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La librería del señor Livingstone

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Algunos lugares son un refugio en mitad de nuestras aceleradas vidas. Algunas novelas tienen la capacidad de llevarnos a esos lugares. Agnes Martí es una joven arqueóloga barcelonesa que decide mudarse a Londres en busca de una oportunidad laboral. Tras varias semanas sin éxito, una repentina lluvia le sorprende dando un paseo y entra en Moonlight Book. Casualmente, su dueñ Algunos lugares son un refugio en mitad de nuestras aceleradas vidas. Algunas novelas tienen la capacidad de llevarnos a esos lugares. Agnes Martí es una joven arqueóloga barcelonesa que decide mudarse a Londres en busca de una oportunidad laboral. Tras varias semanas sin éxito, una repentina lluvia le sorprende dando un paseo y entra en Moonlight Book. Casualmente, su dueño, Edward Livingstone, está buscando una ayudante y le ofrece el puesto. La joven acepta y poco a poco va descubriendo el encanto de esta pequeña librería. Hasta que un día uno de sus libros más preciados y antiguos desaparece y el inspector de policía John Lockewood entra en escena para hacerse cargo de la investigación y dar un vuelco a la vida de Agnes.


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Algunos lugares son un refugio en mitad de nuestras aceleradas vidas. Algunas novelas tienen la capacidad de llevarnos a esos lugares. Agnes Martí es una joven arqueóloga barcelonesa que decide mudarse a Londres en busca de una oportunidad laboral. Tras varias semanas sin éxito, una repentina lluvia le sorprende dando un paseo y entra en Moonlight Book. Casualmente, su dueñ Algunos lugares son un refugio en mitad de nuestras aceleradas vidas. Algunas novelas tienen la capacidad de llevarnos a esos lugares. Agnes Martí es una joven arqueóloga barcelonesa que decide mudarse a Londres en busca de una oportunidad laboral. Tras varias semanas sin éxito, una repentina lluvia le sorprende dando un paseo y entra en Moonlight Book. Casualmente, su dueño, Edward Livingstone, está buscando una ayudante y le ofrece el puesto. La joven acepta y poco a poco va descubriendo el encanto de esta pequeña librería. Hasta que un día uno de sus libros más preciados y antiguos desaparece y el inspector de policía John Lockewood entra en escena para hacerse cargo de la investigación y dar un vuelco a la vida de Agnes.

30 review for La librería del señor Livingstone

  1. 5 out of 5

    leni_hermanni

    Another proof that I shouldn't pay attention to the hype surrounding a book. This one proved to be such a disappointment, especially concerning the disgusting comments against the return of the Greek exhibits, currently found in the British museum, to their country of origin. I believe that every author should respect a country's heritage, or at least not include it in a supposedly easy and light read, as it is a serious matter and a delicate issue for a population that has lost parts of its his Another proof that I shouldn't pay attention to the hype surrounding a book. This one proved to be such a disappointment, especially concerning the disgusting comments against the return of the Greek exhibits, currently found in the British museum, to their country of origin. I believe that every author should respect a country's heritage, or at least not include it in a supposedly easy and light read, as it is a serious matter and a delicate issue for a population that has lost parts of its historical monuments. Apart from these completely inappropriate and offensive beliefs, I started this book genuinely thinking that I would love it. What couldn't someone love about an old bookseller and countless references to classics and fiction. Well... Turns out we were reading a super-slow-paced romance in need of more editing and revisions. To be honest halfway through the book, thinking I should just dnf it, I started skipping paragraphs ( which where completely unnecessary) to get to the end, which was dull and made me kind of cringe.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Zoe

