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The Ice Lion

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This cli-fi novel from a notable archaeologist and anthropologist explores a frozen future where archaic species struggle to survive an apocalyptic Ice Age One thousand years in the future, the zyme, a thick blanket of luminous green slime, covers the oceans. Glaciers three-miles-high rise over the continents. The old stories say that when the Jemen, godlike beings from the This cli-fi novel from a notable archaeologist and anthropologist explores a frozen future where archaic species struggle to survive an apocalyptic Ice Age One thousand years in the future, the zyme, a thick blanket of luminous green slime, covers the oceans. Glaciers three-miles-high rise over the continents. The old stories say that when the Jemen, godlike beings from the past, realized their efforts to halt global warming had gone terribly wrong, they made a desperate gamble to save life on earth and recreated species that had survived the worst of the earth's Ice Ages. Sixteen-summers-old Lynx and his best friend Quiller are members of the Sealion People--archaic humans known as Denisovans. They live in a world growing colder, a world filled with monstrous predators that hunt them for food. When they flee to a new land, they meet a strange old man who impossibly seems to be the last of the Jemen. He tells Lynx the only way he can save his world is by sacrificing himself to the last true god, a quantum computer named Quancee.


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This cli-fi novel from a notable archaeologist and anthropologist explores a frozen future where archaic species struggle to survive an apocalyptic Ice Age One thousand years in the future, the zyme, a thick blanket of luminous green slime, covers the oceans. Glaciers three-miles-high rise over the continents. The old stories say that when the Jemen, godlike beings from the This cli-fi novel from a notable archaeologist and anthropologist explores a frozen future where archaic species struggle to survive an apocalyptic Ice Age One thousand years in the future, the zyme, a thick blanket of luminous green slime, covers the oceans. Glaciers three-miles-high rise over the continents. The old stories say that when the Jemen, godlike beings from the past, realized their efforts to halt global warming had gone terribly wrong, they made a desperate gamble to save life on earth and recreated species that had survived the worst of the earth's Ice Ages. Sixteen-summers-old Lynx and his best friend Quiller are members of the Sealion People--archaic humans known as Denisovans. They live in a world growing colder, a world filled with monstrous predators that hunt them for food. When they flee to a new land, they meet a strange old man who impossibly seems to be the last of the Jemen. He tells Lynx the only way he can save his world is by sacrificing himself to the last true god, a quantum computer named Quancee.

