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The Apocalypse Seven

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This is the way the world ends. Not with a bang, but a whatever. The whateverpocalypse. That’s what Touré, a twenty-something Cambridge coder, calls it after waking up one morning to find himself seemingly the only person left in the city. Once he finds Robbie and Carol, two equally disoriented Harvard freshmen, he realizes he isn’t alone, but the name sticks: Whateverpocal This is the way the world ends. Not with a bang, but a whatever. The whateverpocalypse. That’s what Touré, a twenty-something Cambridge coder, calls it after waking up one morning to find himself seemingly the only person left in the city. Once he finds Robbie and Carol, two equally disoriented Harvard freshmen, he realizes he isn’t alone, but the name sticks: Whateverpocalypse. But it doesn’t explain where everyone went. It doesn’t explain how the city became overgrown with vegetation in the space of a night. Or how wild animals with no fear of humans came to roam the streets. Add freakish weather to the mix, swings of temperature that spawn tornadoes one minute and snowstorms the next, and it seems things can’t get much weirder. Yet even as a handful of new survivors appear—Paul, a preacher as quick with a gun as a Bible verse; Win, a young professional with a horse; Bethany, a thirteen-year-old juvenile delinquent; and Ananda, an MIT astrophysics adjunct—life in Cambridge, Massachusetts gets stranger and stranger. The self-styled Apocalypse Seven are tired of questions with no answers. Tired of being hunted by things seen and unseen. Now, armed with curiosity, desperation, a shotgun, and a bow, they become the hunters. And that’s when things truly get weird.  


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This is the way the world ends. Not with a bang, but a whatever. The whateverpocalypse. That’s what Touré, a twenty-something Cambridge coder, calls it after waking up one morning to find himself seemingly the only person left in the city. Once he finds Robbie and Carol, two equally disoriented Harvard freshmen, he realizes he isn’t alone, but the name sticks: Whateverpocal This is the way the world ends. Not with a bang, but a whatever. The whateverpocalypse. That’s what Touré, a twenty-something Cambridge coder, calls it after waking up one morning to find himself seemingly the only person left in the city. Once he finds Robbie and Carol, two equally disoriented Harvard freshmen, he realizes he isn’t alone, but the name sticks: Whateverpocalypse. But it doesn’t explain where everyone went. It doesn’t explain how the city became overgrown with vegetation in the space of a night. Or how wild animals with no fear of humans came to roam the streets. Add freakish weather to the mix, swings of temperature that spawn tornadoes one minute and snowstorms the next, and it seems things can’t get much weirder. Yet even as a handful of new survivors appear—Paul, a preacher as quick with a gun as a Bible verse; Win, a young professional with a horse; Bethany, a thirteen-year-old juvenile delinquent; and Ananda, an MIT astrophysics adjunct—life in Cambridge, Massachusetts gets stranger and stranger. The self-styled Apocalypse Seven are tired of questions with no answers. Tired of being hunted by things seen and unseen. Now, armed with curiosity, desperation, a shotgun, and a bow, they become the hunters. And that’s when things truly get weird.  

30 review for The Apocalypse Seven

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nilufer Ozmekik

    Wanderers meets Stand and Revolution series vibes. It’s not too close definition of this quiet mind spiraling, grey cell fryer, thought balloons popper, teeth gritting, nerve bending novel but at least it is a start! Seven strangers wake up in different places, finding out the earth they were living is deserted, overgrown with wild life. Pigs, wolves chase them at the night. The electricity failure seems like permanent malfunctioning. A college student Robbie finds himself at another person’s d Wanderers meets Stand and Revolution series vibes. It’s not too close definition of this quiet mind spiraling, grey cell fryer, thought balloons popper, teeth gritting, nerve bending novel but at least it is a start! Seven strangers wake up in different places, finding out the earth they were living is deserted, overgrown with wild life. Pigs, wolves chase them at the night. The electricity failure seems like permanent malfunctioning. A college student Robbie finds himself at another person’s dorm room ( the room number is right but he finds other person’s clothes at the drawers) and only thing he cares is not getting late to his class! What kind of drinks he had at party? But he wakes up to a different world! The dorms look different! The vegetation, the buildings, even the air he breathes is different and only person he finds a young Chinese blind woman who is agitated because her guidance dog is missing! Her name is Carol and she has no idea what the hell is happening to them! Why the streets are isolated? Why there are more animals touring around? A geek boy on his bike stops at the last minute not to hit Robin and he congratulated them for missing the apocalypse just like he did last night. His name is Toure and last thing he remembers he passed out in front of his computer when he was coding. And the rest of gang includes Bethany, 14 years old girl who is really good at opening the locks, Paul: a convicted man who becomes preacher in his early 50’s, Ananda: a smart, middle aged, scientist and Win: a badass farmer girl who is better arrowing skills than Oliver Queen! You keep asking yourself: what the hell happened to them? Are they denying their situation and they are like Bruce Willis acting like curing a young boy till they understand they are on the ghosts the boy can see? Did somebody kidnap them? Or are they living in parallel universe? Are they aliens? Is this really end of the world? And you keep thinking why they are chosen ones! Instead of badass Win and some street smart knowledge of Paul, none of them have surviving skills. But that must be something they are in common, what makes them so special! My brain is on fire! Too many conspiracy theories exhausted the hell of me. I partially find some answers but the conclusion was unexpected! Did I like it? Yes! The ending was well-served and played! And at least three characters became my favorites! Geek boy Toure was my number one because he was the only one having so much fun about the idea of apocalypse and without him: this book couldn’t be one of my favorite sci-fi novel without his existence! And badass, intestine carver, horse rider Win carries her big girl pants so stylishly! Let’s not forget Bethany is quite genius girl is another badass teenager who can break into the places, find resources to survive, fire guns like she’s related with Dirty Harry but she is still lost, emotional kid who still tries to understand what they are dealing with and interestingly she’s closer to find answers! This is well written, riveting, entertaining and surprising survival, sci-fi, apocalyptic story with remarkable characterization which deserves my full five stars ( and the stars of the universe where those 7 last standing survivors live! ) Special thanks to NetGalley and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt/John Joseph Adams/ Mariner Books for sharing this digital reviewer copy with me in exchange my honest thoughts.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Karen’s Library

    Well that was... Interesting. This was a kind of Wanderers meets a reverse The Leftovers. Carol and Robbie wake up in their dorm rooms at Harvard to discover that everyone, and I mean EVERYONE, is gone. After a little exploration, they also realize that there are wild animals everywhere and that all of Harvard is extremely overgrown with vegetation. They run into Toure, and then Bethany, and come to grips that they're in the middle of an apocalypse, or whateverpocalypse as Toure names it. The focu Well that was... Interesting. This was a kind of Wanderers meets a reverse The Leftovers. Carol and Robbie wake up in their dorm rooms at Harvard to discover that everyone, and I mean EVERYONE, is gone. After a little exploration, they also realize that there are wild animals everywhere and that all of Harvard is extremely overgrown with vegetation. They run into Toure, and then Bethany, and come to grips that they're in the middle of an apocalypse, or whateverpocalypse as Toure names it. The focus on survival is next as there's no food on the shelves except some kind of tasteless blocks of packaged energy bars. The books switches POV to Paul and Win, both in the country side who also experience their own versions of waking up to no one left in their worlds. Ananda is the seventh and she's a scientist at Harvard who helps to unravel some of the truth of their new world. I love apocalyptic tales. The Apocalypse Seven was exactly what I love about these types of stories. This one had a unique twist and seven interesting characters, none of which drove me crazy and I liked them all. And there are some extremely strange twists as the answers are revealed. This was a fun apocalyptic story and I really enjoyed the read. *Thanks so much to John Joseph Adams/Mariner Books and NetGalley for the advance copy!*

