still lost as to what actually happened. Also, my mind is a bit blown, because I listened to the audiobook and it was narrated by a woman. And when K meets someone near the beginning, they ask if K is spelled K-A-Y. I went through the entire book thinking K was a woman. But in most of the reviews I’ve read, K is a man. I feel like my world just turned upside down. I don’t know that I’m the target audience. Since I’m not a gamer, and I don’t listen to podcasts, which apparently back in 2017 there was a Rabbits podcast, I felt out of sorts through much of this story. Or maybe it’s just me. Maybe this story just wasn’t quite my cup of tea. I tend to like my books to make sense by the end. Rabbits just got more and more confusing to me. But the story was definitely interesting and I did enjoy it overall. I found K to be a very interesting character. The audiobook is narrated by Christine Larkin and she was amazing!! I do recommend listening to this one because of the performance by Christine. *Thanks so much to Del Rey and NetGalley for the advance copy!*

  23. 4 out of 5

    ☕️Kimberly

    In this technothriller we meet K, a geeky gamer who lost his parents in his teens and lives alone. K sees patterns and connections that have caused him to have manic episodes, and gives presentations (for a fee) about a game called Rabbits. The game began in 1959, but some believe it began sooner than that. There have been ten known iterations and nine winners declared. Players follow clues, unlock hidden messages all hoping to win glory and an unimaginable prize. Some say they unlock the secret In this technothriller we meet K, a geeky gamer who lost his parents in his teens and lives alone. K sees patterns and connections that have caused him to have manic episodes, and gives presentations (for a fee) about a game called Rabbits. The game began in 1959, but some believe it began sooner than that. There have been ten known iterations and nine winners declared. Players follow clues, unlock hidden messages all hoping to win glory and an unimaginable prize. Some say they unlock the secrets of the university, gain immortality or become wealthy beyond your wildest dreams. But when billionaire Alan Scarpio, the alleged winner of the sixth iteration, seeks out K, he learns that something is seriously wrong with the game. Alan tells him K must fix it before the eleventh iteration begins or the entire world will pay. Then Scarpio disappears and soon K is chasing down patterns and searching for clues as players turn up dead or go missing. K enlists the help of his friend and crush, Chloe. The story might prove confusing as you question what is real and id K is still grounded in reality, but the storyline is addictive and the further down the rabbit hole you travel, the more you understand. The first rule of Rabbits is that you don’t talk about it and this makes finding clues and obtaining information difficult. The patterns are sometimes obscure and other times simple, like four of the same dog on the street. K has dreams or nightmares about a darkness and for every clue they gain, something shakes things up. It was brilliant. From the unreliable narrator to the time slips and alternate realities, I was hooked. This isn’t something you can devour in one sitting. In fact, it took me a solid week. Rabbits is perfect for fans of the Matrix, Doctor Who, science fiction and those who see patterns. For Audiobook fans, you’ll want to grab this one on audio. Christine Lakin does a superb job setting the tone and pulling you into the game. From pacing to unique voices she enhances the tale and provides a fantastic listener experience. This review was originally posted at Caffeinated Reviewer