30 review for The Ice Lion

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    2 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2021/06/13/... The term cli-fi has been used to describe any fictional work that deals with climate change and global warming, and although these stories don’t necessarily have to be speculative in nature or take place in a dystopian future, both of these apply to The Ice Lion. The book opens thousands of years from now, as Earth finds itself frozen in an Ice Age. Much of civilization’s history has not survived, though according to legen 2 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2021/06/13/... The term cli-fi has been used to describe any fictional work that deals with climate change and global warming, and although these stories don’t necessarily have to be speculative in nature or take place in a dystopian future, both of these apply to The Ice Lion. The book opens thousands of years from now, as Earth finds itself frozen in an Ice Age. Much of civilization’s history has not survived, though according to legend, powerful godlike beings in the past called the Jemen tried to the very last to preserve life on the planet even when it became clear that Earth was lost. To do this, they took what they knew about the last ice age and recreated humans and creatures to be able to withstand this harsh ecosystem. Now, a young man named Lynx and the members of his clan the Sealion tribe are proof that their ancient gods’ desperate gambit might have paid off, as survivors like them eke out a brutal existence in this frigid landscape. As the story begins, Lynx is accused of being a coward following the massacre of his entire wedding party, in which his wife was included among the slain. Banished to the wilderness, he must now take on a series of trials in a spirit quest to become a shaman or face certain death. Refusing to let Lynx face this challenge alone, his friend Quiller decides to join him on his journey, using her warrior skills to help him reach a new land. Along the way, they meet a mysterious old man whom Lynx believes could be one of the Jemen, as impossible as that may be. Arakie, as the stranger is called, seems to know a lot about the world and its past, including a possible way to save it, a revelation that changes Lynx’s life forever. I confess, I came to The Ice Lion expecting a lot more. This isn’t my first Kathleen O’Neal Gear novel; last year I read Cries from the Lost Island and had a great time. Now I realize this book is not the same at all, nor did I expect it to be. However, Cries from the Lost Island had great characters, an enormous amount of intrigue, fascinating archaeological and historical insights, and pretty much endless adventure and entertainment. Compared to all of that, The Ice Lion felt like all concept and no substance. The premise was just about the only element that was interesting and somewhat well developed. Even then, I felt the world-building could have been more. To the author’s credit, the setting was very detailed, rendered as well as a frozen and forbidding environment could be. The world was richly described and completely believable. You can practically feel the frigid cold seeping into every aspect. I also liked the allusion to prehistoric cultures. Survival is difficult and precarious for the clans, but the peoples’ lives are no less filled with meaning and values. That said though, the sci-fi and dystopic elements can be quite confounding, as I feel they are relatively weaker and less developed, resulting in noise that takes away from the overall effect. Ultimately though, I’m probably most disappointed by the characters. Granted, given their origins, our protagonists must have been a challenge to write convincingly. They are of a new line of humans created with their Stone Age ancestors as a blueprint, living in a distant future bestrewn with the remnants of strange and advanced technology in a world that nonetheless needs to feel prehistoric. I mean, I can’t really say I know what that would sound like, but what I do know is that the writing in The Ice Lion did not do it for me at all. The prose was stilted and hard to get used to, leading to characters I had zero connection with. What kills me is that I know the author is fully capable of writing lively characters with an engaging voice and dialogue from my experience with Cries from the Lost Island, but in contrast here, they are so stiff and dull. All told, I really struggled with The Ice Lion, and to be honest, it probably would have been even more difficult had I not listened to the audiobook. At just under ten hours, it went by pretty quickly, and one thing I do like about Kathleen O’Neal Gear’s storytelling is that it is laser sharp and focused with no time for tangents or extraneous content. The audiobook narrators helped too, with Shaun Taylor-Corbett and Sisi Aisha Johnson delivering solid performances. If they happened to sound a little awkward and unnatural in a few places, I think it was due to the writing, but in spite of that they did a great job overall.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Starts out slow and I would have rated it a 2 or 3--debated finishing it or not. Glad I stuck with it as it progressed nicely to a solid 4 by the end of the book. Post-apocalyptic fare following the consequences of global warming. What happens to the earth as she proceeds to another ice age rebounding from man's attempts to reverse the warming. Foreseeing this state of affairs, scientists bioengineer the revival of long dead species (man and animals) that previously existed and thrived in the fr Starts out slow and I would have rated it a 2 or 3--debated finishing it or not. Glad I stuck with it as it progressed nicely to a solid 4 by the end of the book. Post-apocalyptic fare following the consequences of global warming. What happens to the earth as she proceeds to another ice age rebounding from man's attempts to reverse the warming. Foreseeing this state of affairs, scientists bioengineer the revival of long dead species (man and animals) that previously existed and thrived in the frozen wastelands.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jordan

