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Barbalien: Red Planet

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A groundbreaking new sci-fi action series in the world of the Eisner Award-winning Black Hammer universe, about prejudice, honor, and identity. Mark Markz has found his place on Earth as both a decorated police officer and as the beloved superhero, Barbalien. But in the midst of the AIDS crisis, hatred from all sides makes balancing these identities seem impossible--especia A groundbreaking new sci-fi action series in the world of the Eisner Award-winning Black Hammer universe, about prejudice, honor, and identity. Mark Markz has found his place on Earth as both a decorated police officer and as the beloved superhero, Barbalien. But in the midst of the AIDS crisis, hatred from all sides makes balancing these identities seem impossible--especially when a Martian enemy from the past hunts him down to take him back, dead or alive. Collects Barbalien: Red Planet #1-#5.


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A groundbreaking new sci-fi action series in the world of the Eisner Award-winning Black Hammer universe, about prejudice, honor, and identity. Mark Markz has found his place on Earth as both a decorated police officer and as the beloved superhero, Barbalien. But in the midst of the AIDS crisis, hatred from all sides makes balancing these identities seem impossible--especia A groundbreaking new sci-fi action series in the world of the Eisner Award-winning Black Hammer universe, about prejudice, honor, and identity. Mark Markz has found his place on Earth as both a decorated police officer and as the beloved superhero, Barbalien. But in the midst of the AIDS crisis, hatred from all sides makes balancing these identities seem impossible--especially when a Martian enemy from the past hunts him down to take him back, dead or alive. Collects Barbalien: Red Planet #1-#5.

30 review for Barbalien: Red Planet

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    Hands down the best comicbook I've read this year and I really can't see anything topping it. When people ask me why I still read comics at forty five years of age, with their ignorant noses turned up in an entirely false sense of superiority, I'd like to give them this book and say 'this is why'. This was a beautiful story, so powerful, so tragic, so hopeful, I am crying as I type this. Thankfully, it had artwork to match the words. Everybody who worked on this book gave it their all and I comme Hands down the best comicbook I've read this year and I really can't see anything topping it. When people ask me why I still read comics at forty five years of age, with their ignorant noses turned up in an entirely false sense of superiority, I'd like to give them this book and say 'this is why'. This was a beautiful story, so powerful, so tragic, so hopeful, I am crying as I type this. Thankfully, it had artwork to match the words. Everybody who worked on this book gave it their all and I commend them with the highest praise I can possible give. You should be proud, people. Beautiful work... just, beautiful. If this doesn't win an Eisner there's no justice in the world. My next book: RHS Encyclopedia of Plants and Flowers

