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The Lost Art of Doing Nothing: How the Dutch Unwind with Niksen

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“The best thing about niksen is the absence of a goal. It doesn’t serve a purpose, but it’s wonderful.” Don’t you think it’s time for a break? Plagued—as we are!—by nonstop pings and notifications, we have lost the knack of zoning out. Kicking back. Slacking off. Even when pandemic-induced lockdowns forcibly cleared our calendars, many who thought I’m free! filled their day “The best thing about niksen is the absence of a goal. It doesn’t serve a purpose, but it’s wonderful.” Don’t you think it’s time for a break? Plagued—as we are!—by nonstop pings and notifications, we have lost the knack of zoning out. Kicking back. Slacking off. Even when pandemic-induced lockdowns forcibly cleared our calendars, many who thought I’m free! filled their days with Netflix and doomscrolling. How can we reclaim our free time (planned or not) to truly rest and reset? The Dutch have it figured out: with niksen. Perhaps their best-kept lifestyle secret, niksen is the art of doing, well, nothing. It’s the opposite of productivity, and it’s incredibly good for your . . . MIND—it makes you calmer. BODY—it offers rest on hectic days. CREATIVITY—it clears a space for brilliant ideas. WALLET—it’s free! If you’re waiting for an invitation to go lie down in the sunshine, this book is it.


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“The best thing about niksen is the absence of a goal. It doesn’t serve a purpose, but it’s wonderful.” Don’t you think it’s time for a break? Plagued—as we are!—by nonstop pings and notifications, we have lost the knack of zoning out. Kicking back. Slacking off. Even when pandemic-induced lockdowns forcibly cleared our calendars, many who thought I’m free! filled their day “The best thing about niksen is the absence of a goal. It doesn’t serve a purpose, but it’s wonderful.” Don’t you think it’s time for a break? Plagued—as we are!—by nonstop pings and notifications, we have lost the knack of zoning out. Kicking back. Slacking off. Even when pandemic-induced lockdowns forcibly cleared our calendars, many who thought I’m free! filled their days with Netflix and doomscrolling. How can we reclaim our free time (planned or not) to truly rest and reset? The Dutch have it figured out: with niksen. Perhaps their best-kept lifestyle secret, niksen is the art of doing, well, nothing. It’s the opposite of productivity, and it’s incredibly good for your . . . MIND—it makes you calmer. BODY—it offers rest on hectic days. CREATIVITY—it clears a space for brilliant ideas. WALLET—it’s free! If you’re waiting for an invitation to go lie down in the sunshine, this book is it.

30 review for The Lost Art of Doing Nothing: How the Dutch Unwind with Niksen

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jerecho

    Should I say something? Geeez... I don't want to do anything... Just nothing 😊😊😊 Should I say something? Geeez... I don't want to do anything... Just nothing 😊😊😊

