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Modern Music Masters - Oasis

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In 1994 a group of five lads from Manchester took on the world with their unmistakable brand of rock 'n' roll. Fifteen years later in 2009 it was all over, leaving an imprint on British music that will be felt for generations. The story of Oasis is the story of northern solidarity, of indie-rock 'n' roll, and most importantly, of two brothers. Drawing on interviews with th In 1994 a group of five lads from Manchester took on the world with their unmistakable brand of rock 'n' roll. Fifteen years later in 2009 it was all over, leaving an imprint on British music that will be felt for generations. The story of Oasis is the story of northern solidarity, of indie-rock 'n' roll, and most importantly, of two brothers. Drawing on interviews with those close to the band, 'Modern Music Masters – Oasis' aims to throw new light on one of British music's signature groups. With a close focus on the group's chart placings – including their eight number 1 albums and eight number 1 singles – this book is ideal for those looking for a new angle into a familiar story. ‘Modern Music Masters – Oasis’ is the first in a series of books about the artists you know and love, or are discovering for the first time. With a strong focus on the UK charts, placing the artists in a social and political environment, MMM do not claim to be exhaustive, but offer an accessible route into the music and the history. Tom Boniface-Webb is the co-author of ‘I Was Britpopped: The Definitive A-Z of Britpop’, published by Valley Press in 2017.


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In 1994 a group of five lads from Manchester took on the world with their unmistakable brand of rock 'n' roll. Fifteen years later in 2009 it was all over, leaving an imprint on British music that will be felt for generations. The story of Oasis is the story of northern solidarity, of indie-rock 'n' roll, and most importantly, of two brothers. Drawing on interviews with th In 1994 a group of five lads from Manchester took on the world with their unmistakable brand of rock 'n' roll. Fifteen years later in 2009 it was all over, leaving an imprint on British music that will be felt for generations. The story of Oasis is the story of northern solidarity, of indie-rock 'n' roll, and most importantly, of two brothers. Drawing on interviews with those close to the band, 'Modern Music Masters – Oasis' aims to throw new light on one of British music's signature groups. With a close focus on the group's chart placings – including their eight number 1 albums and eight number 1 singles – this book is ideal for those looking for a new angle into a familiar story. ‘Modern Music Masters – Oasis’ is the first in a series of books about the artists you know and love, or are discovering for the first time. With a strong focus on the UK charts, placing the artists in a social and political environment, MMM do not claim to be exhaustive, but offer an accessible route into the music and the history. Tom Boniface-Webb is the co-author of ‘I Was Britpopped: The Definitive A-Z of Britpop’, published by Valley Press in 2017.

47 review for Modern Music Masters - Oasis

  1. 4 out of 5

    *TUDOR^QUEEN*

    DNF @ 30% I thought I would like this book for a couple of reasons. For one, I love rock biographies. Secondly, I once watched a VH1 show decades ago where Paul McCartney was on and he mentioned Oasis saying, "At least they are derivative of me!" I did buy one of their CDs in the late nineties because of the song, "Don't Go Away", but other than this song and "Wonderwall" (by the way, the name of a kind of obscure George Harrison solo album) I don't know anything else about them musically. The bo DNF @ 30% I thought I would like this book for a couple of reasons. For one, I love rock biographies. Secondly, I once watched a VH1 show decades ago where Paul McCartney was on and he mentioned Oasis saying, "At least they are derivative of me!" I did buy one of their CDs in the late nineties because of the song, "Don't Go Away", but other than this song and "Wonderwall" (by the way, the name of a kind of obscure George Harrison solo album) I don't know anything else about them musically. The book so far tells the story of Oasis's rise to fame, but I'm not enjoying or relating to the information presented. There are British record charts listed at the end of chapters which show Oasis's entry with various songs. I don't know a lot of the other artists, nor their songs. There was also the stock slam against conservative politicians. One of them happens to be one of my favorite United States Presidents. My favorite part of this book was the beginning where the author made it personal, telling the reader how this was the band that really got him enthused about music in a big way. I was seriously drawn in at that point, but slowly became detached as I read further. I feel very badly because I won this in a Goodreads Giveaway and am very appreciative. However, I can only state the obvious- that this is not my cup of tea- and move on.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Adam Parrilli