    Poorly written and absolutely undeserving of the hype. Disgusting propaganda concerning the Marble Sculptures of Parthenon. (By the way, the term Elgin Marbles is incorrect, perhaps people should read a couple of books themselves before deciding to write their own). Anyway, these sculptures were not "transported", they were stolen. Greece was under occupation by the Ottoman Turks at the time and Elgin took advantage of that to steal innumerable treasures. The sculptures are still rotting away in Poorly written and absolutely undeserving of the hype. Disgusting propaganda concerning the Marble Sculptures of Parthenon. (By the way, the term Elgin Marbles is incorrect, perhaps people should read a couple of books themselves before deciding to write their own). Anyway, these sculptures were not "transported", they were stolen. Greece was under occupation by the Ottoman Turks at the time and Elgin took advantage of that to steal innumerable treasures. The sculptures are still rotting away in horrible conditions in the British Museum and all civilised people have been asking for their return home. Ms Gutierrez should know better than have her characters defend what Elgin and the British did. Even without this reference, the book remains unreadable, it has no plot, no depth whatsoever. I'm sorry to say this, but it is a waste of time.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Οδυσσέας Μουζίλης

    https://pepperlines.blogspot.com/2022... https://pepperlines.blogspot.com/2022...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Eleni

    very boring, no plot really, no flow, struggling to finish it, last 100pgs left and still find it pointless full of clichés and not well thought of at all, especially where it speaks of the exhibits in the museum i had enough (maybe i am biased but it was very incensitive to suggest that it is no big deal to have the stolen treasures of one country - learn the history if you write about an archaeologist).

  5. 4 out of 5

    Constantinos Nterziotis

    Save your money and your time. Also, if you like history or you are Greek/Hellene avoid it to save your blood pressure from raising when you will read her views on the stolen statues and anaglyphs of Parthenon.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jimena Rosenkranz

    I love it

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nina ( picturetalk321 )

