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The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line: Untold Stories of the Women Who Changed the Course of World War II

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For fans of Radium Girls and history and WWII buffs, The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line takes you inside the lives and experiences of 15 unknown women heroes from the Greatest Generation, the women who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen during WWII--in and out of uniform, for theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come. The Girls Who S For fans of Radium Girls and history and WWII buffs, The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line takes you inside the lives and experiences of 15 unknown women heroes from the Greatest Generation, the women who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen during WWII--in and out of uniform, for theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come. The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line are the heroes of the Greatest Generation that you hardly ever hear about. These women who did extraordinary things didn't expect thanks and shied away from medals and recognition. Despite their amazing accomplishments, they've gone mostly unheralded and unrewarded. No longer. These are the women of World War II who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen--in and out of uniform. Liane B. Russell fled Austria with nothing and later became a renowned U.S. scientist whose research on the effects of radiation on embryos made a difference to thousands of lives. Gena Turgel was a prisoner who worked in the hospital at Bergen-Belsen and cared for the young Anne Frank, who was dying of typhus. Gena survived and went on to write a memoir and spent her life educating children about the Holocaust. Ida and Louise Cook were British sisters who repeatedly smuggled out jewelry and furs and served as sponsors for refugees, and they also established temporary housing for immigrant families in London. Retired U.S. Army Major General Mari K. Eder wrote this book because she knew their stories needed to be told--and the sooner the better. For theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come.


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For fans of Radium Girls and history and WWII buffs, The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line takes you inside the lives and experiences of 15 unknown women heroes from the Greatest Generation, the women who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen during WWII--in and out of uniform, for theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come. The Girls Who S For fans of Radium Girls and history and WWII buffs, The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line takes you inside the lives and experiences of 15 unknown women heroes from the Greatest Generation, the women who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen during WWII--in and out of uniform, for theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come. The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line are the heroes of the Greatest Generation that you hardly ever hear about. These women who did extraordinary things didn't expect thanks and shied away from medals and recognition. Despite their amazing accomplishments, they've gone mostly unheralded and unrewarded. No longer. These are the women of World War II who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen--in and out of uniform. Liane B. Russell fled Austria with nothing and later became a renowned U.S. scientist whose research on the effects of radiation on embryos made a difference to thousands of lives. Gena Turgel was a prisoner who worked in the hospital at Bergen-Belsen and cared for the young Anne Frank, who was dying of typhus. Gena survived and went on to write a memoir and spent her life educating children about the Holocaust. Ida and Louise Cook were British sisters who repeatedly smuggled out jewelry and furs and served as sponsors for refugees, and they also established temporary housing for immigrant families in London. Retired U.S. Army Major General Mari K. Eder wrote this book because she knew their stories needed to be told--and the sooner the better. For theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come.

30 review for The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line: Untold Stories of the Women Who Changed the Course of World War II

  1. 5 out of 5

    Maja - BibliophiliaDK ✨

    ONE WORD: INSPIRATIONAL I have often wondered, why we hear so few stories of the women, who aided in the war effort during WWII. Apparently, I have not been the only one. I applaud Eder for taking on this mammoth effort - and for pulling it off so spectacularly! 👍 What I Liked 👍 Premise: I cannot stress how amazing I feel this premise is! To finally give this women the recognition they so truly deserve is wonderful and just right. They deserve to have their stories told and acknowledged at last. Wi ONE WORD: INSPIRATIONAL I have often wondered, why we hear so few stories of the women, who aided in the war effort during WWII. Apparently, I have not been the only one. I applaud Eder for taking on this mammoth effort - and for pulling it off so spectacularly! 👍 What I Liked 👍 Premise: I cannot stress how amazing I feel this premise is! To finally give this women the recognition they so truly deserve is wonderful and just right. They deserve to have their stories told and acknowledged at last. Without them, the war would not have gone the way it did. Women: There were so many different women from all walk of life. And they contributed in so many different ways, spy work, topography work, education, documenting, helping refugees etc. I loved the variety of these women. Blend: The way this was written and told was so great. It is a great blend of storytelling and biographical facts. I enjoyed the feeling of viewing them closely and getting into their minds as well as seeing their lives from afar. Wonderful! ARC provided by the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review Follow me for more book loving content! Blog ✨ Facebook ✨ Instagram ✨ Twitter Blog Post: 15 Bookworm Problems