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    I wasn’t familiar with the podcast, but I couldn’t resist reading the Rabbits book as soon as I read the synopsis. As a bit of a conspiracy nut, I can’t help but love a compulsive read like this one. This story was like Stranger Things, Ready Player One, The Adjustment Bureau, and Conspiracy Theory (Mel Gibson) intertwined. It certainly held my interest and I couldn’t wait to see how this underground alternate reality-style game would play out. There were a lot of variables at play here and the I wasn’t familiar with the podcast, but I couldn’t resist reading the Rabbits book as soon as I read the synopsis. As a bit of a conspiracy nut, I can’t help but love a compulsive read like this one. This story was like Stranger Things, Ready Player One, The Adjustment Bureau, and Conspiracy Theory (Mel Gibson) intertwined. It certainly held my interest and I couldn’t wait to see how this underground alternate reality-style game would play out. There were a lot of variables at play here and the ending could have been anyone’s guess, making me feel like the story lacked a bit of direction. Stories like this are all about the ending. A great idea and synopsis means little if the story isn’t wrapped up in a satisfying way. Mostly, I was pleased with how things concluded, but I could’ve used a little more. There was a slight lackluster feeling left behind because I wanted a few more questions answered. Nonetheless, this was an incredibly exciting read. It made me think and dig further into conspiracy theories I hadn’t researched in quite some time. I sense the author is a nerdy kindred spirit, who I’d love to sit down with and chat up! I wouldn’t mind asking plenty questions about this story. Overall, I enjoyed getting lost in the rabbit hole and I’ve started listening to the podcast since I’ve finished. I wish I had familiarized myself with it beforehand, as I think it would’ve made things more clear. Despite that, a really enjoyable read I’ve decided to bump up to 4 stars, from my previous 3 star rating, simply because I can’t stop thinking about it!

  25. 4 out of 5

    inciminci

    Thank you pan macmillan for the proof copy of this whirlwind of a book. Phew, that certainly was a race to the finish from the first page to the last - a very addictive and entertaining race. Rabbits is basically the story of a young man who finds himself trapped in the titular real-life game which is orchestrated by some kind of ominous intelligence, trying to find an error which causes it to malfunction. But because this mysterious underground game has a very crucial function in the universe bey Thank you pan macmillan for the proof copy of this whirlwind of a book. Phew, that certainly was a race to the finish from the first page to the last - a very addictive and entertaining race. Rabbits is basically the story of a young man who finds himself trapped in the titular real-life game which is orchestrated by some kind of ominous intelligence, trying to find an error which causes it to malfunction. But because this mysterious underground game has a very crucial function in the universe beyond being pure entertainment, his mission is equally significant. The game itself is based on finding certain patterns, certain coincidences, glitches, déjà vu’s, which in the Matrix Rabbits mean that you're basically on to something and should follow that clue (It is in reality a little more philosophical and complicated than that but the point is for you to read this book, and not get spoiled). These signs can be particularly unsettling or even scary -clearly remembering a movie or a café that has never existed, seven men with the same name going for the same coffee in Starbucks...) or just a certain pattern, like a song or word repeating itself in different contexts. So most of the book we follow K and his girlfriend Chloe running from point A to point B following these freak-out moments. Let's get over with the criticism first; Rabbits isn't a literary masterpiece. It is written pretty dryly and can even be repetitive at times. But although it shouldn't be first choice for readers who are looking for well-crafted prose, flowery writing or an intellectually challenging read, it's still of a certain charm. It is, above all, a love letter to popular culture, in which Miles grasps the opportunity to fill in the glitches with songs or scenes or motives from films, books and games that certainly had an impact on him. I definitely enjoyed these references and they added a book or two to my TBR, even though they were in my opinion a little overexplained. I have to add that I am a person who likes to do the research on these things, I like a little hint but not an explanation, puzzling on these matters is a pleasure to me. I guess it gives me a feeling of actively joining in the storytelling, but I also see the author not wanting to exclude readers who don't have the background to recognize these allusions. And that's a plus as much as it is a criticism on my part. I probably would have known more had I listened to Terry Miles' podcast Rabbits, which this book is based off. Still, I enjoyed the book Rabbits as a fast-paced, entertaining read. If you listen to the podcast or enjoy books written like games, touching on themes like multiverses, sentient games, speculations on the nature of our world, with a touch of cosmic dread -but not too much by any means- this should definitely hit that mark for you.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dwight