  3. 5 out of 5

    Celia McMahon

    I won this e-arc in a Goodreads giveaway and I dropped all reads to start. I regret nothing. Give me a bunch of people surviving an apocalypse and I will buy your book. I don't care what the plot is, if the cover blows, or if it's full of flat characters, deus ex machina's or whatever. I. Will. Read. It. Imagine waking up and finding out the entire planet has vanished replaced with wild animals, crumbling buildings, overgrown vegetation, and zero electronics. Well, that sounds like a problem. We I won this e-arc in a Goodreads giveaway and I dropped all reads to start. I regret nothing. Give me a bunch of people surviving an apocalypse and I will buy your book. I don't care what the plot is, if the cover blows, or if it's full of flat characters, deus ex machina's or whatever. I. Will. Read. It. Imagine waking up and finding out the entire planet has vanished replaced with wild animals, crumbling buildings, overgrown vegetation, and zero electronics. Well, that sounds like a problem. We start the book from Robbie's perspective. He wakes up in his dorm room after a night of partying to find everyone gone, save for a blind woman named Carol who seems to have lost her seeing-eye dog. Together they navigate Cambridge, MA, looking for shelter from massive coywolves and locating food, water, and survivors. I need to pause here and tell you how terrifying the apocalypse would be if you were blind. I actually tried imagining it and it only added to my anxiety. So Robbie and Carol run into a coder named Toure' and a 13-year-old girl named Bethany. Soon after, they add Win, a seriously fierce farmer and hunter, Ananda, a scientist, and Paul, a nondenominational preacher. While they battle the rapid wildlife, injuries, starvation, and unpredictable weather, they soon put the pieces together as to why they were the only survivors. Life was inconvenient to me. Why is eating and sleeping more important than continuing this book? This was like The Stand, but without the killer virus but with shimmering fireflies that take the shape of humans and maybe could be good and maybe could be bad? Each character has their own POV and their own issues with coming to grips with what's going on. Did I mention this book is set in my hometown??? Enough about the story and more about the writing. This is my first book by the author and I'm thinking that I should probably stack my kindle with the rest of his books because they're anything like this one, I'm going to be neglecting a lot of reality. The voice of this book is what kept me reading. Its humor and heart along with its horror are up there with the likes of King and Douglass themselves. Can we give a round of applause for Elton, the horse, though? He may have stolen the show. And my heart. This review is EVERYWHERE because I literally just finished the book and could not wait to write down my thoughts. I loved it. I loved every second of it. The characters stood out as individuals and the humor was balanced perfectly with the dread and confusion of this quiet apocalypse. This book is smart, funny, and downright terrifying. My only gripe was that it felt rushed at the end and I was HOOOOOOPING for a cliffhanger or an open-ended ending to lead us into a book two, but alas. There's still hope though, right? Do authors read their reviews? O_O Gene, are you reading this right now? Book two. Stat. FIVE STARS FROM YO GIRL

  4. 4 out of 5

    Indieflower

    I enjoyed this one, it was intriguing, with a good sense of place. The author made it easy to visualise the city devoid of people and over run with wildlife. I was a little worried it would be too YA but I found liked the characters and their interaction with each other, and I enjoyed the flashes of humour. At times I got frustrated at their poor attempts at getting organised, and failure to discuss anything properly, aaargh just talk to each other already! 🤦‍♀️ The book is something of a slow b I enjoyed this one, it was intriguing, with a good sense of place. The author made it easy to visualise the city devoid of people and over run with wildlife. I was a little worried it would be too YA but I found liked the characters and their interaction with each other, and I enjoyed the flashes of humour. At times I got frustrated at their poor attempts at getting organised, and failure to discuss anything properly, aaargh just talk to each other already! 🤦‍♀️ The book is something of a slow burn most of the way but then the ending felt a bit too rushed, almost as if there was something missing. I would definitely like to read more from this author, 3.5 stars rounded up (the extra half a star is for Elton the horse, my favourite character, I loved him ☺️). Thanks Netgalley.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Misty

    I really enjoyed this book—from the diverse characters to the realistic dialogue and settings, everything was masterfully developed and seamlessly integrated into the story line. What most appealed to me, however, was the unexpected humor this author infused into many of the high stress scenarios. Unfortunately, it all fell apart when the author attempted to bring this one to its conclusion. I had a very difficult time wrapping my head around what actually transpired, and while I’m fairly sure I I really enjoyed this book—from the diverse characters to the realistic dialogue and settings, everything was masterfully developed and seamlessly integrated into the story line. What most appealed to me, however, was the unexpected humor this author infused into many of the high stress scenarios. Unfortunately, it all fell apart when the author attempted to bring this one to its conclusion. I had a very difficult time wrapping my head around what actually transpired, and while I’m fairly sure I got the gist, the details remain murky. It was a disappointment, at that point, on many levels, including the author’s tech-laden geek explanation as well as my own clearly subpar intellect. So a solid 4, bordering on a clean 5, immediately bore the brunt of my frustration, resulting in a 3.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Kelli Wilson

    Apocalypse 7: A Monotone Metronome. Flighty Almost too cheesy, but a bit too flat to allow for that.  Not sure the distinction matters, as both aren't ideal and I'd have probably felt the same disappointment either way. Lack of connection. Lack of drama. Lack of excitement. Not an ideal description when referring to a post apocalyptic fiction novel. There are apocalyptic dangers specific to extreme and unpredictable weather that occur outside of the 4 seasons the survivors have always known. A bliz Apocalypse 7: A Monotone Metronome. Flighty Almost too cheesy, but a bit too flat to allow for that.  Not sure the distinction matters, as both aren't ideal and I'd have probably felt the same disappointment either way. Lack of connection. Lack of drama. Lack of excitement. Not an ideal description when referring to a post apocalyptic fiction novel. There are apocalyptic dangers specific to extreme and unpredictable weather that occur outside of the 4 seasons the survivors have always known. A blizzard one day, a tornado days later. In addition, the animal population has expanded and taken over all previously human occupied areas. Including the species that are the biggest threat to humans, bears, wolves, cougars, etc. That sounds like it should be exciting, right? However, it ultimately... lacked soul? Now that sounds super cheesy. But it's true. There's no uptick in the heart beat. I had high hopes for this one. So realistically, I may feel more let down as a result. I'm not sure if it was meant to be a probing philosophical approach about humanity and whether they will try to survive when faced with the most impossible circumstances. Or if it was about how will they choose to do that; will they give up or hold onto their principles prior to the apocalypse? Will those who believe in God question their faith?  All these topics are somewhat involved. Unfortunately, I must stress they're only touched upon very lightly, and enclosed in a YA level. With the lightened approach, it lacked the influencing quality to make me really think on it. It was too weak an attempt to create a spark, and I mostly didn't bother putting any brain power towards it, as the book itself never bothered to push my brain. *Thank you to Gene Doucette for the advanced digital copy.

  7. 4 out of 5

    OutlawPoet

    Well, this was fun. Ever read a book and just know that the author would be a blast to talk to in real life? This is that book. The author has a wonderful sense of humor and humanity that just shines through on almost every page. The book definitely kept me guessing. Each time I thought I knew what was going on, I was quite wrong. No spoilers here. I’ll just say that I wasn’t quite all in on a later character to the book. Just didn’t love that one. But I still thought the author handled everything Well, this was fun. Ever read a book and just know that the author would be a blast to talk to in real life? This is that book. The author has a wonderful sense of humor and humanity that just shines through on almost every page. The book definitely kept me guessing. Each time I thought I knew what was going on, I was quite wrong. No spoilers here. I’ll just say that I wasn’t quite all in on a later character to the book. Just didn’t love that one. But I still thought the author handled everything well. As for the reason behind everything, I’ll just say that it had a surprising gravitas – surprising because, for a book about the apocalypse, most of the book is pretty lighthearted. I liked it. I’d definitely read the author again! *ARC via Net Galley