  2. 4 out of 5

    3 no 7

    “The Girls Who Stepped Out Of Line” recounts the incredible stories of fifteen women who answered the call during World War II not only to serve but to also make history. They overcame fears, witnessed unspeakable acts of war, and created the future. It is impossible to condense these lives and experiences into a short review, so I am listing each name with a short sentence. There is nothing to say better than what they say for themselves. 1. Alice Marble -- international tennis star. “I did what “The Girls Who Stepped Out Of Line” recounts the incredible stories of fifteen women who answered the call during World War II not only to serve but to also make history. They overcame fears, witnessed unspeakable acts of war, and created the future. It is impossible to condense these lives and experiences into a short review, so I am listing each name with a short sentence. There is nothing to say better than what they say for themselves. 1. Alice Marble -- international tennis star. “I did what I’ve always done. I fought.” 2. Hilda Gimpel Eisen -- Germans and Russians in the woods. “You either make it or you don’t. You have nothing to lose.” 3. Stephanie Czech Rader – X-2, a spy. “What the heck was I gonna do with a dumb gun?” 4. Elizabeth Peet McIntosh, Office of Strategic Services (OSS) Fake News. “I speak Japanese.” 5. Virginia Hall Goillot – a reporter writing stories with imbedded messages. The CIA named a building for her. 6. Mary Taylor Previte – Japanese internment camp (in China) as a child. “Making a mistake, even when you’re so young as fourteen, can leave you marked for the rest of your life.” 7. Ruth Gruber -- war refugees and wounded U.S. servicemen heading to safety in the United States. “From this moment, on my life would be forever bound with rescue and survival.” 8. Dame Mary Sigillo Barraco -- the real world of a dark prison cell. She told her story, the meaning of patriotism, and the strength to be found in faith and resistance. 9. Berendina Diet Eman -- The Hague, the Netherlands, coordinating shelter for Jews. “I thought that, whatever would happen to me, God was in control.” 10. Ida and Louise Cook -- the gray areas of smuggling “We weren’t the James Bond type— we were just respectable Civil Service typists.” 11. Marion Armstrong Frieswyk – Power Maps a career field that didn’t even exist, “We’re doing war work for the government. It’s Oh. So. Secret.” (The OSS) 12. Elizabeth Bemis Robarts – a work so secret it she did not know what it was until 1995, but it shortened the war by two years. “It was mind-boggling to find out the truth.” 13. Ola Mildred Rexroat McDonald – Millie could not drive a car but she could fly. “After all, nothing could be better than flying.” 14. Katherine Flynn Nolan – nurses went the whole way, from the beaches of Normandy through France right into the heart of the Third Reich. “We were dirty, weary, and chilled to the point of numbness.” 15. Charity Adams Earley – a two-year backlog of mail for troops .“We have a job to do and we’re going to get it done.” “The Girls Who Stepped Out Of Line” by Mari K. Eder is a MUST READ book for all generations.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Morgan

    The short chapters are no less compelling as they record the accomplishments of 15 impressive, exceptional women who did their part in WWII against all the odds. Even as women were not expected to do more than sew and cook they excelled, some at great risk to themselves, not for the medals, but because it was the right thing to do and because they could. This line stuck out to me: “Not all acts of humanity have to be large or sweeping to have an impact.” (Pg.189) It took years for these women’s ac The short chapters are no less compelling as they record the accomplishments of 15 impressive, exceptional women who did their part in WWII against all the odds. Even as women were not expected to do more than sew and cook they excelled, some at great risk to themselves, not for the medals, but because it was the right thing to do and because they could. This line stuck out to me: “Not all acts of humanity have to be large or sweeping to have an impact.” (Pg.189) It took years for these women’s accomplishments to be recognized or even told, let this not be the case going forward.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Natasha Lester

    Just wonderful! A celebration of some amazing women from history, detailing their bravery, their trials and tribulations, and their tremendous successes. Inspirational and uplifting - Mari K. Eder is a fabulous storyteller.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line by Mari K Eder is a wonderful nonfiction book that is a fascinating collection of real-life women that went above and beyond in a multitude of avenues during the events of WWII. I truly loved reading about all of these brave, selfless, courageous, and impressive women that in some way contributed to the success of the county and the allies during the war. I find it invaluable for current-day young girls, adolescents, and women to be able to read such accounts of The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line by Mari K Eder is a wonderful nonfiction book that is a fascinating collection of real-life women that went above and beyond in a multitude of avenues during the events of WWII. I truly loved reading about all of these brave, selfless, courageous, and impressive women that in some way contributed to the success of the county and the allies during the war. I find it invaluable for current-day young girls, adolescents, and women to be able to read such accounts of heroic women in the past to know how resilient we are, what we are capable of, and how we as the human race, and society, can overcome if put to the test. The wonderful array of accounts, some involved with military operations, some outside of these events, all important, and all somewhat under the radar thus far (and unjustly so!). I am so honored to be able to experience and learn about all 15 of these brave and impressive women and will forever be changed and grateful for all that they risked and added for the betterment of all. An excellent collection and book. 5/5 stars Thank you NG and Sourcebooks(nonfiction) for this arc and in return I am submitting my unbiased review and opinion. I am posting this review to my GR and Bookbub accounts immediately and will post it to my Amazon, Instagram, and B&N accounts upon publication.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Janet

