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Every Minute Is a Day: A Doctor, an Emergency Room, and a City Under Siege

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With this debut, emergency room doctor Meyer collaborates with journalist Koeppel to tell a personal account of the COVID-19 pandemic. While the narrative predominately revolves around Meyer's story, it also includes vignettes from interviews with several other doctors, nurses, and medical assistants, to indicate the wide range of U.S. health care workers' experiences. Mey With this debut, emergency room doctor Meyer collaborates with journalist Koeppel to tell a personal account of the COVID-19 pandemic. While the narrative predominately revolves around Meyer's story, it also includes vignettes from interviews with several other doctors, nurses, and medical assistants, to indicate the wide range of U.S. health care workers' experiences. Meyer recounts the pandemic from the period before it was identified, through its emergence in the United States, the virus's terrifying uncontrolled community spread, and concern about the long-term repercussions of COVID-19. The co-authors argue that forging personal connections is vital to practicing emergency medicine, and they impart health care providers' efforts to compensate for the myriad ways that personal connection was hampered by pandemic precautionary measures. The book isn't only a document of trauma; it also notes moments of joy, like when medical staff discovered new treatments with better patient outcomes, or when Meyer's mentor survived after contracting the virus.


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With this debut, emergency room doctor Meyer collaborates with journalist Koeppel to tell a personal account of the COVID-19 pandemic. While the narrative predominately revolves around Meyer's story, it also includes vignettes from interviews with several other doctors, nurses, and medical assistants, to indicate the wide range of U.S. health care workers' experiences. Mey With this debut, emergency room doctor Meyer collaborates with journalist Koeppel to tell a personal account of the COVID-19 pandemic. While the narrative predominately revolves around Meyer's story, it also includes vignettes from interviews with several other doctors, nurses, and medical assistants, to indicate the wide range of U.S. health care workers' experiences. Meyer recounts the pandemic from the period before it was identified, through its emergence in the United States, the virus's terrifying uncontrolled community spread, and concern about the long-term repercussions of COVID-19. The co-authors argue that forging personal connections is vital to practicing emergency medicine, and they impart health care providers' efforts to compensate for the myriad ways that personal connection was hampered by pandemic precautionary measures. The book isn't only a document of trauma; it also notes moments of joy, like when medical staff discovered new treatments with better patient outcomes, or when Meyer's mentor survived after contracting the virus.

30 review for Every Minute Is a Day: A Doctor, an Emergency Room, and a City Under Siege