  8. 5 out of 5

    Candice Jarrett

    Unfortunately, this book was just not for me, and I had to DNF it. The premise sounded awesome, and I was really interested to meet the cast of characters… but the opening really dragged for me. My first red flag was beginning the story with a character waking up. It wasn’t a total dealbreaker because it does work extremely well on the rare occasion (ie. The Hunger Games). But here it didn’t. I understand why the author chose to begin with the character waking up in the context of this story, but Unfortunately, this book was just not for me, and I had to DNF it. The premise sounded awesome, and I was really interested to meet the cast of characters… but the opening really dragged for me. My first red flag was beginning the story with a character waking up. It wasn’t a total dealbreaker because it does work extremely well on the rare occasion (ie. The Hunger Games). But here it didn’t. I understand why the author chose to begin with the character waking up in the context of this story, but I feel like he chose the wrong character. If we woke up in Carol’s head, the emotional stakes would have been immediately through the roof. Escalating terror at not being able to find her seeing eye dog, not being able to find help, and being alone in a place she can’t identify. Then she’s calls out and finally has a stranger answer her… She doesn't know if he's the one who's taken her dog. She doesn't know if the man who answers her cries is a friend or foe. But she calls out to him because she's that desperate. That sounds heart pounding right? The potential was there… But instead, we woke up in the brain of a hung over freshman who drank way too much beer has us fretting for several pages about how he got home last night, whether or not he has slept in, if he’s going to be late for class, rifling through a drawer of clothes, and worrying about his body odor? I mean… there’s just no stakes there. I did know that there would be “waking up” in the beginning thanks to the description… but the characters should wake up to some action or emotional stakes. They shouldn't wake up to the mundane and shuffle around scratching their head. But I thought if I could just power through that opening, I’d make it to the action and everything would be well. Then FINALLY we get to the point where Carol’s having an emotional breakdown on the church steps, and the speeding bicycle comes hurdling a new character into our path! The action is building up! Something's going to happen! But then…. We cut to an info dump of that new character’s backstory. I took a breath. Ok. I can do this… I’ll just make it through this part and the exciting post-apocalyptic action will start. Things are moving along, the group is together…. But then… I’m supposed to believe that these super intelligent kids who got into Harvard would decide to go to their favorite restaurant instead of a grocery store? After they’ve seen churches, hotels, stores all vacant? Only after they arrive at the closed restaurant do they come to the conclusion that a chef wouldn’t be there to prepare their food? Did I read that right? Then… these Ivy League students who all aced their SATs seek drinking water at …. the river? In Boston? I’ve never been in any city where I’d drink the water from a river. By this point, I’m a little disgruntled as a reader. I skim forward to… The wolves! YES!!! The wolves and the wolf chase were great. I liked the exchange where he got into the super market and the new girl says she doesn’t think his friends are going to make it. Great build up of tension there. And the moment where the wolves are on the other side of the fence and Carol hears them sniffing the air… also great. That’s what I was waiting for. But by the time I finally got to it, I’d already had to skim big chunks of text and was exhausted with the story. So, again, great premise. There’s an enticing hook there. (Great cover art too!) And the story likely becomes riveting… but the beginning lost me before I was able to get there. Other reviewers really liked this book from what I can see - it’s got a lot of 4 and 5 stars already. So, I know I’m probably an outlier. Maybe I’d give this book another shot in the future, but for now, I’m going to shelve it. I received this book from NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Bandit

    Gene Doucette blew my mind with Unfiction some time ago. Difficult to go from there, once the bar is set that high. With this, now my third read by him, he definitely doesn’t disappoint, it’s no Unfiction, but it’s quite good. I’d read more of Doucette’s, but he’s got this penchant for series and I prefer standalones. This one seems to be a standalone, at least for now, but it can easily be serialized too. So anyway…that’s obviously why I selected to read it, the other reason being…hey, it’s apo Gene Doucette blew my mind with Unfiction some time ago. Difficult to go from there, once the bar is set that high. With this, now my third read by him, he definitely doesn’t disappoint, it’s no Unfiction, but it’s quite good. I’d read more of Doucette’s, but he’s got this penchant for series and I prefer standalones. This one seems to be a standalone, at least for now, but it can easily be serialized too. So anyway…that’s obviously why I selected to read it, the other reason being…hey, it’s apocalypse, perfectly appropriate for the worst election on US record ever. So…did Doucette’s tale of whateverpocalypse as the seven survivors of it come to call it distract enough from the ever disappointing and depressing news? Well, yeah, it kind of did. Doucette’s a very good writer, he does great descriptions, dynamic pacing and dialogues and likeable engaging characters, but his greatest asset is his wild originality and imagination. And so his stories go places other works in the genre just don’t get to. Although…this one for me was very reminiscent of Wayward Pines, but it was still very much a beast of its own. Apocalypse comes quietly in this story, people just wake up to it, wake up to a barely recognizable world grown wild in flora and fauna and strangely peopleless. Seven survivors of Beneton ad different races (this is not a mere PC nod, it’s logical to the plot as you’ll understand in the end) and of varied ages come to find themselves at the end of the world and must band together to survive it and find out the truth about how it all came to be. The truth takes quite a while to uncover, so for a long time you’re stumbling around as cluelessly as the seven, but in the end the scientist among them gets there. But even armed with the truth, the fight still isn’t quite fair or balanced, because whatever’s after them may not be a force that’s well meaning or even terrestrial. So it’s a survival story and a mystery with a pretty crazy plot twist in the end. And it works, on every level. Despite the abundance of young characters, it never gets dumbed down to YA levels, in fact the youth acquire themselves nicely and maturely in this brave new world they find and work well with the older of the seven, the scientist and the pastor. The depiction of the apocalyptic world they inhabit is vivid and stark, made me think of the World Without Us, which is a high compliment since that’s one of my all time favorite nonfiction (and apocalyptic) reads. The funny thing is that Doucette set the story right around where he lives, which just makes you appreciate how different the writer’s brains are wired, to jauntily and brutally fictionally annihilate their surroundings just for fun. And fun it is, oodles of fun. I really enjoyed this story, it was exciting, compelling, original, infused with just enough humorous aspects and wtf*ckery to prevent it from being opressingly bleak, this is the end of the world you don’t want to sleep through…unlike the titular apocalypse seven. Very good read. Recommended. Thanks Netgalley.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bookish Bullsh*t

    I haven't reviewed anything in weeks, and I'm out of form, but here goes nothing. I received an Arc from Netgalley and HMH in exchange for an honest review Personal rating- 6.5/10 The book starts with Robbie waking up. He's in some other person's dorm. Everything's a bit different somehow, the plants are overgrown, his phone isn't charged, and there aren't any people around on a usually busy street. Where did everyone go? wait is that a deer in the middle of the road? Carol, a blind person wakes I haven't reviewed anything in weeks, and I'm out of form, but here goes nothing. I received an Arc from Netgalley and HMH in exchange for an honest review Personal rating- 6.5/10 The book starts with Robbie waking up. He's in some other person's dorm. Everything's a bit different somehow, the plants are overgrown, his phone isn't charged, and there aren't any people around on a usually busy street. Where did everyone go? wait is that a deer in the middle of the road? Carol, a blind person wakes up without their support dog. Things aren't where they are supposed to be. Toure, Bethany, Win, Paul, Amanda. Everyone asks the same thing. Where did everyone go? Did they sleep through the apocalypse or something? These are the Apocalypse seven. Now that I'm done trying to sound professional, let's get back to my opinions, that's all my reviews are worth anyways. First things first, I feel like this is a plot-driven story even though I noticed a few attempts to make it character-driven. This is neither a pro nor a con for me. It's just something that I noticed. I'm gonna rant first and gush later, as usual. What I disliked- - The Opening: I'll be honest it just wasn't that good. It was very easy to put down for about the first 100 pages. I wasn't very invested in it. Someone on the reviews said it'd be more interesting if we woke up on Carol's perspective, and I agree. Ir would achieve further emotional investment from the audience. Oh well, missed opportunities I guess. - Ananda. No, I didn't have any problem with the character but I have problems with the character but the name itself offended me. I had a conversation with my other Bookish Desi friends, and we all agreed that Ananda is a masculine name. This name is used for a female character. We were NOT pleased. Please change it in the finished manuscript. - Paul. Yes, this time I do have a problem with the character. It Just seems that he never made any wrong decisions. I love that the other characters did make wrong decisions given the circumstances, or were just plain stupid. That made them human, Paul seems to have been written with a narrative bias and I found him very uninteresting. The one time he was "wrong" I immediately called it; I was right but I really wish I wasn't. He had an amazing foundation as a character tho. - The Rising Action. It builds to one climax and that's it. Don't get me wrong, I actually loved the climax and was laughing like a maniac, but that said- if I hadn't liked that climax and plot twist, that'd be it for me. It'd be a 1 star, no questions asked. Because there isn't; anything else worthwhile or a big enough sub-plot to keep me invested in liking it. To be absolutely honest, I did consider DNF-ing this many times, and I probably would've had I not owed a review. I'm done ranting, now onto the gushing. - Great tone. I really vibed with this on. The world-building is FANTASTIC! It captures the feeling of being alone in such a big world very well. Keeping the locations and setting concise was a brilliant move. The Setting was tough to navigate, but the World is so much bigger. You get this feeling when you're in a mountain peak, looking down upon the realms; or when you stargaze and you feel so small, and insignificant... so alone, within the vastness of the universe. - Character Growth: Apart from Paul (I didn't like how he was written) and Toure (I love to hate him because he's such an a**hole) but seeing that he got this much reaction out of me is saying something. I loved the other characters, Win is such a badass. I'm not gonna dwell too much on Character Arcs since I'm going for a spoiler-free review, but Bethany and Robbie's arc was so satisfying to complete. It was done really well. I loved Carol's internal fight to stay useful, I get that feeling sometimes and it was painful yet nice to see. I'd like to think of Robbie as the MC so IDK why the synopsis I read focuses on Toure. - The Diversity. IT MATTERS!! Aside from that Ananda hiccup, it was done well... I think. I don't speak for other cultures, and I don't specialize in sensitivity reading. But at its core, the representation is of the type where the characters just exist, and we love to see it. You don't get the "struggles of PoC in western society" narrative because there IS no society anymore, that's the point. There is a disability rep (Carol is blind), and an Lgbt rep (Bethany is bi/Gay), again this is not about their struggles as minorities. This is about the fundamental human experience of trying to survive and trying to make sense of the world around us. This curiosity of our existence transcends race. That said- PLEASE CHANGE ANANDA'S NAME!!!!! - The Ending: IT WAS SO GOOD! It was a bit abrupt but I liked it nonetheless. I was thinking that something was up, I have to say that the plot twist was a bit tamer than what I was theorizing but it was satisfying, and I'm happy with it. Ps. I'm categorizing it as new-adult because of the ages of protagonists. It's easily accessible to the YA audience. I think of it as a great intro to adult/NA. There is some violence and gore, I'd rate it 16+ but I'm not the best at this either so take this with a grain of salt, That's all I had to say about the book, here are my points I thought were noteworthy. Give it a go if you're interested in it. Thank you for reading my review this far. Happy reading!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