    I was very excited to read this when I saw the book on NetGalley, and thrilled to get an ARC from NetGalley and the publisher. I listened to the Rabbits podcast and felt that this was a great idea. A follow up from the story but together by the podcast. The podcast felt like a season 1 set-up for the world of this mysterious game of hidden clues set up by some enigmatic and vague group in power, with a possible supernatural or sci-fi element. Were details about the world changing as the game wen I was very excited to read this when I saw the book on NetGalley, and thrilled to get an ARC from NetGalley and the publisher. I listened to the Rabbits podcast and felt that this was a great idea. A follow up from the story but together by the podcast. The podcast felt like a season 1 set-up for the world of this mysterious game of hidden clues set up by some enigmatic and vague group in power, with a possible supernatural or sci-fi element. Were details about the world changing as the game went on? A cool idea, and the podcast was fairly cool, but it felt unsatisfying in the end. That’s normal for these fictional podcasts set in a true-crime style format, they often fall flat at the end. So I felt a novel would be a great chance for the already established world to go deeper, and I believe that was the intent. Unfortunately this (for me) becomes an example of how it is easier to think of a compelling story idea then it is to tell a compelling story. The main character, K, has studied the rumors about the underground immersive clue/scavenger-hunt styled game known only as Rabbits. The way people discover the game is through a series of odd discrepancies, coincidences, or clues scattered throughout the real world around them. Then they follow the clues to more clues, and find even more clues. Ultimately they can “win,” somehow, but how it happens, as well as what the prize is, is unknown and vague. And herein lies the biggest problem with the book. The clues and what the game is is too vague, and never really takes shape. Do you just happen to notice too many rungs on a ladder and suddenly you’re “playing the game,” whatever that means. There are some sci-fi types of attempted explanations of what is happening, and the assertion that the game stabilizes the universe, but even that is vague and never has any clear rules set out. Even when crazy sci-fi stuff starts to happen it doesn’t really make sense. People are comparing this to Blake Crouch, and it seems an apt comparison in the sense that Crouch has reality-blending ideas. But he also establishes explanations and rules for the universe within the novel. Then the characters react to that world. You have to have some basis for a story beyond the random events. Or at least have the random events start to come together in such a way that they make some sense eventually. The other problem is that the writing falls flat in character development and dialogue. A lot of the things the characters say is boring. In a podcast like Rabbits you have to have reasons for the characters to be recording, since it purports to be “real life.” This felt like the author was keeping to that model, the characters circle back to K’s apartment about a hundred times to compare notes. Also every scene included a list of descriptors and adjectives, like you are told to do in creative writing class. There were behaviors, or dialogue like “let’s have this conversation before we eat this French toast,” took me out of it. The characters are young adults but relate to each other as if they were 14. There’s the inclusion of what feels like a major character introduction/twist near the end that literally goes nowhere at all, and ends up hurting the story flow. It just read like a less experienced author…sorry to say but just so readers know going into it. The main thing that took me out of it was that it was dull. It felt like it was always in the brink of really starting, which was enough to pull me along but also frustrating when it ended. For a story about an underground dangerous game that had crazy science fiction, murder, and evil shenanigans it felt like it never really got exciting. And K was a fairly one-dimensional character. I kept waiting to like him or for him to become engaged in the plot. For someone obsessed with puzzles and supposedly having a counter-culture or mischievous personality, he sure spent a lot of time wishing he weren’t in this story. A clever idea does not inherently a good story make. I’m sorry but I just couldn’t get into this one. I can’t really recommend it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    We're somewhere between 3-4 stars right now, not sure how I feel about yet. Fascinating concept, execution and pacing was a bit inconsistent for me. Full review to come soon! We're somewhere between 3-4 stars right now, not sure how I feel about yet. Fascinating concept, execution and pacing was a bit inconsistent for me. Full review to come soon!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Reading Reindeer 2021 On Proxima Centauri