    Two stars for content, one star for format. Let's start with the content. I was charmed by the first fifty pages. This is fine world-building: a kind of alternate London that is actually the fantasy London of a non-Briton. It is a little bit how I thought of England before I moved here many years ago. Gutiérrez who is Spanish stands in for all the continental Europeans (and perhaps others), and particularly for those whose mother tongue is not English, and who dream up a tourist destination of fi Two stars for content, one star for format. Let's start with the content. I was charmed by the first fifty pages. This is fine world-building: a kind of alternate London that is actually the fantasy London of a non-Briton. It is a little bit how I thought of England before I moved here many years ago. Gutiérrez who is Spanish stands in for all the continental Europeans (and perhaps others), and particularly for those whose mother tongue is not English, and who dream up a tourist destination of five o'clock teas, drizzly cobble stones and eccentric gentlemen who quote Lewis Carroll. Then, after the first fifty pages, this world started to gall. Brief plot (seeing that most other reviews are not in English as the book has not been translated): A young archaeologist, Agnes, arrives in London, hoping to find work as an archaeologist. She gets a temporary job in Mr Livingstone's bookstore. Mr L is a curmudgeonly but kindly book lover who wears three-piece suits with a fob watch. Also part of his bookstore community are: an eight-year-old boy who loves astronomy and is parked there by his mother in lieu of babysitting; Mr L's girlfriend, the publisher Sioban; the 'writer in residence' who uses the bookstore as a study; John Lockwood of Scotland Yard who falls in love with Agnes; Jasmine, Agnes' Black flatmate and friend; R. Cadwallader the pub cook who falls in love with Jasmine, and a côterie of customers who enter the shop with clueless requests. Everybody quotes books a lot, particularly Shakespeare and a medley of others (it was rather amusing to spot all the sources; I got nearly all of them.) "A feel-good novel", proclaims Que Leer on the back cover. I read the excellent German translation by Petra Zickmann of the Spanish original book. The English quotes below are my own translations from the German translation. What galled: The title's eponymous Mr Livingstone is an heir of the original Stanley Livingstone who traipsed through parts of Africa. This Victorian Livingstone is part of a highly problematic project: British Imperialism and colonialism, European racism. This book blithely ignores this. Note: the book was first published in 2017, and in a country that was itself a European coloniser so ignorance cannot be pled. Africa is the 'exotic contintent' (p.86). The 8-year-old boy bemoans the loss of mystery: "Like back then, when the great-great-great-great-grandfather of Mr Livingstone mapped out the Kalahari desert, navigated down the Zambezi river and named the waterfalls after Queen Victoria. After that there was nothing left to research or to discover." (p.171) What to say. The next problematic point concerns the Elgin marbles. The het couple spend a romantic evening among them in the British Museum. The book does acknowledge the controversy surrounding them, namely, that Greece wants them returned. The archaeologist says she does not know if they should be returned: "I don't know. Many other Egyptian pieces are also affected. If the British and French archaeologists had not taken their finds home back then, hardly anything would now be left of this valuable cultural heritage. Most of it would have fallen prey to grave robbers, ended up on the black market in antiques, been destroyed by acts of terror or wars or have disappeared, thanks to the monstrous corruption of the regimes in Cairo. Those were wild times, and in the nineteenth century, Europe was a relatively safe place for these treasures." (p.230) Oh dear. Greece and, in an elegant sleight of hand, Egypt as corrupt, riddled with terrorists, black marketeers and grave robbers, prone to war, with Europe as the saviour? Who bought those objects on the black market, I wonder? Well, I don't need to wonder, I know it from art history (side note: I am an art historian): Europeans. And there is no mention of the museum that Athens has specially built, with all the mod cons, to house the Parthenon marbles next to the Parthenon. Instead, more obfuscatory ideological self-justification: "Relics ... belong to all of humanity and because of this, because of their universal character, we should not care in which country or in which museum they are exhibited." (p.230) if it doesn't matter where they are, then they might as well be exhibited where they were found, no? The plot? Where is it? A manuscript gets stolen from the shop; enter the Scotland Yard detective; ... but the MS is retrieved half-way through? Someone doesn't want to get married and then they suddenly do...? A deus ex machina job appears for Agnes without foreshadowing, suspense, causality? The love story that may or may not be central to the plot (it is unclear) includes zero chemistry. The couple meet; she is shy; he is bewitched by her fairy-like beauty; and that's about it. Also, she is unsure of whether she wants to be with him but he pressures her and she doesn't want to break his heart. (Wut even. Read some romance novels, Gutiérrez. Discover the amazingness of consent and mutuality.) The English fantasy land: I guess one could decide simply to find it amusing. Although in this Brexit land of Tory politics, I find little to amuse. Here are some nuggets: 'The favourite pastime of Londoners: that of queuing, the art of standing in line that was almost as popular as the timeless tea time'. (p.66) Agnes notices that November is over because shops are putting up Christmas decorations: 'In December, all of London clothed itself in Dickensian nostalgia.' (p.61) (Hahaha, in the past, I have glimpsed the first Xmas deco in late September. They're certainly all up by beginning of November.) Marks&Co (I think this is Marks&Spencer?). Piccadilly Street. And it seems that mention of the "Danish steppes" is not ironic...? Read for #the52bookclub 2022 reading challenge, prompt: features a library or bookstore. Format: Now the format is a delight. It is a hardback that does not weigh a lot and that is no bigger than a trade paperback. (Hello, British publishers! Hardbacks do not need to be 5 kg bricks that fit in no normal-size shelf!) The pages are creamy. They open wonderfully, despite the perfect binding, with no spine cracking, no muscle effort necessary to turn them, and there is ribbon book marker which I appreciate very much. Thank you, Thiele Verlag! The cover is gorgeous, designed by Christina Krutz, using a photo by Ian Lamond. Some google sleuthing on my part revealed that the photo shows The Grove Bookshop in Ilkley, Yorkshire.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rafaila

    It's an easy-to-read and very pleasant book, just perfect for a weekend/holiday reading. It was hard-to-put-down and only took me a couple of days to finish. Not a lot of thrilling events are taking place in the story, on the contrary the book focuses on the small happy moments of everyday routine, implying that this is where happiness can be found. When finished, the book left me with a warm, optimistic mood about life. I'm happy that I chose to read it during Christmas period, as a big (not to It's an easy-to-read and very pleasant book, just perfect for a weekend/holiday reading. It was hard-to-put-down and only took me a couple of days to finish. Not a lot of thrilling events are taking place in the story, on the contrary the book focuses on the small happy moments of everyday routine, implying that this is where happiness can be found. When finished, the book left me with a warm, optimistic mood about life. I'm happy that I chose to read it during Christmas period, as a big (not to say the biggest) portion of the book takes place during winter and Christmas period so it matched well with the festive mood. I have some concerns about the writer's persistance to keep mentioning other books (the majority of which I have to admit I had barely heard of), within which I have counted numerous Harry Potter references (without even a footnote to clarify to the reader what this was about, in case they are not familiar with Harry Potter terms). I'm sure this was not her intention, but at times it felt like the author was bragging about her literature knowledge. Fortunately, understanding those references was not a prerequisite to understand the plot. Having said that, I really enjoyed the relaxing story, the warm atmosphere that it created and all the characters were interesting and nice.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chris Thompson