    Ah, my true heroes. I was IN, lock, stock, and barrel with Oasis. Less English than Blur, less complicated lyrically than say The Smiths, Oasis were the BEST in the late nineties. This book reminds me how forgettable their output was after 2000. Can I sing you any songs on Dig Out Your Soul? Probably not. This MMM1 thankfully steers clear of most of the druggy and girlfriend/wife gossip in favor of solid details on all the lineup changes, album (and single) releases, and tours. I could’ve used mor Ah, my true heroes. I was IN, lock, stock, and barrel with Oasis. Less English than Blur, less complicated lyrically than say The Smiths, Oasis were the BEST in the late nineties. This book reminds me how forgettable their output was after 2000. Can I sing you any songs on Dig Out Your Soul? Probably not. This MMM1 thankfully steers clear of most of the druggy and girlfriend/wife gossip in favor of solid details on all the lineup changes, album (and single) releases, and tours. I could’ve used more of an American perspective or further details of US tours given the sheer number and popularity of Oasis in America. The book recognizes their importance and I would recommend it to devoted fans of old, as well as kids looking to fill in the blanks, something the MMM series does far better than the internet can do.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Harry Whitewolf

    Like any proper music fan, I’m into a broad range of genres, but in those first youthful years of discovery during my teenage days, I guess I was mostly listening to indie rock, grunge, ska, punk, hip-hop, heavy rock, baggy bands, post-punk bands, and Britpop. And although the latter was no more or less of a joy than other genres, it was the scene that belonged to me the most. It was the scene that was happening in my country in my time. And what a scene it was! In fact, as far as guitar bands g Like any proper music fan, I’m into a broad range of genres, but in those first youthful years of discovery during my teenage days, I guess I was mostly listening to indie rock, grunge, ska, punk, hip-hop, heavy rock, baggy bands, post-punk bands, and Britpop. And although the latter was no more or less of a joy than other genres, it was the scene that belonged to me the most. It was the scene that was happening in my country in my time. And what a scene it was! In fact, as far as guitar bands go, I’d say it was the last important scene we’ve had in Britain. Looking back, I guess I was a pretty hardcore member of that scene too. Name a Britpop band, and the chances are I saw them more than once. From tiny gigs like Supergrass and The Bluetones’ first tour at The Joiners in Southampton to key Britpop events like Blur at Mile End, I was there. You can debate who was better out of Oasis and Blur all day long (even though the answer’s Blur by a mile, but Pulp were possibly better, and the truth is most people loved both Oasis and Blur equally) but you can’t doubt that Oasis were the band that arrogantly stepped up to become the Kings of the Britpop scene and take it to a mainstream audience. In this fascinating book my Tom Boniface-Webb, he does an excellent job of summing up Oasis’ place in the Britpop and wider music scene. I learned things about the band that I didn’t know, I was reminded of things I had forgotten, and there was an excellent balance between exploring Oasis’ rise and fall, as well as in the context of the music scenes that pre and post-dated Britpop, including Manchester’s ability to produce one genius after another for quite some time. “Modern Music Masters – Oasis” is exceptionally well written, where there’s just enough factual content and commentary to keep it all moving along swiftly. I’m long past caring about Oasis now, but that didn’t make the reading any less captivating. More than anything, Boniface-Webb allowed me to take a walk through the wider Britpop memory lane, and I enjoyed my journey very much. If you were part of the Britpop scene, even if Oasis aren’t your favourites, you’re sure to gain much from this insightful overview of the ‘90s scene. And I’m sure the other books in this series will be just as good. Did I mention Blur are better than Oasis? Of course, they are. While Blur experimented with different sounds, approaches and production with each album and grew to maturity, and Albarn went on to experiment even more with bands and opuses ranging from funk to hip-hop to opera, and Graham Coxon went on to produce some truly marvellous albums, Oasis and the Gallaghers stopped producing anything of note after just two albums. Ironically, Blur were much more akin to The Beatles than Oasis were, even though Oasis wanted to be The Beatles. I lost interest in Oasis after their third appalling album was released. “Be Here Now” put the nail in Oasis’ coffin as far as I was concerned, and the fact they continued to put out shit and still proclaim they were better and bigger than The Beatles soon made me turn off from their arrogance I had once enjoyed. I rarely listen to Oasis any more. But this book reminded me that, for two or three years, I once considered them to be one of the greatest bands that have ever stepped foot on the planet. I bought, and still have, their second and third singles on seven-inch (“Shakermaker” and “Live Forever”), and their “Cigarettes and Alcohol” cassette single in its cigarette box design, and I saw the band live at the Bournemouth International Centre upon the release of their second album What’s The Story. Hell, I can even remember when the NME originally pitted Oasis against Shed Seven as the emerging kings of Britpop, shortly before Blur took that position instead. At the time, Oasis’s instantly-classic rock-chords and Liam’s snarling voice seared through my body in joyous euphoria like no other. So, I might not have taken much interest in Oasis since the late ‘90s, but this book put a smile on my face, as I remembered those few special years where the most important thing in life was listening to the Evening Session, anticipating new single and album releases, and going to see new and established British bands playing live pretty much every single week. As the book points out, Britpop was the antithesis of America’s Prozac-nation Grunge scene, and while we were all just as much into that scene as the one on our shores, Britpop was the perfect happy high resolution that our country needed at the time. And without Oasis, that Britpop scene would never have happened. If you’re in the mood for some Bitpop memories, check out my YouTube compilation: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list...

