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The Daring Life and Dangerous Times of Eve Adams

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“On these pages, Eve Adams rises up, loves, rebels—her times, eerily resembling our own.” —Joan Nestle, cofounder of the Lesbian Herstory Archives and author of A Restricted Country   Historian Jonathan Ned Katz uncovers the forgotten story of radical lesbian Eve Adams and her long-lost book Lesbian Love  Born Chawa Zloczewer into a Jewish family in Poland, Eve Adams emigrat “On these pages, Eve Adams rises up, loves, rebels—her times, eerily resembling our own.” —Joan Nestle, cofounder of the Lesbian Herstory Archives and author of A Restricted Country   Historian Jonathan Ned Katz uncovers the forgotten story of radical lesbian Eve Adams and her long-lost book Lesbian Love  Born Chawa Zloczewer into a Jewish family in Poland, Eve Adams emigrated to the United States in 1912, took a new name, befriended anarchists, sold radical publications, and ran lesbian-and-gay-friendly speakeasies in Chicago and New York. Then, in 1925, Adams risked all to write and publish a book titled Lesbian Love.  Adams’s bold activism caught the attention of the young J. Edgar Hoover and the US Bureau of Investigation, leading to her surveillance and arrest. Adams was convicted of publishing an obscene book and of attempted sex with a policewoman sent to entrap her.  Adams was jailed and then deported back to Europe, and ultimately murdered by Nazis in Auschwitz. In The Daring Life and Dangerous Times of Eve Adams, acclaimed historian Jonathan Ned Katz has recovered the extraordinary story of an early, daring activist.   Carefully distinguishing fact from fiction, Katz presents the first biography of Adams, and the publisher reprints the long-lost text of Adams’s rare, unique book Lesbian Love 


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“On these pages, Eve Adams rises up, loves, rebels—her times, eerily resembling our own.” —Joan Nestle, cofounder of the Lesbian Herstory Archives and author of A Restricted Country   Historian Jonathan Ned Katz uncovers the forgotten story of radical lesbian Eve Adams and her long-lost book Lesbian Love  Born Chawa Zloczewer into a Jewish family in Poland, Eve Adams emigrat “On these pages, Eve Adams rises up, loves, rebels—her times, eerily resembling our own.” —Joan Nestle, cofounder of the Lesbian Herstory Archives and author of A Restricted Country   Historian Jonathan Ned Katz uncovers the forgotten story of radical lesbian Eve Adams and her long-lost book Lesbian Love  Born Chawa Zloczewer into a Jewish family in Poland, Eve Adams emigrated to the United States in 1912, took a new name, befriended anarchists, sold radical publications, and ran lesbian-and-gay-friendly speakeasies in Chicago and New York. Then, in 1925, Adams risked all to write and publish a book titled Lesbian Love.  Adams’s bold activism caught the attention of the young J. Edgar Hoover and the US Bureau of Investigation, leading to her surveillance and arrest. Adams was convicted of publishing an obscene book and of attempted sex with a policewoman sent to entrap her.  Adams was jailed and then deported back to Europe, and ultimately murdered by Nazis in Auschwitz. In The Daring Life and Dangerous Times of Eve Adams, acclaimed historian Jonathan Ned Katz has recovered the extraordinary story of an early, daring activist.   Carefully distinguishing fact from fiction, Katz presents the first biography of Adams, and the publisher reprints the long-lost text of Adams’s rare, unique book Lesbian Love 

46 review for The Daring Life and Dangerous Times of Eve Adams

  1. 5 out of 5

    Armand R.R.

