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Long Lost

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Eleven-year-old Fiona has just read a book that doesn’t exist. When Fiona’s family moves to be closer to her older sister’s figure skating club—and far from Fiona’s close-knit group of friends—nobody seems to notice Fiona’s unhappiness. Alone and out of place, Fiona ventures to the town’s library, a rambling mansion donated to the town by the long-dead heiress. And there s Eleven-year-old Fiona has just read a book that doesn’t exist. When Fiona’s family moves to be closer to her older sister’s figure skating club—and far from Fiona’s close-knit group of friends—nobody seems to notice Fiona’s unhappiness. Alone and out of place, Fiona ventures to the town’s library, a rambling mansion donated to the town by the long-dead heiress. And there she finds a gripping mystery novel about a small town, family secrets, and a tragic disappearance. Soon Fiona begins to notice strange similarities that blur the lines between the novel and her new town. And when she looks for the book again, it’s gone. Almost like it never existed. With stubbornness and a little help from a few odd Lost Lake locals, Fiona uncovers the book’s strange history. It’s not a novel, but the true story of an unsolved century-old crime filled with clues to the mystery. Lost Lake is a town of restless spirits, and Fiona will learn that both help and danger come from unexpected places—maybe even the sister she thinks doesn’t care about her anymore.


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Eleven-year-old Fiona has just read a book that doesn’t exist. When Fiona’s family moves to be closer to her older sister’s figure skating club—and far from Fiona’s close-knit group of friends—nobody seems to notice Fiona’s unhappiness. Alone and out of place, Fiona ventures to the town’s library, a rambling mansion donated to the town by the long-dead heiress. And there s Eleven-year-old Fiona has just read a book that doesn’t exist. When Fiona’s family moves to be closer to her older sister’s figure skating club—and far from Fiona’s close-knit group of friends—nobody seems to notice Fiona’s unhappiness. Alone and out of place, Fiona ventures to the town’s library, a rambling mansion donated to the town by the long-dead heiress. And there she finds a gripping mystery novel about a small town, family secrets, and a tragic disappearance. Soon Fiona begins to notice strange similarities that blur the lines between the novel and her new town. And when she looks for the book again, it’s gone. Almost like it never existed. With stubbornness and a little help from a few odd Lost Lake locals, Fiona uncovers the book’s strange history. It’s not a novel, but the true story of an unsolved century-old crime filled with clues to the mystery. Lost Lake is a town of restless spirits, and Fiona will learn that both help and danger come from unexpected places—maybe even the sister she thinks doesn’t care about her anymore.

30 review for Long Lost

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stefan Bachmann

    That cover, first of all. And the insides are just as good. LONG LOST contains a creepy small town, a cozy-yet-very-mysterious library, dark things in the woods, and sibling bonds in all their messy, envious, realistic glory. It's also a story *about* stories, about the way they can shape reality and echo out of the past. I will be ordering a hardcopy, so I can admire it from time to time, but also to hand out to any nieces and nephews in search of a great read. That cover, first of all. And the insides are just as good. LONG LOST contains a creepy small town, a cozy-yet-very-mysterious library, dark things in the woods, and sibling bonds in all their messy, envious, realistic glory. It's also a story *about* stories, about the way they can shape reality and echo out of the past. I will be ordering a hardcopy, so I can admire it from time to time, but also to hand out to any nieces and nephews in search of a great read.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    Let’s talk about aesthetics for a moment: This middle grade novel, with its gorgeous, eerie cover, deckled page edges, and fun border designs around the first page of each new chapter, definitely deserves some sort of award for an appearance that lures you in! Sure, we can’t judge the contents by what’s on the outside, but an enticing exterior often leads us to want to know what’s on the inside. Even if I had hated this book, I’d still want it on my shelf for its beauty. Fortunately, I really enj Let’s talk about aesthetics for a moment: This middle grade novel, with its gorgeous, eerie cover, deckled page edges, and fun border designs around the first page of each new chapter, definitely deserves some sort of award for an appearance that lures you in! Sure, we can’t judge the contents by what’s on the outside, but an enticing exterior often leads us to want to know what’s on the inside. Even if I had hated this book, I’d still want it on my shelf for its beauty. Fortunately, I really enjoyed Long Lost, so I need not compromise my values by displaying something for its superficial qualities! This is a book within a book. Having now enjoyed two stories like this within the last two months, I suppose I can no longer claim to not be a fan of such things. It looks like there’s a 50/50 chance that I will enjoy this type of story. In Long Lost, we meet sisters Arden and Fiona. Arden is a figure skater with the Olympics in her sights. The girls’ parents have decided to move closer to Arden’s ice skating club. Fiona already resents her ambitious sister, but this move makes everything worse. The one thing that proves to be a bright spot in this whole ordeal is the library in Fiona’s new town and an intriguing book on the library’s shelf: The Lost One. As Fiona begins reading this exciting find, she gets to know sisters Hazel and Pearl. They do everything together, but one night after a recent quarrel, Hazel goes missing and Pearl returns home, in shock, claiming the town’s legendary boogeyman, The Searcher, has taken her sister. The problem is, at some point, The Lost One just stops. No one ever finished writing the book. That’s a much longer summary than I usually like to provide, but books within books seem to require a bit more explanation! It did take a little time for me to feel fully invested in this, but it proved to be a fun, mysterious, and sometimes creepy story! I will confess that although I had no trouble telling Arden and Fiona apart, Hazel and Pearl never felt distinctly different in their characterizations and I kept mixing them up! That’s a minor nuisance, as this children’s book was truly quite enjoyable. I thought the theme here, surrounding sisterly love, loyalty, and an ability to make amends, was a good one. It may not be true to life for all siblings, but it is a positive and inspiring message. If you or your middle graders enjoy spooky dramas with some fantastical elements, along with visuals that really enhance the story, Long Lost is definitely one to add to the list!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lata