    DNF @ 13% I was admittedly quite curious about this one (in the beginning) but having given up the ghost at a mere 13%, that curiosity clearly died quite rapidly. The Apocalypse Seven opens from the POV of a college freshman who woke up confused as to where he was, thinking that he was late for class, and worrying about how he smelled because he fell asleep in yesterday’s clothes. The sympathy is not strong for this one. But there were subtle curiosities, like the fact that he couldn’t find any o DNF @ 13% I was admittedly quite curious about this one (in the beginning) but having given up the ghost at a mere 13%, that curiosity clearly died quite rapidly. The Apocalypse Seven opens from the POV of a college freshman who woke up confused as to where he was, thinking that he was late for class, and worrying about how he smelled because he fell asleep in yesterday’s clothes. The sympathy is not strong for this one. But there were subtle curiosities, like the fact that he couldn’t find any of his personal belongings in the room, but he was for sure in the dorm room he was assigned. The world outside his dorm has become overgrown with vegetation and animals roam freely, a far cry from the world that he fell asleep in just a few hours prior. The subtle curiosities kept popping up (the strange wolves, the breakfast place that was a completely different business, the lack of electronics, and more so, the complete lack of people) but everything else about this “whateverpocalypse” (a name given by one of the characters) was unfortunately too dry for my liking. This “whateverpocalypse” may very well have developed into a full-fledged story if I had actually given this one more of a chance, but unfortunately, I just felt, well, whatever about it. I received this book free from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    JasonA

    I'm still debating the rating on this one. It's somewhere between 3 and 4 stars, but not sure where I'm gonna end up on it. The first 2/3's of the book, I really liked. It was a little slow, but I still enjoyed the characters trying to figure out what was going on and how to survive. This part would probably be 4 stars, for me. The final third is where I get kind of iffy. We find out what caused the whateverpocalypse, but I'm still trying to figure out how I feel about it. Things get a little too I'm still debating the rating on this one. It's somewhere between 3 and 4 stars, but not sure where I'm gonna end up on it. The first 2/3's of the book, I really liked. It was a little slow, but I still enjoyed the characters trying to figure out what was going on and how to survive. This part would probably be 4 stars, for me. The final third is where I get kind of iffy. We find out what caused the whateverpocalypse, but I'm still trying to figure out how I feel about it. Things get a little too cheesy and some of it just feels too off from the original story for me. I'm pretty sure the whole book was supposed to be a soapbox lesson on the consequences of global warming and fossil fuel usage (not the cause of the whateverpocalypse, though). It didn't get too preachy, but there could have been better ways to do it and incorporate it into the story.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Wolf

    Thank you to Goodreads and the publisher -- I won this terrific book in a giveaway!! I found myself mumbling or exclaiming “WTF???” practically once a chapter, start to finish, in this incredibly entertaining and mind-blowing novel of the apocalypse. Or, as Touré puts it, the whateverpocalypse. Seven seemingly random strangers wake up to find that they’re alone in a world suddenly overrun by plant life and wild animals — in what was formerly an urban college town. At Harvard and at MIT, several ind Thank you to Goodreads and the publisher -- I won this terrific book in a giveaway!! I found myself mumbling or exclaiming “WTF???” practically once a chapter, start to finish, in this incredibly entertaining and mind-blowing novel of the apocalypse. Or, as Touré puts it, the whateverpocalypse. Seven seemingly random strangers wake up to find that they’re alone in a world suddenly overrun by plant life and wild animals — in what was formerly an urban college town. At Harvard and at MIT, several individuals wake up in confusion. Robbie wakes up in his dorm room bed, frantic that he overslept on the first day of freshman classes, only to discover that his technology doesn’t work, he has no idea what time it is, the clothes in the dresser drawers aren’t his, and there’s absolutely no one else around. Before long he meets fellow student Carol, a blind young woman unsuccessfully trying to locate her dog, and the two then meet free-spirited Toure. Meanwhile, MIT astrophysicist Ananda wakes up at her office desk, confused by why she’s wearing her “Monday clothes” on a Tuesday, teen-ager Bethany wakes up in her suburban family home to see the shrine her family has erected in her memory, pastor Paul leaves his isolated New Hampshire mountaintop chapel when he realizes he’s all alone, and tough-girl Win mounts a horse to head toward a city and try to find other people. They quickly realize that they’re the only people in the greater Boston area, and most likely in the world, but they have no idea why. How could all these trees and plants have grown so rapidly? Why are there deer and boar and wolves roaming and/or rampaging through the city streets? Survival is the first issue to address, and initially, Robbie, Toure, and Carol are in rough shape, with no practical skills between them. As they connect with the others and explore local resources, they form plans, raid local malls to stock up on tools and clothing, figure out which parts of campus are safe (and where they’re most likely to run into packs of slavering wolves), and generally start to squeak their way toward something like building a way of staying alive. The question remains, though: Why did they survive, and no one else did? What made them different? What actually happened to the human population of earth? Don’t look at me — I’m not giving a thing away! Hints and odd facts and anomalies come to light along the way, but it’s only in the last 20% or so that the characters start to arrive at some real answers. I gotta be honest — even having finished the book, I’m not sure I completely get it, but I think it’s more a question of my brain not being able to fully follow the WTF-ness of it all than it not making sense. There is definitely an answer — but it’s kind of bent my brain into a pretzel, and it’ll take me some time to untangle it all. There’s so much to love about The Apocalypse Seven. I’m often put off by books that focus on a group coming together, because many times the characters are introduced too quickly or in too large a chunk for them to really differentiate themselves as individuals. Not so in this book — each of the seven are special and memorable, with distinct personalities and backstories and abilities, and I really appreciated how well described they all are. I also really enjoyed the setting. Who would have thought that a college town like Cambridge would offer so many resources for hiding, finding survival gear, and making a safe(ish) long-term shelter? The use of the campuses and their resources is really ingenious, and I was charmed by the characters’ inventiveness. It’s also worth noting that this book — despite being about the near-total extinction of the human race — can be really, really funny. The characters are clever and the banter is crisp, and certain elements are just ridiculous enough to make me laugh out loud (or feel quietly charmed). I really, really want other people to read this book! First of all, it’s so enjoyable and mind-warpy, frightening in its own way — but really, how seriously dire can the end of the world feel when characters use words like “whateverpocalypse”? Beyond the terrific reading experience, I want people I know to read The Apocalypse Seven so someone can explain the ending to me and tell me if we understand it the same way!! Really and truly, though, The Apocalypse Seven is a terrific read, and I had a great time zipping my way through it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Will