    Date reviewed/posted: January 23, 2021 Publication date: August 3, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup and #lockdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #secondwave is upon us, AND the worst sciatica attack in your life means you MIGHT sleep 3 hours a night, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of Date reviewed/posted: January 23, 2021 Publication date: August 3, 2021 When life for the entire galaxy and planet has turned on its end, you are continuing to #maskup and #lockdown to be in #COVID19 #socialisolation as the #secondwave is upon us, AND the worst sciatica attack in your life means you MIGHT sleep 3 hours a night, superspeed readers like me can read 250+ pages/hour, so yes, I have read the book … and many more today. I requested and received a temporary digital Advance Reader Copy of this book from #NetGalley, the publisher and the author in exchange for an honest review. From the publisher, as I do not repeat the contents or story of books in reviews, I let them do it as they do it better than I do 😸. For fans of Radium Girls and history and WWII buffs, The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line takes you inside the lives and experiences of 15 unknown women heroes from the Greatest Generation, the women who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen during WWII—in and out of uniform, for theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come. The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line are the heroes of the Greatest Generation that you hardly ever hear about. These women who did extraordinary things didn't expect thanks and shied away from medals and recognition. Despite their amazing accomplishments, they've gone mostly unheralded and unrewarded. No longer. These are the women of World War II who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen—in and out of uniform. Liane B. Russell fled Austria with nothing and later became a renowned U.S. scientist whose research on the effects of radiation on embryos made a difference to thousands of lives. Gena Turgel was a prisoner who worked in the hospital at Bergen-Belsen and cared for the young Anne Frank, who was dying of typhus. Gena survived and went on to write a memoir and spent her life educating children about the Holocaust. Ida and Louise Cook were British sisters who repeatedly smuggled out jewelry and furs and served as sponsors for refugees, and they also established temporary housing for immigrant families in London. Retired U.S. Army Major General Mari K. Eder wrote this book because she knew their stories needed to be told—and the sooner the better. For theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come. The women in this book are rockstars and I had not heard of any of them before but will now never forget them. I questioned at first why the Cook sisters were so important for smuggling jewels and furs, but it all made sense in the end. The book was wonderfully researched and well written and will appeal to men and women with an interest in history. I will recommend it to friends, family and book clubs alike. As always, I try to find a reason to not rate with stars as I simply adore emojis (outside of their incessant use by "🙏-ed Social Influencer Millennials/#BachelorNation survivors/Tik-Tok and YouTube Millionaires/snowflakes / literally-like-overusers etc. " on Instagram and Twitter... Get a real job, people!) so let's give it 🎖️🎖️🎖️🎖️🎖️

  7. 5 out of 5

    Connie

    I love reading about amazing, courageous women who have been forgotten, women who made a difference and whose lives should be remembered. Theirs are the stories that need to be told. Women such as famous tennis player Alice Marble, who claimed to have been a spy during WWII. Or the fascinating Stephanie Czech Rader, who served in the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) Counter Espionage Branch X-2. And then there was Ruth Gruber, an intelligent young woman who obtained her doctorate at the age of I love reading about amazing, courageous women who have been forgotten, women who made a difference and whose lives should be remembered. Theirs are the stories that need to be told. Women such as famous tennis player Alice Marble, who claimed to have been a spy during WWII. Or the fascinating Stephanie Czech Rader, who served in the Office of Strategic Services (OSS) Counter Espionage Branch X-2. And then there was Ruth Gruber, an intelligent young woman who obtained her doctorate at the age of 20! Ruth became a journalist and helped 1,000 refugees escape Europe in 1944. Retired U.S. Army Major General Mari K. Eder said she didn’t want to write a book “about what these women were forbidden to do. Or how they were discriminated against.” Instead, she chose to write “the story of who these women were and what they did do.” She wrote about what they accomplished in spite of the discrimination that they all confronted and fought to overcome. These women were part of the greatest generation and, as Eder stated, they “not only made history, they created the future.” This book reminds us of what they accomplished and how their determination to fight for their dreams and for their country helped open doors for women decades later. This book is well-researched and has an extensive bibliography. It also includes numerous pictures of each of the women, both during their time in the military and in later years when they were finally recognized for their World War II service. I highly recommend this book that shares the stories of 15 women who made a difference during the war and throughout their lives. Thanks to NetGalley and Sourcebooks for the ARC in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Milou