  2. 4 out of 5

    Katie ♡

    Since I have recently embarked upon my journey of discovering new self-development book titles, I am tempted to pick up any book that proposes a unique concept of living. This is when I stumbled upon the introduction of Niksen lifestyle from the Dutch, along with this very book itself. Well-aware of the idea of Dutch people being good at doing nothing, accompanied by the fact that the country is ranked as one of the happiest destinations to live in, I could not help having high expectations to p Since I have recently embarked upon my journey of discovering new self-development book titles, I am tempted to pick up any book that proposes a unique concept of living. This is when I stumbled upon the introduction of Niksen lifestyle from the Dutch, along with this very book itself. Well-aware of the idea of Dutch people being good at doing nothing, accompanied by the fact that the country is ranked as one of the happiest destinations to live in, I could not help having high expectations to pick up this book and give it a go. *Morgan Freeman’s narrative voice* Her expectations, however, were rather short-lived. Let us first start on some light notes: The book certainly includes several beautiful and eye-catching illustrations, which (I suppose) helps add to the readers’ joy of reading. Moreover, one can say that this book does its job of introducing the concept niksen, along with providing certain realistic and clear examples of how Dutch people unwind in their everyday lives. Another bright side of the book lies in its sufficient background research, with comparisons to different concepts from other countries such as the Swedish concept of hygge, or the Japanese ikigai lifestyle. In my opinion, this contributes to the diversity in the reasonings of the book. However, there are some problematic issues within the book worth pointing out. To begin with, as much as I enjoy getting to know about the term niksen, the execution of the concept was rather poor: “Back to niksen. It could have been nietsen. Get a move on, stop nietsen! But it sounds too much like “Nietzsche” and would only cause confusion. Niksen sounds robust, like an activity. It has class, swagger. It sounds presidential—and I’m not talking about the soft, stinky cheese. I’m busy niksen! It sounds important, and so it is.” Personally, I would not say this is an appealing tone of writing to suggest the history of any word to the readers. In addition, the book is composed of mainly messy discussions with an ineffective attempt to link the storyline to the concept at hand. More specifically, I have difficulties at times trying to connect the reasoning lines and external examples to the purpose of the whole book. “... Sometimes, an escape is necessary. One practical solution is the restroom. Perhaps not the most hygienic environment for your little act of resistance, but let’s face it, every revolution demands small sacrifices. So how do you go about taking a nap in a restroom? Sit down in the cubicle with your clothes on, slumped. It would be good to have a beanie or a hoody to pull down over your eyes, so you can really disappear into dreamworld for a while.” Um... what the heck did I just read? Last but not least, there have been quite some weak, not to mention inappropriate arguments throughout this book. Perhaps some of the quotes gathered below might help illustrate my viewpoints: “Mindfulness is to niksen as Kate Middleton is to Meghan Markle. Here’s how. Having survived the many years of mudslinging by the British tabloid press, Kate is now proudly doing the royal wave as the future queen of the United Kingdom. Meghan, meanwhile, stuck it out for a year before “doing a runner and going her own way. Kate has a higher purpose and is extremely disciplined. Meghan has no staying power and does her own thing.” Whether this line is a joke or not, it is a no go for me. And when it comes to comments on Dutch people themselves, this is what the author has to say: “Fools that we Dutch are, for years we looked to the Americans with their big achievements and eighty-hour workweeks. We should have been watching more Italian films, which could have taught us a thing or two about il dolce far niente. Or else to American films set in Italy, like director Luca Guadagnino’s Call Me by Your Name, which takes place during a seemingly never-ending summer in which the characters do sweet nothing all day, their days punctuated only by breakfast, lunch, and dinner.” And of course, it would not have been a motivational book without a massive ending statement: “We’re ready to become the people who love doing glorious nothing. It’s time to go from the disapproving "Stop being a lazy so-and-so" to the encouraging "Oh nice, you’re doing nothing!” Overall, I am utterly surprised at my ability to finish the book, given so many of its cringe-worthy moments. Oh to keep count of the number of times I have eyerolled while reading this book, I think I was able to see parts of my skull at some point. Don’t get me wrong, I am truly intrigued by the notion of niksen, however, I am seriously doubt that the book has done the term its justice. Simply put, this is just not it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Literary Redhead

    I love that cover and I love THE LOST ART OF DOING NOTHING! Learn how to rest using the Dutch practice of Niksen, in which you reach a kind of meditative state without thoughts by doing absolutely nada. That “space” is healing and much more than it seems. It provides a deep respite for mind, body and spirit — soooooooo needed to cope with COVID angst. 5 of 5 Stars Pub Date 30 Mar 2021 #TheLostArtofDoingNothing #NetGalley Thanks to the author, The Experiment, and NetGalley for the ARC. Opinions are I love that cover and I love THE LOST ART OF DOING NOTHING! Learn how to rest using the Dutch practice of Niksen, in which you reach a kind of meditative state without thoughts by doing absolutely nada. That “space” is healing and much more than it seems. It provides a deep respite for mind, body and spirit — soooooooo needed to cope with COVID angst. 5 of 5 Stars Pub Date 30 Mar 2021 #TheLostArtofDoingNothing #NetGalley Thanks to the author, The Experiment, and NetGalley for the ARC. Opinions are mine.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Morris

