Hot Best Seller

The Album of Dr. Moreau

Availability: Ready to download

Daryl Gregory's The Album of Dr. Moreau combines the science fiction premise of the famous novel by H. G. Wells with the panache of a classic murder mystery and the spectacle of a beloved boy band. It’s 2001, and the WyldBoyZ are the world’s hottest boy band, and definitely the world’s only genetically engineered human-animal hybrid vocal group. When their producer, Dr. M, Daryl Gregory's The Album of Dr. Moreau combines the science fiction premise of the famous novel by H. G. Wells with the panache of a classic murder mystery and the spectacle of a beloved boy band. It’s 2001, and the WyldBoyZ are the world’s hottest boy band, and definitely the world’s only genetically engineered human-animal hybrid vocal group. When their producer, Dr. M, is found murdered in his hotel room, the “boyz” become the prime suspects. Was it Bobby the ocelot (“the cute one”), Matt the megabat (“the funny one”), Tim the Pangolin (“the shy one”), Devin the bonobo (“the romantic one”), or Tusk the elephant (“the smart one”)? Las Vegas Detective Luce Delgado has only twenty-four hours to solve a case that goes all the way back to the secret science barge where the WyldBoyZ’ journey first began—a place they used to call home.


Compare

Daryl Gregory's The Album of Dr. Moreau combines the science fiction premise of the famous novel by H. G. Wells with the panache of a classic murder mystery and the spectacle of a beloved boy band. It’s 2001, and the WyldBoyZ are the world’s hottest boy band, and definitely the world’s only genetically engineered human-animal hybrid vocal group. When their producer, Dr. M, Daryl Gregory's The Album of Dr. Moreau combines the science fiction premise of the famous novel by H. G. Wells with the panache of a classic murder mystery and the spectacle of a beloved boy band. It’s 2001, and the WyldBoyZ are the world’s hottest boy band, and definitely the world’s only genetically engineered human-animal hybrid vocal group. When their producer, Dr. M, is found murdered in his hotel room, the “boyz” become the prime suspects. Was it Bobby the ocelot (“the cute one”), Matt the megabat (“the funny one”), Tim the Pangolin (“the shy one”), Devin the bonobo (“the romantic one”), or Tusk the elephant (“the smart one”)? Las Vegas Detective Luce Delgado has only twenty-four hours to solve a case that goes all the way back to the secret science barge where the WyldBoyZ’ journey first began—a place they used to call home.

30 review for The Album of Dr. Moreau

  1. 4 out of 5

    carol.

    Daryl Gregory always gets a second look from me. I thought Afterparty interesting and clever, Harrison Squared interesting and clever, We Are All Completely Fine interesting and disturbing, Pandemonium interesting and challenging... You get the idea. When I think of Gregory's writing, I think of clever, a story with emotional complexity, and a skewed way of looking at the world.  The Album of Dr. Moreau achieves 2/3s of this, being a normal (for Gregory) mash-up relying on The Island of Dr. More Daryl Gregory always gets a second look from me. I thought Afterparty interesting and clever, Harrison Squared interesting and clever, We Are All Completely Fine interesting and disturbing, Pandemonium interesting and challenging... You get the idea. When I think of Gregory's writing, I think of clever, a story with emotional complexity, and a skewed way of looking at the world.  The Album of Dr. Moreau achieves 2/3s of this, being a normal (for Gregory) mash-up relying on The Island of Dr. Moreau, boy-bands and murder mystery. Weighing in a novella length, it feels light on the emotional complexity I'm used to getting from his stories, as well as the knife-edged horror. If there's horror here, it's strictly of the boy-band variety, a type many will argue is inherently horrific for different reasons. Interestingly, although I originally hesitated to start reading at bedtime, (knowing how Gregory writes, I didn't want it in my dreams), this one ended up being so easily digestible, I had no trouble reading before bed.  "But we don't talk about [redacted], because... well, we're a fucking boy band. We're not The Cure." The feel of the book skews new or young adult, and with members of a boy-band center stage in plot and narration, it's no surprise. The structural conceit is a 14-track album, with bonus track and Intro (which really should have been 'Cover Notes'), which goes quickly. While it opens with a mysterious letter and CD addressed to a 'Melanie,' it really begins with the housekeeper discovering a very altered Bobby the party-cat('the cute one') and a dead body in the room. Detective Lucia Delgado is at home trying to sleep through the racket of her daughter's music when she's called to the hotel by her partner for the investigation. Once they learn they have only a couple of days before the FBI (or FWS) steps in, the pressure to solve is on. "'Fifteen hours?' Banks asked. 'That's not fair. In any decent movie, the hard-ass captain gives the detectives twenty-four hours to solve the case. Eddie Murphy got forty-eight.' 'Eddie's the criminal in that movie,' Luce said. 'Are you saying you'd rather be Nick Nolte? Nobody wants to be Nick Nolte, except for Gary Busey.'" The beginning was a bit of a slower crawl for me, alternating between the viewpoints of various band members and the detective. Although we're progressing the investigation through different people, their background knowledge is concealed, which makes for a complicated task of characterizing them. As such, they do rather take on boy-band personas, only being about as deep as their physical characteristics go. The writing is still prime Daryl Gregory, although perhaps a lighter, more pop version: "He'd evidently just stepped out of the shower, and he smelled amazing--a mix of citrus, cedar, and ex-boyfriend who just worked out." "They were both as fit and aggro-cheery as spin class instructors." Once I hit Track 8--excuse me, half way--I felt a lot more involved with both pace and writing style. I guess the exposition interviews just didn't work as well as they could to keep me caring. It didn't help that I was largely unfamiliar with the original work of H.G. Wells, and that I was waiting for the weirdness. The last quarter of the book is where I felt it really shone. This might be another case of Gregory appealing to a more niche group, only this case, I'm not in it--although I'm clearly in the age group the jokes are aimed at. Still, he writes it, I'll read it. If it sounds intriguing, I'd say give it a shot. Three and a half tracks, rounding up.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Fiona

    The Album of Dr. Moreau took a little while to really ramp up, though the ending was good enough that I really was torn between 3 and 4 stars. Daryl Gregory has some of the most original ideas, and I've been a long time reader of his. But I kind of wish this had either had more room to develop some of the backstory, or that the early section had been trimmed slightly. It just never quite sat comfortably; it wasn't quite fun and over the top enough for the humour it was reaching for, but in reach The Album of Dr. Moreau took a little while to really ramp up, though the ending was good enough that I really was torn between 3 and 4 stars. Daryl Gregory has some of the most original ideas, and I've been a long time reader of his. But I kind of wish this had either had more room to develop some of the backstory, or that the early section had been trimmed slightly. It just never quite sat comfortably; it wasn't quite fun and over the top enough for the humour it was reaching for, but in reaching for it it also pulled itself out of more serious procedural tone. It touches on the "what have we humans wrought" side of the original Dr Moreau, and on questions of personhood when you're a little genetically spliced (just a little), but just slightly too briefly. After about halfway, though, when the series of interviews wraps up, this hits it's stride, and pulls off a genuinely pleasing ending. Much better balanced between tones, and hitting the good notes of it's various influences, this is a book that is ultimately worth it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Erin Clemence