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Barbalien has always been an analog of Martian Manhunter with the twist that he's gay. This origin story is set during the AIDS Crisis of the 80's. Mark Markz is still coming to terms with being gay. He's a closeted police officer by day, Barbalien by night. He becomes enamored with a gay activist he saves at a rally. This book really works when it's about Mark coming to accept itself. The story has quite a few holes with the Martian 'B' plotline that I didn't care about one iota. Gabriel Hernan Barbalien has always been an analog of Martian Manhunter with the twist that he's gay. This origin story is set during the AIDS Crisis of the 80's. Mark Markz is still coming to terms with being gay. He's a closeted police officer by day, Barbalien by night. He becomes enamored with a gay activist he saves at a rally. This book really works when it's about Mark coming to accept itself. The story has quite a few holes with the Martian 'B' plotline that I didn't care about one iota. Gabriel Hernandez Walta's art is packed with emotion making it perfect for this series.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    Wow, this was a happy surprise! Well, "happy," (or anguished!) in that it is about the AIDS crisis, so grim and frightening, of course, and a surprise in that it takes place within Jeff Lemire's Black Hammer series, which is generally not about real world issues. The script is by Tate Brombal, who pitched the idea to Lemire, who had created the original character and co-wrote the story with Brombal. Gabriel Hernandez Walta did a very nice job with the art. But what's unique and special about thi Wow, this was a happy surprise! Well, "happy," (or anguished!) in that it is about the AIDS crisis, so grim and frightening, of course, and a surprise in that it takes place within Jeff Lemire's Black Hammer series, which is generally not about real world issues. The script is by Tate Brombal, who pitched the idea to Lemire, who had created the original character and co-wrote the story with Brombal. Gabriel Hernandez Walta did a very nice job with the art. But what's unique and special about this comic? It's set in the eighties in Spiral City, during the AIDS crisis. Mark Markz, also known as Barbalien, is the Warlord of Mars. He is also gay, and so when he comes to Earth he needs to figure out what that means. He saves someone at an AIDS rally in 1986, an AIDS activist, as Brombal clearly is (since AIDS, as he makes clear in an afterword, is not yet over on this planet, of course) and under the cover of his being a cop works on what it means for him to be both a superhero and gay in the middle of this crisis. Surprising, as I said, emotional, powerful; good for Lemire and his team for taking on this issue and making it meaningful. One of the best comics of the year!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    Mark Markz, a.k.a. Barbalien, is from Mars. Mark Markz is also gay, which is maybe even more of a problem for Martians than it is for Earthlings. This book is about Markz' time in the 1980s of Spiral City, and focuses on him coming to terms with his sexuality. It also focuses on gay rights, and the appearance of AIDS. So Markz has left for Earth, and is hiding there as a police officer, in which guise he quickly encounters LGBTQ+ protests against the persecution of homosexuals. Markz adopts anothe Mark Markz, a.k.a. Barbalien, is from Mars. Mark Markz is also gay, which is maybe even more of a problem for Martians than it is for Earthlings. This book is about Markz' time in the 1980s of Spiral City, and focuses on him coming to terms with his sexuality. It also focuses on gay rights, and the appearance of AIDS. So Markz has left for Earth, and is hiding there as a police officer, in which guise he quickly encounters LGBTQ+ protests against the persecution of homosexuals. Markz adopts another guise, and enters the underground world of gay clubs. He meets one of the protesters, Miguel Cruz, and falls in love with him. Then Miguel gets ill. Markz is also being hunted by another Martian (basically for being gay), and this subplot feels a bit forced - it's a more regular Black Hammer plot, while this book is interesting because it veers away from the regular BH tropes. But there has to be a place to get the SHRAKK!s in. The whole setup of the book can feel a bit jarring - the 1980s Black Hammer universe has pretty much the same problems as real life 1980s Earth. There is a horrible degenerative disease called AIDS, it's falsely presented as a 'gay disease' and people who have the disease are left to die. There's also the same level of homophobia. (To be clear, the other option, making up some sort of AIDS-like disease would feel convoluted and ridiculous.) I think this also the first Black Hammer book that explicitly places Spiral City in America, much like Metropolis and Gotham City on DC's Earth. (Perhaps most jarring of all - Star Wars exists in the Black Hammer universe.) These aren't problems, of course. The book tells a beautiful story, and the art is just as beautiful. (Kindly received a review copy from Dark Horse Books through Edelweiss)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Roman Zarichnyi