    This book isn’t bad, and the concept of Niksen is solid and intriguing, but it seemed a bit dull at points. There are other, more entertaining books on the topic. Unless you want to read them all, I wouldn’t be in a hurry to read this one. This unbiased review is based on a complimentary copy provided by the publisher.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I am obsessed with how this book looks. The cover is very eye catching and the illustrations inside are just as beautiful as the cover! I love reading books similar to this because it helps remind me it is okay to not do anything at all. It is important to sit and relax and should be a daily habit. I enjoyed the topics they go over and learning more about NIKSEN. I can’t wait to get my hands on a copy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cherie Kephart

    If you would have asked me weeks ago if I need more niksen in my life, I would have given you a look of confusion. Now, thanks to this cute little book, I get it. Niksen is a Dutch term that means doing nothing, having no goal, no purpose. I love this. However, it's not as easy as we think. It isn't cuddling your cat (or guinea pig as they suggest in the book), binge watching something you probably didn't even want to watch in the first place but somehow ended up addicted to, or rearranging your If you would have asked me weeks ago if I need more niksen in my life, I would have given you a look of confusion. Now, thanks to this cute little book, I get it. Niksen is a Dutch term that means doing nothing, having no goal, no purpose. I love this. However, it's not as easy as we think. It isn't cuddling your cat (or guinea pig as they suggest in the book), binge watching something you probably didn't even want to watch in the first place but somehow ended up addicted to, or rearranging your paper clips. It's about the absence of anything and doing nothing for no reason at all. The authors do a great job of explaining what niksen is and what it is not. It is somewhat similar to meditation, which I practice daily, but there are several differences. But how does one go about doing (or not doing) niksen? That's the key question bound to plague readers. Myself included. Although I do feel this book gifts us the background and green light for doing nothing and feeling good about it. The illustrations are also fun and quirky and the quotes from public figures and social scientists are relatable and elevate the book. And oh, yes, I definitely need more niksen in my life. Don't we all?

  7. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    This cute little book on the Dutch word of "niksen" was a fun, insightful little read on the art of doing NOTHING. It covers stress, burn out, being overworked, lacking creativity, etc. The illustrations are adorable. I loved this one! This cute little book on the Dutch word of "niksen" was a fun, insightful little read on the art of doing NOTHING. It covers stress, burn out, being overworked, lacking creativity, etc. The illustrations are adorable. I loved this one!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Min

    Doing nothing is the best thing that you can do...the authors spend a book explaining precisely that. Our Germanic language cousins have offered several words over the last few years to help us, and the rest of the world, get more out of living; lagom, lykke, hygge, fika, and now, niksen. All of them different approaches to relaxation, and ultimately, happiness -- true and deep pleasure in Life that is entirely internally created. They offer the reader many examples of what it is not before glidi Doing nothing is the best thing that you can do...the authors spend a book explaining precisely that. Our Germanic language cousins have offered several words over the last few years to help us, and the rest of the world, get more out of living; lagom, lykke, hygge, fika, and now, niksen. All of them different approaches to relaxation, and ultimately, happiness -- true and deep pleasure in Life that is entirely internally created. They offer the reader many examples of what it is not before gliding into a few examples of what it is. The evidence is rife for humans; we need to take a mental, and physical break from Life. Simply 'be', no goal, no intention, only existing with the thoughts fluttering through the consciousness. It's in these moments that wonderful ideas, and creativity can arise. "Our curiosity thrives in leisure", so there should be value in idleness-- what some might term 'lazy', which has no redeeming value in most languages. A quick perusal of a thesaurus proves there are no redeeming synonyms for 'lazy' in English. The grindstone is trained to be ever in front of our eyes, compelling us to continue to labor, even unto exhaustion, as somehow, that makes any relaxation acceptable to the wider society. Karl Marx's son-in-law authored The Right to be Lazy promoting the cause for our health, and sanity. The authors share several studies from many disciplines that demonstrate with absolute clarity the importance of taking this time for ourselves to do absolutely nothing. They also teach the readers words, and phrases from other languages that should inspire us all to a deeper state of relaxation, such as Italian il dolce far niente "the sweetness of doing nothing", and Japanese shinrin-yoku "forest bathing". The Further Reading section, and all of the books suggested throughout the book, are excellent sources for understanding our human need for "nothing", and the scientific studies to show it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tyrell