  1. 5 out of 5

    Petra is slightly on hiatus doing bookshop work

    The book started with a simple text from Dan Koeppel to his cousin Robert Meyer, right at the beginning of the pandemic, he asked him how he was doing and how he rated, on a scale of 1-10, where he was in handling the crisis. '100' was the answer. This waswhen no-one knew what to do, when test-kits and PPE were hard for hospitals to come by and hospitals were swamped by people who couldn't breathe. And from that text, Dan became the stress-reliever for Rob. He got texts, emails, phone calls, voi The book started with a simple text from Dan Koeppel to his cousin Robert Meyer, right at the beginning of the pandemic, he asked him how he was doing and how he rated, on a scale of 1-10, where he was in handling the crisis. '100' was the answer. This waswhen no-one knew what to do, when test-kits and PPE were hard for hospitals to come by and hospitals were swamped by people who couldn't breathe. And from that text, Dan became the stress-reliever for Rob. He got texts, emails, phone calls, voice memos, personal discussions, anything he needed to say that he didn't want to tell his family who would worry. And out of them grew this book. The book is all about the impact of Covid on the hospital and staff. How little they could do for people, how much they feared getting it themselves and passing it on to their families. How people suffering from other treatable illnesses couldn't get treated, there was no room in the hospitals. Every non-emergency surgery, everywhere, was defered or cancelled, every necessary treatment was - if you couldn't pull strings, as the author did for the writer when he was diagnosed with bladder cancer - postponed, delayed and for some that was too late. My Covid story. (view spoiler)[ I got Covid right at the beginning. I was staying in Boca Raton for a couple of months early in 2020. I had all the symptoms (except for muscle aches), the headache, the intestinal issues, the fever, the cough, and extreme exhaustion like I had never felt before. I lost my sense of taste and smell. For five days I was feverish and light-headed, the next two I hardly moved, getting out of bed required a huge amount of energy. On the third, the cough was driving me mad so I decided to walk to CVS just a mile away. It took a couple of hours to get that far. I went to the pharmacy and stood one side of the counter and maybe 18" away stood the pharmacist. I coughed for him, and he gave me some stuff to take. I Uber'd home exhausted. We had both heard of Covid, but it wasn't on either of our daily radar at that stage. He said I didn't have it as I had a runny nose and was sneezing. That's how little we knew. I knew who I'd caught it from (or thought I did), my best buddy. He had similar symptoms but a much worse chest and went to his doctor who'd told him he had a very bad sinus attack and got infected. That's how little the medical profession knew. Both of us recovered rapidly. Next day, I spent the day in bed exhausted, the day after that I went out on a date in the evening. The day after, Sunday, I went back to Miami and walked around Wynwood Walls outdoor art gallery, and had lunch. Three days later I went home to the island. By now people had begun to take precautions. I changed my seat on the plane to sit alone, sailing back to the island I sat outside. After shopping with my son (who was off-colour with 'sinus' issues for three days, or maybe it was Covid) I self-isolated for 14 days. How many people I infected I don't know, but no one I had contact with became ill enough to go to hospital. Precautions were all about social distancing. Then it was hand-sanitizing and finally masks. But that was more than a month after I had been walking around coughing thinking it was flu. Six months later and I could taste my food again without dousing it in hot pepper sauce and salt. (hide spoiler)] I got vaccinated, the first I had a bad reaction to, in bed for a few days, ill for 5 and it gave me tinnitus, hissing in my ears that has never gone away. The second was a two-day reaction. I didn't get it for me I thought I probably had antibodies, but it was for supposed herd immunity, which is never going to happen because the virus mutates too fast. Also it is not a traditional vaccine that protects against getting the disease, but one that produces antibodies that will lessen the impact of it to generally no symptoms or very light ones. Still, it protects the hospitals from being deluged with so many Covid patients that those with other diseases cannot get into the hospitals and will continue suffering when they could have been treated, had surgery, been cured. After reading this book, I see that we owe it to those who are not in good health to protect the availability of treatment for them. It could be any one of us that gets something that isn't as urgent as emergency care that needs diagnosis, treatment or worse - elective surgery, and we might not be able to get it if the hospital is full of Covid patients. Get vaccinated. ____________________ Back in Wuhan in February 2020 (view spoiler)[I got Covid that month (hide spoiler)] Fang Fang was writing Wuhan Diary: Dispatches from the Original Epicenter. The Chinese did everything they could to suppress it. Back then there were 70,000 people in Wuhan who had it. On worldometer.com China only admits to having 96K infections in the entire country up to today. Back then Fang Fang says the crematoria couldn't keep up and they were building hospitals and crematoria literally overnight. I believe her, I think China is the evil empire.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    "I live by the creed 'Do no harm.' But Covid-19 has done the harm, not by a lack of medical competence or goodwill, but because it is a disease that physicians - and an entire medical profession, an entire nation, and entire world - was not prepared to handle." -- Rob Meyer, M.D. on page 199 Robert Meyer is an emergency medicine physician of twenty-five years experience, and part of the E/R staff at a Bronx-based medical center that is routinely one of the busiest (handling well over a quarter-mi "I live by the creed 'Do no harm.' But Covid-19 has done the harm, not by a lack of medical competence or goodwill, but because it is a disease that physicians - and an entire medical profession, an entire nation, and entire world - was not prepared to handle." -- Rob Meyer, M.D. on page 199 Robert Meyer is an emergency medicine physician of twenty-five years experience, and part of the E/R staff at a Bronx-based medical center that is routinely one of the busiest (handling well over a quarter-million patients every year) in the New York City metropolitan area. When his cousin, author Dan Koeppel, sent a text message to him in the early stages of the 2020 pandemic - inquiring "On a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being overwhelmed, where do you think you are?" - Dr. Meyer honestly replied "100." Thus began a steady communication between them which resulted in Every Minute is a Day, with Dr. Meyer documenting his work and the fluctuating situation from March to September 2020. This was a very engaging book - refreshingly free of any sort of overt political stance / bashing or 'soapbox' moments that could be divisive - as it simply places the reader in the trenches alongside Meyer and a handful of his colleagues as they are inundated with a record number of cases. They are depicted as a professional and hardworking group (their motto could be borrowed from the U.S. Marine Corps mantra "improvise, adapt, and overcome") who all somehow manage not to crack up, even when some of their very own friends and loved ones - including a respected older physician who mentored a number of the staff, including Dr. Meyer - suffer and/or perish from the disease. At the risk of sounding morbid, this was a really page-turning vivid account that is likely an excellent representation of what was happened at countless urban hospitals across the nation.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sue