    This isn't quite what I expected, but I still enjoyed it. Full review to come! This isn't quite what I expected, but I still enjoyed it. Full review to come!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    The Ice Lion (Rewilding Reports #1) by Kathleen O'Neal Gear After Maze Master, Lady you better not be right. I cheered when the Gears first introduced this book at the last People of the Earth days meeting. I have been waiting a long time to see this story. The remarkable aspect is that even after waiting for this for years, I am still excited. The book as a young adult book would be a great thought provoking lesson for students. I can't wait to share it with my students. The idea that climate ch The Ice Lion (Rewilding Reports #1) by Kathleen O'Neal Gear After Maze Master, Lady you better not be right. I cheered when the Gears first introduced this book at the last People of the Earth days meeting. I have been waiting a long time to see this story. The remarkable aspect is that even after waiting for this for years, I am still excited. The book as a young adult book would be a great thought provoking lesson for students. I can't wait to share it with my students. The idea that climate change is inevitable has been haunting us for years in the news. That we can't fix what we broke is what they like to say. The concept of Ice Lion is when they fixed it, they did too good of a job. An attempt to combat their mistake causes them to fight an unending battle with the glaciation of the Earth. The remarkable story shows how people adapt to the Glacial Ice Ball Earth. The concepts of small groups, hunting and gathers, and oral traditions are all expanded on in this book. As you begin the story it could have been in the future or the very distant Ice age past. You immediately make a connection with Lynx, a young man who does not fit in as a warrior or a hunter, too gentle a spirit for his world. Quiller is the young girl that not only is a warrior, a leader in her own right at the ripe old age of 15. The book allows students to understand you don't have to fit in to be special, and being what everyone else claims is right is not always the best choice. I found the mystery of the adaptation of Ice Ball Earth and the specific characters in this book even more intriguing as you get into the story. It's perfect for younger readers, because the clues were always there, if you just knew what you were looking for. I can't wait for the next book to see where not only the characters land but how the science develops, to either solve the problem of their own creation or just show the tragedy in assuming the wrong solution.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kim

    A thousand years in Earth’s future, thick algae-like zyme coats the oceans, while glaciers three miles thick cover vast swathes of land. Before the ice took over the world, human scientists recreated certain species of Ice Age animals and hominids in the desperate hope that some kind of life would survive on Earth. Lynx and his best friend Quiller are members of the Sealion tribe, Denisovans descended from the recreated hominids of a thousand years earlier. Their world is full of ice and monstro A thousand years in Earth’s future, thick algae-like zyme coats the oceans, while glaciers three miles thick cover vast swathes of land. Before the ice took over the world, human scientists recreated certain species of Ice Age animals and hominids in the desperate hope that some kind of life would survive on Earth. Lynx and his best friend Quiller are members of the Sealion tribe, Denisovans descended from the recreated hominids of a thousand years earlier. Their world is full of ice and monstrous beasts constantly hunting them with something more than animal intelligence. At sixteen summers old and newly married, Lynx thinks his place in his village is assured, but after a disastrous night, he is forced to undergo a sacred rite that will likely end in his death. Quiller moves to follow Lynx into the unknown in an act of love and devotion. As the two proceed on their journeys to a new land, they come across a strange old man who seems to be the last of the Jemen– the ancient people who made the world as it is now. The man pushes both Lynx and Quiller to their emotional extremes for reasons neither can fathom, but which may change the world as they know it. There are few American writers as accomplished in such incongruous fields as archaeology and creative writing as Kathleen O’Neal Gear, who has published dozens of novels and won numerous distinctions for her work in preserving the cultural history of the United States over the past few decades. Her fictional works blend these two fields, portraying the ancient peoples of North America as historical and archaeological research understand them, bringing the past to life in a way that few other writers can. In The Ice Lion, Gear imagines a possible future where twenty-first-century technology gene-editing technology, CRISPR, is used to recreate– and possibly blend– species that lived tens of thousands of years ago in order to prevent the total destruction of life on Earth after a last-ditch effort to reverse global warming due to climate change goes wrong and plunges the planet into a new Ice Age. The story is told from the perspective of two young Denisovans who, understandably, have no knowledge of the science that created the Earth as they know it. The Jemen are remote legends, and the Sealion people have developed stories that explain their world. But they have understandably gotten things wrong because they know nothing about the ancient technology that made them. And so the voices of the Ice Giants are entirely mysterious, as are the fates of the Jemen. The reader can gather certain things from context clues (assuming they have a working knowledge of current scientific trends), but the clues don’t explain everything, and so important questions about this icy world go unanswered- presumably to be addressed in later books. Perhaps the unanswered questions would be less frustrating if the story slowed down a little. The pacing is quick and tends to take great leaps forward, which leads to confusion as to how far Lynx and Quiller have traveled on their respective travels. That’s not to say that The Ice Lion isn’t thoughtful or introspective; it puts a good deal of emphasis on the characters’ interior journeys and less on the exterior ones, which makes it difficult to place them in space and time. The most challenging aspect of The Ice Lion are the characters themselves. Lynx and Quiller do not have lovable personalities. They are radically different from modern humans, and their society is unlike anything a Western reader of the twenty-first-century would know, but the essentials– Quiller’s love for Lynx and willingness to care for those weaker than she is, and Lynx’s desire to prove that he is a brave man– are qualities we all share, even if the packaging is different from what we see every day. Lynx and Quiller’s stories make The Ice Lion a worthwhile story, but the unanswered questions make for an ambiguous ending. ---- Thank you to NetGalley and DAW for providing me with a free ebook in exchange for an honest review. This did not affect my opinion.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kenya Starflight