    I requested this book through Netgalley because of course I want to read a book about some amazing women. And I am really glad I did so. In this book we read the stories of 15 women who in some way contributed in the war effort… maybe by being a pilot, a spy, a smuggler for Jewish refugees, part of the resistance, a map maker or by sorting out the mess that was the postal services. Women may not have fought on the front lines, but still they were incredibly important during WWII… something for wh I requested this book through Netgalley because of course I want to read a book about some amazing women. And I am really glad I did so. In this book we read the stories of 15 women who in some way contributed in the war effort… maybe by being a pilot, a spy, a smuggler for Jewish refugees, part of the resistance, a map maker or by sorting out the mess that was the postal services. Women may not have fought on the front lines, but still they were incredibly important during WWII… something for which they didn’t get their rightful recognition until far too late. Although most of the women included in this book are American, I hugely appreciated the other nationalities included in this book. Especially the Dutch Diet really struck close to home (being Dutch myself) and just… wow. That women, as all the others included in this book, was so incredibly strong and inspirational. The book itself is incredibly well written. I’m impressed the the anecdotes Eder managed to include in here. The chapters themselves are also just the perfect length, making this whole book very easy to read. After the stories of the 15 women, we are told about how long it took for them to get their medals. We also get to see how the actions of these and other women during WWII influenced future generations, especially the Baby Boomers. Eder concludes her book by showing how there are still too many firsts, and drawing our attention to some of the women and girls who step out of line today (such as Greta Thunberg and Malala Yousafzai, but also many more). If you want to read a book filled to the brim with strong, smart, brave, amazing and inspirational women… please pick this up. I adored it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kim McGee

    Once again we have stories of behind the scenes heroism by women who stepped up to help win WWII and stepped out of line to do what needed to be done. A tennis pro turned spy, an amputee who was one of the most sought after female spies behind enemy lines, resistance fighters and much more. They did these selfless acts risking their lives and couldn't tell anyone about their role. There was no ticker tape parade when these ladies came home after the war and picked up their lives. The author who h Once again we have stories of behind the scenes heroism by women who stepped up to help win WWII and stepped out of line to do what needed to be done. A tennis pro turned spy, an amputee who was one of the most sought after female spies behind enemy lines, resistance fighters and much more. They did these selfless acts risking their lives and couldn't tell anyone about their role. There was no ticker tape parade when these ladies came home after the war and picked up their lives. The author who has made her career in the armed forces, has an easy going storytelling writing style that pulls you in and you get a sense of how much research went into getting the story right. For any reader that is fascinated by both the female based WWII fictional stories and the real women the stories inspired. Unbelievable what they accomplished with so little training. My thanks to the publisher for the advance copy.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Anna Guastello

    This was a very eye-opening and interesting read! I had no idea who any of these women were before reading this work, and I'm so glad that I do now. The book is well-structured, each impressive woman has a dedicated chapter, making it an easy book to digest and to come back to. I was also impressed how the author was able to connect some of the women to each other, strengthening the stories of each of the women. I would highly recommend this book to anyone looking for a little inspiration! This was a very eye-opening and interesting read! I had no idea who any of these women were before reading this work, and I'm so glad that I do now. The book is well-structured, each impressive woman has a dedicated chapter, making it an easy book to digest and to come back to. I was also impressed how the author was able to connect some of the women to each other, strengthening the stories of each of the women. I would highly recommend this book to anyone looking for a little inspiration!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I learned many things about WWII and the people involved with it. It has the stories of 15 different women who either changed the outcomes of WWII or where changed by WWII. I don't really agree with the extra bit of the title saying they changed the course of the war while some of the women did, others were changed by the war. Instead, they took what happened to them and channeled it in their later life activities. My favorite chapter was about Virginia Hall and I I thoroughly enjoyed this book. I learned many things about WWII and the people involved with it. It has the stories of 15 different women who either changed the outcomes of WWII or where changed by WWII. I don't really agree with the extra bit of the title saying they changed the course of the war while some of the women did, others were changed by the war. Instead, they took what happened to them and channeled it in their later life activities. My favorite chapter was about Virginia Hall and I wholeheartedly recommend reading more books about her because she is the person who got me interested in WWII in the first place. Her story is awesome because she not only is helps the French Resistance and Allies, she does this all with one leg!! My second favorite chapter is about the English women who casually got Jews out of Nazi Germany all because they loved opera. The women in the book are primarily white Americans, with few other nationalities, and only a couple of non-whites. My one issue is the first woman talked about. Her story is not verified by anyone other than herself. Now, her mission records could have been lost and her story true, but I'd have preferred her story not be included until there is other evidence to corroborate it apart from her biography. Though, she did have an impact of tennis and stepped out of line there by speaking out against racism and inequalities in the tennis world. All in all, it is well worth the read for a brief look at others involved in WWII that have been over looked in history.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kaysha