    «Варбулець: Червона планета»— ще один мальопис, який розширює всесвіт «Чорного Молота». Джефф Лемір написав історію, яка розкриває глибше Варбульця, а-ля Марк Маркц, події в якій відбуваються на початку 1980-х років. Початкова сцена відбувається на Марсі, де Варбульцю виносять вирок смерті через його любов до людей. Та більшість подій відбуваються на Землі, до того, як марсіанина силою заберуть на червону планету. У першій арці «Чорного Молота» ми дізнаємося, що Варбулець ґей, тому це не спойлер. «Варбулець: Червона планета»— ще один мальопис, який розширює всесвіт «Чорного Молота». Джефф Лемір написав історію, яка розкриває глибше Варбульця, а-ля Марк Маркц, події в якій відбуваються на початку 1980-х років. Початкова сцена відбувається на Марсі, де Варбульцю виносять вирок смерті через його любов до людей. Та більшість подій відбуваються на Землі, до того, як марсіанина силою заберуть на червону планету. У першій арці «Чорного Молота» ми дізнаємося, що Варбулець ґей, тому це не спойлер. Ідіть читайте, нарешті, перший том, тим більше він вийшов українською. Марсіанин на Землі постійно змінює свій вигляд, щоби знайти місце між людьми. Але це тільки одна сторона, бо інша — пошук свого я та пошук розуміння своєї сексуальності. Варбулець, щоб приховати своє марсіанське походження, працює поліцейським, де змінює зовнішність та бере собі ім’я Марк Маркц. Події на початку переносять нас у Спіраль Сіті, де відбувається мітинг за ґендерну рівність. Тут Варбулець знайомиться одним із мітингувальників, рятуючи його, де він ледь не загинув через дурний вчинок. Згодом він теж змінює свій зовнішній вигляд, спеціально для спілкування з ним, відвідування підпільних клубів та усвідомлення того, ким він є. Якщо зробити зріз усіх випусків лімітки, то все обертається навколо боротьби сексуальних менший за свої права, намагання поліції все це прикрити й те, як у цю всю ситуацію потрапляє Варбулець, який, окрім усвідомлення своєї ідентичності, також намагається перебувати між кількох берегів. Сюжетно вийшло непогано, бо порівняно з деякими іншими лімітками в цьому всесвіті, цей мальопис дійсно розширює розуміння особистості Варбульця. Окрім того малюнк Ґабріеля Вальти, який ще мені сподобався в іншому мальописі «Sentient» написаний теж у співавторстві з Джеффом Леміром, добре формує правильну атмосферу. Та і взагалі виглядає добре. У висновку скажу, що цю лімітку вартує прочитати, щоби більше зрозуміти героя, який грає не останню роль в основних подіях.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    Ooph, this one's painful. As it should be, given the subject matter, but even so. Barbalien's story as part of and as a parallel to the AIDs Crisis is handled both delicately and honestly by writer Tate Brombal. (Lemire's name's on the cover, but Brombal did all the heavy lifting here so he's getting all the credit). In five issues, we see how Mark's internal struggles and the struggles that the queer community are facing are both massively similar and irreconcilably different. The fact that Mar Ooph, this one's painful. As it should be, given the subject matter, but even so. Barbalien's story as part of and as a parallel to the AIDs Crisis is handled both delicately and honestly by writer Tate Brombal. (Lemire's name's on the cover, but Brombal did all the heavy lifting here so he's getting all the credit). In five issues, we see how Mark's internal struggles and the struggles that the queer community are facing are both massively similar and irreconcilably different. The fact that Mark can pass as a police officer complicates matters even further, and some parts of this book are difficult to read as a result. It's almost a shame when the superheroic stuff rears its head, because Mark's Martian problems are nowhere near as interesting as his human ones, and while his victory over those issues works well to contrast with the plot denouement on the other side of things, I'd almost have preferred this to be an entire slice of life book rather than a superhero one. But if this is the way these stories get told, then I'll take it. Barbalien has always been a pastiche of Martian Manhunter, and it's interesting to see how the fact that Mark portrays himself as a white man in his human identity (in both guises) contrasts to how Martian Manhunter is always a black guy. I wonder how this story would have changed, if it was J'onn rather than Mark getting involved. The artwork from Gabriel Hernandez Walta is his usual understated, less-is-more type pencils that made his Vision and Doctor Strange runs so successful. The emotion he can invoke with only a few pencil strokes is astounding, it truly is, and it helps ground the human side of things as well as making the Martian plot even more alien than before. Yet another in the wide array of Black Hammer spin-offs, Barbalien's solo outing stands head and shoulders above the others for daring to tell a story that's at times painful and joyous to read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Paul W.

    There are 2 endings in this book, both with the main character's acceptance. The art is perfectly evocative but I feel the story could have been better with a more deft hand in writing it. There are 2 endings in this book, both with the main character's acceptance. The art is perfectly evocative but I feel the story could have been better with a more deft hand in writing it.