    "We're here on Earth to fart around" The Lost Art of Doing Nothing explains how Niksen, a method concerning the importance of doing nothing, can dramatically improve your life. Eh, it was alright. I would probably not recommend this book due to the repetition and fluff. There was a couple of points that really stuck out but the author's statement surrounding the fast-paced movement of our lives sincerely resonated with me. We're all scrambling to live life to the fullest and forget to slow down. "We're here on Earth to fart around" The Lost Art of Doing Nothing explains how Niksen, a method concerning the importance of doing nothing, can dramatically improve your life. Eh, it was alright. I would probably not recommend this book due to the repetition and fluff. There was a couple of points that really stuck out but the author's statement surrounding the fast-paced movement of our lives sincerely resonated with me. We're all scrambling to live life to the fullest and forget to slow down. We consider "wasting time" to be based on others' beliefs. This made me feel better about re-watching episodes of The Office over and over again. Overall, this book seriously gave me an existential crisis.

  10. 5 out of 5

    April

    I would give this book 3 1/2 stars if I had that option. The content of the book was thought-provoking and helpful, the illustrations were delightful, but parts of the book felt stilted. I wonder perhaps if it was trying too hard to come off as a lighthearted take on the serious problem of overwork. Still, I'm glad I read the book and will take things from it into my life in the future. So... 3 1/2 stars feels about right. I would give this book 3 1/2 stars if I had that option. The content of the book was thought-provoking and helpful, the illustrations were delightful, but parts of the book felt stilted. I wonder perhaps if it was trying too hard to come off as a lighthearted take on the serious problem of overwork. Still, I'm glad I read the book and will take things from it into my life in the future. So... 3 1/2 stars feels about right.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ashley (Tiny Navajo Reads)

    Eh…. While the idea of niksen holds great appeal, it doesn’t really get down down to the meat of niksen. The book seems to repeat itself a lot, and while there are some good ideas and wonderful ways to start, it does seem to chide you if you’re thinking too deeply of how/what niksen is.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Adrian Mazzarolo

    Nice, quick, and easy read. A little all over the place, but likely what the author was going for. Semi-informative, but not super robust!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    I felt like this book was a lot of ways that people can kill time, and how the world is trying to prioritize doing nothing, but every other page it would say "but, of course, this isn't niksen". But then again, how much of a book can you dedicate to an art of literally doing nothing? I read this in an ebook format, but it seems like it may be a nice colorful experience if I read it in a physical format. Ultimately, I'm not sure how much this book adds to the niksen commentary. But a light read. I felt like this book was a lot of ways that people can kill time, and how the world is trying to prioritize doing nothing, but every other page it would say "but, of course, this isn't niksen". But then again, how much of a book can you dedicate to an art of literally doing nothing? I read this in an ebook format, but it seems like it may be a nice colorful experience if I read it in a physical format. Ultimately, I'm not sure how much this book adds to the niksen commentary. But a light read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ama

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. It read like a really long blog post. There was a disturbing bit on Meghan Markle that literally made no sense. It seems odd to compare Meghan suffering from racist vitriol and deciding to leave to a non-poc Kate's treatment by the media. I thought this was odd until I got to the example on the kardashians later and I realized that this book has a lot of unconscious bias in it. It read like a really long blog post. There was a disturbing bit on Meghan Markle that literally made no sense. It seems odd to compare Meghan suffering from racist vitriol and deciding to leave to a non-poc Kate's treatment by the media. I thought this was odd until I got to the example on the kardashians later and I realized that this book has a lot of unconscious bias in it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jazmyn Dolbin