    4 / 5 ✪ https://arefugefromlife.wordpress.com... When the world ended, it wasn’t with a bang. It was with more of a… blah. Thus passes the Whateverpocalypse—the end of the human race, where cities fall to ruin and the entire planet becomes overgrown. There seem to be no survivors, except those few that overslept the end of the world, awakening only after everything had already ended. Carol and Robbie are students at Harvard—both freshmen, they awaken to find their dorms deserted and Cambridge around 4 / 5 ✪ https://arefugefromlife.wordpress.com... When the world ended, it wasn’t with a bang. It was with more of a… blah. Thus passes the Whateverpocalypse—the end of the human race, where cities fall to ruin and the entire planet becomes overgrown. There seem to be no survivors, except those few that overslept the end of the world, awakening only after everything had already ended. Carol and Robbie are students at Harvard—both freshmen, they awaken to find their dorms deserted and Cambridge around them in ruin. While Carol had spent her last night in, Robbie had gone out drinking. Neither remembered the world ending, but Robbie didn’t even recall stumbling home. And while disoriented, he’s barely in the dark at all compared to Carol—as she’s blind and all. The two soon run across Touré—a twenty-something coder, and the only person excited by the prospect the end of the world presents. With him in tow, the group soon adds Bethany, a teen with a mysterious past and a helpful skillset (all of which suggesting a record). As they explore the ruins of Cambridge, the group soon discovers that the end of humanity is only the beginning of their poor luck. There’s also the lack of power, the packs of violent boars choking downtown, the freakish weather (including hailstorms, tornadoes, snowstorms and heat waves all in the same week), not to mention the horse-sized wolves. Elsewhere, the world is little better. Paul is a non-denominational preacher living in backwater Vermont. He awakens to the apocalypse on Monday but it takes the man til Sunday to notice anything wrong. Once he does, he discovers a voice on the radio—the last sign of human life he’s seen. Soon he sets off for Boston, eager to meet Ananda, a former MIT adjunct, who remains picking through the ruins of her former campus for clues. Also there’s Win—an olympic hopeful stranded in the countryside. All leads eventually point to Boston, where the Apocalypse Seven might eventually meet, if they can survive the Whateverpocalypse long enough to find one another. And even then, it’ll take all their combined effort to not only discover what ended the world, but to survive what comes next. I do love a good apocalypse now and then. This one does it all without any undead, too, which is impressive. I was getting major Last of Us vibes from this—not so much the story, but the world. Those stolen moments between the cutscenes where nothing’s actively trying to kill you. The decaying, overgrown cities. The wildlife just milling about. The quiet. For the most part, this was a quiet apocalypse. One that provided a good premise, and then just let the story unfurl until The 7 (my shorthand for the survivors) finished filling it in. I can’t say enough about how much I loved the story. It combines a physical sense of loss and deterioration with the struggles of its survivors. Carol is missing her seeing-eye dog. Everyone’s lost family. Some are away from home. None are in their comfort zone. Mental breakdowns co-mingle with physical hardships. Loss with hope. The mystery of what’s befallen the world brings them all together, focuses them on something other than just trying to survive (well, except maybe Touré). And throughout it all there’s an undercurrent of lively—sometimes silly, sometimes dark, always entertaining—humor. Lots of jokes seemingly off the cuff. In conversation. During emergencies. At the literal end of the world. It all goes together exceptionally well—which I loved. Despite this being the end of the world, it never seems all that hard to survive. I mean, there IS everything that’s trying to kill The 7 all the time, but otherwise. They’re helpfully stocked with Noot Bars—your lembas from LotR, grot from the Faithful and the Fallen, and a number of other things from other places. Noot is basically an foodstuff that never goes bad, has all the nutrients a body needs to live, and leaves something to be desired in the taste-department. So… basically an MRE. And since the young’uns are all stocked up, they’re not likely to starve to death. Win and Paul can hunt, but this is mostly glossed over shortly upon being introduced. Ananda’s nutrition is barely even addressed. I honestly would’ve expected a lot more survival from this story, but there’s comparatively little. It’s a tale more about the mystery, the strange happenings, and the atmosphere. And the end of the world atmosphere is strong. It kept reminding me of the Last of Us or the like: huge sprawling metropolises empty of people, overrun by animals, overgrown and haunting as hell—except with out all the zombies. No zombies. Just the end of the world, and whatever happened to cause it. I have to say, while I eventually called the ending, the big reveal was nowhere near done after one twist. There were a number of other details that made the whole thing worth it twice-over, even though I did pretty much guess the overarching mystery. And even if you wouldn’t read this for the mystery of what happened, it’s a well-written apocalypse tale with a tense, spooky atmosphere and wolves the size of horses—recommending it is pretty much a no-brainer. I would recommend skipping the epilogue. While it may provide a little closure, for me it raised more questions than it answered. And as I assume this is a standalone—you don’t need that in an ending. Everything was all well and truly wrapt up before—don’t ruin it. TL;DR The Apocalypse Seven is a thoroughly enjoyable post-apocalyptic science fiction dystopian set in a world teeming with life. Just empty of humanity. No undead, no super mutants, no robotic overlords. Just an overgrown world with desensitized wildlife and wolves the size of compact cars. And the mystery of how it got that way. Only seven survived (The 7) and they alone set out to solve this new world or die trying. Possessive of a tense, haunting atmosphere; a strong and immersive mystery; an all-too human cast complete with both strengths and weaknesses; and another twist even when you assume all’s been said and done—the Apocalypse Seven presents an excellent post-apocalyptic scifi and executes it just as well. While there’s comparatively little survival in terms of the Pincher-Martin-level I expected, the mystery and tension carries the story more than well enough. There’s little to hate about this one, and a lot to love.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    4 stars... I think. I'm struggling with this rating. The first 75% or so was right about 4.5 stars. Then it was almost like the editor stopped reading - there was a specific block of time that was very obviously missing. In fact, I went back twice to reread it because I thought I must have missed a scene or accidentally skipped ahead on my kindle. It was very strange. This might be an ARC thing. I hope it is. Up until that point, I was completely on the edge of my seat every step of the way. Aft 4 stars... I think. I'm struggling with this rating. The first 75% or so was right about 4.5 stars. Then it was almost like the editor stopped reading - there was a specific block of time that was very obviously missing. In fact, I went back twice to reread it because I thought I must have missed a scene or accidentally skipped ahead on my kindle. It was very strange. This might be an ARC thing. I hope it is. Up until that point, I was completely on the edge of my seat every step of the way. After that, I admittedly had a bad taste in my mouth for a while and it made me feel a little untrusting. Still, all in all I enjoyed it and Paul's revelation at the end elicited a gasp from me and I'll be thinking about this one for a while yet. Essentially, this is something of a puzzle box thriller. Seven very different individuals have all woken up one seemingly normal day to discover that the apocalypse happened while they were sleeping, and the Earth they have woken up to is VERY different from the Earth they thought they knew. We get to follow their different storylines as they try to piece together what has happened while struggling to survive in a world with mutant predators, no electricity, no information, and no food. The plot isn't bogged down with exposition or back story - we get to know the characters as who they are moving forward rather than descriptions/glimpses of who they WERE, and I loved that. We are granted front row seats to their discovering pieces of themselves they never would have known existed, and watch relationships develop between people who probably would have never crossed paths in the "real world." We've got: 1) a blind college student with a heart of gold and a desire to be anything but disposable, 2) another college student who was just supposed to start classes today and finds out he's more of a leader than he ever thought he could be, 3) a hermit preacher with a lot of guns and an unpure past, 4) a crossbow wielding business woman who went to visit her mom in the country and now finds that the lessons of her youth are more important than what she learned in the city, 5) a teenager with an uncanny ability to pick locks and a quick trigger finger, 6) a gamer who is initially rather inappropriately excited it's the apocalypse because he has talked extensively through apocalypse scenarios with friends, and 7) an astrophysics professor who is described as "probably being on some kind of spectrum." Great characters, great dynamics, great relationships (I'm a sucker for a good "found family" story). Though the ending made me feel a little unsatisfied, I still have to give this 4 stars because that was a hell of a ride. Also, as I have debated with friends what my contribution to a post-apocalypse world might be, I can now say that I would like to officially be the wild animal tamer/domesticator. Thank you Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and NetGalley for the ARC!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    I read a lot of apocalyptic themed books and the blurb for this book sounded really good. The book is a quick read and it wasn’t easy to guess they reason for the apocalypse but the characters and the why kind of fell flat for me. It didn’t have any build up and I wasn’t on the edge of my seat waiting for the big climactic ending. Thanks to NetGalley for an early review copy.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Maxine

    Seven people living in the Boston area wake up to discover they are the only people left alive on the planet. Not only that but seemingly over night, the bodies of the dead have turned to dust inside their rusted out cars, some buildings have completely disappeared and wild life, including wolf packs, has taken over the empty streets. I really enjoyed the first approximately 80% of The Apocalypse Seven by author Gene Doucette. The premise was interesting, the characters were mostly likeable, and Seven people living in the Boston area wake up to discover they are the only people left alive on the planet. Not only that but seemingly over night, the bodies of the dead have turned to dust inside their rusted out cars, some buildings have completely disappeared and wild life, including wolf packs, has taken over the empty streets. I really enjoyed the first approximately 80% of The Apocalypse Seven by author Gene Doucette. The premise was interesting, the characters were mostly likeable, and there was plenty of twists and turns to keep my attention. Unfortunately, the last 20% seemed rushed. If this was the first book in a series, it would have been a way to pique interest for the next entry. For a standalone novel, it seemed unsatisfying. As a result, the first part of the book was an easy four stars but I’m deleting one star because of the ending. Thanks to Netgalley and Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review