    Beautiful, poetic remembrance of innocence betrayed by the State REVIEWED: Jonathan Ned Katz — The Daring Life and Dangerous Times of Eve Adams (18 May 2021, Chicago Review Press, ISBN 978-1-64160-519-9, KINDLE version). A NYT review led me to this newly published book of Jonathan Ned Katz about the State‘s betrayal of a beautiful person, a Polish-born Jew who, as non-Christian, was not at home in her own land (Poland); was a foreigner in any other country; and in 1912 (born 16 March 1891) boarded Beautiful, poetic remembrance of innocence betrayed by the State REVIEWED: Jonathan Ned Katz — The Daring Life and Dangerous Times of Eve Adams (18 May 2021, Chicago Review Press, ISBN 978-1-64160-519-9, KINDLE version). A NYT review led me to this newly published book of Jonathan Ned Katz about the State‘s betrayal of a beautiful person, a Polish-born Jew who, as non-Christian, was not at home in her own land (Poland); was a foreigner in any other country; and in 1912 (born 16 March 1891) boarded the boat from the Old World to New York Harbor. Chawa Zloczower Americanized her name to Eve Adams — a play both on the opening chapters of the Torah on the first man and woman in the Garden, and on her own feeling of intersexuality, as she thought of it, with her own attraction to women. Eve Adams founded from the teens to the mid-twenties a couple of safe places, first in Chicago and then in New York, which provided safe places primarily for lesbians, but also for gay men, where there might be cake, coffee, intellectual gathering, and safety from public bigotry. Ms. Adams became noted among good leaders, among whom was the great Emma Goldman. Circa February of 1925, Ms. Adams took on a pen-name, Evelyn Addams, and wrote a lyrical set of beautiful, dreamy short stories of young women who innocently and with tenderness of a butterfly or newly blossoming flower find attraction in each other. Ms. Adams‘ book itself is quite short, shows poetic insight and inspiration, and is quite valuable historically for its revelations of lesbian thought in the mid-twenties. It is miraculous that any exemplar of „Lesbian Love“ exists, because Ms. Adams had funded a private printing of only 150 copies of this poetic prose; the police powers of the State managed to seize and destroy all copies - save one (!), which has been preserved and is reprinted in full text in Mr. Katz‘ invaluable work. „Lesbian Love“ was seized as obscene, but the only obscenity is the act of the State itself. „Lesbian Love“ is itself quite innocent and beautiful and testifies to the sensitivity and love of the author‘s own soul. As a result of the State‘s brutal police action, Ms. Adams was convicted in Federal Court on obscenity charges, imprisoned, and then deported to Poland in 1927. Ms. Adams wandered primarily to France. During the onset of WWII, Ms. Adams fled with a beloved woman friend, a pretty actress, to Nice, which was then occupied by the less harsh Italians. Ironically, the liberation of Italy occasioned the Nazi occupation of Nice. Eve and her beloved were soon shipped by train to Auschwitz-Birkenau, where they both were martyred brutally in December 1943. The author, Mr. Katz, challenges us to action to counter bigotry to at least learn something human and worthwhile from the tragic fate and unjust police treatment of Eve Adams. I found the work to be compelling and intimately moving.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sam

    Mild spoilers, but no more than in the book description.. This was a quick but very interesting read. It follows the life of Polish-Jewish lesbian radical Chawa Zloczewer, who emigrated to the US in 1912 and became known as Eve Adams. Katz pieces together details of her life through stories from friends and activists, legal records involving the FBI interest in her and her eventual deportation, and letters written from Europe before she was killed in the Holocaust. He does an excellent job at pro Mild spoilers, but no more than in the book description.. This was a quick but very interesting read. It follows the life of Polish-Jewish lesbian radical Chawa Zloczewer, who emigrated to the US in 1912 and became known as Eve Adams. Katz pieces together details of her life through stories from friends and activists, legal records involving the FBI interest in her and her eventual deportation, and letters written from Europe before she was killed in the Holocaust. He does an excellent job at providing cultural context from the time period to better understand the details of her life. In the appendix, the author includes the book she wrote, "Lesbian Love," and it's amazing that she wrote this in 1925 at a time when lesbian life, and especially that of a Jewish anarchist, was not to be mentioned. It was this book that attracted the FBI's attention and part of the reason they deported her to a Europe where being Jewish was more dangerous than ever. As a queer leftist of Polish descent, I was interested in many aspects of her life, and the book shed light on a daring, unapologetic person in queer history that I had never heard of before.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Carol Tilley

    3.5 - compelling subject though the book world benefit from a heavier editorial hand.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Summer

    I’m not sure how to feel about it, I liked the topic and the poetry, but I found the writing style difficult to read at times.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Haley

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jayme

  7. 4 out of 5

    Isabelle

  8. 4 out of 5

    Julie

  9. 5 out of 5

    Madeline

  10. 4 out of 5

    Maggie & Marie

  11. 4 out of 5

    fausto

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

  14. 4 out of 5

    Victoria Turley

  15. 4 out of 5

    Dore Zahavy

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amy House

  17. 5 out of 5

    Molly

  18. 5 out of 5

    Lindsey

  19. 4 out of 5

    Israa Ahmed

  20. 4 out of 5

    Bachael Rarrie

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kaleb

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Bianchi

  23. 4 out of 5

    Dubravka

  24. 4 out of 5

    Travis

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jinx:The:Poet {the Literary Masochist, Ink Ninja & Word Roamer}

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lía Hermosillo Rojas

  27. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn

  28. 4 out of 5

    Aoife

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sally

  30. 4 out of 5

    Robbie

  31. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  32. 5 out of 5

    Anna

  33. 4 out of 5

    Maria Vakmann

  34. 5 out of 5

    Leo

  35. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

  36. 5 out of 5

    Jason

  37. 4 out of 5

    Living Like Lindsey ~Librarian in Training~

  38. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Kindle

  39. 4 out of 5

    Karlena

  40. 4 out of 5

    Cailyn H

  41. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

  42. 5 out of 5

    Mel

  43. 4 out of 5

    Stacey Shapiro

  44. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  45. 4 out of 5

    Briana San Miguel

  46. 5 out of 5

    Molly Schoenherr

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