    Moving to a new town so her older sister Arden can attend her many skating practices, Fiona is upset, missing her old bedroom, her friends, and well, everything else. Her parents are trying to get accustomed to a new town, new jobs, keep on top of the practices, and Fiona is getting a little lost in the shuffle. When she stumbles upon an old town mystery about two sisters in a strange book that seems to wander the town's library shelves, Fiona is entranced, and starts researching the town and the Moving to a new town so her older sister Arden can attend her many skating practices, Fiona is upset, missing her old bedroom, her friends, and well, everything else. Her parents are trying to get accustomed to a new town, new jobs, keep on top of the practices, and Fiona is getting a little lost in the shuffle. When she stumbles upon an old town mystery about two sisters in a strange book that seems to wander the town's library shelves, Fiona is entranced, and starts researching the town and the two sisters, one of whom had disappeared many years before with no trace. Meanwhile, Fiona and Arden argue as neither is happy with the other and the distance growing between them. Fiona, with the help of a local boy who is equally entranced by the library and the mystery, gets closer to the answers. This was good! The tension, both between the present-day sisters and the pair in the past is believable. Fiona’s anger and hurt feelings about all the changes in her life are well drawn. I liked the slight creepiness of the story and clearly enjoyed this book, as I finished it in one day.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Reign_ 1982

    Omg. Is all I can say.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC provided by Edelweiss When Fiona's family moves to Lost Lake, she's not thrilled. Her preants have decided it makes more sense to be near her older sister Arden's skating training facility instead of spending so many hours driving back and forth, and both parents were able to get jobs nearby. Never mind that Fiona has to leave all of her friends and live in a semi-creepy house; everything is always about Arden. Instead of spending four hours on a summer day watching her sister skate, Fiona E ARC provided by Edelweiss When Fiona's family moves to Lost Lake, she's not thrilled. Her preants have decided it makes more sense to be near her older sister Arden's skating training facility instead of spending so many hours driving back and forth, and both parents were able to get jobs nearby. Never mind that Fiona has to leave all of her friends and live in a semi-creepy house; everything is always about Arden. Instead of spending four hours on a summer day watching her sister skate, Fiona asks to be dropped off at the local public library, which is in an older mansion donated by the Chisholm family. There, she finds an old book in the mystery section entitled The Lost One. She starts to read, but has to leave before finishing. Her mother drags her feet on getting Fiona a library card, and when she is finally able to check the book out, it isn't there. She sees the librarian, Ms. Miranda, with the book in a staff room, and takes it home. The story, about two sisters named Pearl and Hazel, is a riveting one, but the book disappears! Is The Searcher that the book talks about real? And what did happen to Evelyn Chisholm? Fiona starts to investigate the history of Lost Lake, and is helped by Charlie Hobbs, whose grandfather knew the Chisholm family and who is also interested in the book. Things get stranger and stranger, and on the third floor of the library, Fiona runs into a strange, stern woman and a small dog named Pixie. Once she talks to Ms. Miranda, she finds out that there's no one at the library who matches that description, and Charlie lets her know that the third floor is in fact haunted. Fiona gets in trouble for sneaking away from home, and isn't very nice to Arden, but eventually realizes that Arden's life isn't easy either, and that her sister misses her as much as she misses her sister. As Fiona gets further into the mystery and closer to the truth of what happened to Evelyn, things become dangerous. Strengths: This was a brilliant blend of enthralling, cozy library and MURDEROUS GHOSTS. My students don't just want ghosts that scare people, they want ghosts like those in Lindsey Duga mysteries who want to kill the people who come across them. I don't want to spoil the mystery, but this not only had ghosts that are more than threatening enough, but also wove in some history, and some very touching and realistic sister drama. One of my favorite parts was something small-- the town of Lost Lake doesn't take to newcomers kindly, and Ms. Miranda mentions that she has taken to wearing something spectacular in her bun every day to give them something positive to talk about. Didn't hurt that the mother, a pediatrician, also had fun jewelry. The library, of course, is brilliant, and one that anyone who loves books would want to investigate. This was short, fast-paced, and really intriguing, with plenty of twists and turns. My daughter was an enormous fan of this author's The Shadows, and I may have to buy her a copy even though she's 22! Weaknesses: The first couple of chapters of The Lost One went on a bit too long for my taste; I got in to the story soon enough, but I was so invested in Fiona's struggles in her new home that I skimmed the story of Pearl and Hazel and had to go back and reread.Just good to know in case I have readers who struggle with the story-within-a-story concept. What I really think: Definitely purchasing and glad to add to a growing collection of killer ghost books like Brown's The Forgotten Girl, Currie's Scritch Scratch, Poblocki's Ghost Hunter's Daughter , and Schwab's Cassidy Blake books.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

    Not sure what age this is meant for cause it genuinely creeped me out lol. This was a great little book about 2 sisters moving to a town with secrets and stories - totally my type of thing! Sweet and a lil spooky :)

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cara (Wilde Book Garden)

    4.5 stars This was so good! Part of the set-up reminded me a little of Small Spaces by Katherine Arden (in a good way) but Long Lost definitely stands on its own. Fiona is a great main character and I was instantly invested in her story and feeling her loneliness in her family. I just wanted to yell at her parents "LOVE YOUR CHILDREN EQUALLY THE WAY YOU'RE SUPPOSED TO!" I thought the exploration of sister relationships was really compelling and I liked the way that combined with the creepy book plo 4.5 stars This was so good! Part of the set-up reminded me a little of Small Spaces by Katherine Arden (in a good way) but Long Lost definitely stands on its own. Fiona is a great main character and I was instantly invested in her story and feeling her loneliness in her family. I just wanted to yell at her parents "LOVE YOUR CHILDREN EQUALLY THE WAY YOU'RE SUPPOSED TO!" I thought the exploration of sister relationships was really compelling and I liked the way that combined with the creepy book plotline. The atmosphere was great and I really enjoyed Jacqueline West's writing style (though for me personally the book-within-a-book parts weren't as engagingly written as the main story). Definitely recommend this for fans of spooky middle grade, especially if you like when authors use those spooky elements to highlight themes, like I do. Oh, and I loved the focus on books and libraries!! CW: Grief, emotional neglect, drowning