    As seen on www.mysteryandsuspense.com Expected publication date: May 18, 2021 Daryl Gregory is the award-winning author of Spoonbenders and We Are All Completely Fine. He takes his next foray into quirky fiction with his new novella, The Album of Dr. Moreau. The genetically-modified human-animal hybrid pop band “The WyldBoyZ” are the hottest and newest thing going. Rescued from a secret government-science research barge, The BoyZ are taken under the wing (no pun intended) of a producer As seen on www.mysteryandsuspense.com Expected publication date: May 18, 2021 Daryl Gregory is the award-winning author of Spoonbenders and We Are All Completely Fine. He takes his next foray into quirky fiction with his new novella, The Album of Dr. Moreau. The genetically-modified human-animal hybrid pop band “The WyldBoyZ” are the hottest and newest thing going. Rescued from a secret government-science research barge, The BoyZ are taken under the wing (no pun intended) of a producer identified as “Dr. M”. At a hotel party after a show, Dr. M is found murdered in his bed, and all of the band members are suspects. Detective Luce Delgado is thrown into the mix as lead investigator, and she has less than 24 hours to find the culprit. Gregory very obviously takes a lot of his cues from The Island of Dr. Moreau (of the late, great, H.G Wells’ fame) but he does it in his own way, adding quirky puns to the modern twist of a boy bands’ rise to fame. The novella is divided into segments, of course, but they are labeled as “tracks” as opposed to “chapters” (for example, “Track 1”), encouraging the musical theme. The novel is narrated by Luce Delgado, but each band member also gets the chance to tell his story, helping the reader learn more about the formation of the band, and its mysterious history. There is some deeper societal reflections to be found within Gregory’s pages as well. As the band members tell their individual tales, they speak of their desire to be “seen as humans” but instead they were “indentured” and “labeled as immigrants” when they first arrived on the shores of the United States. Each animal-human hybrid struggles to identify as one or the other, either human or animal, and yet finds common ground with both. The premise is creative and modern, and Gregory writes in a style all his own, full of puns and quirky repertoire. The novella left me wanting more, wanting to know more about the mysterious barge fire and rescue that left only the band members alive. I wanted to know more about their rise to fame and the dirty, decrepit goings-on of the victim, Dr. M. Of course, fans of Wells’ work can make their own speculations and assumptions as to the before and after stories, but the specific tales of these charming characters were what really touched a chord with me (again, no pun intended). When the ending comes, it provides the perfect twist that is both unexpected and yet completely satisfying. The Album of Dr. Moreau will leave you wanting more.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Truly bizarre and tons of fun, this is a locked-room murder mystery featuring a boy band that's a bit unusual, to say the least. Whether you're familiar with H.G. Wells' sci-fi classic The Island of Doctor Moreau and recognize the references or not, the genetically engineered members of The WyldBoyZ make for an outrageous assortment of human/animal hybrid "beast men", with all the usual hilarious melodrama you'd expect from a boy band, plus some deeper, darker secrets buried in their mysterious p Truly bizarre and tons of fun, this is a locked-room murder mystery featuring a boy band that's a bit unusual, to say the least. Whether you're familiar with H.G. Wells' sci-fi classic The Island of Doctor Moreau and recognize the references or not, the genetically engineered members of The WyldBoyZ make for an outrageous assortment of human/animal hybrid "beast men", with all the usual hilarious melodrama you'd expect from a boy band, plus some deeper, darker secrets buried in their mysterious past. Overall, an incredibly odd, amusing, and even sweet at times, twist on a conventional genre. Mix in some Daryl Gregory and you get a blast of fun, weird magic that was truly an enjoyable read. I received an ARC from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kyra Leseberg (Roots & Reads)

    In 2001, the world is obsessed with boy bands like *N Sync and Backstreet Boys. But those singing and dancing heart throbs have nothing on the human-animal hybrid vocal group the WyldBoyZ. Bobby (the cute one / ocelot), Matt (the funny one / giant bat), Tim (the shy one / pangolin), Devin (the romantic one / bonobo), and Tusk (the smart one / elephant) are wrapping up their world tour when their producer, Dr. M, is found murdered in his hotel room with deep slashes across his body. Vegas detectiv In 2001, the world is obsessed with boy bands like *N Sync and Backstreet Boys. But those singing and dancing heart throbs have nothing on the human-animal hybrid vocal group the WyldBoyZ. Bobby (the cute one / ocelot), Matt (the funny one / giant bat), Tim (the shy one / pangolin), Devin (the romantic one / bonobo), and Tusk (the smart one / elephant) are wrapping up their world tour when their producer, Dr. M, is found murdered in his hotel room with deep slashes across his body. Vegas detective Luce Delgado has to interview the BoyZ and solve this case in twenty-four hours without breaking her daughter’s (#1 fan of the WyldBoyZ) heart. This novella is a quirky mash-up of a locked room murder mystery with the premise of the classic H.G. Wells novel The Island of Dr. Moreau spiced up with the boy band craze of the early 2000s. The Album of Dr. Moreau is unique, amusing, and full of pun-filled cleverness with strong world building. You can breeze through this mystery in an afternoon and I highly recommend it to readers who enjoy classic retellings, sci-fi, and boy band nostalgia. Thanks to Tordotcom and NetGalley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for my honest review. The Album of Dr. Moreau is scheduled for release on May 18, 2021. For more reviews, visit www.rootsandreads.wordpress.com

  6. 5 out of 5

    Dylan

    “I don’t want to be the one to tell her,” Matt said to Tusk. “Maybe we could send a card. ‘Condolences on the Murder of Your Scumbag Husband.’” One of my favorite reads of 2021 so far. One part The Island of Doctor Moreau (my favorite Wells), and one part And Then There Were None (my favorite Christie) with a healthy dash of meta-humor (dare I say, my favorite humor?) and a whole heap of puns (okay, definitely my favorite humor). This is such a fun read from beginning to end and it's a damn good “I don’t want to be the one to tell her,” Matt said to Tusk. “Maybe we could send a card. ‘Condolences on the Murder of Your Scumbag Husband.’” One of my favorite reads of 2021 so far. One part The Island of Doctor Moreau (my favorite Wells), and one part And Then There Were None (my favorite Christie) with a healthy dash of meta-humor (dare I say, my favorite humor?) and a whole heap of puns (okay, definitely my favorite humor). This is such a fun read from beginning to end and it's a damn good mystery too, no matter what TS Eliot and his five elements of a good detective story would think!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Octavia (ReadsWithDogs)