    I felt like this book was grasping at a lot of ideas to try to turn the idea of Niksen into a book, when it really could've been an essay. I felt like this book was grasping at a lot of ideas to try to turn the idea of Niksen into a book, when it really could've been an essay.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Erika

    This book was just the same idea repeated over and over in slightly different ways. DNF

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cherilyn

    This book is so bad. Don’t read it. I picked it up to learn more about the Dutch concept of “niksen,” which means doing nothing. Daydreaming. Sitting and being, without needing to be productive. I’m an American with Dutch ancestry. I’ve been really stressed lately, so I thought I’d get some solid advice from the homeland on how to step back and quit being in high gear all the time. I should have chosen an article instead. It seems that this book tries to capture the spirit of niksen with clever, This book is so bad. Don’t read it. I picked it up to learn more about the Dutch concept of “niksen,” which means doing nothing. Daydreaming. Sitting and being, without needing to be productive. I’m an American with Dutch ancestry. I’ve been really stressed lately, so I thought I’d get some solid advice from the homeland on how to step back and quit being in high gear all the time. I should have chosen an article instead. It seems that this book tries to capture the spirit of niksen with clever, breezy language and cute illustrations. Instead of being cozy and familiar, the text is full of shallow generalizations and unconnected ideas. And then there’s the racism. I was cruising through the book, frequently rolling my eyes and saying, “What the hell?”, when I got to this paragraph in a section on mindfulness. “Mindfulness is to niksen as Kate Middleton is to Meghan Markle,” it starts. I held my breath. Where was this going? “Having survived the many years of mudslinging by the British tabloid press, Kate is now proudly doing the royal wave as the future queen of the United Kingdom. Meghan, meanwhile, stuck it out a year before doing a runner and going her own way. Kate has a higher purpose and is extremely disciplined. Meghan has no staying power and does her own thing. Surely this analogy is crystal-clear and in no way flawed.” My jaw hit the floor. Pitting these women against each other then erasing and negating vicious, racist attacks on Meghan was completely unnecessary for this book. Why even go there, and why feed negative narratives against Meghan that are clearly based on racism? It doesn’t cost any money to walk away from the topic and chose a better analogy, but clearly the author and editors didn’t see a problem. I will never understand this kind of nonsense. I read the paragraph through several times, trying to understand the point. I had friends read it to see if I was missing something. Nope. The paragraph makes no sense and appears to try to give the author cover for yet another random and unprovoked attack on Meghan Markle.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ashima Jain

    Rating 3.5 “The best thing about niksen is the absence of a goal. It doesn’t serve a purpose but it’s wonderful.” Our lives are so crammed that it leaves little-to-no time for rest. When we do set aside time, we invariably get caught up in thinking of the next item on our to-do list. Work, chats, chores, meeting friends - all these demand time and attention and #FOMO keeps us from stepping back or cancelling plans to simple relax. What if you could replace #FOMO with #JOMO a.k.a the joy of missing Rating 3.5 “The best thing about niksen is the absence of a goal. It doesn’t serve a purpose but it’s wonderful.” Our lives are so crammed that it leaves little-to-no time for rest. When we do set aside time, we invariably get caught up in thinking of the next item on our to-do list. Work, chats, chores, meeting friends - all these demand time and attention and #FOMO keeps us from stepping back or cancelling plans to simple relax. What if you could replace #FOMO with #JOMO a.k.a the joy of missing out? The Dutch have it figured out: with niksen. Perhaps their best-kept lifestyle secret, niksen is the art of doing, well, nothing. It’s the opposite of productivity, and it’s incredibly good for your mind, body, creativity and wallet. The book elaborates why we must immediately replace our understanding of usefulness with doing nothing. Niksen takes practice but its effects are multifold. All it asks for is time, a calm mind and a quiet place where you won’t be disturbed. One may argue that doing nothing is boring. The cute little illustrations by Lona Aalders peppered throughout the book and the simple, practical exercises lay the foundation to finding joy in doing nothing. The purpose of this book is to avoid stress and early burnout plaguing many in their 30s and be able to live a well-balanced, relaxed life. It may take some effort but with time and skill, it can become a procedural memory, an inherent, unforgettable habit stored in our body. The fact remains, we could all do with some niksen in our lives. All we need is to find those precious few blissful moments and learn to hold on to them. For complete review, visit https://aquamarineflavours.wordpress.... Find me on other platforms via https://linktr.ee/AshieJayn