  8. 4 out of 5

    Brad McLelland

    Long Lost is one of those novels I would have read on steady repeat when I was a kid. It's a splendid study in dark but playful tone, intriguing gothic-style atmosphere, and unique, mysterious settings (including one of the coolest fictional libraries you'll ever get to explore). But what really makes this story shine are the characters -- Fiona, her big sister Arden, their very real-feeling rivalry, the mysterious small-town kid who may just hold a secret or two, the sweet, trying-to-understand Long Lost is one of those novels I would have read on steady repeat when I was a kid. It's a splendid study in dark but playful tone, intriguing gothic-style atmosphere, and unique, mysterious settings (including one of the coolest fictional libraries you'll ever get to explore). But what really makes this story shine are the characters -- Fiona, her big sister Arden, their very real-feeling rivalry, the mysterious small-town kid who may just hold a secret or two, the sweet, trying-to-understand parents who just can't seem to figure things out quickly enough to help Fiona . . . the whole cast is perfectly rendered. In short, this book is just wonderful fun. If you're looking for a quick, adventurous read that will also have you chewing your fingernails in suspense, Long Lost is just the book for you. Highly recommended! *I read an advanced reader copy of this book.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Leah

    This takes place in June in Massachusetts. The story is about a book that doesn't exist, sibling rivalry, and making friends. There is a touch of paranormal and fantasy in the story. The story within the story takes place in the early 1900's. This also involves siblings. The ending wasn't what I thought it would be, but it was a little weirder than I expected. This takes place in June in Massachusetts. The story is about a book that doesn't exist, sibling rivalry, and making friends. There is a touch of paranormal and fantasy in the story. The story within the story takes place in the early 1900's. This also involves siblings. The ending wasn't what I thought it would be, but it was a little weirder than I expected.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Allison

    Sometimes it’s a little hard to review middle grade books because they’re not meant for an adult audience. Some parts of the story may feel flat or predictable, but those parts wouldn’t necessarily feel that way to the intended audience. I always have to remind myself of that when I read these books. The reason I go back to them is for the simplicity and pure fun that they give. Usually, the middle grade books I pick up are fantastical, and I just love the pure imagination I find. Long Lost is ab Sometimes it’s a little hard to review middle grade books because they’re not meant for an adult audience. Some parts of the story may feel flat or predictable, but those parts wouldn’t necessarily feel that way to the intended audience. I always have to remind myself of that when I read these books. The reason I go back to them is for the simplicity and pure fun that they give. Usually, the middle grade books I pick up are fantastical, and I just love the pure imagination I find. Long Lost is about Fiona Crane who has to move away from her old life to Lost Lake with her family. She’s very unhappy about it and jealous of the attention her older sister, Arden, receives for being a figure skater. The story takes place during the summertime, so Fiona has to find something to do with her time. She turns to the local library and discovers a mysterious book. This leads her on a hunt for truth. I highly enjoyed reading this book. It’s about Fiona and her family, but it’s also about the mysterious book she discovers, which is also about two sisters, Hazel and Pearl, who lived about a hundred years ago. The story of Fiona involves her reading this story, and it’s hard to say which story is more interesting. At first, I thought it was going to be a frame story, but Fiona gets interrupted in reading the Hazel and Pearl book. This brought some intrigue since you, as the reader, wanted to finish it with Fiona. I personally don’t like too much detail about the books I’m going to read, so I’m not going to give away much more details. But the adventure Fiona goes on is so much fun. I quickly read through the second half of the book, when things really started taking off. As I stated at the top, some things do feel flat and predictable, but that’s more on me. I’m not the audience for this. Even so, those few small things don’t kill the book. The overall story is a joy. There’s many characters throughout the book, and most of them are pretty distinct. I can’t say the writing was anything special. It was all pretty straightforward, just telling us what we need to know, but there were a few pretty phrases. However, I think middle grades are more about the story instead of pretty writing. I’ve never read a book my Jacqueline West before, but the imagination in this book really impressed me. tinyleafbooks.com

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kathie

    Thank you to the publisher and Edelweiss+ for an eARC of this book. A mysterious book that goes missing from a library, two sets of sisters separated by decades, long-held secrets, ghostly encounters, and rumors which may or may not prove to be are the premise for this engaging novel by Jacqueline West. Fiona's family has moved to the new town of Lost Lake to be closer to her sister Arden's skating club. Fiona feels like Arden's needs are the center of her family's existence, and she's bitter she Thank you to the publisher and Edelweiss+ for an eARC of this book. A mysterious book that goes missing from a library, two sets of sisters separated by decades, long-held secrets, ghostly encounters, and rumors which may or may not prove to be are the premise for this engaging novel by Jacqueline West. Fiona's family has moved to the new town of Lost Lake to be closer to her sister Arden's skating club. Fiona feels like Arden's needs are the center of her family's existence, and she's bitter she had to leave her friends behind and start over in a new town that doesn't seem very welcoming. While at the local library, she discovers a book in the mystery section and is immediately hooked by a story called The Lost One. But when the book goes missing, the librarian claims she doesn't know anything about it. When Fiona eventually finds it (and discovers the librarian lied to her), she realizes the story isn't finished and she's desperate to know how it ends. As Fiona starts to research this alluring book, she discovers its ties to Lost Lake, and to a history that is filled with unexplained events, rumors, and secrets. How much of the story is true, and to what lengths will Fiona and her new friend Charlie go to solve how the story actually ends before the past catches up with them. I would definitely recommend this book to mystery fans, and those who like stories where a clues from the past must be uncovered to solve. This book has the added element of supernatural presences that both help and hinder Fiona's investigations. I liked to see Fiona and Charlie find a common interest that brings them together, and I appreciated the relationship between Fiona and Arden and how it's not only mirrored in the sisters from long ago, but help both girls to understand each other better.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Rivera