    The Album of Dr. Moreau is a locked room style mystery where a tough-but-actually-a-sweetheart detective has 24 hours to figure out who killed a guy after a party, that alone sounds interesting to me but then you throw in the twist and I couldn't read fast enough! The dead guy is a band manager and the band he manages; The WyldBoyz are a popular boy band (think Backstreet Boys) made up of genetically altered human-animal hybrids. There's Devin, "the romantic one" who's mixed with bonobo, Matt, " The Album of Dr. Moreau is a locked room style mystery where a tough-but-actually-a-sweetheart detective has 24 hours to figure out who killed a guy after a party, that alone sounds interesting to me but then you throw in the twist and I couldn't read fast enough! The dead guy is a band manager and the band he manages; The WyldBoyz are a popular boy band (think Backstreet Boys) made up of genetically altered human-animal hybrids. There's Devin, "the romantic one" who's mixed with bonobo, Matt, "the funny one" who's a giant bat, Bobby, "the cute one" who's part cat and has claws, Tusk, the hybrid elephant and "smart one" and my favorite; Tim, "the shy one" who's mostly pangolin. Tim's stress management consists of burrowing into a pillow fort and "contemplating future dooms," which is super relatable because that's also how I handle stress. Each chapter is a new song title, which was fun and I liked getting to know each "boy" and why they each had their own reasons for wanting their manager dead. There were so many puns, which was a true delight to read. Honestly, my only complaint was that I wanted the book to keep going long after things were resolved. If you like puns, mystery, and can appreciate the title and the inspiration behind it, you'll love this!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Lata

    4.5 stars. A tragic, horrifying and sad mystery story about a boy band of human-animal hybrids, WlydBoyz, and their murdered band manager. Former magician’s assistant and now police detective Luce Delgado, known as the “celebrity whisperer” by her colleagues for her skill in dealing with high-strung famous types, is assigned the case, which quickly becomes something even darker than a case about a murdered man. We meet the members of WlydBoyz, each carrying a load of trauma from their birth and t 4.5 stars. A tragic, horrifying and sad mystery story about a boy band of human-animal hybrids, WlydBoyz, and their murdered band manager. Former magician’s assistant and now police detective Luce Delgado, known as the “celebrity whisperer” by her colleagues for her skill in dealing with high-strung famous types, is assigned the case, which quickly becomes something even darker than a case about a murdered man. We meet the members of WlydBoyz, each carrying a load of trauma from their birth and time aboard a barge of experiments and horrors, to their fame crafting immensely catchy pop hits. I love Daryl Gregory’s work, and this novella does not disappoint. It’s makes great use of the original classic, The Island of Doctor Moreau, while also making some quite funny observations about the popularity and composition of boy bands' personas. I also really liked the novella's chapter headings, each a WyldBoyz’ song title in an album, while also a sly reference to plot details. I loved also how Gregory made in-story references to the Golden Age mystery writers, as this story is a nice riff on the locked-room mystery with a small pool of suspects, numerous clues and reveals. This was an emotional, enjoyable, and thought-provoking story.

  9. 5 out of 5

    The Captain

    Ahoy there me mateys!  I received this sci-fi eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  So here be me honest musings . . . I have really enjoyed Daryl Gregory's work in the past and tordotcom novellas are great so I was excited to get a copy of this.  I did not know the premise before reading this, but having been a fan of a boy band back in me young (stupider) days, I found this to be a hoot. This story follows the aftermath of an end-of-tour party of WyldBoyZ whose teenage band memb Ahoy there me mateys!  I received this sci-fi eARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.  So here be me honest musings . . . I have really enjoyed Daryl Gregory's work in the past and tordotcom novellas are great so I was excited to get a copy of this.  I did not know the premise before reading this, but having been a fan of a boy band back in me young (stupider) days, I found this to be a hoot. This story follows the aftermath of an end-of-tour party of WyldBoyZ whose teenage band members are animal-human hybrids.  Their manager is murdered and Detectives Luce has to solve the case.  But the fan base is rabid, the party was out of control, and the suspect list super long.  It doesn't help when the fans, I mean suspects, are dressed in full animal costumes! Aye, the premise be silly but don't let that fool ye.  This is so wonderfully put together.  There are puns, lovely chapter titles, and the quirkiness that I love about the author's writing.  There is also subtle jabs at the ideas of personhood, fame, and greed.  The murder mystery's resolution was entertaining but the boy band shined.  I highly recommend this one.  I will continue to read Gregory's backlist and whatever he puts out next.  Arrrr! So lastly . . . Thank you tordotcom!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Galloway

    Well, this is a whole lot of fun! I basically picked it up just because it’s Daryl Gregory and didn’t really pay attention to what it was about. This novella satisfies in nearly every possible way. It’s kooky, but perfectly takes the feel from its inspirations — it has the feel of classic science fiction but also of the classic mystery. It feels modern and plays with pop music tropes well. But most of it all, it is such a pleasure to read! Now, I got some coworkers to read his “We Are All Complet Well, this is a whole lot of fun! I basically picked it up just because it’s Daryl Gregory and didn’t really pay attention to what it was about. This novella satisfies in nearly every possible way. It’s kooky, but perfectly takes the feel from its inspirations — it has the feel of classic science fiction but also of the classic mystery. It feels modern and plays with pop music tropes well. But most of it all, it is such a pleasure to read! Now, I got some coworkers to read his “We Are All Completely Fine” earlier this year and one pointed out that there are some male-gazey bits to that one. And I could definitely see it on that re-read. I did not see any of that here, so I think maybe she’d be more pleased with this one. I did say satisfies in “nearly” every way. There was one line — of course publishers ask you not to quote from review copies, so I won’t and I’ll be interested to see if it is in the final copy. I need to sit on it a bit and ponder why I think it was there. Currently I’m thinking it’s a joke in poor taste that maybe was written after some big events of the past year, but not the most recent ones. Which means I’d still have thought it was in poor taste if I’d read this last April, but it wouldn’t have stung quite so much.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    4.5 rounded up. Fun, short mystery novel featuring a boy band made up of Dr Moreau type animal people. Discovering how that came to be is part of the fun. This felt lighter, and more humorous than the other stuff I've read by Gregory, but I enjoyed it a lot. I had preordered it based entirely on Gregory + Dr Moreau and was surprised to see a fairly standard mystery plot when I started it. If knew that at some point I'd forgotten it, along with the title being Album instead of Island which gave me 4.5 rounded up. Fun, short mystery novel featuring a boy band made up of Dr Moreau type animal people. Discovering how that came to be is part of the fun. This felt lighter, and more humorous than the other stuff I've read by Gregory, but I enjoyed it a lot. I had preordered it based entirely on Gregory + Dr Moreau and was surprised to see a fairly standard mystery plot when I started it. If knew that at some point I'd forgotten it, along with the title being Album instead of Island which gave me a sort of eh? moment when it appeared on the kindle.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chessa