  19. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

    Thanks to NetGalley and The Experiment for the digital review copy of this book. In our non-stop, twenty-four “on” lifestyle, we could all use a break every now and again. But, if you’re like me, when you sit down to do “nothing,” you immediately get distracted by the phone or the tv or a book, and all of that isn’t as relaxing and restorative as simply doing nothing. Unfortunately, doing nothing can come with a slew of negative emotions, and I start thinking about all the “shoulds” I need to do. Thanks to NetGalley and The Experiment for the digital review copy of this book. In our non-stop, twenty-four “on” lifestyle, we could all use a break every now and again. But, if you’re like me, when you sit down to do “nothing,” you immediately get distracted by the phone or the tv or a book, and all of that isn’t as relaxing and restorative as simply doing nothing. Unfortunately, doing nothing can come with a slew of negative emotions, and I start thinking about all the “shoulds” I need to do. Niksen has many benefits, including making you calmer, helping you to rest, giving your brain space for creativity, and also, it’s free! This book introduces its reader to Niksen and is full of other facts, info, and fun drawings. Honestly, I think it could have been a nice, long blog post for just the relevant information, but I enjoyed leisurely strolling through its pages and learning about the adjacent info. The pace of the book invites calm and an easy-going attitude, and it’s pretty short, I finished it in about an hour. It was a nice palate cleanser from some of the heavier, longer books I’ve been catching up on lately. It’s out in March, just in time for new, springtime habits, and hopefully we’ll be close to whatever the new normal looks like then and there will be time and space for a little bit of nothing.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ryan |

    The Lost Art of Doing Nothing and I love the cover and the idea behind it. Thanks to @netgalley and @theexperiment for this e-advanced copy! Doing nothing sounds so simple but in fact it's one of the toughest things to do. Even when we're sitting on our couches we aren't resting. I know I'm always checking my phone, getting notifications, watching tv. Meditation is a laundry list of to-dos and reading is constantly interrupted. ✨Our world is overstimulated and in constant motion. We need REAL REST The Lost Art of Doing Nothing and I love the cover and the idea behind it. Thanks to @netgalley and @theexperiment for this e-advanced copy! Doing nothing sounds so simple but in fact it's one of the toughest things to do. Even when we're sitting on our couches we aren't resting. I know I'm always checking my phone, getting notifications, watching tv. Meditation is a laundry list of to-dos and reading is constantly interrupted. ✨Our world is overstimulated and in constant motion. We need REAL REST. That's where this book comes in.✨ I thought the author did a great job of explaining 'why' we need to add some nothing time into our days and 'what' the benefits are to setting aside some time to completely let go and just be. I felt that the 'how's' were missing a bit but really that is because you do NOTHING. And in our culture that idea seems outlandish because we never stop. There were a few practice ideas I'd like to try. All in all loved the concept and the illustrations were gorgeous. Easy face paced read if you want to know a little more about Niksen!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shafiqah Nor