    If this were a film it would be one of those Christmas ones where somebody discovers the delights of the small town United States and where everyone is lovely. In this case though everyone is lovely and cosy in the bookshop - or in the pub, in the park or with family - everywhere in fact. The number of regurgitated clichés about the English and London made me smile but that and the somewhat amateur writing style with so many repetitive adjectives were easily vanquished by the niceness of it all. If this were a film it would be one of those Christmas ones where somebody discovers the delights of the small town United States and where everyone is lovely. In this case though everyone is lovely and cosy in the bookshop - or in the pub, in the park or with family - everywhere in fact. The number of regurgitated clichés about the English and London made me smile but that and the somewhat amateur writing style with so many repetitive adjectives were easily vanquished by the niceness of it all. Who cares that It's a Wonderful Life could never have happened?

  10. 5 out of 5

    Stelios Avramidis

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. When Timon and Pumba told Simba to "hakuna matata" and forget his worries, there was more character development and realism in that scene of Lion King, than the entirety of this book. A contast critisim of "feel good" entertainment is the lack of meaningful plot that engages the audience. This book is one of those pieces. There is a bookstore. And an owner. Who is in love with a publisher. She is also in love with him, no worries. And a little boy that likes the stars and clearly has socialising When Timon and Pumba told Simba to "hakuna matata" and forget his worries, there was more character development and realism in that scene of Lion King, than the entirety of this book. A contast critisim of "feel good" entertainment is the lack of meaningful plot that engages the audience. This book is one of those pieces. There is a bookstore. And an owner. Who is in love with a publisher. She is also in love with him, no worries. And a little boy that likes the stars and clearly has socialising issues, is neglected by his mother who dumps him in the bookshop every day, has no friends to the point that he prefers astronomy in a borderline escapism fixation but no worries. And a Spanish archealogist who doesn't really know what she is doing with her life and is the only one who has some sort of conflict and strife and she starts dating someone who is engaged to someoone else but that also gets resolved pretty quick in one date. Sometimes I don't even know the last name of someone that I have dated once, but these two love birds declared their love and got over the lying, manipulation and the clearly unhealthy amount of baggage that comes with the "hey I am still engaged with my ex in order to make my parents happy". No worries. This is not an optimistic look in life. This is called "living in a fantasy" and "being delusional". At least Simba knew that he was escaping his problems with Hakuna Matata. This people don't even recognising. "Stelios you are a grumpy idiot who likes to comlain". Well, fine but even all the plot threads get resolved 70 pages before the end. What is included in the rest of the book? I don't know. I just read it and I don't know. No worries. Dear "feel good" writers. Without a gripping plot and engaging characters you will not manage to draw me into your universe. Your creation will not make me feel good, because it will fail to make me interested in the first place. Don't be afraid to show real problems and real people. And yeah give me a happy ending. But make me interested first. Watch a Disney movie. It's better.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ann

    Another entrant in the genre of "lonely girl finds community and love in an indie bookstore", which I can never resist. The twist here is that the heroine is a Spanish archeologist whose hopes of finding a job in one of London's museums keep on getting dashed. So she takes a job in Moonlight books, a small bookstore hidden near The Temple district. Mr Livingstone, the owner, is much given to quoting from the greats of English literature, makes tea at all hours of the day and night, and is an ann Another entrant in the genre of "lonely girl finds community and love in an indie bookstore", which I can never resist. The twist here is that the heroine is a Spanish archeologist whose hopes of finding a job in one of London's museums keep on getting dashed. So she takes a job in Moonlight books, a small bookstore hidden near The Temple district. Mr Livingstone, the owner, is much given to quoting from the greats of English literature, makes tea at all hours of the day and night, and is an annual nominee for the award of "Most grumpy bookseller". The bookstore also functions as a daily daycare for a precocious boy with an interest in astronomy (in my opinion, inspired by a similar character in Alexander McCall Smith's Edinburgh series). When the precious diary of the victorian explorer Dr. Livingstone (forebear of the bookseller) disappears, a tough Scotland Yard detective is called in. Can you imagine how the story ends? Yes, you can, and you would be right! What I liked about the book : the atmosphere of winter in London, the snow, the quiet parks, the bookstore. What I liked less about the book, and left it at two stars: the author seemed unsure as to who the main character was. Is it the Spanish bookstore assistant? Is it Mr. Livingstone? Neither of them really came alive for me, nor did the detective. I actually had more fun with the secondary characters, like the heroine's roommate Jasmine and her unlikely love interest.