    It's always disappointing when a book with an excellent premise turns out to be bad -- especially when said book is by a well-known and respected author. I've never read anything by Kathleen O'Neal Gear before, so I'm not sure if this book was a fluke or typical of her writing... but despite its interesting premise, it turned out to be a dud. The story meandered all over the place, the characters were dull as ditchwater, and the great premise felt particularly wasted. In a future where a plan to It's always disappointing when a book with an excellent premise turns out to be bad -- especially when said book is by a well-known and respected author. I've never read anything by Kathleen O'Neal Gear before, so I'm not sure if this book was a fluke or typical of her writing... but despite its interesting premise, it turned out to be a dud. The story meandered all over the place, the characters were dull as ditchwater, and the great premise felt particularly wasted. In a future where a plan to reverse global warming has resulted in a new Ice Age and the oceans covered in a carnivorous algae called zyme, the cowardly Lynx finds himself cast out from his tribe when he's found responsible for the death of his bride on their wedding night. As Lynx wanders the icy wilderness in search of a spirit guide to help him home, he runs into a mysterious old man who seems to have connections to the Jemen, the ancient beings who were said to have fought the Ice Giants who took over the world ages ago. Meanwhile, the spirited Quiller, who's harbored her own secret love for Lynx, must save her tribe from an attack by the barbaric Rust Tribe... and perhaps save Lynx in the process. And as these two young people's lives entwine, mysteries about the past are slowly brought to light... There are times when the writing in "The Ice Lion" is quite lovely, especially when its describing the frozen wilderness and the zyme that coats the oceans. But it fails in a lot of other aspects. The story seems unable to focus, leaping from event to event without doing much to tie itself together. It seems to want to focus on primitive tribes while also incorporating dystopian themes and a Mad-Max vibe from the Rust Tribe, but it never fully manages to do either. And while there are glimmers of brilliance here and there, the worldbuilding is so haphazard and patchy that I still have no clear idea what's going on or what the backstory of the world is. Perhaps Gear was saving some of that for the sequel, but still, it would have been nice to have more explanation of certain elements. The characters might have saved the story... but they're all pretty flat. Quiller is your typical "strong feisty heroine" without much else to define her, while Lynx is simply a coward whose cowardice comes and goes to suit the needs of the plot. Of the other characters, the only ones who have a glimmer of personality are those who are obviously the villains because they hate either Lynx or Quiller. The sole exception is Arakie, who honestly is a far more interesting character than either Lynx or Quiller and gives off strong "why isn't this book about him?" vibes. I'm sure Gear must be a better writer than this... which makes me wonder if "The Ice Lion" is just a fluke or of she just didn't put much effort into what's supposed to be a YA book. Either way, this book is still a disappointment.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    The Ice Lion is a dystopian story about climate change in the worst case scenario. Written by an expert in the field of archeology, there is a ring of truth to this fictional story of the struggle to survive in a frozen world. I found it to be a fascinating and terrifying look at what the future might hold for life on Earth. The story is set in a future a thousand years off. The Earth is now in the grips of an Ice Age. In a last ditch attempt to preserve some higher life on Earth, scientists have The Ice Lion is a dystopian story about climate change in the worst case scenario. Written by an expert in the field of archeology, there is a ring of truth to this fictional story of the struggle to survive in a frozen world. I found it to be a fascinating and terrifying look at what the future might hold for life on Earth. The story is set in a future a thousand years off. The Earth is now in the grips of an Ice Age. In a last ditch attempt to preserve some higher life on Earth, scientists have recreated humans from the last Ice Age along with the prey and predators that they hunted and where hunted by. Now these early humans struggle to survive in a world that is still growing colder and is extremely hostile. The Sealion Clan struggles to eke out a living in this world and predators like the Saber-Tooth Tiger and Dire Wolves are not their only enemies. They complete for resources with other tribes of humans. It is a very dangerous time to be alive. The star of the show here are the characters. The author made characters that I liked. I understood and identified with them, though it took me a bit to like Lynx. The trials they were put through and how both Lynx and Quiller characters grew as the story progressed was done nicely. At first, I was not a fan of Lynx. However, the author was able to build his character and I began to see that there was more to him than what was on the surface. Not an easy thing to do and I appreciate the subtlety that took. The plot was fast paced and there was lots of action to keep me excited about what was going to happen next. Though there were not any large plot twists to make you gasp, there were a few surprises that worked nicely in keeping the story interesting. My only grip is with the world building. I wanted more. I felt the story would have worked better if I understood more of the events leading up to the recreation of prehistoric life. There were a few hints but not enough to slack my thirst for more information. Just a bit more additional information woven into Arakie’s story would gone a long way to making the story even better. Despite that I didn’t get as much world building as I like, this is still a solid start to the series. I have no reservations in recommending it. Just note, this is not your typical Sci-Fi story and thus I feel it is best suited to those readers that like a mix of both the Fantasy and Sci-Fi genres within the same book. In addition, the book is a great pick for readers of Young Adult fiction. I am looking forward to the next installment and hoping I will learn more about Arakie’s past. I received a free advanced copy from the publisher in exchange for my honest review. For more of my reviews, and author interviews, see my blog at www.thespineview.com.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Wytzia Raspe