  18. 5 out of 5

    MundiNova

    The story didn't work for me. A combination of story pacing and structure caused this book to fall flat. In a traditional three-act story there's the setup, then confrontation, then resolution. The first act of this book consumed 80% of the pages. It's as if Doucette really liked the beginning of disaster movies, where they're forming the team, but didn't come through in the end. The confrontation shouldn't have been focused on the nature battles (which for smart people attending Harvard, should The story didn't work for me. A combination of story pacing and structure caused this book to fall flat. In a traditional three-act story there's the setup, then confrontation, then resolution. The first act of this book consumed 80% of the pages. It's as if Doucette really liked the beginning of disaster movies, where they're forming the team, but didn't come through in the end. The confrontation shouldn't have been focused on the nature battles (which for smart people attending Harvard, should not have been so dumb). I would like to have seen more with the true advisory. The characters ... not sure what to say about them other than they were what they were. Again, looked like a Hollywood cast of types and personalities. Any changes or growth they accomplish in the epilogue, like a cutaway scene. We don't see them change. Also, the characters are written the same, and all think of things in numerical order. This was a pet peeve of mine. The author uses 1) ... 2) ... 3) ... categorization for when a character is thinking of options or possible outcomes or whatever. But each character does this! It's as if they all have the same mind. I'm sure there's an audience for this book, but it isn't me. I received a copy from NetGalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review. Story: 2 stars Character Development: 2 stars Writing: 2 stars https://readingbetweenthestitches.wor...

  19. 5 out of 5

    D.K. Hundt

    ‘The whateverpocalypse. That’s what Touré, a twenty-something Cambridge coder, calls it after waking up one morning to find himself seemingly the only person left in the city. Once he finds Robbie and Carol, two equally disoriented Harvard freshmen, he realizes he isn’t alone, but the name sticks: Whateverpocalypse. But it doesn’t explain where everyone went. . .’ THE APOCALYPSE SEVEN, by Gene Doucette, was fun! Twisty-mind-bending-fun-at-times, but fun nonetheless. As many of you know, I’m a mas ‘The whateverpocalypse. That’s what Touré, a twenty-something Cambridge coder, calls it after waking up one morning to find himself seemingly the only person left in the city. Once he finds Robbie and Carol, two equally disoriented Harvard freshmen, he realizes he isn’t alone, but the name sticks: Whateverpocalypse. But it doesn’t explain where everyone went. . .’ THE APOCALYPSE SEVEN, by Gene Doucette, was fun! Twisty-mind-bending-fun-at-times, but fun nonetheless. As many of you know, I’m a massive fan of survival-apocalyptic-type stories; this one is minus the Zombies. So, when I say ‘fun’—from the reader's perspective—I love to see the said writer of the story I’ve submerged in throw their characters into the literal apocalyptic-sh**t-storm, stir it up a bit, and bear witness to the tension-filled narrative that unfolds. Doucette does a great job confusing this reader, and the characters, as we struggle to piece together their altered surroundings. The one pet peeve I have is the depiction of Carol regarding her inability to be self-sufficient and contribute. I don’t want to tread down Spoilerville Lane, so I will stop there. Thank you, NetGalley and Mariner Books, for loaning me an eGalley of THE APOCALYPSE SEVEN in the request for an honest review. Recommend!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sherron

    I have not yet read the author’s vanguard novel, The Spaceship Next Door, but The Apocalypse Seven does unfold literally next door to me, and I recognized every street, every town, and every loose cobblestone I’ve tripped over. It was fun to imagine the area overgrown and teeming with animals—I especially loved the sounder* of vicious pigs in a flooded Boston and the packs of gigantic, mixed-breed wolves (or “puppies,” as Carol affectionately calls them) in an overgrown Cambridge. The story is p I have not yet read the author’s vanguard novel, The Spaceship Next Door, but The Apocalypse Seven does unfold literally next door to me, and I recognized every street, every town, and every loose cobblestone I’ve tripped over. It was fun to imagine the area overgrown and teeming with animals—I especially loved the sounder* of vicious pigs in a flooded Boston and the packs of gigantic, mixed-breed wolves (or “puppies,” as Carol affectionately calls them) in an overgrown Cambridge. The story is presented by a straightforward omniscient narrator and the prose is a wee bit stilted with lots of nuggets of dark humor sprinkled throughout. The first few jokes seemed forced and made me groan, but I grew to appreciate how some later ones, such as a sly allusion to the early American Roanoke settlement, slid in so effortlessly. I love apocalypse stories, and it was interesting how this one was presented. There are seven diverse characters, and I really enjoyed how we see the catastrophe through their eyes, a natural take on the “blind men and the elephant” trope. Oh wait, perhaps the Seven Samurai would be a better analogy? No, no, it’s Rashomon I’m thinking of. The author did an excellent job fleshing out these unique characters and how they think. For example, one character thinks that this is the Rapture yet another thinks that it is a secular purgatory, and each conclusion is entirely plausible. Ironically, the author gives only tiny, compressed bits of physical characterization—the roommate who grooms his brows, the one who folds his underwear—and we can connect so easily that we don’t need a picture or a thousand words to visualize these people. The story begins through the POV of a Harvard freshman. This was the most difficult part of the book to get through, as he was so lacking any street smarts (common sense). How lacking was he? He was so lacking smarts I was wondering how he got into Harvard at all. He is such a helpless dork I really don’t see how he could become the de facto leader. Besides his stiff ineptitude, the prose is a little stiff. But I promise that if you can get through his scenes, a will love the next character, Carol, another Harvard student, who is blind, yet wise, empathetic, and competent. She awakens to the apocalypse without her seeing eye dog, which is devastating both on a practical and emotional level. The author does a terrific, fairly nuanced job presenting this diverse group of people. For example, the third character revealed to us is a space case D&D nerd. But we see that he is not completely lost in a world of make believe when he shows some unexpectedly touching empathy for Carol’s predicament of being blind plus being sans her companion seeing eye dog. With that gesture, I loved him and was on his side. As the novel moves forward, each section describes a specific character and their world view, and none of it feels like it’s pandering just to insert the “obligatory [gay|PoC|disabled] character.” And as is often the case with a character-driven novel, the pace is slow, which I appreciated. While I recognize the need to present unique personal traits to make each character stand out, I think it’s easy to overcorrect into the land of comical unbelievability. One scene that had me rolling my eyes and chuckling was when the Xena Warrior Princess character was collecting the carcass of a deer she had instantly felled with her bow and arrow. A gaunt wolf shows up to steal her kill, but she banishes him with her Intense StareTM and an offhanded “shoo.” And then she effortlessly heaves the deer over her shoulders—as easily as I would drape cat across my shoulders—and strolls into the house. It’s all so unrealistic! (I also winced when she ignores the field dressing prep work and goes straight to kitchen butchery.) In my eyes, all of this hyperbole isn’t a huge flaw but just strikes me as very funny and an unintentional homage to Xena, a fun, smart, bingeable TV show. In general, I loved seeing all of the competent, strong female characters; all are unique, yet any one is a valid role model. However, I did feel bad that the male characters all got stuck with sort of crappy (yet entirely believable) roles: the man baby, the D&D nerd, and the bible thumper. That makes me sad in itself, and also because having strong women does not inherently mean there must be weak men; and furthermore, equal rights is not a zero sum game. Fortunately, the author did show each of these men growing and maturing—even if only a smidge or kicking and screaming against their will. Hmmm, maybe actually this book is showing a bit of realism? ;) I liked the ending although it left me a little confused. I would have enjoyed a bit more explication in terms of both character analysis and science. This was an absorbing read. When I wasn’t reading, I sometimes wondered what was going on with the characters. I really appreciate having received an advanced reader copy from NetGalley in exchange for an unbiased review. The ideal reader enjoys ensemble stories, science fiction, post-apocalyptic fiction, time travel, aliens, and other science-based flights of imagination. *I knew a group of pigs MUST have a weird name, so I had to look it up. A “sounder” of pigs? Who made up all of these nonintuitive words anyway? Update. I’m lowering the rating from five to four stars to reflect my two small criticisms: First, I definitely wanted more info about the apocalypse itself as I mentioned above plus other mysteries like those nutritional blocks, the jaw bone, and empty grocery stores. My second criticism is the prose being slightly uptight (although it does loosen up a bit as the story progresses). Ironically, I don’t mind Robbie’s part being a bit stiff as he is such a sweaty self-conscience noob. But...it does create a challenging beginning to the book.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Davenport Public Library