    I could not put this book down. It was so good and so fast paced and the mystery was so interesting. 11yr old Fiona just moved to Lost Lake to be closer to her older sisters Arden’s figure skating club and far from any of Fiona’s friends but nobody seems to her unhappiness. Fiona ends up in the towns library which is a rambling mansion donated by a long dead heiress and there she finds a gripping mystery novel about two sisters and small town and a mysterious disappearance. As she keeps reading I could not put this book down. It was so good and so fast paced and the mystery was so interesting. 11yr old Fiona just moved to Lost Lake to be closer to her older sisters Arden’s figure skating club and far from any of Fiona’s friends but nobody seems to her unhappiness. Fiona ends up in the towns library which is a rambling mansion donated by a long dead heiress and there she finds a gripping mystery novel about two sisters and small town and a mysterious disappearance. As she keeps reading there appear startling similarities to Lost Lake and when she comes back after getting her library card to check the book out and finish it she is told it doesn’t exist. She finds where the librarian hid the book and she takes it but as she keeps reading it abruptly stops in the middle and now she has to figure out what happened to the sisters and why the book keeps disappearing to end up back at the library. This was so good and the characters were so spot on and the conflicts between the sisters and their faltering relationship was just so interesting to read. The mystery with the story and it actually being something that really happened in the town and Fiona investigating to figure out what happened and get to the truth was so great and how eventually Fiona and Arden make up and their relationship get so much better and that it parallels what the sisters in the story were going through. The ghost parts were really good and sometimes took you a while to figure out who was the ghost which was really fun. Just a great fast read and would be perfect for fans of mysteries with a ghost story included. Thanks to HarperCollins Children’s Books and Netgalley for the complimentary copy of this book in e-book form. All opinions in this review are my own.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Kaul

    Sisterly spite, a spooky old town, and a library shelved with secrets... LONG LOST is a must-have for every middle grade library, be it in the classroom or at home. Having previously taught this age group, and thinking back to myself at this age, I'm excited for all the readers who will be able to relate to this book. And there are so many reasons to relate! Feelings of being left out, of being overshadowed by a more talented or seemingly perfect sibling, of moving and leaving everyone and everyt Sisterly spite, a spooky old town, and a library shelved with secrets... LONG LOST is a must-have for every middle grade library, be it in the classroom or at home. Having previously taught this age group, and thinking back to myself at this age, I'm excited for all the readers who will be able to relate to this book. And there are so many reasons to relate! Feelings of being left out, of being overshadowed by a more talented or seemingly perfect sibling, of moving and leaving everyone and everything you love behind. And then there's the ghost story - creepy, but not too creepy, a story in a story combining past and present and threatening to spill over into the main character's life. As a reader, I wanted to zip through the story to solve the mystery and discover what was to happen to the main character, Fiona. As a writer, I wanted to savor the twists and turns in plot, the seamless transitions between the main story and the story within it, the realistic family dynamics, and the captivating word choice. The reader in me won out, and I devoured LONG LOST in less than a weekend. I definitely recommend this book, for middle grade readers and beyond. Hope you enjoy it as much as I did!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kris - My Novelesque Life

    RATING: 4.5 STARS 2021; Greenwillow/HarperCollins (Harper Audio) I really enjoyed this middle grade novel. I love the gorgeous cover, but was not sure how the story would be. It looked like a mixture fantasy and contemporary, but not sure how much of either. Long Lost reminded me a bit of Mary Downing Hall with that mixture of realism and magic of sorts. Fiona, at eleven years old is feeling unappreciated by her family. She is moved away from her friends so that they are closer to her sister's ska RATING: 4.5 STARS 2021; Greenwillow/HarperCollins (Harper Audio) I really enjoyed this middle grade novel. I love the gorgeous cover, but was not sure how the story would be. It looked like a mixture fantasy and contemporary, but not sure how much of either. Long Lost reminded me a bit of Mary Downing Hall with that mixture of realism and magic of sorts. Fiona, at eleven years old is feeling unappreciated by her family. She is moved away from her friends so that they are closer to her sister's skating lessons. Refusing to go to her practices, Fiona asks to be dropped off at the library. On her visit visit she discovers a book with an irresistible story about two sisters. It is not a book that can be checked out, so she returns to read it again. After her third or fourth visit, the book disappears. It turns out the book does not exist, even though it seems to take place in the town. This leads Fiona to try to uncover more about the book and its tie to the small town. I was a bit sad when the book ended, and now will have to go see what else West has written. This is a great book for children that love magic, supernatural, fantasy and/or realism. ***I received a complimentary copy of this ebook from the publisher through Edelweiss. Opinions expressed in this review are entirely my own.***

