Hot Best Seller

Rewire Your OCD Brain: Powerful Neuroscience-Based Skills to Break Free from Obsessive Thoughts and Fears

Availability: Ready to download

Rewire the brain processes that cause obsessions and compulsions—and take back your life! If you’ve ever wondered why you seem to get trapped in an endless cycle of obsessive, compulsive thoughts, you don’t have to wonder anymore. Grounded in cutting-edge neuroscience and evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), Rewire Your OCD Brain will show you how and why your Rewire the brain processes that cause obsessions and compulsions—and take back your life! If you’ve ever wondered why you seem to get trapped in an endless cycle of obsessive, compulsive thoughts, you don’t have to wonder anymore. Grounded in cutting-edge neuroscience and evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), Rewire Your OCD Brain will show you how and why your brain gets stuck in a loop of obsessive thinking, uncertainty, and worry; and offers the tools you need to short-circuit this response and get your symptoms under control—for good.  Written by clinical psychologist Catherine Pittman and clinical neuropsychologist William Youngs, this groundbreaking book will show how neurological functions in your brain lead to obsessions, compulsions, and anxiety. You’ll also find tons of proven-effective coping strategies to help you manage your worst symptoms—including relaxation, exercise, healthy sleep habits, cognitive restructuring, cognitive defusion, distraction, and mindfulness.  The brain is powerful, and the more you work to change the way you respond to obsessive thoughts, the more resilient you’ll become. If you’re ready to rewire the brain processes that lie at the root of your obsessive thoughts, this book has everything you need to get started today.


Compare

Rewire the brain processes that cause obsessions and compulsions—and take back your life! If you’ve ever wondered why you seem to get trapped in an endless cycle of obsessive, compulsive thoughts, you don’t have to wonder anymore. Grounded in cutting-edge neuroscience and evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), Rewire Your OCD Brain will show you how and why your Rewire the brain processes that cause obsessions and compulsions—and take back your life! If you’ve ever wondered why you seem to get trapped in an endless cycle of obsessive, compulsive thoughts, you don’t have to wonder anymore. Grounded in cutting-edge neuroscience and evidence-based cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), Rewire Your OCD Brain will show you how and why your brain gets stuck in a loop of obsessive thinking, uncertainty, and worry; and offers the tools you need to short-circuit this response and get your symptoms under control—for good.  Written by clinical psychologist Catherine Pittman and clinical neuropsychologist William Youngs, this groundbreaking book will show how neurological functions in your brain lead to obsessions, compulsions, and anxiety. You’ll also find tons of proven-effective coping strategies to help you manage your worst symptoms—including relaxation, exercise, healthy sleep habits, cognitive restructuring, cognitive defusion, distraction, and mindfulness.  The brain is powerful, and the more you work to change the way you respond to obsessive thoughts, the more resilient you’ll become. If you’re ready to rewire the brain processes that lie at the root of your obsessive thoughts, this book has everything you need to get started today.

40 review for Rewire Your OCD Brain: Powerful Neuroscience-Based Skills to Break Free from Obsessive Thoughts and Fears

  1. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

    This is such an important and meaningful read. For the most part, people associate “organization” and “cleanliness” with OCD. People don’t understand how this is considered a mental illness, since almost all of what they see in people with OCD is from the outside. And I was one of those people. ...That was until I got diagnosed with OCD a couple months ago. Although all the symptoms were there since I was seven or eight, I misunderstood this mental illness so much, I never even considered that I This is such an important and meaningful read. For the most part, people associate “organization” and “cleanliness” with OCD. People don’t understand how this is considered a mental illness, since almost all of what they see in people with OCD is from the outside. And I was one of those people. ...That was until I got diagnosed with OCD a couple months ago. Although all the symptoms were there since I was seven or eight, I misunderstood this mental illness so much, I never even considered that I might have it. OCD is not what it looks like from the outside... it’s not always keeping your locker tidy and organizing your room every week. It’s like a demon in your head whispering the same stressful thoughts into your head every hour of the day, for months. A monster convincing you the thoughts are true or will become true if you don’t obey the compulsions. And ever since I was diagnosed, I wondered how that monster formed... This book tackled that so well. I learned so much about my brain and why at times it feels like I have absolutely no control over it. As an avid-fiction reader, I was surprised at how intrigued I was throughout this whole book. The brain is amazing, but at times, it’s evil. And how do you ever conquer over evil when you don’t know why it exists? Where it exists? How it formed? Just acknowledging that the brain, full of power and intelligence, actually makes mistakes, is scary. The part of the body that is in control over everything you say and do - can lie to you. It can misinterpret events, emotions, and thoughts, but since it’s your brain, you tend to think it’s more powerful and truthful than the rest of you. This can happen to anyone with anxiety. So remember that not everything you think is true. While I was only a few chapters into this, I wondered why I learned more from reading this book in one night than I had in the last year of life. There were multiple times that I went “Ohhh,” making sense of why so many of my thoughts and experiences with OCD happen/have happened. When I picked this back up again this morning, I started spewing off facts about the brain to my sister, and went on for over an hour about the cortex and amygdala, probably looking very well like a know-it-all who looks like she has no idea what she’s talking about. I read well into the afternoon, rarely looking away from the pages. This helped me so much. Who knew an ARC of a nonfiction book could make me understand so much about everything that happens in between my ears and others with OCD? I took away so much from this... And after being in a bad place for the last couple months, I feel inspired to accept the fact that although I can’t have control over every single thought that pops into my brain, I have control over how I react and I have the control to acknowledge that at times, the brain is honestly a lying, dumb, bitch. And with that, I highly recommend “Rewire Your OCD Brain,” to those who struggle with this tiring mental illness. You’re not alone, and you’re not an illness 💕💪. And to those who aren’t directly affected by OCD, I highly encourage you to research OCD & other mental illnesses and help spread awareness. 💗 (Please note I decided to include my experience not to receive attention, put down those without OCD, or lessen other’s experiences with mental illnesses. Thank you to Netgalley for providing a free ARC in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Didu