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. There are books that cost you a night sleep. Simply because you cannot stop reading them. This is such a book. I benefited greatly from the fact that I had downloaded it on my phone to leave it dormant for a few weeks and thus forgetting the cover or the sales blurp. Because of that I discovered the world of glaciers one page at the time with the characters instead of having been clued in. I would strongly advice the publisher to alter that synopsis. I started reading and thought at first I was r There are books that cost you a night sleep. Simply because you cannot stop reading them. This is such a book. I benefited greatly from the fact that I had downloaded it on my phone to leave it dormant for a few weeks and thus forgetting the cover or the sales blurp. Because of that I discovered the world of glaciers one page at the time with the characters instead of having been clued in. I would strongly advice the publisher to alter that synopsis. I started reading and thought at first I was reading a story set in pre-Columbus America with native Americans hunting bison who all had the name of an animal and where 46 is old and 16 is the age to marry. With Ice Giants being snow capped mountains. But then one of the guys was described as having a heavy brow ridge and a sloping forehead and the word Neanderthals flashed in my mind. So even further back in time? But hooo... enemies who sail rusting ships with motors?????? Green slime or something on the oceans? The Ide Giants glaciers? Fast forwarding centuries. . Gods called Jemen.-.G-men? Jemen who sail the sky. All this forms a mystery for the readers but also for young dreamer Lynx who loses his wife at the beginning of the novel and his best friend Quiller a tall readhead who is as capable as the male hunters. When Lynx is forced to go on a dangerous trip Quiller who has been in love with him for ages follows him to save him. But who is that old man they meet? After finishing the novel I was wide awake and trying to piece together the pieces of the puzzle. The worldbuildings done very well and the personal development also. ---SPOILER ALERT ----- I think that modern men in the future became older than we do but the prehistoric recreations just 40 years or so. As Arakie was a seasoned mountaineer who conquered even Everest he was quite equipped for the new Ice Age world that was formed after a disastrous attempt to fight global warming. Others however just gave up or went mad when they lost hope they could reverse the Ice Age. He however thought that recreating prehistoric people and the animals of those days would give mankind a last chance to survive and start over again. Does Quiller have modern genes? Did people have a connection to certain animal before the end of the world and is that now the case with Lynx and the wolf and Arakie and the lion? PS: When I was writing my review on my blog and went to Amazon for a link to the cover I realised the book I had in mind when I started reading was one of the prehistoric American tales this same author had written.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Riley