  4. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    Never was a big Oasis fan, but I do love Supergrass, Pulp, Suede and The Charlatans and there's plenty of them present and accounted for. Mr. Boniface-Webb wrote a fine read on the Britpop era that kept my interest and even kept me amused reading about The Gallagher Bros' increasing hatred of each other. At any rate, it's to the author's credit he kept my attention reading about a band I never liked. BTW, I do like the High Flying Birds so perhaps it's just Liam I can't stand. Never was a big Oasis fan, but I do love Supergrass, Pulp, Suede and The Charlatans and there's plenty of them present and accounted for. Mr. Boniface-Webb wrote a fine read on the Britpop era that kept my interest and even kept me amused reading about The Gallagher Bros' increasing hatred of each other. At any rate, it's to the author's credit he kept my attention reading about a band I never liked. BTW, I do like the High Flying Birds so perhaps it's just Liam I can't stand.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rob Jenkins

    Reader friendly introduction/overview of the life and times of Oasis. The band, not the bottled soft drink. Loved the nostalgia of the charts at the time the singles and albums were released. Terrific reminder of the quality of the music the were producing. Briefly touching on the changing direction of music (death of 'singles/b-sides', streaming and cost increases of merch and tours due to changing nature of revenue streams), Also deserving of extra marks for bringing my attention to the "Don't s Reader friendly introduction/overview of the life and times of Oasis. The band, not the bottled soft drink. Loved the nostalgia of the charts at the time the singles and albums were released. Terrific reminder of the quality of the music the were producing. Briefly touching on the changing direction of music (death of 'singles/b-sides', streaming and cost increases of merch and tours due to changing nature of revenue streams), Also deserving of extra marks for bringing my attention to the "Don't stop... (Demo) release that I had somehow missed.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Antonio Sáez