    I LOVED THIS SO MUCH!!!!! This was just the greatest. A locked-room mystery featuring a boy band comprised of human-animal hybrids called The WildBoyZ.? Yes, please! And there are SO MANY PUNS! Was this written just for me?! The author does some really excellent work setting the structure of this story up; it allowed him to switch perspectives really fluidly, back and forth between the members of the band and the detective investigating the murder, Luce Delgado, who is a total badass. The murder i I LOVED THIS SO MUCH!!!!! This was just the greatest. A locked-room mystery featuring a boy band comprised of human-animal hybrids called The WildBoyZ.? Yes, please! And there are SO MANY PUNS! Was this written just for me?! The author does some really excellent work setting the structure of this story up; it allowed him to switch perspectives really fluidly, back and forth between the members of the band and the detective investigating the murder, Luce Delgado, who is a total badass. The murder is tricky and kept me guessing. The banter between Delgado and her punny partner is great. Everyone is generally good, and the writing about the music - I’m not exaggerating when I say that I cried. When I got to the end, I went back to the beginning to read the intro all over again and it is just *chef’s kiss.* This is a special novella from Tordotcom. I feel extremely lucky to have gotten to read an advanced copy. It’s already one that I’m yelling at everyone to preorder immediately.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mogsy (MMOGC)

    4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2021/05/24/... Mr. Gregory, please do not ever apologize for writing ridiculous mashups! In fact, I sincerely hope you will decide to write more of them. I have been a fan of the author for a long time, and knowing that The Album of Dr. Moreau is the latest from the same creative mind who brought us such unforgettable quirky reads like Spoonbenders, Harrison Squared, and We Are All Completely Fine, I just knew this one was going to offer 4 of 5 stars at The BiblioSanctum https://bibliosanctum.com/2021/05/24/... Mr. Gregory, please do not ever apologize for writing ridiculous mashups! In fact, I sincerely hope you will decide to write more of them. I have been a fan of the author for a long time, and knowing that The Album of Dr. Moreau is the latest from the same creative mind who brought us such unforgettable quirky reads like Spoonbenders, Harrison Squared, and We Are All Completely Fine, I just knew this one was going to offer some unexpected twists! In this story, readers have the pleasure of meeting the WyldBoyZ, a hit pop music boyhand made up of genetically engineered human-animal hybrid singers Bobby the ocelot (“the cute one”), Matt the bat (“the funny one”), Tim the pangolin (“the shy one”), Devin the bonobo (“the romantic one”), and Tusk the elephant (“the smart one”). They have just wrapped up the last night of their musical tour which happens to be in Las Vegas, and true to form, the “boyz” have decided to celebrate by throwing a party that’s out of this world. The next morning, however, housekeeping knocks on the door to Bobby’s room and enters to find the ocelot groggy and confused, his fur drenched in blood. Next to him in the bed are the remains of the band’s manager Dr. M torn to shreds. Before long, the police are on scene, led by LVPD Detective Luce Delgado who wishes she hadn’t been assigned to the case. Her own nine-year-old daughter is a huge fan of the WyldBoyZ, and Luce knows that once all this gets out, little Melanie would be heartbroken. It’s bad enough that any of the members could be a suspect in the killing, but all of them also have a motive—after all, it’s no secret how Dr. M treated them, and the rumor was that they were about to break up. No matter how things play out, it’s looking like the end for the WyldBoyZ. Still, there is a murder to be solved and Luce is too good a detective to let anything get in the way of her job. Together with her partner Mickey Banks, they start putting together a list of persons of interest to interview, which is not limited to the band members. There’s a rather huge list of party attendees to comb through, which includes the WyldBoyZ’s extensive crew of roadies as well as a number of megafans who were lucky enough to be invited, and of course, there’s also Dr. M’s wife herself, the inscrutable Mrs. Marilyn Bendix. Any of them could have done it, and Luce must race the clock to get to the bottom of the mystery before the case is taken out of her hands. Does this plot sound completely weird and absurd? Yes, but hear me out—The Album of Dr. Moreau is a legit locked room murder mystery featuring a classic detective storyline structure complete with red herrings, complex clues, and of course plenty of suspenseful surprises. Luce Delgado is an empathetic but also intelligent and tough-as-nails kickass female sleuth I was happy to see on the case, as her fierce tenacity is matched only by her sense of decency and compassion. And boy, was this book funny! As a preteen in the 90s, I was sort of at the heart of the boyband craze, and while my musical interests ran more towards alternative rock and grunge, back then my CD tower also contained its fair share of albums from the likes of The Backstreet Boys, *NSYNC, Westlife, Take That, and—oh heck, you get the picture. Looking back, it was definitely a pop culture phenomenon, one which Gregory does not hesitate to exploit or poke fun at mercilessly for this novella, and for that I am grateful because it resulted in lots of laughs. For you see, while the WyldBoyZ may be a completely unique and original creation, they are similar to their inspirations in that the band’s music is only a small part of their success, with the arguably more important part being made up of the group’s carefully managed image. With his sharp sense of humor but also what’s clearly a deep affection, the author pays homage to these defining stereotypes and idiosyncratic characteristics of 90s boybands using witty references, clever puns, and other little bonuses and easter eggs related to that style of music and their fanbase at the time. Just take a look at the chapter headings to see what I mean. Finally, this being a book by Daryl Gregory, you can of course expect his signature flair for the uncanny. While the story is a mystery at its heart, there are also several plots exploring its more supernatural aspects, not to mention a few nods to the original H.G. Wells classic The Island of Dr. Moreau whose “Beast Folk” provided much of the basis for the members of WyldBoyZ. Add in some weightier social topics and emotional content, and you have yourself a compelling and thought-provoking read. In sum, I’m usually very picky with novellas, but The Album of Dr. Moreau impressed me in that it was the perfect length to deliver this story’s main ideas and themes. Check it out, and just be sure to have a couple hours uninterrupted reading time before you do, because I promise you’ll not want to stop once you start.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Bennett