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Seven ordinary(ish) people wake up one day to find that the world has ended. Some find themselves alone, others are lucky enough to find others. Each seems to have their own ideas about what has happened to cause the "whateverpocalypse" and as they try to puzzle it out, surviving becomes more and more difficult. And things become stranger and stranger. I do love apocalypse stories, and this story did not disappoint. The mystery of what had happened was more than enough to keep me reading even wh Seven ordinary(ish) people wake up one day to find that the world has ended. Some find themselves alone, others are lucky enough to find others. Each seems to have their own ideas about what has happened to cause the "whateverpocalypse" and as they try to puzzle it out, surviving becomes more and more difficult. And things become stranger and stranger. I do love apocalypse stories, and this story did not disappoint. The mystery of what had happened was more than enough to keep me reading even when the characters tended to get a little, let's say, annoying. I did like that this story included people that had zero idea about how to survive - let's face it, a lot of us, including me, definitely would not! But then there was the end. I mean ... not what I expected. The cause, okay, sure. But "Noah"? Certainly a non-traditional ending to an end-of-the-world tale like this!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    This book was a joy. The hook of trying to figure out what happened pulled me along, and I found myself unable to stop turning pages. I stayed up late for this book. Each character has a unique viewpoint and set of advantages and disadvantages, and while occasionally this made things a little convenient at times, it also dropped me deep into the story. There is one scene that was so exciting and freaky that I made a little scream noise and got chills, and then I had to go find my husband and narra This book was a joy. The hook of trying to figure out what happened pulled me along, and I found myself unable to stop turning pages. I stayed up late for this book. Each character has a unique viewpoint and set of advantages and disadvantages, and while occasionally this made things a little convenient at times, it also dropped me deep into the story. There is one scene that was so exciting and freaky that I made a little scream noise and got chills, and then I had to go find my husband and narrate the whole thing to him in a shouty voice. Seriously. So. Much. Fun. Thank you to Netgalley and HMH for an advanced reader ecopy.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Roberta R. (Offbeat YA)

    Rated 3.5 really. Excerpt from my review - originally published at Offbeat YA. Pros: Nice variation on the post-apocalypse trope with an unexpected twist. Lots of diversity (though most of it is barely addressed). Cons: The characters, while solid, don't generate a strong emotional connection with the reader. WARNING! Despite the characters' predicament, nothing overly graphic to report, but there's a death by fire. Will appeal to: Sci-fi fans who can appreciate a tragic but entertaining twist. Read Rated 3.5 really. Excerpt from my review - originally published at Offbeat YA. Pros: Nice variation on the post-apocalypse trope with an unexpected twist. Lots of diversity (though most of it is barely addressed). Cons: The characters, while solid, don't generate a strong emotional connection with the reader. WARNING! Despite the characters' predicament, nothing overly graphic to report, but there's a death by fire. Will appeal to: Sci-fi fans who can appreciate a tragic but entertaining twist. Readers who care more about the actual story than they do about getting attached to the humans in it. First off...DISCLAIMER: I requested this title on NetGalley. Thanks to John Joseph Adams/Mariner Books/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt for providing a temporary ecopy. This didn't influence my review in any way. A TWISTED TALE First off, this is one of those books that grow on you the second time you read them (well, it did for me 😉), though I ultimately decided to stand by my original rating because I tend to love character-driven books more, and despite there being a number of them, I didn't feel like this was the case - but such reread will impact my review nonetheless. There's no denying that, despite lacking the extra oomph for me, TAS is well written, nicely plotted, able to revitalise the age-old post-apocalyptic scenario, and it's got a unique, unexpected twist that pays off (I mean the ultimate twist, because there's more than one) and that fans of Doctor Who, especially of the Matt Smith era, will eat up (I'm first and foremost a David Tennant devotee, but let's get real - not only Matt's Doctor was fantastic, but had hands down the best, if often craziest, stories). Sometimes I like my books better the second time around because I know where they're heading, which may not be true for most readers; but in cases like this, the anticipation of what one knows is going to happen (or to have happened...) makes the story more exciting...for people like me at least. [...] https://offbeat-ya.blogspot.com/2021/....

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chantal Lyons

    This book took me by complete surprise, in the best possible way. For the first thirty or so pages, I wasn't really feeling it. But I'm so glad I kept going because I haven't been so entertained by a novel in a good few months. The thing I love about 'The Apocalypse Seven' is that it reminds me strikingly of Birdbox with a dash of Station Eleven, but it laughs at both of those comparisons and goes and does its own thing. Specifically, all seven characters in the story are... good people. Sure, th This book took me by complete surprise, in the best possible way. For the first thirty or so pages, I wasn't really feeling it. But I'm so glad I kept going because I haven't been so entertained by a novel in a good few months. The thing I love about 'The Apocalypse Seven' is that it reminds me strikingly of Birdbox with a dash of Station Eleven, but it laughs at both of those comparisons and goes and does its own thing. Specifically, all seven characters in the story are... good people. Sure, they argue sometimes, but all of them are cooperative and kind. It's like an anti-Lord of the Flies. I didn't realise how refreshing I was going to find this spin on the post-apocalyptic, de-populated setting until I was reading it. Although technically, the book should be called 'The Apocalypse Eight' because the horse is his own special character. The second thing I loved about the book was that I snort-laughed more times than I can count. The humour was never try-hard and it was sufficiently spaced out that it was always a delightful surprise. Most of it came from the interactions between the characters - adorable and kind they may be, but they're not above poking fun at each other's perceived flaws. There are also moments in the book that I found genuinely unnerving, something I very rarely experience while reading. The mystery surrounding the characters' predicaments was compelling rather than annoying, and my fascination was just another reason to keep reading. The explanation wasn't fully satisfying on some levels, but on other levels, it was pretty damn smart. I appreciated the way the author struck a balance between scientific realism and science fiction in creating both the setting and the reason for the characters' predicament, and there's a certain irony in the explanation that anyone who cares about climate change will appreciate. All in all, I had a huge amount of fun reading 'The Apocalypse Seven' and having to put it down to do other stuff like work or sleep was really inconvenient. (With thanks to Houghton Mifflin Harcourt and NetGalley for this ebook in exchange for an honest review)

  25. 5 out of 5

    Kurolayefah Owugah

    Holy crap!...I finally finished it!! The Apocalypse Seven. Needless to scream '' This book eventually totally sucked me in!!'' It drew me away from work and into work. Take it from a guy who is crafting a story about the criminally insane trying to put an end to the world. Reviewing this book in the element of its euphoria right away without spoilers is....definitely appropriate. it initially read like any generic YA dystopian teen fiction I've come across in life peppered with romance and doome Holy crap!...I finally finished it!! The Apocalypse Seven. Needless to scream '' This book eventually totally sucked me in!!'' It drew me away from work and into work. Take it from a guy who is crafting a story about the criminally insane trying to put an end to the world. Reviewing this book in the element of its euphoria right away without spoilers is....definitely appropriate. it initially read like any generic YA dystopian teen fiction I've come across in life peppered with romance and doomed lovable characters until it didn't...until it started sounding off deeper scary notes... Until it started pulling the threads off the mind blowing essence of a deadly futuristic universe. The premise of this book reflects thought provoking science that exists in a haunting powerful element of its own right. It follows a bunch of individuals waking up to the end of the world and scrounging for answers to how life threateningly weird things have gotten. For starters Nature is in full antagonizing force with vicious animals and crazy weather and with every breath our heroes advance closer to answers their lives descend further into jeopardy of a new reality. I really enjoyed this book and honestly it ticks off the best kind of tension diving into it with no knowledge of what's going on.. 🔰 Highly recommended, I'll give it a dazzling 4.5 stars. It should be a stellar 5 stars but...my only gripe with this book is that the ending didn't settle well with me. It was bitter sweet. It felt too contrived mid way through and it's climax dropped scale on intensity. Notably, It didn't quite resolve things satisfactorily with a certain other worldly character. I'll love it if Gene Doucette crafts another follow up wild novel to this. I can't wait to revisit Robbie, Carol, Ananda, Win and the Wolves and oh how could I forget Bethany and Paul and Elton the brave. 🔰 This was my first read of Gene Doucette. I'll definitely pick up more books by him . My unbiased review is given in exchange of an ARC from the author/ Net Galley and HMH publishing which have my utmost gratitude for granting me a copy. I'll also like to thank Michelle Horgan for her invaluable recommendation.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shannon (It Starts At Midnight)