    The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line by Mari K. Eder tells the stories of many different women who played meaningful roles in World War II. After a couple chapters, I was able to figure out that these women were not connected, and I was better able to fully grasp each woman’s stories. Reading these little-known stories makes me wonder who else we can learn about who has made an impact on the world. Each woman played a powerful role in the War; Eder ends the book talking about women are making an im The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line by Mari K. Eder tells the stories of many different women who played meaningful roles in World War II. After a couple chapters, I was able to figure out that these women were not connected, and I was better able to fully grasp each woman’s stories. Reading these little-known stories makes me wonder who else we can learn about who has made an impact on the world. Each woman played a powerful role in the War; Eder ends the book talking about women are making an impact in our world today, too. I received an advanced reader’s copy through a Goodreads giveaway in exchange for a review.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    An inspiring collection of 15 stories of women who helped change the course of World War II. Although I'm a big fan of reading histories of women -- especially women who have flown under the radar, I was a bit nervous about reading this book. I feared a book written by Major General Mari K. Eder would be dry and dull. I am happy to say I was wrong, and Eder is an excellent writer who brings each woman's profile to life. Check this book out; you won't be disappointed. An inspiring collection of 15 stories of women who helped change the course of World War II. Although I'm a big fan of reading histories of women -- especially women who have flown under the radar, I was a bit nervous about reading this book. I feared a book written by Major General Mari K. Eder would be dry and dull. I am happy to say I was wrong, and Eder is an excellent writer who brings each woman's profile to life. Check this book out; you won't be disappointed.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bookreporter.com Biography & Memoir

    They were women who would have and should have gained fame for a myriad of reasons, though their very gender was often their greatest barrier. But when the need arose to fight for their country, they "stepped out of line" to accomplish deeds of daring that required skills, grit and high intelligence. These are the heroines of retired U.S. Army Major General Mari K. Eder’s collection. The book opens with the story of “Wonder Woman.” Alice Marble was an aspiring athlete who took up tennis in her te They were women who would have and should have gained fame for a myriad of reasons, though their very gender was often their greatest barrier. But when the need arose to fight for their country, they "stepped out of line" to accomplish deeds of daring that required skills, grit and high intelligence. These are the heroines of retired U.S. Army Major General Mari K. Eder’s collection. The book opens with the story of “Wonder Woman.” Alice Marble was an aspiring athlete who took up tennis in her teens. In 1933, she collapsed on court and was diagnosed with tuberculosis. She rallied back, becoming #1 on the Top Ten list of amateur players. Her life allowed her to mix with the rich and famous, and she was asked to endorse a new comic series to be called Wonder Woman. She did so, and became part of the production team only when its creator agreed to use the comic to highlight accomplishments of great women like Clara Barton and Eleanor Roosevelt. When war broke out, Marble had the opportunity to act as a spy for the U.S. in Switzerland, and would later become such a strong advocate of young Althea Gibson that her words were instrumental in getting the first African American woman accepted to the U.S. Open. Another remarkable female highlighted here is Virginia Hall, who lost her left leg below the knee in a hunting accident in 1933. Brilliant, with a grasp of multiple languages and a photographic memory, she began work for the Allied underground at the inception of World War II, using every conceivable disguise, including that of an old farm woman, dying her hair gray and using the shuffle of her prosthetic limb to enhance the effect. Her life-threatening work was vital to the war effort, gaining her a Distinguished Service Medal among other awards. After her service ended, she rarely spoke of it --- out of respect, she said, to the many who had died in her same line of work. With 15 historical portraits drawn in dramatic detail, and predictions made about current female icons --- such as Greta Thunberg, Ilhan Omar and Queen Elizabeth --- THE GIRLS WHO STEPPED OUT OF LINE casts light on women whose careers, abilities and aspirations can shine now, out of the obscurity of history. Eder’s outstanding international career has led her to recognition as a speaker, writer and educator. This impressive work can serve as an inspiration to other strong-minded women ready to take their rightful places in the history books of the future. Reviewed by Barbara Bamberger Scott

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jerri Carlin

    I never tire of reading non-fiction about the WWII era. Perhaps because my parents lived and survived the trauma of WWII. They married before my father was shipped overseas for 2 1/2 years and my mother spoke of the day she realized that she didn’t smile anymore. Ret. General Eder brings alive the stories of strong, amazing women who never hesitated to do their part to save the innocent and the persecuted, to shorten a war that would have been longer without their courage. This is the history th I never tire of reading non-fiction about the WWII era. Perhaps because my parents lived and survived the trauma of WWII. They married before my father was shipped overseas for 2 1/2 years and my mother spoke of the day she realized that she didn’t smile anymore. Ret. General Eder brings alive the stories of strong, amazing women who never hesitated to do their part to save the innocent and the persecuted, to shorten a war that would have been longer without their courage. This is the history that needs to be told in our schools.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Rhonda Struthers-Badour

    These are powerful essays about brave women who stepped up their game in time of war. No Egos, No expectation of recognition: Just women who did their duty for country and helped define the victory of world war 11

  17. 5 out of 5

    Michele

    This is a great book. Take the time to read this book this summer while on the beach, at camp or just relaxing at home.