    From the Scandinavian quest for 'lykke' (happiness), 'hygge' (coziness), to the Finnish concept of 'pantsdrunk' (drinking in your undies at home). The Dutch brings the concept of 'niksen' - to do absolutely nothing and think of absolutely nothing. This is a cute book and a sober reminder of how incredibly distracted and addicted to productivity we are. Little did I know that I have actually been engaging in 'niksen' when I zone out to stare blankly at the leaves of my plants. The book walks thro From the Scandinavian quest for 'lykke' (happiness), 'hygge' (coziness), to the Finnish concept of 'pantsdrunk' (drinking in your undies at home). The Dutch brings the concept of 'niksen' - to do absolutely nothing and think of absolutely nothing. This is a cute book and a sober reminder of how incredibly distracted and addicted to productivity we are. Little did I know that I have actually been engaging in 'niksen' when I zone out to stare blankly at the leaves of my plants. The book walks through the conditions for 'niksen', the joy of doing absolutely nothing, its history and benefits - the economic angle to even feminist perspectives (of doing nothing at home as protest to promote social progression). We are all craving and dreaming about the utopia of freely doing nothing apparently since the Middle Ages. Ironically, with all the time we've had during lockdowns, I wonder the attainable of niksen in the current pandemic...

  22. 5 out of 5

    JANET

    Some things were left out... 🤓 While entertaining in concept the young ladies who wrote and illustrated this book are ...young. Get to a certain age and you might find there's not a lot that upsets you anymore because you've already seen it or done it or just plain don't care enough to let it bother you! At this time in life some may call it niksen, while others call it retirement. What you do during this time of life? Whatever you want whenever you want! In addition, over a year of staying at ho Some things were left out... 🤓 While entertaining in concept the young ladies who wrote and illustrated this book are ...young. Get to a certain age and you might find there's not a lot that upsets you anymore because you've already seen it or done it or just plain don't care enough to let it bother you! At this time in life some may call it niksen, while others call it retirement. What you do during this time of life? Whatever you want whenever you want! In addition, over a year of staying at home during covid has allowed for plenty of staring into space - or at a Kindle - and indulging in some niksen time before we found out it had a cool foreign language name. Not a bad book tho, especially when there's nothing else to do. 🤓

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ellie

    I have read several books that focus on slowing down, getting comfortable, and finding solace in life. That is why this book was a little confusing for me. The author educated the reader about how the Dutch are excellent merchants with extremely cleanly habits. That is all well and good, but it lacked the concrete ways folks tend to really slow down and do nothing without getting judged by others. I really wanted this book to dig deep and get in there with revolutionary ideas! Perhaps this is mo I have read several books that focus on slowing down, getting comfortable, and finding solace in life. That is why this book was a little confusing for me. The author educated the reader about how the Dutch are excellent merchants with extremely cleanly habits. That is all well and good, but it lacked the concrete ways folks tend to really slow down and do nothing without getting judged by others. I really wanted this book to dig deep and get in there with revolutionary ideas! Perhaps this is more of a relaxed call to arms for the people of the Netherlands? Maybe I skimmed it too quickly? I will agree that switching off my phone and pursuing creative ventures are good ideas--thanks for that! **The PDF that I enjoyed was an advanced reader copy granted to me through Netgalley. All opinions are my own and not that of the publisher.**

  24. 4 out of 5

    Morgan

    A really intellectual and comforting take on how we can learn from other countries, especially the Netherlands and NOT America, on how to take life a little slower so that we can make room for actual happiness and relaxation. This book felt guided enough to be classified as instructional, but at the same time, it was also loose to interpretation and laid-back. There's no pressure (that's the point), and it felt very reassuring to read because there are so many distractions in this "attention eco A really intellectual and comforting take on how we can learn from other countries, especially the Netherlands and NOT America, on how to take life a little slower so that we can make room for actual happiness and relaxation. This book felt guided enough to be classified as instructional, but at the same time, it was also loose to interpretation and laid-back. There's no pressure (that's the point), and it felt very reassuring to read because there are so many distractions in this "attention economy" we're forced to live in, as the author describes, pulling at us every which way. This is a timely read and much-needed, personally. I loved it.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Anna Hammerschmidt