    It would had been a 5/5 but it's too much science related (not a lot of advice). It would had been a 5/5 but it's too much science related (not a lot of advice).

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Peterson

    Rewire Your OCD Brain by Catherine M. Pittman and William H. Youngs explains how your brain works and how you can take advantage of that to manage OCD. The book focuses on the two main areas in the brain that are relevant to OCD, the cortex and amygdala. It explains the role of each, how they communicate with each other, and how that contributes to symptoms. Key points that are emphasized repeatedly are that thoughts are just thoughts, but the amygdala assumes they represent truth and generates t Rewire Your OCD Brain by Catherine M. Pittman and William H. Youngs explains how your brain works and how you can take advantage of that to manage OCD. The book focuses on the two main areas in the brain that are relevant to OCD, the cortex and amygdala. It explains the role of each, how they communicate with each other, and how that contributes to symptoms. Key points that are emphasized repeatedly are that thoughts are just thoughts, but the amygdala assumes they represent truth and generates the fight/flight/freeze response, which is misinterpreted as being a signal that there’s actual danger. The authors also explain that the feeling like you’re going crazy sometimes actually makes a lot of sense when you know how the brain works, because the cortex (and therefore your conscious thought) isn’t in control of the vehicle when the amygdala is getting you ready to run away from the tiger that only exists in your thoughts. The authors aren’t dismissive with any of this, and reassure the reader that your amygdala is reacting the same way whether the tiger is in your thoughts or in front of you. There’s a lot of normalizing in a good way, as in, your brain does [x], so for you to experience [y] is to be expected, and it doesn’t mean you’re a freak. The authors say that people with OCD underestimate how commonly people have random intrusive thoughts (it actually happens all the time), and a key difference is that in OCD, people get fused to their thoughts, thinking they represent absolute truth. These intrusive thoughts may come from the left hemisphere, which uses words, or the right hemisphere, which uses visuals and other sensory material. After explaining all the background information on how things work, the book shifts into strategies for rewiring both the cortex and the amygdala. These strategies are all tied back into brain functioning, and the authors acknowledge that they may sound too simple to work, but they actually do. Exercise can help in the moment when you’re experiencing distress because the amygdala is preparing you to run away from the tiger, so exercising helps burn off some of that adrenaline rush. Slow, deep breathing recommended as the best anti-anxiety strategy there is, as it’s the most effective way to calm the amygdala. Exposure and response prevention is also discussed, and framed as the only way for the amygdala to learn what’s not dangerous. I love the biology focus, because I’m really into that kind of thing in general. Even if it’s not generally your thing, though, knowing the underlying processes really helps to make it clear why OCD does what it does. Although it’s very brain-focused, the authors used clear, simple language without relying on a lot of jargon, and it doesn’t go into unnecessary detail. Everything is clearly related to how the brain stuff impacts the way people are feeling. I think this book makes a great choice for anyone wanting to gain a greater understanding of the nuts and bolts behind OCD. I received a reviewer copy from the publisher through Netgalley.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly Barnes