    If you don’t read the blurb (which is an iffy representation of the book, by the way), when you start reading this truly awesome book, you might think this is a story about some prehistoric people. You will read about tribes such as the Sea Lion people, living off the land, struggling against both nature and each other. Then stuff gets thrown in. Like the zyme (a slime that covers the ocean surface). Like the name Hoodwink, which stands out among names like Lynx, Ice Giant, Bluejay, and Mink. An If you don’t read the blurb (which is an iffy representation of the book, by the way), when you start reading this truly awesome book, you might think this is a story about some prehistoric people. You will read about tribes such as the Sea Lion people, living off the land, struggling against both nature and each other. Then stuff gets thrown in. Like the zyme (a slime that covers the ocean surface). Like the name Hoodwink, which stands out among names like Lynx, Ice Giant, Bluejay, and Mink. And talk of the Jemen, the more advanced beings from that past. There is also a mysterious watcher, observing members of one tribe help another and wondering if he can hope. It will become obvious that the story takes place far into the future, after man has brought ruin to his environment and caused an ice age. But the tribes don’t know this, because the live only for today and tomorrow. Lynx is a young member of the Sea Lion tribe. He has been accused of cowardice, because his wedding party, including his wife, was slaughtered by Lions. As punishment, he is abandoned in the wilderness to experience a spirit quest. Survival means he may become a gifted shaman. Otherwise, he faces death. During his quest, Lynx meets Arakie, and old man that Lynx believes to be one of the Jemen. The reader knows there is both more and less to the old man. He is wise, but not all-knowing. He seems to be part archeologist, part biologist, part futurist. He really is quite enigmatic and I really like his place in this story. The travels of Lynx and Arakie will put Lynx in the position of changing the life of an outsider. Quiller is Lynx’s friend. Ex-lover really. Disappointed when he decided to marry someone else, she is still determined to help him make it back alive. But first she must join a scouting group looking for the Rust people, their tribe’s mortal enemy. In doing so, Quiller will connect with the Rust people in an unforeseen way. The icy setting with its mountains and ocean, provide a cold backdrop to the warmth of the peoples, who’s lives are going to be inescapably altered when paths cross and the past is excavated. I loved this book with it’s juxtaposition of primitive people against a technologically advanced past. The people are in for some big changes and I am eager to see where the story goes. Through NetGalley, the publisher provided a copy of this book so that I could bring you this review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Melvyn