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alana

    This book, without a shred of doubt, ranks in my top 5 of books so far this year. It's creepy, perfect for a variety of ages, and beyond that it explores the meaning of stories and how they shape the very world we live in. West, you truly wrote a gem - though the MC is 11 (and I'm in my 20s), I connected and related to her just as much as I assume any teen reader would. There's chills, emotional bits, amazing characters, and more. An absolute gem to read! This book, without a shred of doubt, ranks in my top 5 of books so far this year. It's creepy, perfect for a variety of ages, and beyond that it explores the meaning of stories and how they shape the very world we live in. West, you truly wrote a gem - though the MC is 11 (and I'm in my 20s), I connected and related to her just as much as I assume any teen reader would. There's chills, emotional bits, amazing characters, and more. An absolute gem to read!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    LONG LOST was the perfect mystery to get back to reading the middle grade genre. Over the past year, I have been reading a lot of YA books for my job as a librarian aide at a high school , and yet I have missed the middle grade books I read while working as a library aide for an elementary school. First off: the COVER. Beautiful, intricately detailed, and slightly creepy. Second: the author’s dedication “to the librarians.” Me being a librarian in the making in getting my MLS, PERFECT. I love a LONG LOST was the perfect mystery to get back to reading the middle grade genre. Over the past year, I have been reading a lot of YA books for my job as a librarian aide at a high school , and yet I have missed the middle grade books I read while working as a library aide for an elementary school. First off: the COVER. Beautiful, intricately detailed, and slightly creepy. Second: the author’s dedication “to the librarians.” Me being a librarian in the making in getting my MLS, PERFECT. I love a good book about libraries and librarians, not surprisingly. Finally, a story set in a old town with a haunted library and a cursed book? Count me in! Going in, I thought that was it to the story: weird town, a beautiful and old yet haunted library, a kick-ass librarian, and a younger sister who always felt second best to her older sister, and loved books and discovering things. Yet, it was so much more. I would have loved to have this book as a tween. Being the second of five children, I felt I was always compared to my perfect older sister, similar to how Fiona felt with her sister Arden. Ten year old Emily also wanted to be an archeologist ✅loved books ✅ loved the library ✅And I would have found a kindred spirit in Fiona. The hidden mystery in LONG LOST is a valuable lesson, and especially with one where sisters are at odds. Had I had this book at 10 years old, it would have been an encouragement to me- not only that it’s ok to be at odds with your sisters, (but to always come back together in the end) but also that it’s very ok to love reading, exploring, and being a spunky individual that doesn’t fit into the box society makes for young girls.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Kristin Johnson

    I've already recommended this book to friends -- yes, it's one of those books you want to tell people to read right away! Quick read: ghost story, historical novel, sibling rivalry. I highly recommend Long Lost if you want a ghoulish story that will keep you reading until you can't keep your eyes open anymore. It's not just a good read; it's a GREAT read. I've already recommended this book to friends -- yes, it's one of those books you want to tell people to read right away! Quick read: ghost story, historical novel, sibling rivalry. I highly recommend Long Lost if you want a ghoulish story that will keep you reading until you can't keep your eyes open anymore. It's not just a good read; it's a GREAT read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    D.D. Prairie

    This review is on the advance copy of an unpublished work I received through NetGalley. Long Lost by Jaqueline West is due for release May 11th, 2021. TL;DR - Highly recommended to bookworms and lovers of ghosts and unsolved mysteries everywhere. I have written and re-written this review several times. Everything I say seems like a discredit to what I truly experienced reading this book. There’s something simply divine about being a girl reading a book about a girl reading a book. The story-within This review is on the advance copy of an unpublished work I received through NetGalley. Long Lost by Jaqueline West is due for release May 11th, 2021. TL;DR - Highly recommended to bookworms and lovers of ghosts and unsolved mysteries everywhere. I have written and re-written this review several times. Everything I say seems like a discredit to what I truly experienced reading this book. There’s something simply divine about being a girl reading a book about a girl reading a book. The story-within-a-story element of Long Lost by Jacqueline West brought me back to my childhood, hiding in a closet with A Never-ending Story, Narnia, Alice in Wonderland, a Wrinkle in Time, ect… I am certain Long Lost would rank among these as one of my favourites. I got cozy and devoured these pages. They took me to another place and time, where anything could happen. Fiona Crane is a young girl whose family just moved to a mysterious old town in Massachusetts. It was a practical move; her parents are closer to work and her perfect Olympic-skater-hopeful sister, Arden, is only a fifteen minute drive away from where she goes to practice. It worked out well for everyone. Everyone except Fiona. Her life and friends are now miles away, and all anyone seems to care about is her older sister. Unwilling to while away the hours of the day alone at their creepy old house or watch her sister’s practice from the benches, Fiona ventures into the strange old town library. There she encounters unwelcoming residents, a librarian who is keeping a secret, a strange little boy, and a mysterious old book… a book that isn’t supposed to be there. You might notice I keep using the adjective “old”. And that’s on purpose. Everything about the stage upon which Long Lost is set is old. Centuries old. Old books, old town, old library–all of it covered in layers of dust, moss, legends, and deception. If that doesn’t thrill you, you miiiight not be an avid bookworm 😉 I didn’t know much about Long Lost going in. I didn’t read the blurb or even know the genre. It was that stunning cover that drew me in. Not every book lives up to what its cover promises, but believe me, Long Lost certainly did. West’s writing is fantastic. I’ve not read her previous works, but I was not surprised to find that this isn’t her debut. She handles words like a master artist, invoking all the right sensations to put me right in the shoes of her protagonist. One moment I was cuddled up next to Fiona on the Turkish rugs of the library, the sun warming my back and the smell of musty aged pages in my nostrils, the next I was racing through the cool damp forest with the characters of the book she was reading. Pearl and Hazel. The “sisters who always did everything together. Until one of them disappears.” I was enthralled. I got goosebumps as the mystery played out. Fiona’s side of the story was every bit as mysterious and compelling as the sisters’. I never skipped ahead to read one because I was bored of the other. The flow was masterful. Fiona was easy for me to relate to–even though she’s the youngest of two and I’m the eldest of ten children. But she’s a bookworm, and I think, deep down, all bookworms can find solidarity based on that point alone. A subtle detail I think that parents of children of colour may appreciate when considering this book is that Fiona and her sister are only ever described as having dark hair and brown eyes. Some characters Fiona encounters are specifically described as white. I think these two little details may help readers envision Fiona as a girl of colour, and she may be more relatable to them in that way as well. I still wonder about the librarian character, what her connection really is and what she really knows. Being a librarian myself, my only complaint is that element did not seem fully resolved by the end, and maybe that was done on purpose. Some authors like to leave the stories of side characters open-ended so that they can be explored in other stories. Again, I haven’t read West’s other works (yet!) to know if that is the case here. All in all, this is a book for book-lovers, and it does not disappoint. Highly recommended, especially to those who enjoy ghosts, paranormal activity, mysteries, and, at it’s heart, a story about sisters who might not always get along, but at the end of the day are each others’ closest confidants. What did you think of Long Lost? I'd love to discuss on my blog: http://whitemeadowbooks.com/long-lost...