    Written from the perspective of a 20 year emergency department physician in the Bronx, 20 years in the same hospital. He told his ideas, thoughts, worries, fears, everything, to his cousin with whom he collaborated on this memoir, in serial essays, to report on the beginning of the Covid-19 epidemic in New York City. The book covers the time period from the days of the early rumors of a new illness in early March, 2020 through to October of 2020 when the disease has already gone through more tha Written from the perspective of a 20 year emergency department physician in the Bronx, 20 years in the same hospital. He told his ideas, thoughts, worries, fears, everything, to his cousin with whom he collaborated on this memoir, in serial essays, to report on the beginning of the Covid-19 epidemic in New York City. The book covers the time period from the days of the early rumors of a new illness in early March, 2020 through to October of 2020 when the disease has already gone through more than one phase. Much of what I read I have had glimpses of over the past 18 months, but now I feel that I have a better idea of what was happening in all of those ERs in hard hit areas in the spring of 2020, as well as in the ICUs as everyone struggled to learn how to treat these patients who didn’t follow the disease courses seen before. And of course, now the same is happening again but with a difference; the doctors of 2021 are benefiting from lessons learned on 2020. While there are hard and difficult moments here, there are also uplifting and happy moments. The camaraderie among all staff is a high point even if at times it consists of allowing others to be alone. Perhaps the major takeaway I found here as I read was that, in my words but Dr. Meyer’s thought, we ( the nation, the world, the medical world) can’t afford to ever be caught this flat footed again...and there will be an again, another virus. I do recommend reading this book if you have enough personal distance from Covid right now. You can get a realistic view of the difficult but very caring way these many health care workers did their utmost to help those who entered their emergency department. A copy of this book was provided by the publisher through NetGalley in return for an honest review.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jenny (Reading Envy)

    I wasn't sure I was ready to read *about* the pandemic since we are still in it, but this is a compelling close account from an emergency room doctor (and colleagues) who works at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx. He details the quick adaptability of medical professionals as information changed and cases grew, and even as covid changed in how it presented. I didn't realize the gastrointestinal symptoms had become so prevalent, and I also didn't know that paranoia and confusion were so common. (I I wasn't sure I was ready to read *about* the pandemic since we are still in it, but this is a compelling close account from an emergency room doctor (and colleagues) who works at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx. He details the quick adaptability of medical professionals as information changed and cases grew, and even as covid changed in how it presented. I didn't realize the gastrointestinal symptoms had become so prevalent, and I also didn't know that paranoia and confusion were so common. (I knew there were patients that continued to "not believe" they had the virus, but assumed that was more political than virological.) I hadn't heard that flipping patients on their stomachs saved so many from having to be intubated. There is also a lot about the emotional toll, on emergency medicine as its own specialty, and historical context for medical training in this region. (Learning from HIV/AIDS and 9/11 still didn't prepare them for scenarios where every facility was overloaded and supplies ran out.)

  5. 5 out of 5

    Karen R

    “People are dying because nobody knows what to do.” This book’s content is breathtaking. From the perspective of compassionate and dedicated medical angels of NYC’s most overwhelmed hospital, Montefiore. Staff is blindsided by the fast-moving virus and caught unprepared for the massive number of sick and dying people walking into their ER. One statistic states that the hospital’s three admissions at the beginning of March grew to more than 1,000 by the end of the month. A must read!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Meredith Hoy

    I listened to this book and the audio version was fantastic. The NY accent added to the story and made me feel as though Dr. Meyer was talking to me. The details of his ER experience in "the covid zone" will be with me for quite some time, and as someone whose life has been saved by incredible doctors - thank you for all that you do 🖤 I listened to this book and the audio version was fantastic. The NY accent added to the story and made me feel as though Dr. Meyer was talking to me. The details of his ER experience in "the covid zone" will be with me for quite some time, and as someone whose life has been saved by incredible doctors - thank you for all that you do 🖤

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    My Shelf Awareness review: The Bronx's Montefiore Medical Center serves an ethnically diverse community of the working poor in New York City. Between March and September 2020, 6,000 Covid-19 patients crossed its threshold. Nearly 1,000 of them died. Unfolding in terrifying real time, Every Minute Is a Day is emergency room doctor Robert Meyer's riveting diary of an unprecedented crisis. Compared to AIDS and 9/11, the previous medical disasters of Meyer's 25-year career, Covid felt bewildering for My Shelf Awareness review: The Bronx's Montefiore Medical Center serves an ethnically diverse community of the working poor in New York City. Between March and September 2020, 6,000 Covid-19 patients crossed its threshold. Nearly 1,000 of them died. Unfolding in terrifying real time, Every Minute Is a Day is emergency room doctor Robert Meyer's riveting diary of an unprecedented crisis. Compared to AIDS and 9/11, the previous medical disasters of Meyer's 25-year career, Covid felt bewildering for how quickly the situation changed. High fever and dangerously low blood oxygen were the initial hallmarks of the illness, but new symptoms and potential therapies emerged all the time. Medical staff learned by doing. For instance, "proning" (turning people onto their stomachs) was found to forestall intubation in many cases. As the morgue filled up, Meyer was distressed not just by patients dying apart from loved ones, but at the thought of seriously ill people avoiding hospital treatment for fear of infection. Relating bereavements from his past-his mother was killed by a drunk driver; his son's friend died of cancer-helps him set the pandemic in context. He also weaves in Montefiore's history and his colleagues' struggles. Covid turned personal when his mentor and the ER director's father both tested positive. Compiled into a firsthand account by journalist Dan Koeppel, Meyer's cousin, and based on interviews as well as e-mails and texts they exchanged, this is hard-hitting nonfiction in the vein of Five Days at Memorial. Its re-creation of an atmosphere of daily panic and uncertainty makes it as absorbing as any thriller. (Posted with permission from Shelf Awareness.)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Cari