  12. 5 out of 5

    IrinivK

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Starting out, this book felt funny and lighthearted. I found myself laughing out loud a couple of times. The combination of simple jokes with a good description of the atmosphere and facial expressions just did it for me. This is by far the strongest skill of the writer and the thing that kept me going through this book. During "serious conversations" I felt that the writer was trying to hard to make the conversations feel meaningful and deep. Because of that, a lot of passages felt unnatural an Starting out, this book felt funny and lighthearted. I found myself laughing out loud a couple of times. The combination of simple jokes with a good description of the atmosphere and facial expressions just did it for me. This is by far the strongest skill of the writer and the thing that kept me going through this book. During "serious conversations" I felt that the writer was trying to hard to make the conversations feel meaningful and deep. Because of that, a lot of passages felt unnatural and treadded into the dangerous territory of clichés. Adding a stream of bookquotes on top of that, just made me even more annoyed. And can we talk about the fact that the main character was so absolutely devastated and gloomy for days because the person she had met only once(!) pretended to have a fiancé? I would only recommend this book as an easy read to come out of a book slump. Because it is enjoyable. But if you want a good plot (yet simply written book) that leads to a satisfying ending this is just not it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    ✨ A book that anyone who wants a glance of magic in his/her life should read! ✨ ‌🌃 A few words for the plot: It occures at the Christmas season an this makes it even more cozy, gives the sense of a fairy tale and make me to want a visit at this place! The bookstore and the characters as well, are very friendly (even if Mr. Livingston doesn't want to look like this 😋 ) and you can feel what kindness, true love and true friendship means! ‌📝A few words for the writing: A well-written book. Given the f ✨ A book that anyone who wants a glance of magic in his/her life should read! ✨ ‌🌃 A few words for the plot: It occures at the Christmas season an this makes it even more cozy, gives the sense of a fairy tale and make me to want a visit at this place! The bookstore and the characters as well, are very friendly (even if Mr. Livingston doesn't want to look like this 😋 ) and you can feel what kindness, true love and true friendship means! ‌📝A few words for the writing: A well-written book. Given the fact that contains phrases from other writers we can see the research that is made by Mónica Gutierrez to involve quotes. And these quotes customize her text more literature! ‌♥️A phrase that I loved: << To dream it is not necessary to close our eyes, it is enough to read.>> ~ Michel Foucault ~

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    This book was a bit underwhelming to be honest. The atmosphere was cozy, the book was a welcome break from reality and it made me audibly laugh a few times. However, there was really nothing more to it. The characters are lovable, but the plot is basically non-existent. I still can't tell if the main plot was the retrieval of the stolen book, which was solved half way through, or if this served as a way to set up the meet-cute between Agnes and the policeman, thus the hastily written romance bei This book was a bit underwhelming to be honest. The atmosphere was cozy, the book was a welcome break from reality and it made me audibly laugh a few times. However, there was really nothing more to it. The characters are lovable, but the plot is basically non-existent. I still can't tell if the main plot was the retrieval of the stolen book, which was solved half way through, or if this served as a way to set up the meet-cute between Agnes and the policeman, thus the hastily written romance being the central story. I really enjoyed the first 10 chapters, but I found it very difficult to finish the rest of book. I wanted to love this book, I just couldn't. I won't even begin to explain why the views regarding the Parthenon marbles are plainly wrong and shouldn't even be in the book. I found them extremely disrespetful, as well as out of place given the lighthearted nature of the book.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Manouka