    Daryl Gregory is a "go-to" author for me. Although I haven't read everything he has written, I have loved everything I've read so far. This one is no exception. It was fun, witty and had an excellent cast of characters. From the animal/human boy band to the ex-magician's apprentice now detective, it was a crazy and fun ride. Very original and well put together. Can't wait for more from this wonderful author! Daryl Gregory is a "go-to" author for me. Although I haven't read everything he has written, I have loved everything I've read so far. This one is no exception. It was fun, witty and had an excellent cast of characters. From the animal/human boy band to the ex-magician's apprentice now detective, it was a crazy and fun ride. Very original and well put together. Can't wait for more from this wonderful author!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Wolf

    This book is so weird… and I loved it. In The Album of Dr. Moreau, we meet the WyldBoyZ — the world’s most adored boy band, who sing in perfect harmony, have killer dance moves, and have the physical appearance of very interesting animal/human mixes. These five pop stars are genetically engineered animal-human hybrids, and they’ve taken the world by storm. As the book opens, their ethically-challenged, manipulative manager Dr. M. has been found brutally murdered in his Las Vegas suite after the Bo This book is so weird… and I loved it. In The Album of Dr. Moreau, we meet the WyldBoyZ — the world’s most adored boy band, who sing in perfect harmony, have killer dance moves, and have the physical appearance of very interesting animal/human mixes. These five pop stars are genetically engineered animal-human hybrids, and they’ve taken the world by storm. As the book opens, their ethically-challenged, manipulative manager Dr. M. has been found brutally murdered in his Las Vegas suite after the Boyz’s final tour performance and blow-out afterparty. Who wanted Dr. M. dead, and who had opportunity? As Detective Luce Delgado quickly establishes, all of the Boyz had motive, and any one of them could have had access. Meanwhile, the case is complicated by the WyldBoyZ’s wild celebrity, as well as by their rabid fan base, referred to as zoomies (which true fans consider offensive — they prefer zoomandos, thank you very much). Zoomies dress in elaborate animal costumes, so as Luce and her colleagues review the video footage from the party, it’s pretty much impossible to tell who’s who beneath the unicorn, gopher, chipmunk, and other furry costumes. As Luce investigates, we get to know each of the Boyz, and learn more and more about their backstory, where they came from, and what they’ve had to endure. I absolutely loved her interviews with the band members, seeing their personalities, their habits, and their quirks… and how not weird she tries to make it as she’s sitting and having a conversation with a human-pangolin hybrid, as one example. This book is short, but so jam-packed with goodness that there’s no wasted space. I was entertained and hooked from page one, and adored every moment. The wacky idea of a human-animal-hybrid boy band is so out there, and it’s perfect. I happen to have read The Island of Dr. Moreau by H. G. Wells last year, and that made reading The Album of Dr. Moreau extra amusing as a point of comparison — but don’t worry if you haven’t read the Wells classic. It’s not necessary for enjoying this book, since they don’t really have anything to do with one another except as a passing reference… but if you’re curious, it’s worth checking out. The Album of Dr. Moreau is so much crazy fun. My only complaint: I really, REALLY, want to see a video of the WyldBoyZ in action. Please, someone, make it happen!! Review copy courtesy of the publisher via NetGalley. Full review at Bookshelf Fantasies.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Wakizashi

    Daryl Gregory is fast becoming my new favourite writer. Review to come...

  17. 5 out of 5

    Doreen

    5/18/2021 Full review tk at TheFrumiousConsortium.net. 5/19/2021 This novella combines three of my favorite things: murder mysteries, sci-fi (and I don't care if calling it that is "vulgar", Matt) and boy bands! Add a police detective with a fascinating history, literary snarkiness and huge doses of humor, and you've got a book that hits all of my reading sweet spots. Las Vegas Police Detective Luce Delgado is called to the scene of the Matador hotel, where music producer Dr Maury Bendix has been 5/18/2021 Full review tk at TheFrumiousConsortium.net. 5/19/2021 This novella combines three of my favorite things: murder mysteries, sci-fi (and I don't care if calling it that is "vulgar", Matt) and boy bands! Add a police detective with a fascinating history, literary snarkiness and huge doses of humor, and you've got a book that hits all of my reading sweet spots. Las Vegas Police Detective Luce Delgado is called to the scene of the Matador hotel, where music producer Dr Maury Bendix has been found clawed to death in his bed, next to the bloodied and extremely drugged up form of one of his protegees, Bobby O, "the cute one" of the world's hottest boy band WyldBoyZ. As Bobby O is part ocelot, he's immediately considered prime suspect, tho it soon becomes clear that all five members of the WyldBoyZ -- genetically modified human-animal hybrids who fled a burning barge conducting secret scientific experiments in the middle of the ocean before achieving global superstardom -- had plenty of reason to want Dr M dead. Could the murderer have actually been Devin, "the romantic one", who was perhaps too close to Dr M's wife? Or Matt M, "the funny one", who was looking to leave the band to pursue academia? Surely it couldn't have been Tusk, "the smart one", or Tim, "the shy one"? Could the murderer really be, as Luce's pun-loving partner Detective Banks posits, "a rabid fan"? Complicating matters is the fact that Luce's 9 year-old daughter, Melanie, is a megafan herself. But Melanie's expertise may be the key to cracking the case, and to saving the lives of even more people in the WyldBoyZ' charmed, endangered circle. The Album Of Dr Moreau packs a lot of terrific cultural commentary into less then 200 pages, celebrating and critiquing its subjects in witty ways that lean into both thoughtfulness and humor. Matt really is the funny one -- I loled at at least two of his wisecracks, needing to put the book down as I just lost it laughing. The novella's length, however, is also its main drawback. This is such a smart story that deserves to be drawn out into a full-length novel, with a little more reflection and slightly less pressured pacing. I felt like the murder mystery went by too quickly, juddering forward in transitions that could have used a little more story padding to smooth it all out. The sci-fi aspects could also have been given a bit more meat: I'd still like to know the whole deal with Jorge, for example. Like, I get who he is but I'd like to know a bit more of how he became who he did. That said, I really appreciated all the writing on music and pop culture, which was treated here with both the reverence and ribaldry it deserved. I'll definitely be looking out for more of Daryl Gregory's work from here on in. The Album Of Dr. Moreau by Daryl Gregory was published May 18 2021 by Tordotcom and is available from all good booksellers, including Bookshop!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Reading Reindeer 2021 On Proxima Centauri