  8. 5 out of 5

    April Gray

    I'm not familiar with the Black Hammer universe, and I was not expecting such an emotional gut punch as my introduction. I'm not complaining, just wasn't expecting it. On one level, you've got a standard fish-out-of-water superhero story of an alien, Mark Markz, who comes to live on Earth after leaving Mars. He can shapeshift, and is a cop by day, superhero by night. What isn't standard is he's gay, and it's the '80s, and the AIDS crisis is in full swing. Markz is just starting to come to terms I'm not familiar with the Black Hammer universe, and I was not expecting such an emotional gut punch as my introduction. I'm not complaining, just wasn't expecting it. On one level, you've got a standard fish-out-of-water superhero story of an alien, Mark Markz, who comes to live on Earth after leaving Mars. He can shapeshift, and is a cop by day, superhero by night. What isn't standard is he's gay, and it's the '80s, and the AIDS crisis is in full swing. Markz is just starting to come to terms with his sexuality; he's closeted as a cop, and AIDS protests have him conflicted; how can he fight against the protesters when he believes in their cause, and wants to join them? After saving an activist's life as Barbalien, he wants to learn more, and creates another persona, Luke, in order to meet Miguel and get to know him. So now he has a young, just coming out gay man perspective going as well, and wow, this all just brings the feels. I was a teenager in the '80s, and almost all my male friends were gay, and I remember being afraid for them. I remember Reagan doing nothing. I remember the protests, and the righteous anger of gays at being ignored and forgotten and left to die. I remember every friend that died because of this disease. This story brought that home. This story will make you hurt, and that's good. We need to not forget. While all this is going on, a Martian bounty hunter-type dude shows up, looking to bring Markz back to Mars for supposedly being a traitor, and that gets ugly as well. The overall storytelling is really good, with a small caveat that I wish we'd been given a bit more context about past events. The art is gorgeous, and effectively done; in so many scenes, it just made me stop and sit back for a minute from the impact. Oh yeah, Barbalien/Mark Markz is an obvious nod to Martian Manhunter/ J'onn J'onzz yadda yadda yadda, you'll read that in every review, and people who know more about comics are better equipped to tell you about it, but I figured I'd better mention it. The important thing to take away is go buy this book, it's a great, powerful story, and y'all should read it.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Cooke

    One of the most important books on shelves right now. This tells such a vital and REAL story, hidden within a superhero comic book. Tate Brombal writes with such an incredible passion and fierceness that comes through in every single panel on the page. Gabriel Walta and Jordie Bellaire are the DREAM TEAM with their art and colours. I stopped regularly just to take in all the subtleties of their work that brings Brombal's story to life on the page. And Aditya Bidikar's lettering is brilliant - fr One of the most important books on shelves right now. This tells such a vital and REAL story, hidden within a superhero comic book. Tate Brombal writes with such an incredible passion and fierceness that comes through in every single panel on the page. Gabriel Walta and Jordie Bellaire are the DREAM TEAM with their art and colours. I stopped regularly just to take in all the subtleties of their work that brings Brombal's story to life on the page. And Aditya Bidikar's lettering is brilliant - from the alien language to the every day dialogue and bright word pops of Dr. Day and the Sunlight Sisters. Everyone poured their heart and soul into this story and you can tell. This book is perfect in every way and it is a MUST read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    David Wilson

    YES!! Fantastic. Probably one of the best queer superhero stories ever told. Poignant.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Martijn Van

    I have no words for this comic. The combination of 80's aids drama and sci-fi superhero vs intergalactic bountyhunter should'nt work but it does and damn. This is good. Maybe my favourite Black Hammer story. I have no words for this comic. The combination of 80's aids drama and sci-fi superhero vs intergalactic bountyhunter should'nt work but it does and damn. This is good. Maybe my favourite Black Hammer story.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Josh

    As Lemire hands a lot of control over to co-writer Tate Brombal for this story, Barbalien: Red Planet delivers a compelling story about identity, freedom, and violence in the midst of the AIDs crisis and Barbalien's own personal quest to find his place in the universe. With strong art from Walta and the rest of the creative team, this collection delivers another strong chapter in the ever-expanding Black Hammer world. As Lemire hands a lot of control over to co-writer Tate Brombal for this story, Barbalien: Red Planet delivers a compelling story about identity, freedom, and violence in the midst of the AIDs crisis and Barbalien's own personal quest to find his place in the universe. With strong art from Walta and the rest of the creative team, this collection delivers another strong chapter in the ever-expanding Black Hammer world.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Nate Billy