    Rewire your OCD brain by Catherine M. Pittman and William Youngs attempts to explain how and why your brain gets stuck in obsessive thoughts. This book delves deeply into the underpinnings of the brain and the two main areas of the brain that directly impact obsessive thinking: the amygdala and the cortex. The authors clearly explain these parts of the brain and how they contribute to and impact obsessive thinking patterns. Not only is the anatomy discussed, but also, proven strategies to combat Rewire your OCD brain by Catherine M. Pittman and William Youngs attempts to explain how and why your brain gets stuck in obsessive thoughts. This book delves deeply into the underpinnings of the brain and the two main areas of the brain that directly impact obsessive thinking: the amygdala and the cortex. The authors clearly explain these parts of the brain and how they contribute to and impact obsessive thinking patterns. Not only is the anatomy discussed, but also, proven strategies to combat your OCD. Some of these include: relaxation, exercise, sleep, distraction, and changing your thinking. This book is an amazing resource for anyone trying to not only gain a greater understanding of the biology behind OCD, but also, those that are trying to engage in techniques to combat OCD. Thank you to Netgalley and the publisher for the advance review copy in exchange for my honest review.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Emma

    This book provides valuable information on the OCD brain and outlines tools to help get OCD symptoms under control. As someone who lives with OCD, here is why I loved it. The authors do an excellent job of explaining the inner workings of the OCD brain using everyday language and comparisons that are easy to digest and understand. Even when it got a bit scientific, I never became overwhelmed or confused, and I learned so much about how and why my brain functions the way it does. I also learned m This book provides valuable information on the OCD brain and outlines tools to help get OCD symptoms under control. As someone who lives with OCD, here is why I loved it. The authors do an excellent job of explaining the inner workings of the OCD brain using everyday language and comparisons that are easy to digest and understand. Even when it got a bit scientific, I never became overwhelmed or confused, and I learned so much about how and why my brain functions the way it does. I also learned more about how and why some people may be predisposed to OCD. Also, this book outlines so many helpful coping strategies and methods, and includes different types of tools for different types of people. I already practice some of these methods, but others are brand new to me! Personally, I feel so seen and heard in this book. The authors sprinkle in little scenarios that are so incredibly relatable to someone with OCD, and reading these scenarios made me feel less alone. Finally, it’s easy to see that the authors genuinely care about helping people who live with OCD, and that goes a long way for me as a reader and as someone who lives with this disorder. I highly recommend this to anyone struggling with OCD or to anyone who wants to learn more about this mental health disorder. Thank you to NetGalley and New Harbinger Publications for the advance copy in exchange for an honest review. This book publishes June 1, 2021.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

    Rewire Your OCD Brain is a self-help book aimed at helping the reader manage their OCD symptoms. Focused heavily on the physiological side of OCD, this book includes multiple chapters explaining the functions in the brain that lead to the obsessions and compulsions of OCD. Rewire Your OCD Brain also includes tips on how to manage each part of the brain that contributes to OCD behaviors, with emphasis in cognitive behavioral therapy with exposure and response prevention. The content provided in Re Rewire Your OCD Brain is a self-help book aimed at helping the reader manage their OCD symptoms. Focused heavily on the physiological side of OCD, this book includes multiple chapters explaining the functions in the brain that lead to the obsessions and compulsions of OCD. Rewire Your OCD Brain also includes tips on how to manage each part of the brain that contributes to OCD behaviors, with emphasis in cognitive behavioral therapy with exposure and response prevention. The content provided in Rewire Your OCD Brain is incredibly useful. The chapters that go into detail on the brain functions behind OCD behaviors may seem daunting for anyone looking for a quick read on the subject. However, this is all very valuable information because when you understand the biological responses behind OCD, it really makes the disorder easier to grasp and helps treatment feel possible. Backing the treatment suggestions in CBT/ERP is great, and I appreciated that there were sections on how to treat each part of the brain. I would recommend this book for people dealing with OCD or those wanting to become more familiar with the topic, and I would suggest pairing this book along side an additional workbook-style book. Thanks to Netgalley and New Harbinger Publications, Inc. for this ARC; this is my honest and voluntary review.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Nandika

  8. 5 out of 5

    Manny

  9. 5 out of 5

    Rehan

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emilia

  11. 5 out of 5

    Heather Nicole

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ines (Bookstaroom)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Khuey40

  14. 4 out of 5

    Anne

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jessirey Medado

  16. 5 out of 5

    Naman

  17. 4 out of 5

    Dan Ianchis

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dominika Betáková

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sophia

  20. 5 out of 5

    Karli

  21. 4 out of 5

    Walter

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mr. November

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nik Dolničar

  24. 5 out of 5

    Magda w RPA

  25. 5 out of 5

    love2read

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ashlyn Campbell

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ryosuke

  28. 5 out of 5

    Nita Shoyket

  29. 4 out of 5

    TinaTheBookDragon

  30. 5 out of 5

    Maisie

  31. 5 out of 5

    Kit

  32. 4 out of 5

    Nejme Mahamid

  33. 4 out of 5

    Jenn

  34. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Galt

  35. 4 out of 5

    Nada Ezzat

  36. 5 out of 5

    Akshita

  37. 5 out of 5

    Amy Lancaster

  38. 5 out of 5

    jules

  39. 4 out of 5

    Leigh

  40. 4 out of 5

    Ramona Porter

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.