    This is a unique partnership - written from the perspective of Dr. Rob Meyer, who was on the ground during the early days of COVID in NYC, but authored by both Meyer and his cousin, writer Dan Koeppel. It's a harrowing read, not only because we are still in the throes of the pandemic that doesn't seem to ever let up, but because it draws the reader back to the time when we still didn't know much about the disease, and it killed so fast. My experience locked down in suburban Ohio was nowhere near This is a unique partnership - written from the perspective of Dr. Rob Meyer, who was on the ground during the early days of COVID in NYC, but authored by both Meyer and his cousin, writer Dan Koeppel. It's a harrowing read, not only because we are still in the throes of the pandemic that doesn't seem to ever let up, but because it draws the reader back to the time when we still didn't know much about the disease, and it killed so fast. My experience locked down in suburban Ohio was nowhere near as challenging as those of the people in the Bronx during that scary time. Though it's not easy to read, it's a valuable chronicle of that time, deftly written and looking back with the perspective we have now. More books about this topic will surely be released with even more information, but this raw and honest account will stick in my mind.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Schultz

    Read if you: Want a stark, moving, and harrrowing personal account of hospital medicine in the COVID-19 era. The COVID-19 books are here--mostly nonfiction now, but fiction is on the way. Like other major historical events, personal accounts are the first ones to publish, and the ones that seem to be the most popular with readers. Although this is not a long read, it's emotionally powerful and memorable long after you read it. Librarians/booksellers: Definitely purchase if nonfiction books about Read if you: Want a stark, moving, and harrrowing personal account of hospital medicine in the COVID-19 era. The COVID-19 books are here--mostly nonfiction now, but fiction is on the way. Like other major historical events, personal accounts are the first ones to publish, and the ones that seem to be the most popular with readers. Although this is not a long read, it's emotionally powerful and memorable long after you read it. Librarians/booksellers: Definitely purchase if nonfiction books about the coronavirus have been popular. Many thanks to Crown Publishing and NetGalley for a digital review copy in exchange for an honest review,

  10. 4 out of 5

    Mbgirl

    Covid is real. Life is sacred. This virus has thrown a large wrench in hopefully the way that we now prioritize our lives. And as my pastor recently said, the primacy of love and compassion is clear. The curve ball with the st 3 bladder ca got me. Thank you for the compassion and dedication and selflessness of those mentioned therein.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Megz

    Like many healthcare workers, I have often turned to narratives to cope with my work, and these have been plentiful during the (COVID) pandemic. But eventually one reaches a point where you can no longer look into the mirror of your daily life – and I have reached that limit much sooner than I expected. Every Minute Is A Day by Meyer (MD) and Koeppel is dedicated to the “many, many people [who] died alone, without their loved ones.” This is important: the express purpose of this book was “to hon Like many healthcare workers, I have often turned to narratives to cope with my work, and these have been plentiful during the (COVID) pandemic. But eventually one reaches a point where you can no longer look into the mirror of your daily life – and I have reached that limit much sooner than I expected. Every Minute Is A Day by Meyer (MD) and Koeppel is dedicated to the “many, many people [who] died alone, without their loved ones.” This is important: the express purpose of this book was “to honor and respect those this disease claimed.” I cringed when I first considered my rating for Every Minute Is A Day. I did not exactly love Meyer’s memoir, but I do not doubt that it will find its audience of ardent readers. With the advent of COVID literature, I have often found myself drawing parallels with books written about World War II. For as long as I have been a reader, WWII has been a favourite topic of authors and readers. Why is it that the world so loves a good Auschwitz novel? Reading Every Minute Is A Day gave me some insight into that phenomenon. While WWII took place long enough ago that most readers alive today did not experience it personally; it occurred recently enough that the effects on our lives remain tangible. Conversely, the world is still living COVID, and throughout Every Minute I have not been able to clear the term “too soon” from my mind. Meyer writes how “the rules kept changing” – and they continue to do so. In some ways, Every Minute feels like a tribute written too soon. Does Meyer’s memoir achieve what it set out to do? I believe so. It may clear up much confusion for laypersons. I think it may provide peace when people think about their relatives, and how they could not be with them in their final moments. I hope that survivors will know not only that their healthcare workers cared, but how they cared. I hope they will know that the masks, the PPE, the difficulty communicating, were all as challenging for their doctors as for patients and relatives. That death weighed heavily on them, and that any perceived inadequacies were doubly perceived by healthcare workers themselves. So much of the memoir should be relatable, but the authors actually detract from that by focussing largely on Montefiore – a hospital they are clearly, and rightfully, very proud of. But that singular focus leads to an atmosphere of “us, alone” – we alone were suffering. We alone were scrambling to make things work. That this is not the author’s intention is not the point – the impression that it creates, is. What I miss most of all is growth, and hope. Every Minute depicts so well the despair. The confusion. The feelings of failure. But by the end of it all, I cannot see the growth I would have liked to see, and once more I venture that it comes down to timing. The author cannot depict that which is yet to come fully to fruition. Again, I do not think the time is right for THIS memoir. Soon, but not yet. I received an advanced review copy of this book via Netgalley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    This book chronicles the catastrophic beginning of the Covid pandemic in the USA from the viewpoint of Dr. Robert Meyer, who worked in New York City in the Montefiore emergency department, one of the largest in the country. They were quickly flooded with the first wave of sick and dying people. There were no guidelines for treating Covid, so they treated symptoms and learned more from experience. The book also has background on the author's career, including the very humane philosophy/approach o This book chronicles the catastrophic beginning of the Covid pandemic in the USA from the viewpoint of Dr. Robert Meyer, who worked in New York City in the Montefiore emergency department, one of the largest in the country. They were quickly flooded with the first wave of sick and dying people. There were no guidelines for treating Covid, so they treated symptoms and learned more from experience. The book also has background on the author's career, including the very humane philosophy/approach of the Montefiore emergency department. They were patient-centered, paying a lot of attention to each person, but the pandemic made that almost impossible. The book seemed slow-moving to me at first, but as I read on, I realized that the background at the beginning was needed to set the stage, and it comes together very well. As well as the hectic situation at the hospital, the book includes accounts of the author's family, friends, and associates who were affected by Covid. The pandemic was traumatic for all the medical providers, and you can see how telling the story provides some therapy for Dr. Meyer. His co-author is his cousin, a journalist, who also figures into the book.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