    Black Hammer is hands down the best current series for one reason alone: None of the stories are ever what you’d expect. Looking at all the issue covers I could’ve sworn I was in for a Gay Conan the Barbarian on Mars story, or possibly the entire story of Barbie being shunned from Mars for his sexuality (still with Conan-like bloody warlord battles spliced though). When I finally dove into the Barbalien series I was ecstatic to find out I was (almost) completely wrong. Again Lemire managed to wri Black Hammer is hands down the best current series for one reason alone: None of the stories are ever what you’d expect. Looking at all the issue covers I could’ve sworn I was in for a Gay Conan the Barbarian on Mars story, or possibly the entire story of Barbie being shunned from Mars for his sexuality (still with Conan-like bloody warlord battles spliced though). When I finally dove into the Barbalien series I was ecstatic to find out I was (almost) completely wrong. Again Lemire managed to write another fantastic, heartbreaking saga that defies all expectations and truly elevates the superhero genre to a whole new level. I’m not even going to get into the plot, just read it and take the ride.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Mike Hughes

    Really happy to see Barbalien’s story fleshed out. Examining lgbtq identity and gay liberation through an alien perspective is a tightrope walk, but one that Brombal and Lemire pull off with grace. Some issues with pacing and editing that didn’t quite make this a clean read for me, but there’s a lot of power, beauty, and pain in the story (Barbie’s “you act as if anger cannot be just” in the face of his oppressor gave me chills). Special book, and I look forward to reading more from Brombal.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Tracey

    From Afterword by Tate Brombai: "Queer writers don't often get to write queer stories for queer superheroes in mainstream comics--let alone ones set during the AIDS crisis, a disease buried under metaphor or weaponized by supervillains. Red Planet, I knew, was a chance to right those wrongs." Great timing for me to get this from OPL during Pride month because this is super gay! (YEAH!) Wait, what I mean is the superheroes in this are gay, but yeah, it's also super gay and I loved it. I love that From Afterword by Tate Brombai: "Queer writers don't often get to write queer stories for queer superheroes in mainstream comics--let alone ones set during the AIDS crisis, a disease buried under metaphor or weaponized by supervillains. Red Planet, I knew, was a chance to right those wrongs." Great timing for me to get this from OPL during Pride month because this is super gay! (YEAH!) Wait, what I mean is the superheroes in this are gay, but yeah, it's also super gay and I loved it. I love that it addresses how being marginalized in more than one way (aka intersectionality) can make it difficult for people to understand one another if they don't share the same intersections. While it is set in 1986 (oh, and on Mars in some parts of the story), many of the issues the gay community faces around access to health care and police violence are still relevant today. The art work in this is really cool and I appreciated how rainbow colors appear in a variety of ways.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    Barbalien was originally created to be a riff on the Martian Manhunter but what Tate Brombal does with the character is use him to tell a story about the AIDs crisis. Brombal tackles the inherent privilege of a shapeshifter who can choose to be white-presenting, who has the authority of a cop, who has the powers of a superhero, but who asks for "peace" instead of using violence. Someone who can choose not to interfere, who chooses to use reason and make compromises while others lose their lives. Barbalien was originally created to be a riff on the Martian Manhunter but what Tate Brombal does with the character is use him to tell a story about the AIDs crisis. Brombal tackles the inherent privilege of a shapeshifter who can choose to be white-presenting, who has the authority of a cop, who has the powers of a superhero, but who asks for "peace" instead of using violence. Someone who can choose not to interfere, who chooses to use reason and make compromises while others lose their lives. Brombal turns this from a Martian Manhunter pastiche to an openly queer and intensely heart-breaking story about protest, anger, and identity. Of choosing to be who you are and not apologizing for it, and how what is "right" usually isn't what is "acceptable". Sometimes peace isn't an option.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rattoni