  18. 5 out of 5

    MaryPat

    Check it out!!!!! Mari K Eder’s new book “The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line,” due out in August hits New York Post as one of this week’s best new books! This is a great read, untold stories of women who changed the course of WWII by taking on jobs or actions not considered the norm for women. They STEPPED OUT OF LINE! Pre-order now on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/Girls-Who-Step... Such an exciting book, filled with stories of women who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen during WW Check it out!!!!! Mari K Eder’s new book “The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line,” due out in August hits New York Post as one of this week’s best new books! This is a great read, untold stories of women who changed the course of WWII by taking on jobs or actions not considered the norm for women. They STEPPED OUT OF LINE! Pre-order now on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/Girls-Who-Step... Such an exciting book, filled with stories of women who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen during WWII―in and out of uniform. These women tackled the effects of war and journeyed behind the lines, undercover, and underground to save people and their countries. Their stories have lingered in the background, were whispered amongst their compatriots of wartime but were rarely mentioned in news reports or archives, their stories never told, never publicly thanked or acknowledged. Many families don't know their grandmother, aunt or other female relative was a wartime heroine. You will hear about their accomplihsments as code breakers, intelligence gatherers, spies, rescuers of children, and so many other extraordinary jobs. These stories are frightening, touching, and insightful. The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line takes you inside the lives and experiences of 15 unknown women heroes from the Greatest Generation, the women who served, fought, struggled, and made things happen during WWII―in and out of uniform, for theirs is a legacy destined to embolden generations of women to come. #thegirlswhosteppedoutofline

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sharon Brewer

    Thank you to Net Galley and Sourcebooks (NON-FICTION) for the chance to read and review this fabulous book! The opinions expressed are my own. This book was wonderful! This book is filled with the stories of so many courageous women who changed the course of WW II. These women did not let anything hold them back. In spite of danger and adversity, these brave women had the courage to do what they thought was right. I really admire these brave women and I love to read their stories. Highly recommen Thank you to Net Galley and Sourcebooks (NON-FICTION) for the chance to read and review this fabulous book! The opinions expressed are my own. This book was wonderful! This book is filled with the stories of so many courageous women who changed the course of WW II. These women did not let anything hold them back. In spite of danger and adversity, these brave women had the courage to do what they thought was right. I really admire these brave women and I love to read their stories. Highly recommend!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    I won an advanced copy of this book on Goodreads, and thoroughly enjoyed reading it. The author tells the stories of 15 "unknown" women who made a difference during WWII and afterwards. As an avid reader of material from this period in history (both fiction and non-fiction), I can attest to the the lack of stories involving women's roles in winning the war. The book was clearly written not only to recognize the contributions made by the women whose stories are told, but to inspire girls and women I won an advanced copy of this book on Goodreads, and thoroughly enjoyed reading it. The author tells the stories of 15 "unknown" women who made a difference during WWII and afterwards. As an avid reader of material from this period in history (both fiction and non-fiction), I can attest to the the lack of stories involving women's roles in winning the war. The book was clearly written not only to recognize the contributions made by the women whose stories are told, but to inspire girls and women of today to achieve their dreams and goals. I will be sure to pass this book along to my teenage daughter, who I'm sure will enjoy reading it as much as I did.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Natasha Ybarra

    I 100% recommend this book. These women belong in all history books. This is exactly the reason I love history.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Sheila