  19. 4 out of 5

    Katrina Forest

    Long Lost tells two parallel stories about two pairs of sisters. Fiona and Arden live in the modern world, and the family has just moved to a new town in the interest of furthering Arden’s promising skating career. Hazel and Pearl live in the world of a strange book called The Lost Ones. Fiona finds the book in the library on one of the many days the rest of the family is occupied with Arden’s practices. Long Lost is almost equally divided between the two stories, and I confess, I was skeptical Long Lost tells two parallel stories about two pairs of sisters. Fiona and Arden live in the modern world, and the family has just moved to a new town in the interest of furthering Arden’s promising skating career. Hazel and Pearl live in the world of a strange book called The Lost Ones. Fiona finds the book in the library on one of the many days the rest of the family is occupied with Arden’s practices. Long Lost is almost equally divided between the two stories, and I confess, I was skeptical the format would work at first. It’s hard enough to ground the reader in one world and build up empathy for one set of characters. It’s even more difficult to do it twice. But Long Lost does so with incredible effortlessness. There are obvious parallels between the two stories; both of them revolve around a younger sister who constantly feels like she’s living in the shadow of the older one. But as Hazel and Pearl’s tale gets darker and darker, the animosity builds between Arden and Fiona. Curiosity grows to escapism and obsession, and for a decent chunk of the book, Fiona’s main goal revolves around getting hold of the mysterious library book, which she never seems to be able to keep in her hands long enough to read to the end. And I found myself right there with Fiona, begging her to find a way back to the library to read more (Fiona’s inability to get a library card to take the book out by normal means is a quest unto itself). When an author tells you they’ve got a fascinating story to tell, my first instinct is a skeptical, “Oh, really? It’s that good?” By building up Fiona’s obsession with getting to the end of The Lost Ones, Ms. West hypes up the story within a story with an incredible amount of confidence. And that story delivers. Fiona is such a sympathetic character, flawed yet understandably so, with a fierce determination to drive her own story even when the adults are doing everything to stop her. Her sister Arden is a wonderfully developed character in her own right–not the entitled golden child but a complex girl who both wants her sister involved in her passions and wants to apologize for monopolizing their parents’ attention. Long Lost captures some complicated and heartfelt relationships while at the same time delivering an eerie supernatural story that will stay in readers’ memories long after the last chapter ends. Feel free to check out more of my reviews at UrbanFantasyMagazine.com

  20. 5 out of 5

    indigo (little dove) {fallen angel}

    rating: five out of five stars! i would give it a million if i could long lost is a beautifully written book about a pair of sisters, an old town, old secrets, and a book that doesn't exist. this book explores sibling relationships in such a beautiful way that it brought tears to my eyes at multiple points throughout the book, because that was me. it was my siblings, and our messy, real relationships. the ending was cathartic, and perfect for the novel; i think this is one of my new favorite book rating: five out of five stars! i would give it a million if i could long lost is a beautifully written book about a pair of sisters, an old town, old secrets, and a book that doesn't exist. this book explores sibling relationships in such a beautiful way that it brought tears to my eyes at multiple points throughout the book, because that was me. it was my siblings, and our messy, real relationships. the ending was cathartic, and perfect for the novel; i think this is one of my new favorite books. as always, miss jacqueline's writing style is amazing. her prose is full of rich descriptions that transport the reader straight into the small town of lost lake. i never felt that the story was too slow, or flat, or boring; my one complaint is i wish it was longer! as soon as my copy arrived in the mail, i wolfed it down in under four hours. it felt like four minutes. i've loved jacqueline's writing style since i read her books of elsewhere series, then read dreamers often lie. (i have yet to read the collectors and last things! shhhhh.) the dialogue moved smoothly, and the vivid descriptions were full of color and texture and feeling. and the best part of all? there's a story within the story. i've only seen it done a handful of times, and pulled off flawlessly even fewer times. it's not easy; i've been trying to write a book with a story in it as well for the past few months, and it's hard. it's refreshing to see it done so well, and integrated so deeply within the book. normally, i'm not one for middle grade; i'm almost twenty years old, and am reading and writing mostly young adult these days. this book was a pleasant surprise; of course, i knew i was going to love it, seeing as miss jacqueline is a wonderful writer and i'm obsessed with her style of writing, but i wasn't expecting to love long lost this much. excuse me while i go shove it in the faces of all of my friends and family.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Miriam