    What I found most intriguing in THE ISLAND OF DR. MOREAU (yes, note the play on the excellent H. G. Wells' THE ISLAND OF DR. MOREAU) was, not the "locked room" mystery (Who? How? Why? [Why Not?]) and not the Pop-Celebrity-Status, but the incredible feat of Genetic Engineering and Manipulation.  Throughout the novel I kept wanting to push back beyond the beginning and find out the real "How? Who? and especially WHY? WHY would you--whoever you are--genetically engineer THIS? Isn't this a violation What I found most intriguing in THE ISLAND OF DR. MOREAU (yes, note the play on the excellent H. G. Wells' THE ISLAND OF DR. MOREAU) was, not the "locked room" mystery (Who? How? Why? [Why Not?]) and not the Pop-Celebrity-Status, but the incredible feat of Genetic Engineering and Manipulation.  Throughout the novel I kept wanting to push back beyond the beginning and find out the real "How? Who? and especially WHY? WHY would you--whoever you are--genetically engineer THIS? Isn't this a violation of--yes, Nature--but also, of the Civil Rights of the human portion, and Animal Cruelty to the nonhuman portion? I mean, in the immortal words of "Lunchables" marketing,  "This is MIXED-UP!" Give Daryl Gregory a lot of credit: I am NOT going to stop thinking about the scientific-philosophical-metaphysical-religious-spiritual-political-compassionate-futuristic aspects of this novel!!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mayar El Mahdy

    4.5/5 This book was so good. It's clever and weird, which is probably the best combination ever. I enjoyed it so much. It really packs a punch in so few pages. Great stuff. 4.5/5 This book was so good. It's clever and weird, which is probably the best combination ever. I enjoyed it so much. It really packs a punch in so few pages. Great stuff.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Daryl Gregory The Album of Dr. Moreau Tordotcom 176 pages 8.2 (Best New Book) Bending T. S. Eliot's rules for excellent detective fiction, Daryl Gregory's The Album of Dr. Moreau gives sci-fi twists and turns to a whodunit story about a boyband whose all members are animal-human hybrids. Daryl Gregory The Album of Dr. Moreau Tordotcom 176 pages 8.2 (Best New Book) Bending T. S. Eliot's rules for excellent detective fiction, Daryl Gregory's The Album of Dr. Moreau gives sci-fi twists and turns to a whodunit story about a boyband whose all members are animal-human hybrids.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I received a copy of the book from NetGalley. All thoughts are my own. This is a murder mystery novella about genetically modified furry boyband. Somehow, it’s really good. The Album of Dr. Moreau inspired by 90s American boybands. I must first admit that as someone born at the turn of the century to immigrant parents, I know absolutely nothing about 90s American boybands. As an Asian American, what I do know is K-pop. It was only natural that every connection I made while reading this is referenc I received a copy of the book from NetGalley. All thoughts are my own. This is a murder mystery novella about genetically modified furry boyband. Somehow, it’s really good. The Album of Dr. Moreau inspired by 90s American boybands. I must first admit that as someone born at the turn of the century to immigrant parents, I know absolutely nothing about 90s American boybands. As an Asian American, what I do know is K-pop. It was only natural that every connection I made while reading this is referenced from my familiarity with K-pop and said fandom shenanigans. From this novella, I’ve learned that 90s American boybands and modern K-pop have a surprisingly lot in common. With how insane the premise is, I ended up live-blogging this to a group of friends and like any responsible boyband fandom, we immediately took arms over who to stan in the WyldBoyZ. Does Tusk give off RM vibes? Is Devin a Problematic Fave or Cancelled™? Does Bobby the ocelot count as the resident catboy? (of course he does WTF michael ocelots are cats) Somehow Matt was immediately adopted upon first appearance, while Tim was declared the group cinnamon roll and maknae. All of this is to say that despite the relatively large cast for such a sort novella, Gregory shows a master class in introducing, and developing, a whole set of interesting and memorable characters. Within just several pages, we’re shown their personality, background, and potential motivations for murdering their manager. While I won’t go too much into the worldbuilding, given how so much of it is critical to plot itself, I will say that Gregory has managed to craft a surprisingly plausible setting and background given how outrageous the premise is. I was surprised by how much we learn about the fans of the WildBoyZ (their actions totally believable having read some outrageous saesang stories) and their WildBoyZ themselves have a surprisingly heart wrenching background. The book is sold as a reinterpretation of a famous HG Wells story, The Island of Doctor Moreau, which I have not read. Despite that, I never felt like I was missing information or that knowledge of said short story was crucial to understanding this one. If I had one complaint, it would be that the worldbuilding takes one step too far. Namely, the origins of the WildBoyZ are explained just a little too much, and with it all the spectacle and bizzare-ness of a GMO furry boy band loses part of its charm. More annoyingly, the whodunnit murder mystery goes from intriguing to, well, kind of deus ex machina. I can’t say much more without spoiling the ending, but if murder mysteries are supposed to be guessable, this one absolutely was not. Overall, I rate this book a 4/5. The character work, the worldbuilding, and the sheer fact that I genuinely enjoyed a book about a group of genetically-modified furry boy band (though I admit my brain still cannot visually comprehend how these members look), make this novella amazing already. My one complaint would be how the ending is approached, but really, this book was a wild read and I had a ton of fun.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Liz (Quirky Cat)

    I sincerely think that The Album of Dr. Moreau is the most fun I've had while reading a novella in a long time. Quite possibly, ever. So thank you to both Daryl Gregory and Tor.com for making this highly entertaining read possible. The year is 2001, and the WyldBoyZ are making what is quite possibly the last tour. However, that statement doesn't work as well when they've essentially been on tour their entire career. This is a band known for its loud songs, intense lyrics, and outstanding antics I sincerely think that The Album of Dr. Moreau is the most fun I've had while reading a novella in a long time. Quite possibly, ever. So thank you to both Daryl Gregory and Tor.com for making this highly entertaining read possible. The year is 2001, and the WyldBoyZ are making what is quite possibly the last tour. However, that statement doesn't work as well when they've essentially been on tour their entire career. This is a band known for its loud songs, intense lyrics, and outstanding antics. Oh yeah, and the fact that they are all genetically engineered human-animal hybrids. That probably doesn't hurt things either. Their producer is known as Dr. M, and their career path is about to change when he's found brutally murdered within his hotel room. "I don't want to be the one to tell her," Matt said to Tusk. "Maybe we could send a card. 'Condolences on the Murder of Your Scumbag Husband.'" I went into The Album of Dr. Moreau expecting a quick and entertaining read. What I got was so much more. This novella was an absolute delight to read, one that had lots of comedy, surprise twists, and a few heavier moments to balance it all out. In short, it was perfect. There are several perspectives to help carry this narrative forward. Each of the WyldBoyZ gets a chance to share their thoughts (literally), starting with Bobby, the ocelot. Following him, we have Matt the megabat, Tim the Pangolin, Devin the bonobo, and Tusk the elephant, plus the detective that has to put this case into some semblance of order: Luce Delgado. I actually love that each chapter had a different perspective. It helped to keep the mystery going while giving us a chance to know the different personalities that made up this very unusual band. Each boy is wildly (no pun intended) different, and that in itself left plenty of room for interest and a bit of humor. The final twist was unexpected but actually ended up making quite a lot of sense, which I appreciate. This moment, along with several others hinted throughout, succeeded in breaking my heart, at least just a little bit—one more reason to love The Album of Dr. Moreau and everything it had to offer. Thanks to Tor.com and #NetGalley for making this book available for review. All opinions expressed are my own. Check out more reviews over at Quirky Cat's Fat Stacks