    An Ice Age story of the future This cli-fi novel depicts a dystopian future where a new Ice Age has hit the Earth. A science-fiction variation of Jean M. Auel’s “Earth’s Children” book series (1980-2011), or Roland Emmerich’s “10,000 BC” feature film (2008), with hints of Terry Brooks’ “The Sword of Shannara” trilogy (1977-1985), or even Guerrilla Games’ “Horizon Zero Dawn” action-RPG video game(2017). It has the perfect amount of science-fiction, mystery, and fantasy that I like to read. Followin An Ice Age story of the future This cli-fi novel depicts a dystopian future where a new Ice Age has hit the Earth. A science-fiction variation of Jean M. Auel’s “Earth’s Children” book series (1980-2011), or Roland Emmerich’s “10,000 BC” feature film (2008), with hints of Terry Brooks’ “The Sword of Shannara” trilogy (1977-1985), or even Guerrilla Games’ “Horizon Zero Dawn” action-RPG video game(2017). It has the perfect amount of science-fiction, mystery, and fantasy that I like to read. Following the exploits of Lynx and Quiller, tribe members living in a post-apocalyptic Ice Age, this story covers the survival of their clan and others they encounter along the way, as well as the search for answers about the world, from the freezing climate and the Ice Giant formations to the mysterious slime-covered ocean, and the legends of ancient gods/humans called the Jemen. The two parallel storylines were perfectly woven together to keep the reader’s attention throughout the novel, and I thought the character development was marvelously executed. I really enjoyed the hints about the ancient civilization (or our modern society) spread throughout the novel, without it being forcibly explained either. There are still a lot of unanswered questions that I hope will get explored in future books in this series! I would like to express my sincere gratitude to the author, the publishers and the NetGalley team for providing me with an Advanced copy. I cherished this opportunity to read it in exchange for an honest review.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pamela

    Having read many books by the author Kathleen O'Neal Gear (co-authored with her husband) in the North America's Forgotten Past series, I was curious and interested to read a book focused on the far future. The world building had me guessing throughout the book. I cannot say my questions were completely answered, but some do resolve as the book goes on. There is a fantasy feel to the book with the belief system of the Sealion People, which is reminiscent of the Gear’s other series. While there a Having read many books by the author Kathleen O'Neal Gear (co-authored with her husband) in the North America's Forgotten Past series, I was curious and interested to read a book focused on the far future. The world building had me guessing throughout the book. I cannot say my questions were completely answered, but some do resolve as the book goes on. There is a fantasy feel to the book with the belief system of the Sealion People, which is reminiscent of the Gear’s other series. While there a few similar aspects between this book and the other series, this is a completely different world. Hints of our modern world now long past pop up. The icy world that now exists seems to have developed with an attempt at fixing the climate change problem in the past and failed. Now tribes are at war with each other, while constantly on watch for the large animals that hunt them, such as bears, lions and wolves. The biggest obstacle though, seems to be keeping warm in this icy world. I love how women are warriors too! Good book for fans of the Gear’s books, as this book will have the same feel. While generally I don't read series, I do make exceptions and this will be another, as I'm looking forward to the next book. Thanks to DAW Publishers and NetGalley for an uncorrected electronic advance review copy of this book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Whimsy Dearest

    Legend says that Ice Giants plunged the world into another Ice Age, so in a desperate attempt to preserve life on Earth—the Jemen, a god-like race—resurrected once-extinct prehistoric species that would be able to survive the harsh conditions. Now an antient human subspecies roams the earth in clans. Among them is 16-year-old Lynx who is sent on a spirit quest by his elder council. However, along his journey, he meets an enigmatic man who holds knowledge of the past along with earth-shattering t Legend says that Ice Giants plunged the world into another Ice Age, so in a desperate attempt to preserve life on Earth—the Jemen, a god-like race—resurrected once-extinct prehistoric species that would be able to survive the harsh conditions. Now an antient human subspecies roams the earth in clans. Among them is 16-year-old Lynx who is sent on a spirit quest by his elder council. However, along his journey, he meets an enigmatic man who holds knowledge of the past along with earth-shattering truths. The Ice Lion by Kathleen O'Neal Gear is haunting, genre-bending work of eco-fiction that weaves sci-fi with myth. It’s important to note though that this is the first in a series, and it very much feels like a set up to a larger, over-arching story. We’re teased hints about how Earth got into the state it currently is and the shocking revelations at the end opened up a huge can of worms, so I’m curious to find out the rest of the answers. Thank you, NetGalley and DAW, for sending me an ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cynde