    Do you like ghost stories? You’ll love this one! Jacqueline West’s “Long Lost” is perfect for a lazy summer afternoon. Fiona, the book lover, finds the local library which is in a mansion donated by a long-dead heiress. Tucked away in the library is a green book with no title and no call number. Fiona, along with the reader, dives into the book about a missing girl, The Searcher, and a terrible secret. Fiona doesn’t finish the book. Darn it, she needs a library card. It won’t surprise you that F Do you like ghost stories? You’ll love this one! Jacqueline West’s “Long Lost” is perfect for a lazy summer afternoon. Fiona, the book lover, finds the local library which is in a mansion donated by a long-dead heiress. Tucked away in the library is a green book with no title and no call number. Fiona, along with the reader, dives into the book about a missing girl, The Searcher, and a terrible secret. Fiona doesn’t finish the book. Darn it, she needs a library card. It won’t surprise you that Fiona hides the book when she has to go home. When she returns next day, the book is missing. No wait, the librarian has it. Most strange. Fiona is haunted by the book which keeps appearing and disappearing, by the story, and by ghosts. Oh My! You’ll have to read the rest of the book to find out what’s happening. Is Fiona seeing ghosts? Is The Searcher real? And how can Fiona set things back to normal. “Long Lost” by Jacqueline West grabs you from the first few pages. You get to read the story in the mysterious book along with Fiona. Best of all, you get to untangle the tale about ghosts and the missing sister. I loved that Jacqueline West provides the text of the book that Fiona reads. It provides the second story / timeline which is creative and seamless, especially for the 8-12 year-old audience. Thanks to the BookLoft of German Village (Columbus, OH) http://www.bookloft.com for an ARC to read and review.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joe Kessler

    This middle-grade ghost story is not particularly spooky, perhaps because the overtly paranormal stuff doesn't really start until midway through. Mostly, the eleven-year-old protagonist is chafing at her family's recent move (to benefit her older sister's prospective Olympic skating career) and getting hooked on a mysterious library book that isn't listed in the database and keeps vanishing from wherever she puts it down. Luckily, the personal dynamics are pretty engaging on their own, and autho This middle-grade ghost story is not particularly spooky, perhaps because the overtly paranormal stuff doesn't really start until midway through. Mostly, the eleven-year-old protagonist is chafing at her family's recent move (to benefit her older sister's prospective Olympic skating career) and getting hooked on a mysterious library book that isn't listed in the database and keeps vanishing from wherever she puts it down. Luckily, the personal dynamics are pretty engaging on their own, and author Jacqueline West does a fine job making each girl's grievances with the other seem reasonable and sympathetic. Still, the unfolding plot never quite kicks into the higher gear that I want from it, and I think either more spirits or fewer might have strengthened the text by giving it a clearer direction. The nested novel excerpts also aren't as gripping as they could have been, which makes it harder to believe that the heroine would become so obsessed with finding the lost ending and the real local history behind it. Ultimately there's not a whole lot that this title does wrong, just a number of cases where it seems to exhibit varying degrees of untapped potential. Find me on Patreon | Goodreads | Blog | Twitter

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rachael

    I received an ARC of this book through NetGalley for review purposes. This was a fantastic read. I burned through it in a day. It hits all the right notes for me: a mystery in the past with elements of a ghost story. When Fiona is forced to move to meet the demands of her sister’s competitive skating practices, she ends up spending quite a bit of time in the library to avoid said practices. It’s there that she finds a small, unlabeled book titled The Lost One. She reads this fictional story abou I received an ARC of this book through NetGalley for review purposes. This was a fantastic read. I burned through it in a day. It hits all the right notes for me: a mystery in the past with elements of a ghost story. When Fiona is forced to move to meet the demands of her sister’s competitive skating practices, she ends up spending quite a bit of time in the library to avoid said practices. It’s there that she finds a small, unlabeled book titled The Lost One. She reads this fictional story about two sisters named Hazel and Pearl who did everything together, until they didn’t. The book within a book is wonderfully atmospheric and had me in the edge of my seat waiting for the other shoe to drop. There was just enough of a supernatural element to keep me guessing about what was real and what wasn’t. This is pretty scary in parts, so I’m not sure if the 8-12 rating would be 100% correct. I teach fourth grade and could imagine some of my students would be pretty scared, particularly by some of the earlier parts. This may be more of a 10-14.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Ab

    This book took me right back to being 10-14 years old, looking through my library's YA shelf for something spooky to read (but not TOO spooky), that would consume my next several days and nights. This book was middle-grade-spooky-GOLD. It was SO good! It provides the angst of sibling rivalry and "you're the favorite!" with moving to a new town. Enter, the Library, which is inside of an old mansion donated to the town by a woman who lost her sister when they were children. Enter, GHOSTS. Yes, thi This book took me right back to being 10-14 years old, looking through my library's YA shelf for something spooky to read (but not TOO spooky), that would consume my next several days and nights. This book was middle-grade-spooky-GOLD. It was SO good! It provides the angst of sibling rivalry and "you're the favorite!" with moving to a new town. Enter, the Library, which is inside of an old mansion donated to the town by a woman who lost her sister when they were children. Enter, GHOSTS. Yes, this book hit all the right spots, perfect for any kid who loves to read, loves spooky tales, loves libraries and books, and can relate to the strife of being a sibling. I came to this book because of the "If you like Katherine Arden's 'Small Spaces,' then you'll love this" blurb, and I was not disappointed. This book is not quite as scary as Arden's awesome spooky books can be, but it still hits the spot just right. Also, the cover is brilliant!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kristi Lawrence

    Great read. The mystery sucked me in to finish this book in just a couple days. First of all the cover is gorgeous. I won’t go into detail of the plot and spoil it for you. I didn’t know anything about this book or author aside from the brief description from the publisher and I think that helps when you go into it with no expectations. Several points in the story truly surprised me which says a lot for a middle grade book that are often predictable reading as an adult. I loved reading the book Great read. The mystery sucked me in to finish this book in just a couple days. First of all the cover is gorgeous. I won’t go into detail of the plot and spoil it for you. I didn’t know anything about this book or author aside from the brief description from the publisher and I think that helps when you go into it with no expectations. Several points in the story truly surprised me which says a lot for a middle grade book that are often predictable reading as an adult. I loved reading the book within the book and got so into it that I almost forgot about the present day storyline. It was hard to connect with the relationship between Fiona and Arden for me but that’s probably since I am not the intended audience. I am curious to see what my kids think once they read it too. Supernatural elements are not usually my kind of thing but this is the exception with the historical mystery aspect. Good pacing of the clues and twists along the way really kept you invested. What started out as a old mysterious town turned into more of a ghost story. I may not have picked it up had I known that an would have missed out. I mean what avid reader doesn’t love a story about libraries and books, Thanks to the publisher and Netgalley for the ARC.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