    You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight You know that feeling when you're reading a really awesome book and you think "I could legit just keep reading this story forever"? That is me with Apocalypse Seven. Full stop, I did not want this story to end, yet at the same time I desperately craved all the answers! So I will try to break down what made this such a win for me! ►The characters were just so relatable. These folks are You can find the full review and all the fancy and/or randomness that accompanies it at It Starts at Midnight You know that feeling when you're reading a really awesome book and you think "I could legit just keep reading this story forever"? That is me with Apocalypse Seven. Full stop, I did not want this story to end, yet at the same time I desperately craved all the answers! So I will try to break down what made this such a win for me! ►The characters were just so relatable. These folks are not the Katniss Everdeen of the apocalypse. They're all bumbling, fumbling, and completely the same as most of us would be in their shoes. They panic, they cry, they behave exactly as you'd expect everyday people to. And eventually, slowly, they start to get the hang of surviving, but they're not particularly tickled about it. ►The humor is so fun! Admittedly, a global apocalypse in which only seven people (as far as we know) have survived is... a downer. But the humor laced throughout this story was perfect. It was just the right amount of lightheartedness in between the rough stuff to make it so incredibly readable. ►There is a mystery- of the "what the heck happened here!?" variety. The characters are not only trying to survive. Once their basic needs are handled, they kind of want to know why the world ended, and why they, of all people, are the ones who survived. And I loved the way the mystery unfurled, giving us bits and pieces as the story went on- just enough to be satisfying without giving away too much. ►Mind. Blown. There were some incredible twists that just... well, like the heading suggests, blew my mind. ►Honestly it is just really enjoyable, entertaining, and well-paced. I had so much fun reading this book, and that's that. Bottom Line: So entertaining and engaging, I simply could not put this one down!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Julien

    Well...this was not exactly what I had expected when requesting it, haha. The Apocalypse Seven follows seven individuals as they awake in an unfamiliar world. While the structure from the human race linger deep under the overpowering force of nature, animals run free and aggressive. At first, there's no trace or other life as each member awakes, but soon they find each other and begin putting the pieces together of what might have happened to the rest of the human race...and what they discover is Well...this was not exactly what I had expected when requesting it, haha. The Apocalypse Seven follows seven individuals as they awake in an unfamiliar world. While the structure from the human race linger deep under the overpowering force of nature, animals run free and aggressive. At first, there's no trace or other life as each member awakes, but soon they find each other and begin putting the pieces together of what might have happened to the rest of the human race...and what they discover is out of this world... Overall, I was NOT expecting the outcome of this apocalypse and honestly, I'm a bit confused still about how it all works. To me, from what I gather, they're now living in a continuous loop? It's a bit unclear now I'm afraid, but really this was an interesting read. Each character was "saved" for a particular reason, no one is seemingly there by random so it's up to each of them to figure out the why. The difference in each member of the pack is unique and they all have their strengths and weaknesses. I found it quite humorous that they wake up in a post-apocalyptic world and, at first, none of them were too worried about the basic needs to survive. Maybe that's the prepping in me, LOL, but I think I would be looking for a safe shelter, water, and food before worrying about ensuring I wasn't the only remaining human on the planet....especially with the unpredictable weather, it's best to be prepared. I will say that the age of the Apocalypse 7, the first few you meet at least, give way to a bit of "they're young, they don't know any better." Even though it was not the post-apocalypse book I was hoping for, it was still a cool read. It's easy to see the author did their research and thought through most of the scenarios presented so it made it an easy read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Erin Boyington

    This is The Day of the Triffids meets The Langoliers. Seven people wake up in a strange new world that used to be their home—the once-familiar city of Cambridge, Massachusetts is suddenly overgrown and full of overlarge wild predators. There is no sign of other humans anywhere, and the seven survivors slowly band together to stay alive. They face erratic weather, killer wild boars, packs of roving wolves, and a mysterious shimmering presence that could be something even more dangerous. Robbie is a This is The Day of the Triffids meets The Langoliers. Seven people wake up in a strange new world that used to be their home—the once-familiar city of Cambridge, Massachusetts is suddenly overgrown and full of overlarge wild predators. There is no sign of other humans anywhere, and the seven survivors slowly band together to stay alive. They face erratic weather, killer wild boars, packs of roving wolves, and a mysterious shimmering presence that could be something even more dangerous. Robbie is a would-be college freshman, along with Carol, who is blind and desperately missing her service dog. Touré is a hyperactive coder with some theories about what he’s dubbed the “whateverpocalypse.” Paul is an off-the-grid, gun-toting preacher (but not as crazy as that makes him sound). Win is an archery pro with an affinity for horses. Bethany, only 13, is a self-taught lockpicking master and delinquent. And finally, Ananda is an MIT astrophysicist whose research might help them all figure out exactly what happened to the world they woke up in. I read this in a single sitting, pulled along by the story and wanting to know what happens next. I love a good post-apocalyptic survival story, particularly where the characters aren’t terminally stupid or at odds simply for the sake of ginning up narrative tension (looking at you, AMC's The Walking Dead). There’s plenty of tension already, stemming from the eerie world they’ve woken up in and the strange clues that start adding up to a disturbing new reality. Received a free copy via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Angela

    The Apocalypse Seven could be renamed An Inferior Version of The Stand. The story starts with NerdDudeBro Robbie waking up in his Harvard dorm room the morning after a rager to discover - oops! - he must have drunkenly stumbled into the wrong room. After trying to figure out where he is and question what his next move is, he comes to realize things in general are... quieter. More overgrown. Harvard, and yet, not Harvard. The Apocalypse Seven expands out and starts to follow other characters in th The Apocalypse Seven could be renamed An Inferior Version of The Stand. The story starts with NerdDudeBro Robbie waking up in his Harvard dorm room the morning after a rager to discover - oops! - he must have drunkenly stumbled into the wrong room. After trying to figure out where he is and question what his next move is, he comes to realize things in general are... quieter. More overgrown. Harvard, and yet, not Harvard. The Apocalypse Seven expands out and starts to follow other characters in the Boston area who all slowly come to the same conclusion: they've survived a whatpocalypse (a term coined by one of the characters). Doucette did a decent job of coming up with an interesting premise and setting the scene to accommodate said premise. The was a lot of build up of each of the characters figuring out what happened, coming to terms with it, and pondering their next steps. As a reader, we are slowly given bits of additional information as the story progressed to more fully comprehend the situation our protagonists are facing. But. There are a lot of buts. My biggest gripe with this book is how stupidly the characters act - especially since we're talking about multiple Harvard educated people here. Without giving away spoilers, there are times when it makes no sense for the characters not to have more in depth conversations with each other in order to gain a better collective understanding of the situation at hand. Gripe #2 is how predictable and easy to guess the progression of the story was. The reason for the whatpocalypse is pretty obvious. Although I do have to admit - I didn't see the ending coming. Gripe #3 is how flat all of the characters felt. Everyone fit into a generic stereotype. I liked Win - the Katniss Everdeen of the group - but all of the other characters were rather meh. It was an interesting premise and a fun read, but the overall execution was rather flawed. Thanks to NetGalley for an ARC in exchange for my honest review.

  30. 4 out of 5

    phngtrnreads

    eARC provided by Netgalley in exchange for an honest review It's been a while since I got to read a book about an apocalypse. I ended up enjoying this more than I expected. It turns out Dystopian and I haven't fallen out of love thank god XD The title kind of sold it away lol. The book is about 7 people waking up from their sleep in their same old places, just to find out everyone has vanished and everything has been abandoned. They try to get to one another and to figure out what has happened. I eARC provided by Netgalley in exchange for an honest review It's been a while since I got to read a book about an apocalypse. I ended up enjoying this more than I expected. It turns out Dystopian and I haven't fallen out of love thank god XD The title kind of sold it away lol. The book is about 7 people waking up from their sleep in their same old places, just to find out everyone has vanished and everything has been abandoned. They try to get to one another and to figure out what has happened. I like the idea of the characters being absolutely clueless about everything at first and their journeys in search of other living people. The writing is well-paced; the dangers that the group had to encounter and how they managed to deal with them were pretty realistic but still enjoyable, in my opinion. And since my brain is small, I am incredibly grateful the author didn't throw in a bunch of scientifically complex terms and force me to understand everything to get a grip on crucial details. The ending is somewhat bittersweet, but rather makes sense (I hope it's not a spoiler). I just wish the characters showed more of their emotions and talk... less, and that we get to know more of the elements involved in the third part of the book.

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