    Written by Army Major General Mari K. Eder, Retired, this is a collection of non-fiction stories about women during the World War II era that stepped up to life’s challenges in ways that saved lives and helped to change the course of history. Spy, refugee, nurse, resistance fighter, pilot… it didn’t matter as all showed courage above and beyond what could ever have been expected of them. All of the women who are recounted in this book were amazing. I’m sure they didn’t think so, but given the abi Written by Army Major General Mari K. Eder, Retired, this is a collection of non-fiction stories about women during the World War II era that stepped up to life’s challenges in ways that saved lives and helped to change the course of history. Spy, refugee, nurse, resistance fighter, pilot… it didn’t matter as all showed courage above and beyond what could ever have been expected of them. All of the women who are recounted in this book were amazing. I’m sure they didn’t think so, but given the ability to do what had to be done, they lighted a path for others to follow. One thing that I must remark upon is that in the aftermath of WWII, so much talent was suppressed when women were forced in many ways to not work. I can only guess what could have been accomplished just here in the United States had these and other women been treated as equals. What a waste of talent. The writing overall was crisp, clean, and coherent. The only area that I thought was weak was a later chapter (Chapter 17) that discussed what had happened to the women in the book in later years, and then shifted more toward talking about how the various professions had changed over time. Chapter 16 also discussed what happened to the women after the War. I thought that Chapter 17 could have been edited more and been more organized, possibly with subheadings. It felt a little “wordy” in comparison to many of the biographies at the beginning of the book. Perhaps Chapter 16 and 17 could be organized in similar ways as they covered a similar overall topic. Just a note about Gen X versus Baby Boomers as mentioned in the text. In the early 1980’s, two national news magazines (United States) had headlines about Gen X. They said that it started in 1963. If you look up various websites in 2021, it has been reclassified as 1964 for most, and some mid-1964. I remember the classification as I was born at the end of 1963 and have always considered myself Gen X, especially where the lack of available jobs for that generation is concerned. Gen X definitely DID NOT start in the 1970’s as the author states. I guarantee it! Overall a very interesting read with life stories that must be shared. Thank you to Mari K. Eder, Sourcebooks, and NetGalley for allowing me to read an eGalley of this book. I have not received anything in return for my review and am providing an honest review with my opinions.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line tells individual biographies of 15 women who fought, served, and “stepped out of line” during WWII and in the aftermath. The women featured in this book include: Lieutenant Colonel Charity Adams Earley, Hilda Eisen, Ida and Louise Cook, Alice Marble, Ruth Gruber, Mary Taylor Previte, Major Stephanie Czech Rader, Betty Peet McIntosh, Virginia Hall, Dame Mary Sigillo Barraco, Diet Eman, Marion Armstrong Frieswyk, Betty Bemis Robarts, Millie Rexroat McDonald, and K The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line tells individual biographies of 15 women who fought, served, and “stepped out of line” during WWII and in the aftermath. The women featured in this book include: Lieutenant Colonel Charity Adams Earley, Hilda Eisen, Ida and Louise Cook, Alice Marble, Ruth Gruber, Mary Taylor Previte, Major Stephanie Czech Rader, Betty Peet McIntosh, Virginia Hall, Dame Mary Sigillo Barraco, Diet Eman, Marion Armstrong Frieswyk, Betty Bemis Robarts, Millie Rexroat McDonald, and Katherine Flynn Nolan. These women were resistance fighters, inmates at an internment camp in China, smugglers, WASPs, WACs, spies, cartographers, nurses, and code-breaking bombe builders. Eder wrote an incredible book that is both accessible and content driven. Each chapter starts with a quote from one of these amazing women and then proceeds with a short story about them. Eder goes into a biographical vignette of the woman and includes pictures of each woman. “History did an injustice to these women, wiping the slate clean of not just their service, but their very names.” (Eder, 2021). No longer. Eder is telling some of the stories that have been sealed and forgotten, inspiring us to stand up against injustice, to speak out, to protect those in need, to have courage, and to shatter all the ceilings that continue to be placed over us. The last three chapters of the book discuss the aftermath of WWII and its affect on women and society in their struggle to “return to normal”. These chapters presented fascinating and disheartening information about how many of these women who served in the war weren’t considered veterans. She also describes how some of the women suffered from PTSD and what services were available to them—none. Eder discusses how some of the women chose roles of wife and mother, while others refused to quietly go home. No matter the life these women chose after the war, all had a tremendous impact on their communities, both at the local and international level. Additionally, their hard work and courage has inspired countless people to be bold. Eder does a lovely job including today’s women “who have stepped out of line”, including VP Kamala Harris, Serena and Venus Williams, Greta Thunberg, and Malala Yousafzai. The last three chapters could have been structured better. For example, some of the information could have been included in the personal chapters. I had to flip back and forth because I couldn’t remember everyone’s name. Thank you to NetGalley and SourceBooks for a humbling and inspiring read. These women were brave and kind; brilliant and daring. I hope to live up to the model of courage and strength they provide. Thank you to SourceBooks for providing me with a hard copy of this book in addition to NetGalley’s ARC. “My world was full of mystery and surprise. You sailed into this giant ocean, moving away from the safety of the shore, not knowing the destination—but knowing God was there. The world isn’t flat—the way folks said. It is round, with distant shore to find.” (Previte, M. T. as quoted in Eder, 2021).

  24. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    An absolute must-read for anyone, history buff or not. Eder’s “The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line” is not merely a recounting of the same World War II stories we have all heard before but a complete unearthing of those that have never been told. Each chapter is dedicated to a separate woman who pioneered into realms previously unexplored or disallowed to females. Whether a code-breaker, special forces operative, resistance fighter, or concentration camp survivor, Eder gives each woman the attenti An absolute must-read for anyone, history buff or not. Eder’s “The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line” is not merely a recounting of the same World War II stories we have all heard before but a complete unearthing of those that have never been told. Each chapter is dedicated to a separate woman who pioneered into realms previously unexplored or disallowed to females. Whether a code-breaker, special forces operative, resistance fighter, or concentration camp survivor, Eder gives each woman the attention they deserve but had not previously received. In doing so, she weaves together a compilation of just a sample of the courage and determination of women during the Second World War to show that, while women helped immensely on the home front, they also didn’t shy away from sitting in the cockpits of warplanes and trenches of battlefields in the name of service to their countries, families, and fellow citizens.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ruth B.