    Imagine Lovecraft living into the 21st century, and writing Cosmic Horror from a Quantum Theory viewpoint. Combine that with Multiverse Theory, Dimensional Shifts, and what I term Probability Shifts....and you're about to enter the World of RABBITS. No, this is not a treatise on Biology. This is all the Conspiracy Theories that ever lived run through Schrodinger's experiment and filtered with Lovecraftian Cosmic Horror. Read RABBITS, and never see the Universe the same way, ever again. Imagine Lovecraft living into the 21st century, and writing Cosmic Horror from a Quantum Theory viewpoint. Combine that with Multiverse Theory, Dimensional Shifts, and what I term Probability Shifts....and you're about to enter the World of RABBITS. No, this is not a treatise on Biology. This is all the Conspiracy Theories that ever lived run through Schrodinger's experiment and filtered with Lovecraftian Cosmic Horror. Read RABBITS, and never see the Universe the same way, ever again.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Teri

    I couldn’t resist this description of an alternate reality game – and it turned out to be a mindbender of a book. I wasn’t familiar with the Rabbits podcast created by this author, but after checking it out it seems to be pretty popular. The website states it’s a documentary/docudrama, and the show’s producers won’t admit it isn’t real. That little niggle at the back of my brain wondering if this could really happen made this story even more appealing for me. The game of Rabbits is kind of like F I couldn’t resist this description of an alternate reality game – and it turned out to be a mindbender of a book. I wasn’t familiar with the Rabbits podcast created by this author, but after checking it out it seems to be pretty popular. The website states it’s a documentary/docudrama, and the show’s producers won’t admit it isn’t real. That little niggle at the back of my brain wondering if this could really happen made this story even more appealing for me. The game of Rabbits is kind of like Fight Club – you don’t talk about it, it doesn’t exist, and you tell no one you’re playing. Rumors about its purpose have surrounded the game for years, and the identities of the winners are unknown. It involves finding patterns, inconsistencies, and following clues in our everyday world, and the players seem to be pretty tech savvy and geniuses at detecting subtle irregularities. After K is contacted by Scarpio (a former winner – maybe?) who tells him something has gone wrong with the game, things take a dark turn. Players go missing and/or turn up dead. K has had some issues in his past and at times is unsure of what’s real and what’s not – along with the reader. He loses time, encounters shadow figures, and remembers movies that don’t exist. My jaw dropped more than once at unanticipated twists, and I formed all sorts of theories. At times, you’ll feel like you’re literally going down a rabbit hole with the characters, then look up at the clock and see you’ve also lost time because you need to know what’s happening. With quantum physics, alternate realities, false memory syndrome, and more, Rabbits is a trippy and often baffling novel I’d recommend to avid sci-fi fans. Now I’ll be looking for patterns and inconsistencies everywhere. I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Bakertyl

    This book swings wildly from way to much detail to not nearly enough. But it was fun, something I haven't found in a book in quite awhile. The main character/narrator reminds me of main character/narrator from The Contortionist's Handbook. Don't know if that's good or bad, but I loved the pacing and jumping around topics from both books. From the beginning, the narrator is weirdly unreliable, in the way that drug users are... they may or may not believe what they're telling you, and that belief ma This book swings wildly from way to much detail to not nearly enough. But it was fun, something I haven't found in a book in quite awhile. The main character/narrator reminds me of main character/narrator from The Contortionist's Handbook. Don't know if that's good or bad, but I loved the pacing and jumping around topics from both books. From the beginning, the narrator is weirdly unreliable, in the way that drug users are... they may or may not believe what they're telling you, and that belief may change over time. The characters are fun, though weird. They do things for reasons only they understand, usually, which matches they "anything can happen" feeling of the text. The text, speaking of, makes me think of magic. Fantasy author Brandon Sanderson is famous for his Three Laws of Magic: An author's ability to solve conflict with magic is DIRECTLY PROPORTIONAL to how well the reader understands said magic. Limitations > Power Expand on what you have already, before you add something new. This is a book about things so far removed from the reader's normal life, they might as well be magic. These rules are meant for an author or creator, but Rule 1 feels the weakest in Rabbits. I had no idea what was happening most of the story, in a good way. This lack of understanding set the tone, matched much of what the characters were feeling, But that means the ending left me feeling unfulfilled... since I think this was a reflection of my understanding of the story, another reader may love the ending. **I received an advance copy from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

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