  23. 4 out of 5

    Marlene

    Originally published at Reading Reality It’s not a surprise to say that this story ties back to The Island of Dr. Moreau, a classic mixture of SF and horror by H.G. Wells. The punch in the gut at the end is the WAY in which it reaches back and grabs the reader by the heart – and the throat. But that’s all the way at the end. Along the way it’s pretty easy to lose sight of that past while being completely immersed in the book’s very wild and extremely woolly present. And I’m not just talking about t Originally published at Reading Reality It’s not a surprise to say that this story ties back to The Island of Dr. Moreau, a classic mixture of SF and horror by H.G. Wells. The punch in the gut at the end is the WAY in which it reaches back and grabs the reader by the heart – and the throat. But that’s all the way at the end. Along the way it’s pretty easy to lose sight of that past while being completely immersed in the book’s very wild and extremely woolly present. And I’m not just talking about the WildBoyZ themselves – as wild and definitely woolly – or at least furry – as some of them are. I’m not even talking about their “rabid fans” who are, in their own ways, even stranger than the Boyz they follow. Oh no, I’m talking about the world of sex, drugs, rock and roll, and boy bands. If you’ve ever wondered whether the members of boy bands are cloned instead of merely born and nipped and tucked and botoxed and trained. Or however else it might actually happen that may honestly be weirder than this story. In the middle of all of the sheer WTF’ery of a boy band on tour, there’s a murder mystery. A real, honest-to-goodness police procedural in a case and a place where all of the police’s normal procedures have been kicked out a penthouse window because 1) the victim is the evil, grasping manager of the above mentioned boy band, and every single one of the WildBoyZ is a suspect; and 2) the murder happens in Las Vegas, which isn’t a place where real world rules apply anyway – even if those rules applied to the hottest band EVAR. Which they don’t. It’s the police, especially Detectives Luce Delgado and her partner, who hold this story together, even as they attempt to hold the WildBoyZ in Sin City long enough to figure out whodunnit and how. But it’s the why of the whole thing that kicks the reader in the teeth at the end. Escape Rating A+: I haven’t read a mashup between SF and Mystery that was this much fun since Bimbos of the Death Sun, and that’s a very long time ago indeed. But where Bimbos uses SF, or rather an SF convention, as the setting for an otherwise traditional murder mystery so it can poke fun at the genre, The Album of Dr. Moreau is SF after all, just with a murder on top rather like a 200 proof cherry on top of a drugged and drunken sundae. The SF is in the boyz themselves. However they came to exist – which isn’t revealed until the end – the kind of genetic manipulation required to blend animal and human DNA into a person with traits from both sides of that equation is science gone in a direction we haven’t managed yet. (And this is what this story takes from its progenitor. You don’t have to read The Island of Dr. Moreau to get into the Album. If you’re not familiar with the barebones of the older story, the summary in Wikipedia is more than enough to get a reader up to speed.) So Dolly the cloned sheep carried out to the nth degree – who does get referred to – absolutely does science fiction make. It also raises, begs, explores and twists the question of exactly what is required to consider someone human. Or self-aware and sentient and eligible for all the rights and responsibilities generally conferred thereunto. It’s a question we still seem to suck at answering – or rather that some people don’t like the answers that science makes clear. On the one hand, this story is both amazingly fun and incredibly funny. It lampoons boy bands, fandom and fan culture and the cult of celebrity and what it takes to enter that rarefied atmosphere and maintain a place there. The humor is black and deadpan and spot on at every turn. On the other, there’s the dark underbelly about youth and innocence and exploitation. And hidden below that cesspit, there are alphabet agencies and conspiracy theories. It’s mucky and murky all the way down, and all the laughs turn out to be gallows humor – sometimes complete with actual gallows. But the question of whether anyone deserves to hang for the murder – well, that answer was both perfectly surprising and absolutely perfect in its fine application of justice. I think that The Album of Dr. Moreau deserves to go platinum. I hope you’ll think so too.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Nowark

    It's 2001 and boy bands are all the rage. When a murder occurs, Detective Lucia Delgado, the "Celebrity Whisperer" must work through the many strong personalities in order to get to the bottom of the mystery. As of writing this review, I have not read The Island of Dr. Moreau, but I intend to read the story sometime soon. I'd love to see the connections this and Island has. The Album of Dr. Moreau was really a great time! It's a traditional locked-room mystery, add in some humor, a little bit of s It's 2001 and boy bands are all the rage. When a murder occurs, Detective Lucia Delgado, the "Celebrity Whisperer" must work through the many strong personalities in order to get to the bottom of the mystery. As of writing this review, I have not read The Island of Dr. Moreau, but I intend to read the story sometime soon. I'd love to see the connections this and Island has. The Album of Dr. Moreau was really a great time! It's a traditional locked-room mystery, add in some humor, a little bit of science fiction, and you have this book. I'm not a big mystery reader, but I can say I'll be looking up some more mysteries to read in the future. I really did enjoy trying to figure out who committed the murder. (I was wrong--but it's fine, I still enjoyed the ending!) The science fiction was also a special treat for me. I'm a big genetics fan, and while this type of story is 100% not possible, the way it was told was pretty accurate, I would say. Even through the humor, there were definitely some emotional moments. For a novel under 200 pages, there were a lot of emotions expressed in a short period of time. I managed to read this book in just a few hours, and definitely needed a nap when I was finished. This is my first read by Daryl Gregory, and I would love to get my hands on some of his other work, especially Spoonbenders. Thank you to Net Galley, Tordotcom, and Daryl Gregory for this advanced review copy!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Erin Boyington