    Something catastrophic has happened to the earth, the seas glow with green life that eats and destroys all it comes in contact with. The earth is covered with Ice and the people who are surviving live like early cavemen. The animals are prehistoric as well, mastodons, lions, saber-tooth tigers, wolves and Dire wolves. There is a constant threat from the animals , the freezing temperatures, the dangers of attacks from other tribes, starvation and extinction. The author has created a beautiful worl Something catastrophic has happened to the earth, the seas glow with green life that eats and destroys all it comes in contact with. The earth is covered with Ice and the people who are surviving live like early cavemen. The animals are prehistoric as well, mastodons, lions, saber-tooth tigers, wolves and Dire wolves. There is a constant threat from the animals , the freezing temperatures, the dangers of attacks from other tribes, starvation and extinction. The author has created a beautiful world of snow and ice, mountains and oceans in which her characters live and thrive. The characterizations are vibrant and real and the reader becomes the cheering squad for the survival of each of them. There is an underlying hidden story of the people who were alive before and what they tried to do to save the earth from boiling climate change and reintroduce man and animals that would survive in what the earth had become. This is a beautifully scripted book and I enjoyed reading it. The author also left an opening for more of the story , so I hope this will be a series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Cole

    Thank you Netgalley for the opportunity to read this! A thousand years into the future and earth is frozen. The clan's struggle to survive against the elements and enemies both in human and animal form. While I liked the plot I stayed for the characters so this review will be mainly about them. Lynx did not care for him. He never deserved Quiller. She sacrificed so much for him just to get dumped. Lynx seems to only care about her when he wants to be saved. He's ungrateful and selfish. Quiller i Thank you Netgalley for the opportunity to read this! A thousand years into the future and earth is frozen. The clan's struggle to survive against the elements and enemies both in human and animal form. While I liked the plot I stayed for the characters so this review will be mainly about them. Lynx did not care for him. He never deserved Quiller. She sacrificed so much for him just to get dumped. Lynx seems to only care about her when he wants to be saved. He's ungrateful and selfish. Quiller is strong and kind I really liked her. Just wish she did not spend so much time mooning over Lynx. It's realistic though. So many of us waste our time wanting who we shouldn't and ignoring those who do deserve our time. Which brings me to Rabitear I adored his character and spent most of this book wondering why Quiller spent so much time trying to be Lynx’s second choice when she was always Rabitears first.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Midu Hadi

    Classified as cli-fi, this book's premise goes something like this: when the world was about to end, scientists mixed genes of hardy ice-age surviving animals and prehistoric human to create new species that would be able to brave such a world. We follow two main characters on their journey to find themselves. For a more detailed review, go to I Smell Sheep. Classified as cli-fi, this book's premise goes something like this: when the world was about to end, scientists mixed genes of hardy ice-age surviving animals and prehistoric human to create new species that would be able to brave such a world. We follow two main characters on their journey to find themselves. For a more detailed review, go to I Smell Sheep.

  16. 5 out of 5

    sandra mae zendrosky

    The Ice Giants As usual Gear writes a tremendous story of our ancestors. A story of love and loss and of discovery for a lost man.

  17. 4 out of 5

    ❀●○●○Ashley○●○●❀

    This was just not for me. I thought the writing was a bit awkward and the plot was something that I was just not getting into. Thank you to NetGalley and DAW for sending me a copy for review.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kali

    3.5 stars. I didn’t completely understand all of it, there were parts that were confusing. I’m still interested enough to read the next one.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Philip B. Litteral

  20. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

  21. 4 out of 5

    Steven

  22. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jacquelyn Scherer

  24. 4 out of 5

    Janet

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mike Hickerson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

  27. 5 out of 5

    Karla McMorran

  28. 4 out of 5

    Flockhart

  29. 4 out of 5

    Andy

  30. 4 out of 5

    David Fox

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