    Theres a lot of hype about this one recently, it just got nominated to 3 Eisner awards. I don´t get it. I think that Lemire has so much better works than this one, also Walta. I had already left it unfinished after issue 3, then I read about the Eisner nomations and retook it. I alrady knew about Barbalien, he was one of my favorite characters in Black Hammer, the balance of mystery and rapport that was achieved with him in the first compendium of Black Hammer is great, but here that totally goe Theres a lot of hype about this one recently, it just got nominated to 3 Eisner awards. I don´t get it. I think that Lemire has so much better works than this one, also Walta. I had already left it unfinished after issue 3, then I read about the Eisner nomations and retook it. I alrady knew about Barbalien, he was one of my favorite characters in Black Hammer, the balance of mystery and rapport that was achieved with him in the first compendium of Black Hammer is great, but here that totally goes away. It seems that there are three stories in here, the one about Barbalien being chased by another martian, which is where the whole story begins making it seem that it will be poignant, but it´s not. Then the life of Mark Marks as a gay cop that has to struggle between his duty and dealing with his sexuality in a strange world, and then there´s the story about Luke and Miguel. The way these three stories connect does not seem fluid, one story goes one way and provides nothing to the other two, as you can see in the description that I just made, it´s quite easy to separate the three stories. It seems that there could´ve been something interestin in the story of Miguel and Luke, but having to share time with the other stories it was diluted leaving not much time for the character development. Miguel seems to me like a pastiche, the gay puertorican lider in NY, he seems to fit all the boxes that a gay in an 80s movie would, and maybe that´s what Lemire wanted, but I am used to his narratives with deeper characters. There are some effective and interesting uses of the medium, but since the story is not tight those suffer as well, ending up as pure eyecandy. I like a lot other Lemire works, this one seems to me like an easy award catcher.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Shane Perry

    Excellent. This just may be the best of all the Black Hammer spin-offs. As is mentioned in the back of this book, it’s not often you see a queer writer getting to tell a queer story in mainstream superhero comics. Jeff Lemire made Barbalien something unique, but this story lifts the character to a whole new level, seeing him discover his true self in the 1980’s during the height of the AIDS epidemic. Essential reading and something that should be easily understood even if you’ve never read anyth Excellent. This just may be the best of all the Black Hammer spin-offs. As is mentioned in the back of this book, it’s not often you see a queer writer getting to tell a queer story in mainstream superhero comics. Jeff Lemire made Barbalien something unique, but this story lifts the character to a whole new level, seeing him discover his true self in the 1980’s during the height of the AIDS epidemic. Essential reading and something that should be easily understood even if you’ve never read anything else from Black Hammer. Loved Walta’s art in this.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Vincent

    On an execution level this is a great book. I loved the art, the colours, the scripting and the story. I'm maybe not in the target audience and it didn't have as much emotional resonance for me as it would for others, but everything about this book is beautiful. I never would have expected a mashup of the Martian Manhunter and Barsoom's Tharks to be in such a poignant story. And is it just me or was there something a little Romita Jr-esque about the art? On an execution level this is a great book. I loved the art, the colours, the scripting and the story. I'm maybe not in the target audience and it didn't have as much emotional resonance for me as it would for others, but everything about this book is beautiful. I never would have expected a mashup of the Martian Manhunter and Barsoom's Tharks to be in such a poignant story. And is it just me or was there something a little Romita Jr-esque about the art?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Somebody did the math and realized that Barbalien would have been active during the early days of the AIDS crisis, and that was the jumping off point for this book. It's a tough read, and it's thoroughly grounded in real world history. And it's not just a history of protest. It's also a coming out story, a first love story. It's a story about exploring your identity, when it doesn't feel safe to do so. And it's really, really good. Somebody did the math and realized that Barbalien would have been active during the early days of the AIDS crisis, and that was the jumping off point for this book. It's a tough read, and it's thoroughly grounded in real world history. And it's not just a history of protest. It's also a coming out story, a first love story. It's a story about exploring your identity, when it doesn't feel safe to do so. And it's really, really good.

  21. 4 out of 5

    J.J.

    Damn. Monsters, and then two weeks later Red Planet. The competition is over: Graphic Novel wins Genre of the Month!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Andres Pasten

    que buena historia nos entrega Lemire, para dar empuje a la inclusión y que no se olvide como era que trataban a la minorías

  23. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    I liked the message this conveyed, but I also feel like there were bits missing to give proper context. But overall, it was great.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Leonard Razgon

    Loving the series. The art is too good to handle.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Pierce

  26. 4 out of 5

    R.E.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Vasilis Fotsinos

  28. 4 out of 5

    Benji Glaab

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cosmin

  30. 4 out of 5

    noah t

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