    I think it is a very good book, even though some small sections are a bit monotonous. It is clear that Oasis was a very important band, nowadays I still hope to hear an album as good as Definitely Maybe or (What's the Story) Morning Glory. I think it is a very good book, even though some small sections are a bit monotonous. It is clear that Oasis was a very important band, nowadays I still hope to hear an album as good as Definitely Maybe or (What's the Story) Morning Glory.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    I won a copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways and am voluntarily leaving a review. I was a huge Oasis fan from the mid-90s to probably mid-00s so I was really pumped to get this book. I thought it would give me greater insight into some of those Oasis classics that I literally can’t stop singing just from seeing their titles listed. To a point, it did, but this book didn’t go deep enough for me. I feel like it would be awesome for people who are just discovering Oasis or are really big f I won a copy of this book through Goodreads Giveaways and am voluntarily leaving a review. I was a huge Oasis fan from the mid-90s to probably mid-00s so I was really pumped to get this book. I thought it would give me greater insight into some of those Oasis classics that I literally can’t stop singing just from seeing their titles listed. To a point, it did, but this book didn’t go deep enough for me. I feel like it would be awesome for people who are just discovering Oasis or are really big fans of just Wonderwall or Live Forever; or maybe it’s the last piece of the pie for diehard huge Oasis fans, but for me—somewhere in the middle—it just felt like a quick gloss over of their songs. It’s well-written and easy to read, and it reminded me of a lot of other great mid-90s music and events, but it just want quite enough for me.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Donna BW

    Loved it! The details about the albums and songs transport you right back to the first times you heard them in the way only stories about music can, and the insightful commentary about 90s society has you looking at things with me eyes. The charts information is also awesome. Bloody Robson and Jerome!

  9. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    Loved the music and still miss it but ... the book? It was an easy okay read but didn't have a lot that I didn't know or suspect. Hopefully, though, this is the first in a series and we'll see some of the other artists spotlighted like this. I won a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway for this honest review. Loved the music and still miss it but ... the book? It was an easy okay read but didn't have a lot that I didn't know or suspect. Hopefully, though, this is the first in a series and we'll see some of the other artists spotlighted like this. I won a copy of this book in a Goodreads giveaway for this honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Meg

    This was definitely a comprehensive overview of Oasis' career but I don't really think it added anything new or told me something I didn't already know. As a pretty big Oasis fan, I've obviously seen their documentary Supersonic, and the beginning half of this book really just felt like I was reading the same content from the documentary. It's enjoyable and I liked the added context that it gave with the charts for each single and album release but I think I would have enjoyed it more if I didn' This was definitely a comprehensive overview of Oasis' career but I don't really think it added anything new or told me something I didn't already know. As a pretty big Oasis fan, I've obviously seen their documentary Supersonic, and the beginning half of this book really just felt like I was reading the same content from the documentary. It's enjoyable and I liked the added context that it gave with the charts for each single and album release but I think I would have enjoyed it more if I didn't know as much about Oasis as I do. *Won in Goodreads giveaway*

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alex Margolies

  13. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Duffrin

  14. 4 out of 5

    Angela

  15. 4 out of 5

    Rwby

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jill

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shminder S Bindra

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amber

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tom Boniface-Webb

  21. 5 out of 5

    Traci

  22. 4 out of 5

    Leah

  23. 4 out of 5

    Gabby

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dayna

  25. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  26. 5 out of 5

    Melisa Dowling

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kim Ellis

  28. 5 out of 5

    Bianca

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jean Felty

  30. 5 out of 5

    Steff

  31. 4 out of 5

    Astrid Galactic

  32. 4 out of 5

    Sheila

  33. 5 out of 5

    Judy

  34. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia Fry

  35. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Hughes

  36. 5 out of 5

    Judy

  37. 5 out of 5

    Susan Kennedy

  38. 4 out of 5

    Dana

  39. 5 out of 5

    Kirk Weber

  40. 4 out of 5

    Karyn Palmer

  41. 5 out of 5

    Paige

  42. 5 out of 5

    Alex Helm

  43. 4 out of 5

    Christina Dubosky

  44. 4 out of 5

    Megan Henn

  45. 4 out of 5

    Luna

  46. 5 out of 5

    Donna Sutay-Cooke

  47. 4 out of 5

    Paula

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