    Personal account of an ER doctor in the Bronx coping with COVID-19 from the first days on. It’s shocking how casual they were with it from the beginning limiting their diagnoses to such specific symptoms that they missed many cases. Testing and PPE was short so they used it sparingly. But something that I find strange is that the US didn’t follow what was successful in other countries so our sickness and death rate was so much higher. This book is a snippet of the American experience of COVID-19 Personal account of an ER doctor in the Bronx coping with COVID-19 from the first days on. It’s shocking how casual they were with it from the beginning limiting their diagnoses to such specific symptoms that they missed many cases. Testing and PPE was short so they used it sparingly. But something that I find strange is that the US didn’t follow what was successful in other countries so our sickness and death rate was so much higher. This book is a snippet of the American experience of COVID-19.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Great perspective.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    A very tough, but excellent read. The story of an emergency room doctor experiencing a pandemic should be read by everyone, especially people who deny the truth about Covid-19.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alex Kogay

    I can't believe that this book and thousands of stories like this one are out there and there are still people who won't believe this pandemic is the real deal. Devastating. I can't believe that this book and thousands of stories like this one are out there and there are still people who won't believe this pandemic is the real deal. Devastating.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    This book was incredible and as soon as I started it, I couldn't put it down. Told from the standpoint of an ER doctor in the heart of the Covid surge in the Bronx, we get an insider's look at how the pandemic crisis unfolded in hospitals and the level of gut-wrenching devastation it has left in it's wake. As I read the book, I had a hard time wrapping my head around the fact that this book is non-fiction and happened within the last year. It literally reads like a dystopian, sci-fi novel. Meyer This book was incredible and as soon as I started it, I couldn't put it down. Told from the standpoint of an ER doctor in the heart of the Covid surge in the Bronx, we get an insider's look at how the pandemic crisis unfolded in hospitals and the level of gut-wrenching devastation it has left in it's wake. As I read the book, I had a hard time wrapping my head around the fact that this book is non-fiction and happened within the last year. It literally reads like a dystopian, sci-fi novel. Meyer and Koeppel did an amazing job of injecting humanity into something that so many have worked hard to distance themselves from. I have already recommended this book to friends and family as there were too many parts for me to even share with them.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Sandy