    Ohhh this was a rough one to get through. This book read as a poorly written research paper. Every section of this book felt like a completely separate idea, and that the author was pulling at strings to add more background info about Niksen. I do think the idea it Niksen is interesting, but you can learn everything you want to know in a short Google search. This book didn’t add much value. I was tempted to give it one star, and I know this review doesn’t put this out in a good light at all. Whi Ohhh this was a rough one to get through. This book read as a poorly written research paper. Every section of this book felt like a completely separate idea, and that the author was pulling at strings to add more background info about Niksen. I do think the idea it Niksen is interesting, but you can learn everything you want to know in a short Google search. This book didn’t add much value. I was tempted to give it one star, and I know this review doesn’t put this out in a good light at all. While the book as a whole wasn’t great, there were some sections that were interesting.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    The Lost Art of Doing Nothing by Maartje Willems is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in mid-March. The concept of doing nothing with yourself, outside of yourself, and over time, as described with simple, feel-good philosophy, colorful sketches, and low-stress ways of looking at life - it's like talking with your favorite aunt who’s comfortable in her own skin, unaffected by the latest fads, and just wants you to relax and not take things so seriously. The Lost Art of Doing Nothing by Maartje Willems is a free NetGalley ebook that I read in mid-March. The concept of doing nothing with yourself, outside of yourself, and over time, as described with simple, feel-good philosophy, colorful sketches, and low-stress ways of looking at life - it's like talking with your favorite aunt who’s comfortable in her own skin, unaffected by the latest fads, and just wants you to relax and not take things so seriously.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Terresa

    Stop the glorification of your busy schedule, clear an afternoon and read this book. It's worth a look, flip through, and browse, at least. Insightful book with darling (yes, darling) illustrations. Small, compact, easily portable and somewhat snarky, which I appreciated. Includes tips on meditation, good sleep habits, flextime, and reviewing your schedule to make time to do absolutely nothing at all, which as it turns out, can be invigorating in this fast paced world. The biggest takeaway for m Stop the glorification of your busy schedule, clear an afternoon and read this book. It's worth a look, flip through, and browse, at least. Insightful book with darling (yes, darling) illustrations. Small, compact, easily portable and somewhat snarky, which I appreciated. Includes tips on meditation, good sleep habits, flextime, and reviewing your schedule to make time to do absolutely nothing at all, which as it turns out, can be invigorating in this fast paced world. The biggest takeaway for me was the concept of #jomo: the joy of missing out: removing things from our to-do list, swapping FOMO for JOMO, and giving ourselves permission to be as lazy as possible for a change.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ramon

    This is why I don't like these so called self help books. They say something is good for you in one sentence and then spends the rest of the book justifying the premise. I believe this guy was sitting around doing nothing and needed some money and decided to write a stupid book about nothing. He reminds me of the guy trying to sell a worthless elixir. Yes he had some good ideas but not worth the price of admission. This is why I don't like these so called self help books. They say something is good for you in one sentence and then spends the rest of the book justifying the premise. I believe this guy was sitting around doing nothing and needed some money and decided to write a stupid book about nothing. He reminds me of the guy trying to sell a worthless elixir. Yes he had some good ideas but not worth the price of admission.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kitty

    If you ever need an excuse to excused yourselves from work, or having a hard time to power down, or asking why you should sleep, or get outside and enjoy a cup of coffee or a pint. This is a great book for advices/suggestions. We are too connected with our electronics, and busied with distractions that we're walking "zombie," sleep deprived, good for nothing human beings. Do yourselves a favor, get cozy, and do nothing for the good of your friends/families/work buddies/strangers too. If you ever need an excuse to excused yourselves from work, or having a hard time to power down, or asking why you should sleep, or get outside and enjoy a cup of coffee or a pint. This is a great book for advices/suggestions. We are too connected with our electronics, and busied with distractions that we're walking "zombie," sleep deprived, good for nothing human beings. Do yourselves a favor, get cozy, and do nothing for the good of your friends/families/work buddies/strangers too.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Thanks to the publisher for proving me with a free copy of this cute little book! Loved the fun illustrations and concept of this book. This would make a nice gift or coffee table book, but is one of those books that basically could’ve been an article rather than a whole book, as it started to feel a bit repetitive after a while.

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