    Such nice vibes. A warm bubble of books and tea, stars and snacks, friends and fictional characters. This book almost made me miss winter. Almost. My one negative thing is: MAYBE??? Someone asks you if the Parthenon marbles should be returned to Athens and you said MAYBE. JAIL. As a Greek person that paragraph was UNREADABLE. The audacity. Leave get out right now it’s the end of you and me. I had to stop reading for a second to calm myself. I just want this bookstore in my life. Cozy vibes. Very w Such nice vibes. A warm bubble of books and tea, stars and snacks, friends and fictional characters. This book almost made me miss winter. Almost. My one negative thing is: MAYBE??? Someone asks you if the Parthenon marbles should be returned to Athens and you said MAYBE. JAIL. As a Greek person that paragraph was UNREADABLE. The audacity. Leave get out right now it’s the end of you and me. I had to stop reading for a second to calm myself. I just want this bookstore in my life. Cozy vibes. Very wholesome, very cute. Also liked the references and quotes although they do get tiring when they’re translated. Mommy look I read a book in Greek !

  16. 5 out of 5

    Evdoxia Pantazi

    My favourite book for this year!! It made me laugh, it made me ponder it made me feel. And travel and see all those places through their eyes and my eyes. Those people exist like all the characters Mr Livingston is bringing up. Reminded that age is not a barrier for people to connect. Neither their knowledge of literature. All you have to remember is to have will. Will to try new things, will yo open up to people and things, a will to live.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mariana Almeida

    3.5 Love how all the literary references are used, all the characters and the good dinamic of the bookstore. The fact that the main character Agnes is an Archeologist and decide to go to London just like me is also a plus in the book.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Evie

    A very relaxing read. Not a mystery at all, not much reaaally happens but the author has written it in such a way that you feel like Mr Livingstone's library is such a real place in your mind. It's not a book that you can't put down but that's also what's refreshing about it. A very relaxing read. Not a mystery at all, not much reaaally happens but the author has written it in such a way that you feel like Mr Livingstone's library is such a real place in your mind. It's not a book that you can't put down but that's also what's refreshing about it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Angelique

    A casual read, but nothing special. I usually enjoy casual books without very complicated plots from time to time, but this one is a bit too boring for me. Also there are too many references to other books and authors that it gets exhausting. Easy to read but not worth the time (3/5 stars)

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maria Geralda

    I loved it ❤️

  21. 5 out of 5

    Ioanna

    It's wonderful. You can read it in one seat and you can find some good recommendations if you haven't read them! It's wonderful. You can read it in one seat and you can find some good recommendations if you haven't read them!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mariann Komlós

    This is a hidden gem, I loved to submerge in it! Also I want to live in this bookshop!! :D

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina

    It's a very nice story with a Christmas vibe which makes it ideal to read during the Christmas holidays or winter. It'a also very easy to read and follow. It's a very nice story with a Christmas vibe which makes it ideal to read during the Christmas holidays or winter. It'a also very easy to read and follow.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Fotini

    A truly good feeling book full of books and magic..

  25. 5 out of 5

    Socratis Ploussas

    This is what a "feelgood" book looks like. This is what a "feelgood" book looks like.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Polly Lafazani

    Indeed, it's a feel-good novel if you are familiar with the books and authors' references. It makes many bibliophiles feel like belonging to a family. However, the plot is a bit predictable. Indeed, it's a feel-good novel if you are familiar with the books and authors' references. It makes many bibliophiles feel like belonging to a family. However, the plot is a bit predictable.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Giannis Athanasopoulos

    "Home is where the books are." "Home is where the books are."

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christine Georgiou

    Cute reading. Quiet dissapointed though for the greek translation/content editing, translating the Parthenon's sculptures in "marbles". Cute reading. Quiet dissapointed though for the greek translation/content editing, translating the Parthenon's sculptures in "marbles".

  29. 4 out of 5

    Nadia Kara

    A sweet delight! Books, tea, Mr. Livingstone. If you feel fed up and want a little break, read this little blue book!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kamila Notario-Galaj

    Cozy and hugging. Hearthwarming <3

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