    Thank you to NetGalley and Greenwillow Books for providing me an e-arc of this book in exchange for an honest review I LOVED Long Lost. It was exciting and fast paced. It had just the right amount of creepiness and suspense to keep me reading long past when I had planned to stop for the night. While this is a novel geared toward middle grade readers it is so well written and the characters are so relatable that I would recommend it to anyone. The resolution—not of the ghost story, I won’t mention Thank you to NetGalley and Greenwillow Books for providing me an e-arc of this book in exchange for an honest review I LOVED Long Lost. It was exciting and fast paced. It had just the right amount of creepiness and suspense to keep me reading long past when I had planned to stop for the night. While this is a novel geared toward middle grade readers it is so well written and the characters are so relatable that I would recommend it to anyone. The resolution—not of the ghost story, I won’t mention that and give anything away—but of the family difficulties was sweet and well crafted. This would be a great book for anyone who feels overshadowed in their family as in the end our protagonist gets a look at her sister’s life from her point of view and realizes it isn’t all coming up roses for her either and the sisters pull together in the end. But really, what’s not to love about a creepy library, a half-written book, and a mysterious old town? This book is worth the read.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Harrison

    4.5 Stars Long Lost is a tale of sisters — two sets from two time periods. And while their circumstances are different, their lives parallel each other in multiple ways. These familial connections are at the heart of this novel, influencing each of the characters’ choices. Equally important is the mystery Fiona stumbles upon. The novel she discovers is dark and atmospheric. And as that world bleeds into the “real” one, Long Lost becomes a page-turner. I often recommend Jacqueline West’s Books of E 4.5 Stars Long Lost is a tale of sisters — two sets from two time periods. And while their circumstances are different, their lives parallel each other in multiple ways. These familial connections are at the heart of this novel, influencing each of the characters’ choices. Equally important is the mystery Fiona stumbles upon. The novel she discovers is dark and atmospheric. And as that world bleeds into the “real” one, Long Lost becomes a page-turner. I often recommend Jacqueline West’s Books of Elsewhere series, which follows a girl who travels into paintings. Though those books and Long Lost have different subjects, they both give off that ghost-story tingle that middle-readers love. Long Lost is a fast-moving read that never feels forced or too convenient. There are enough twists to keep even the best sleuths entertained. It should appeal to a large cross section of readers.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    West's new adventure has something for everyone: mystery, suspense, friendship, sisterhood, jealousy, ice skating and libraries. Fiona has to move to a small town that's a lot closer to her sister's ice skating competitions, forcing her to leave her friends and causing resentment. When a trip to the library results in the find of a very unusual book, Fiona finds herself embedded in a local mystery and making a new friend even as she's talking to ghosts and running from the eerie creature of loca West's new adventure has something for everyone: mystery, suspense, friendship, sisterhood, jealousy, ice skating and libraries. Fiona has to move to a small town that's a lot closer to her sister's ice skating competitions, forcing her to leave her friends and causing resentment. When a trip to the library results in the find of a very unusual book, Fiona finds herself embedded in a local mystery and making a new friend even as she's talking to ghosts and running from the eerie creature of local legend, the Searcher. The first half of the book seems like pretty standard fare and requires a lot of set up, as there are three sets of sisters that readers have to keep straight, but the second half ramps up the action and West adds a few interesting twists. Young readers will keep turning pages past their bedtimes with this one. Review from e-galley.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Connie Anderson

    First, the cover is mesmerizing -- and the story is the same. I kept putting off other tasks to read just a little bit more. And before I knew it, I had read through to the end. The main character, Fiona, is so sympathetic. And the plotline with her sister, Arden, is realistic and cathartic--if you've ever grown up with a sibling. I really enjoyed the atmospheric town, creepy old house/library and the mystery of what had happened to two other sisters a long time ago. I couldn't foresee how it wo First, the cover is mesmerizing -- and the story is the same. I kept putting off other tasks to read just a little bit more. And before I knew it, I had read through to the end. The main character, Fiona, is so sympathetic. And the plotline with her sister, Arden, is realistic and cathartic--if you've ever grown up with a sibling. I really enjoyed the atmospheric town, creepy old house/library and the mystery of what had happened to two other sisters a long time ago. I couldn't foresee how it would all end, and I love that kind of book. The twists and turns were great! And when I got to the last page, I'm happy to say it was a highly satisfying ending. I recommend this book if your middle-grade reader likes mysteries and spooky--but not too spooky--stories, along with beautiful writing.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Barfield

    4* Wow. What a delightfully creepy read. This story kept me hooked and wondering what would happen next. I was wonderfully spooked.. After Fiona is forced to move to a new town for her older sister's skating Fiona is resentful. Everything is always all about Arden. Fiona finds a mysterious book while exploring the library and is quickly entranced by the story within. But no one has ever heard if the book, it is not in the library system, in fact, the book has never been published at all. When Fio 4* Wow. What a delightfully creepy read. This story kept me hooked and wondering what would happen next. I was wonderfully spooked.. After Fiona is forced to move to a new town for her older sister's skating Fiona is resentful. Everything is always all about Arden. Fiona finds a mysterious book while exploring the library and is quickly entranced by the story within. But no one has ever heard if the book, it is not in the library system, in fact, the book has never been published at all. When Fiona finds parallels between her new town and the mysterious book, her curiosity drives her deeper into discovering what really happened all those years ago. Will Fiona be able to solve the mystery and reconnect with her sister, or will the dreaded Searcher take her away as well? This book was provided to me through NetGalley in exchange for my review. All opinions stated are completely my own.

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