    I know, I know, I know. People are tired of hearing about Covid but I really wanted to hear from someone different. Someone who actually worked on the front lines, in an area different than my own and I wanted to hear his own words about what he experienced and witnessed with his own eyes. I really enjoyed this book, in fact, the book exceeded my expectations. At first, I hesitated on reading it, afraid it might contain difficult medical jargon but the book was very down-to-earth. This book cent I know, I know, I know. People are tired of hearing about Covid but I really wanted to hear from someone different. Someone who actually worked on the front lines, in an area different than my own and I wanted to hear his own words about what he experienced and witnessed with his own eyes. I really enjoyed this book, in fact, the book exceeded my expectations. At first, I hesitated on reading it, afraid it might contain difficult medical jargon but the book was very down-to-earth. This book centers on Montefiore Health System in Harlem which serves about 1.5 million people annually. With their staff including their medical students, their facilities including their modern equipment, they feel that there’s no better equipped hospital to serve Covid patients than their building. Within one month of receiving their first Covid patient, the hospital gets control of the situation but there’s no end in sight. They were able to manage the shortages that came with the demand of this illness while still providing what they could to their patients and staff. The hospital experienced highs along with the lows while they provided care for their patients, those highs amongst all the chaos and despair provided hope and strength for another day. There were many references that I enjoyed in this book, remarks that stood out as I read them. The first one referred to how the hospital dealt with the crisis. This state of mind continues today as officials examine the booster vaccine. The doctors learned as they go. They learned about the illness from others, they learned from doing something different, and they learned from going outside-the-box. This illness is new, it’s something our society has not dealt with before. This is a new crisis- there are no set rules, there is no handout to follow, no set procedures in place. We are creating the handout and the rules as the days on the calendar move forward and unfortunately, as people get sick, die, and refused to believe that this illness really exists. The second comment that stuck with me was how the medical staff put everything on hold while they dealt with Covid. How will that effect our future? What will happen if we encounter another untreatable illness? I stop and think about the implications of this time? What has this done to us as a nation and to us around the world? Has this united us or tore us apart? According to a few surveys, our children’s education has suffered. That’s our future. How long will we continue to argue and battle what is “right?” There was a wake-up moment in Harlem when other colleagues in other areas of the hospital started to offer their help. Months earlier they’ve been too scared to help but now, they see how things are not letting up and they feel the need to pitch in but how? They don’t have the training to work in the ER. The emergency doctors took them, they trained them on something/anything that they thought they could do, they needed another pair of hands, someone to provide some relief. These newly trained ER staff members thought they were scared before, well working on the front lines now, they’re realizing just how bad Covid really is. I didn’t expect a happy story and I found myself crying a few times while I read this book, the emotional toil and the personal stories hit me. You never knew how things would turn out. An image that stayed with me as I read this book was the person lying in the hospital, just waiting, all alone. Imagine yourself lying there, alone, isolated, no TV or entertainment, all you hear is the constant beeping of the monitors all around you and the noises of the staff as they scramble to assist the others that are lying nearby. How do you feel? Sick, helpless, defeated, worried, deflated….. It’s a crisis that’s hitting every continent and not everyone is able or willing to stop/control it. You need to be able to live your life, not just survive but live. We need to remember all of those who have died, what we have learned through these individuals, and we need to honor those who have helped us along the way. It’s a great read and one that I highly recommend. I appreciate the two cousins getting together and sharing this story with us and although, I haven’t witnessed it firsthand, I have heard enough stories from friends and loved ones that I don’t want to nor do I need to, to understand how serious this crisis is. Emergency medicine is constantly changing and you have to remember that no one has all the answers yet. Stay well everyone. 5 stars

  19. 4 out of 5

    Cozy Cat Reviews

    This is a true remarkable journey told by a highly respected emergency room physician of 25 years of the truth of covid and the effect the pandemic had on our health care workers. . I wish all covid deniers and anti vaccine types would read this book. Thank you to the publisher, Net Galley and the author. I was grateful to read this most inspiring book. I highly recommend everyone read this book to fully understand the depth and despair of this pandemic we are fighting. Everyone reading this wil This is a true remarkable journey told by a highly respected emergency room physician of 25 years of the truth of covid and the effect the pandemic had on our health care workers. . I wish all covid deniers and anti vaccine types would read this book. Thank you to the publisher, Net Galley and the author. I was grateful to read this most inspiring book. I highly recommend everyone read this book to fully understand the depth and despair of this pandemic we are fighting. Everyone reading this will have the utmost respect for the unimaginable difficulties our health care workers and doctors are facing. Robert Meyer is an emergency medicine physician of twenty-five years experience, and doctor on staff at a Bronx medical center that is one of the most populated in New York City . His cousin is author Dan Koeppel. Dan sent a text message to him in the early stages of the 2020 pandemic - "On a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being overwhelmed what do you think?" - Dr. Meyer replied "100." They began a regular daily discussion of the covid situation from the onset throughout Fall 2020. The daily body count, the loss of patient after patient, the despair , the lack of PPE for employees the covid deniers that attacked our health care workers, the impossible odds of losing more patients day after day. The refrigeration trucks backed up to the hospital full of dead covid patients. ( A friend of mine that is a neighbor of this hospital saw the trucks every day for months). It is all honestly and truthfully documented here. The remarkable and awe inspiring staff that dedicated themselves to their patients and struggled to save those with covid. Their dedication is so inspiring that we should all be grateful that such professionals existed for our loved ones who became ill with covid and died. The communication here is raw, honest and a real time view of how the doctors and and health care support staff suffered. I highly recommend this book for everyone to read to fully understand the magnitude of covid and what our hospitals went through. i lost 3 people early on in the first stages of covid so I understood about much of what was going on and have friends that are nursing staff in various hospitals. So I was aware of this impact of covid throughout our country . For all covid deniers and all anti vaccine types you need to read this book. This book is a education in the truth of covid and the magnitude of the pandemic on our health care system. Its heart wrenching but necessary to read to truly understand that our medical staff are the utmost in professionals and handled the effects of covid for each individual patient with the most loving care .