    I was lucky to get an preview copy of Mari K. Eder’s outstanding book. As a retired military officer myself, I thought I knew a lot about women who served in WWII but I didn’t. This book is loaded with tributes to women who responded to threats wherever they existed. As I read chapter after chapter, I would think I had a favorite, only to decide they were all special. Eder writes with a clear and interesting style and she pays a lasting tribute to the featured women for all they risked and contr I was lucky to get an preview copy of Mari K. Eder’s outstanding book. As a retired military officer myself, I thought I knew a lot about women who served in WWII but I didn’t. This book is loaded with tributes to women who responded to threats wherever they existed. As I read chapter after chapter, I would think I had a favorite, only to decide they were all special. Eder writes with a clear and interesting style and she pays a lasting tribute to the featured women for all they risked and contributed. She shows what a difference women made, and how little they asked for or expected in return. The chapters at the end are especially reflective and inspirational, linking the past to the present and to the future. Women’s history, and world history, is advanced with this book, and that’s no small compliment. I strongly recommend The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Stoolfire

    I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line: Untold Stories of the Women Who Changed the Course of World War II by Mari K. Eder is a fascinating set of biographies featuring women heroes and their actions during World War II. I wasn't already familiar with most of them. At the most, I might recognize a name but no next to nothing else about them, but there's so much more I'd like to know about their lives and efforts now. I'm especially int I received an ARC from NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. The Girls Who Stepped Out of Line: Untold Stories of the Women Who Changed the Course of World War II by Mari K. Eder is a fascinating set of biographies featuring women heroes and their actions during World War II. I wasn't already familiar with most of them. At the most, I might recognize a name but no next to nothing else about them, but there's so much more I'd like to know about their lives and efforts now. I'm especially interested in getting to know Ida and Louise Cook. Those two sisters sounded like they made quite a team. Reading about women's experiences during wartime, especially WWII and the WASP, is one of a topic I can't resist and this author did a fantastic job of telling their stories.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kristine Kahn

    Both entertaining and informative, this well-crafted and well-researched book is about the little-known exploits of women who in WW II undertook courageous actions not then recognized as a woman's domain, or in some cases, right. These tales of heroic women are inspiring, not only for their recognition of strong women who served their country faithfully, but who did so by undertaking often dangerous steps , without need for reward or recognition. The author, herself a much decorated advocate f Both entertaining and informative, this well-crafted and well-researched book is about the little-known exploits of women who in WW II undertook courageous actions not then recognized as a woman's domain, or in some cases, right. These tales of heroic women are inspiring, not only for their recognition of strong women who served their country faithfully, but who did so by undertaking often dangerous steps , without need for reward or recognition. The author, herself a much decorated advocate for women in the military, has lovingly researched and revealed stories of women that serve as both forerunners and models for the women of today and the societal and cultural challenges they still face. An absorbing read that deserved to be told about women of whom their country can be proud!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Burd

    A wonderful book of the lives of many women who received little recognition at the time but who were instrumental in accomplishing tasks that led to the victory in WWII. From spies to code breakers to journalists to airplane pilots, these women led amazing and sometimes dangerous lives doing what only they could do. Their lives are inspirational, and even though they received little recognition at the time, as documents became declassified, their value to the war efforts was recognized and many A wonderful book of the lives of many women who received little recognition at the time but who were instrumental in accomplishing tasks that led to the victory in WWII. From spies to code breakers to journalists to airplane pilots, these women led amazing and sometimes dangerous lives doing what only they could do. Their lives are inspirational, and even though they received little recognition at the time, as documents became declassified, their value to the war efforts was recognized and many share a place with their make counterparts. Well researched and based on documentation and interviews, these stories of ordinary women inspire generations of women to achieve greatness. Great reading for anyone who wants to know more about the roles and contributions women made during the war. My only criticism is that I wanted to know more about each of these amazing women, many of whom have not had other books written about them. A great addition to women's history.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kristi Lewis

    This was a well written book by Mari Eder. The stories of the brave women who stepped out of line and made a difference during WW II were amazing, heroic and patriotic. They followed their calling into a man's world when they were needed. Its just sad it took so long her them to be honored and celebrated, and metals awarded. It's these women and all the others who filled in jobs that our men held prior to the war to keep our country running. Our great grandmothers, grandmothers, mothers, and aunt This was a well written book by Mari Eder. The stories of the brave women who stepped out of line and made a difference during WW II were amazing, heroic and patriotic. They followed their calling into a man's world when they were needed. Its just sad it took so long her them to be honored and celebrated, and metals awarded. It's these women and all the others who filled in jobs that our men held prior to the war to keep our country running. Our great grandmothers, grandmothers, mothers, and aunts, all helped to clear the path for our great granddaughters, granddaughters and daughters. We need these stories to continue to be told and not forgotten.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Louise Gray

    Amazing slice of history from different perspectives and with different voices. This book gives visibility to the key roles played by women in major historical events and does so in such an exciting, engaging way. The short “story” format really works here.

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