    Many pop supergroups are manufactured these days, but the WyldBoyZ were genetically engineered. The boyz are as adorable as the endangered animals they were hybridized with: cute ocelot, shy pangolin, randy bonobo, smart elephant, and quipping megabat. Tween girls are crazy for them. Pop stars are practically another species already, but the boyz take it to the next level. When their manager (only 10% human, 90% scumbag) is torn to shreds in a Las Vegas hotel the night after WyldBoyZ’s very last Many pop supergroups are manufactured these days, but the WyldBoyZ were genetically engineered. The boyz are as adorable as the endangered animals they were hybridized with: cute ocelot, shy pangolin, randy bonobo, smart elephant, and quipping megabat. Tween girls are crazy for them. Pop stars are practically another species already, but the boyz take it to the next level. When their manager (only 10% human, 90% scumbag) is torn to shreds in a Las Vegas hotel the night after WyldBoyZ’s very last performance, Detective Luce Delgado faces a ticking clock to solve the crime before her witnesses—and the killer—scatter. OMG, SO many animal puns. (Delgado’s partner Banks is all about them, and I adore him for it.) The humor is sharp as an ocelot’s claws (though ironically, Bobby O is, uh, not the sharpest of the boyz). The characters all have a warmth and likability, including Delgado. I enjoyed the heck out of watching her interview all of the larger-than-life characters and put the truth together. We even get an exposition in the parlor scene that is pretty epic. Gregory shows off by quoting T.S. Eliot’s Five Rules of Detective Fiction in the very beginning, a sure sign that he plans to break every one of them by the end. He pulls out plenty of nods to classic detective and science fiction, as well as pop culture, expertly and entertainingly deployed. Received a free copy via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    The Album of Dr Moreau follows the murder of Dr M, producer of the WyldBoyZ, a boy band of genetically engineered humans-animals. Lucy Delgado has 24 hours to investigate the boys, and a case that goes back to before the band’s fame, and where they came from. Thanks to NetGalley and Tordotcom for this delightful eARC! The Album of Dr Moreau is such a fun novella! It reads so quickly, jumping straight into a murder mystery, basically a locked room murder. Toss in a group of seemingly innocent gene The Album of Dr Moreau follows the murder of Dr M, producer of the WyldBoyZ, a boy band of genetically engineered humans-animals. Lucy Delgado has 24 hours to investigate the boys, and a case that goes back to before the band’s fame, and where they came from. Thanks to NetGalley and Tordotcom for this delightful eARC! The Album of Dr Moreau is such a fun novella! It reads so quickly, jumping straight into a murder mystery, basically a locked room murder. Toss in a group of seemingly innocent genetically engineered hybrid humans, and you have a great time. Not only was the really well paced for a murder mystery, but it gives just enough background of all of the characters to feel like you actually know all of the boys in the band, as well as as really great grasp on Delgado herself. For a novella, Gregory manages to give everything you need for a well rounded story without skimping on details or character development. And the ending! Not only a satisfying, surprising ending to the mystery, but an added bit of heartwarming made it just wonderful. This feels like a book for everyone, one that I can’t recommend enough. If you’re looking for a quick read to spend an evening with, a locked room mystery is always a good time, and adding in that touch of the science fiction just makes this book all the better.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dan Trefethen

    OK, I'm giving this five stars but it's not for everybody. Only for those who like absolutely gonzo, off the wall speculative fiction that combines human-animal hybrids, boy bands, locked-room murder mysteries, and really bad puns. For those people, this is YOUR book. Daryl Gregory is quick with a quip and bizarre with his imaginings in all his books, but this one takes the cake. Fast, funny, head-scratching (how DID the murderer get away with it?), and short (161 pages). You can read this in an OK, I'm giving this five stars but it's not for everybody. Only for those who like absolutely gonzo, off the wall speculative fiction that combines human-animal hybrids, boy bands, locked-room murder mysteries, and really bad puns. For those people, this is YOUR book. Daryl Gregory is quick with a quip and bizarre with his imaginings in all his books, but this one takes the cake. Fast, funny, head-scratching (how DID the murderer get away with it?), and short (161 pages). You can read this in an afternoon over a vodka and bag of popcorn (both are in the book). Actually, those sound like the perfect accompaniment to this book. The author leads off the book by quoting T.S. Eliot's five rules of detective fiction. He proceeds to break every one, and it still works as a murder mystery. Book Riot describes this book as “Completely Banana Pants!” Actually, those are the pants that Devin, the Bonobo hybrid, should be wearing. I imagine he would really enjoy a pair of banana pants. Quick, somebody order a pair for a semi-human Bonobo in XXL! Daryl Gregory here! Get your funny, goofy, totally bonkers Daryl Gregory book here!

  28. 5 out of 5

    K.N.

    I read this book in one sitting with a flashlight while my power was out. In theory, this was tailor-made for me: The Island of Doctor Moreau is one of my favorite books. Daryl Gregory is one of my, if not my number one, favorite authors. My first CD was The Backstreet Boys, and even earlier I collected magazines and fanzines about Hanson and listened to their cassette incessantly. The requirements were checked. But, I don’t know. This one didn’t really wow me. I think I just didn’t really click I read this book in one sitting with a flashlight while my power was out. In theory, this was tailor-made for me: The Island of Doctor Moreau is one of my favorite books. Daryl Gregory is one of my, if not my number one, favorite authors. My first CD was The Backstreet Boys, and even earlier I collected magazines and fanzines about Hanson and listened to their cassette incessantly. The requirements were checked. But, I don’t know. This one didn’t really wow me. I think I just didn’t really click with and enjoy the characters, and Gregory’s characters are usually what I fall most in love with. I also found the mystery to be, again, less than engaging, not one where enough pieces were laid out that you can solve along with the detective if you piece all the clues and evidence together just so. Though there’s a bit that gave me some Benson and Moorhead’s Spring vibes, which I briefly enjoyed but then decided I’d rather be watching that film. So, yeah. I’m slightly bummed since I had looked forward to this one since pre-order, but, there’s always his next!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Keely

    In this riff on The Island of Dr. Moreau, a group of human/animal hybrids escape from a secret evil lab in international waters...and form a successful boy band called the WildBoyZ..and get tangled up in a murder mystery that threatens their fame and freedom. And it’s up to a sharp Las Vegas detective/former magician to figure out whodunnit... I loved this short, goofy mystery almost as much as Gregory’s Spoonbenders. That one is pretty zany in its own way, too, but both books have a warm, relati In this riff on The Island of Dr. Moreau, a group of human/animal hybrids escape from a secret evil lab in international waters...and form a successful boy band called the WildBoyZ..and get tangled up in a murder mystery that threatens their fame and freedom. And it’s up to a sharp Las Vegas detective/former magician to figure out whodunnit... I loved this short, goofy mystery almost as much as Gregory’s Spoonbenders. That one is pretty zany in its own way, too, but both books have a warm, relational quality holding them together. I guess it’s called heart. Whatever it is, I find Gregory’s writing irresistible.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Arthur Maia

    I just finished The Album of Dr. Moreau, one of the funniest things I read recently. Everytime I pick something by Daryl Gregory, I know I will smile and cry at some point. I also love how he manages to write about totally different themes while still keeping a signature style.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.