  20. 4 out of 5

    C

    Thank you Goodreads Giveaways, Crown Publishing, Dr. Robert Meyer, and Dan Koeppel for such an incredible book. I'm blown away.  Every Minute Is a Day by Dr. Robert Meyer and Dan Koeppel. Found myself reading it aloud to my daughter, after she left I fell into this book and then was on page 77 before long.  This book follows Dr. Meyer and his team as they are the first to get patient after patient when this whole Covid-19 started in Bronx, New York at Montefiore Medical Center. Beginning in 2020 i Thank you Goodreads Giveaways, Crown Publishing, Dr. Robert Meyer, and Dan Koeppel for such an incredible book. I'm blown away.  Every Minute Is a Day by Dr. Robert Meyer and Dan Koeppel. Found myself reading it aloud to my daughter, after she left I fell into this book and then was on page 77 before long.  This book follows Dr. Meyer and his team as they are the first to get patient after patient when this whole Covid-19 started in Bronx, New York at Montefiore Medical Center. Beginning in 2020 in the first chapters Dr. Meyer and his team learn as they go which is a good part of the book. There are highs and lows that as the description of the book says fast paced and high tempo. The team has seen a lot and you hear their cries and feel their fatigue. I felt like I was there. I love the parts that describe Bronx, New York it's history and the histories of the medical center that Dr. Meyer has worked at for 25 years.  I can't recommend this book more and you will learn a lot. Praying for Mr. Dan and hope he is doing well. Thanks again for the opportunity to enter and thankfully I won a copy. Available now-get a copy

  21. 5 out of 5

    Arianna Piech

    “I learned that bravery doesn’t mean that you’re fearless. Bravery is when you’re scared and yet you get up and do what you need to do. That’s stayed with me. I try to be brave every day. We’ve been preparing for something like this our whole lives. If we don’t show up, who’s going to take care of all the sick people?” -Rob Meyer This is a personal account of one doctor’s experience on the COVID-19 pandemic. Rob Meyer works for The Montefiore health system in the Bronx, one of the most impacted a “I learned that bravery doesn’t mean that you’re fearless. Bravery is when you’re scared and yet you get up and do what you need to do. That’s stayed with me. I try to be brave every day. We’ve been preparing for something like this our whole lives. If we don’t show up, who’s going to take care of all the sick people?” -Rob Meyer This is a personal account of one doctor’s experience on the COVID-19 pandemic. Rob Meyer works for The Montefiore health system in the Bronx, one of the most impacted areas by COVID. He shares his about his experiences, emotions, and relationships through the pandemic. It feels a bit wrong to say I enjoyed this book, so I will simply say that this book was a good reminder of the humanity behind the statistics. I felt as the I became personally invested in some of Meyers stories, especially that of caring for his mentor. I am glad these stories are being shared and preserved as a reminder of what we have been through.

  22. 4 out of 5

    SJCB

    Everyone should read this book, to get a glimpse into the heart and soul of our frontline healthcare workers…seeing a bit of their exhaustion, turmoil, devastation, fear, grief, and the true care and medical expertise they have painstakingly given since day 1 of this pandemic. “I don’t like beating myself up, but I know I’m not alone. Every doctor in the world who has fought for patients with Covid and lost feels the same way. I guarantee it. Doctors are well intentioned. But good intentions are Everyone should read this book, to get a glimpse into the heart and soul of our frontline healthcare workers…seeing a bit of their exhaustion, turmoil, devastation, fear, grief, and the true care and medical expertise they have painstakingly given since day 1 of this pandemic. “I don’t like beating myself up, but I know I’m not alone. Every doctor in the world who has fought for patients with Covid and lost feels the same way. I guarantee it. Doctors are well intentioned. But good intentions aren’t always enough, and during Covid when we didn’t know what we were dealing with, we couldn’t help everyone. That’s something I’ll have to live with. I hope I’ll learn from it. Be better because of it.” Dr. Robert Meyer (page 203)

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    There is bound to be a new genre of books about peoples' various experiences with Covid-19. This one is written by an emergency medicine doctor at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx borough of NYC, one of the hardest hit neighborhoods in the entire country. Both factual documentation of the first 6 months of the pandemic (the book was completed in November 2020) and personal experience of treating and sometimes losing people very close to the doctor, it's sobering insight into the lives of the pers There is bound to be a new genre of books about peoples' various experiences with Covid-19. This one is written by an emergency medicine doctor at Montefiore Hospital in the Bronx borough of NYC, one of the hardest hit neighborhoods in the entire country. Both factual documentation of the first 6 months of the pandemic (the book was completed in November 2020) and personal experience of treating and sometimes losing people very close to the doctor, it's sobering insight into the lives of the personnel caring for the sickest Covid patients at a time when nobody knew what this virus was all about.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Denise Chojnacki

    This book should be a must-read for anyone regarding the pandemic. No matter what you believe about Covid, it was hell for many on the front lines and this account portrays that in raw candor. Rob Meyer is an amazing doctor anyway but his dedication, as well as his colleagues, was heroic and heartbreaking at the same time. Everyone was affected in one way or another, but medical staff encountered crisis unlike any other. After reading this book, I am grateful for the little I had to go through i This book should be a must-read for anyone regarding the pandemic. No matter what you believe about Covid, it was hell for many on the front lines and this account portrays that in raw candor. Rob Meyer is an amazing doctor anyway but his dedication, as well as his colleagues, was heroic and heartbreaking at the same time. Everyone was affected in one way or another, but medical staff encountered crisis unlike any other. After reading this book, I am grateful for the little I had to go through in comparison to these amazing human beings.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    I never thought I'd say this, but I didn't want a book about COVID-19 to end! EMIAD was a surprising page turner. Even though I followed news closely during the pandemic, I found myself wanting to know what happened to the characters (which is to say, real live people) and their families. I was drawn in by the quality of the writing and the small details that are added that show the human side of these events. Reading this book was cathartic and a way to process what humanity has collectively ex I never thought I'd say this, but I didn't want a book about COVID-19 to end! EMIAD was a surprising page turner. Even though I followed news closely during the pandemic, I found myself wanting to know what happened to the characters (which is to say, real live people) and their families. I was drawn in by the quality of the writing and the small details that are added that show the human side of these events. Reading this book was cathartic and a way to process what humanity has collectively experienced in the past 18 months.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Beth Hommes

    Robert Meyer and Dan Koeppel have written an outstanding book about life in a NYC emergency room during the COVID pandemic. This was often a difficult book to read because the conditions described were so sad and scary however I think if more people took the time to educate themselves about what medical professionals and first responders dealt with (and nineteen months later are still dealing with) they would be more proactive about taking steps to end this pandemic. I thank NetGalley and the pu Robert Meyer and Dan Koeppel have written an outstanding book about life in a NYC emergency room during the COVID pandemic. This was often a difficult book to read because the conditions described were so sad and scary however I think if more people took the time to educate themselves about what medical professionals and first responders dealt with (and nineteen months later are still dealing with) they would be more proactive about taking steps to end this pandemic. I thank NetGalley and the publisher for the opportunity to read this ARC. I highly recommend it.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Rebecc3553

    Throughout the book you hear the voice of Dr. Rob Meyer telling his story. He manages to draw you in with each person he spoke of. So many emotions were felt on each page. It is a heartfelt, caring, sincere book about a time that was so terrifying. Reading Every Minute Is A Day will bring you comfort in hearing stories of the people he met, treated and were a part of his life. Together with his cousin, they wrote what will be one of the best reads of 2021.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    An inside look at the experience of working in an ED during the first months of the pandemic in NYC. It tells a much fuller story than I could ever gather from news articles or academic papers, and being written during and after the surge in NYC adds a layer of reflection that we didn’t have yet when it was all playing out. Heartbreaking, yet hopeful. A few stories feel a bit disjointed or out of place, but overall it’s quite a captivating read.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gail

    The testimony of a doctor on the front line I'm a retired RN & I often hear friends doubt the severity of the pandemic. I'm anxious to read first hand accounts so that I can adequately respond to these skeptics. Dr. Meyer was honest about how unprepared healthcare was for this pandemic and how horrific the situation was in his ER. The public needs to hear this, realize the threat this ongoing virus poses and get immunized! The testimony of a doctor on the front line I'm a retired RN & I often hear friends doubt the severity of the pandemic. I'm anxious to read first hand accounts so that I can adequately respond to these skeptics. Dr. Meyer was honest about how unprepared healthcare was for this pandemic and how horrific the situation was in his ER. The public needs to hear this, realize the threat this ongoing virus poses and get immunized!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte Talbot

    An incredibly real and harrowing depiction of the life of a physician during the pandemic. I would love to read a similar memoir from the perspective of a physician in the UK system. There is a slight sense of "us alone" with the singular focus on the hospital in which he works however I think this is unintentional and more simply a product of the reality of being within the walls of a hospital which feel all consuming. An incredibly real and harrowing depiction of the life of a physician during the pandemic. I would love to read a similar memoir from the perspective of a physician in the UK system. There is a slight sense of "us alone" with the singular focus on the hospital in which he works however I think this is unintentional and more simply a product of the reality of being within the walls of a hospital which feel all consuming.

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