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The Christian Counselor's Manual: The Practice of Nouthetic Counseling

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The Christian Counselors Manual is a companion and sequel to the authors influential Competent to Counsel. It takes the approach of nouthetic counseling introduced in the earlier volume and applies it to a wide range of issues, topics, and techniques in counseling: *Who is qualified to be a counselor? *How can counselees change? *How does the Holy Spirit work? *What role The Christian Counselor’s Manual is a companion and sequel to the author’s influential Competent to Counsel. It takes the approach of nouthetic counseling introduced in the earlier volume and applies it to a wide range of issues, topics, and techniques in counseling: *Who is qualified to be a counselor? *How can counselees change? *How does the Holy Spirit work? *What role does hope play? *What is the function of language? *How do we ask the right questions? *What often lies behind depression? *How do we deal with anger? *What is schizophrenia? These and hundreds more questions are answered in this comprehensive resource for the Christian counselor. A full set of indexes, a detailed table of contents, and a full complement of diagrams and forms make this an outstanding reference book for Christian counselors.


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The Christian Counselors Manual is a companion and sequel to the authors influential Competent to Counsel. It takes the approach of nouthetic counseling introduced in the earlier volume and applies it to a wide range of issues, topics, and techniques in counseling: *Who is qualified to be a counselor? *How can counselees change? *How does the Holy Spirit work? *What role The Christian Counselor’s Manual is a companion and sequel to the author’s influential Competent to Counsel. It takes the approach of nouthetic counseling introduced in the earlier volume and applies it to a wide range of issues, topics, and techniques in counseling: *Who is qualified to be a counselor? *How can counselees change? *How does the Holy Spirit work? *What role does hope play? *What is the function of language? *How do we ask the right questions? *What often lies behind depression? *How do we deal with anger? *What is schizophrenia? These and hundreds more questions are answered in this comprehensive resource for the Christian counselor. A full set of indexes, a detailed table of contents, and a full complement of diagrams and forms make this an outstanding reference book for Christian counselors.

30 review for The Christian Counselor's Manual: The Practice of Nouthetic Counseling

  1. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    Anyone who has heard of the author already has an opinion of the work; however, in spite of these assumptions, if one really reads Adams for what he is saying, the reader should walk away with the following concepts: (1) Adams believes that the Bible hold the answers for all of lifes problems. (2) All problems in life are either physical (the realm of the doctor) or spiritual (the realm of the pastor). (3) Adams believes that every believer should be able to assist others in applying the Bible Anyone who has heard of the author already has an opinion of the work; however, in spite of these assumptions, if one really reads Adams for what he is saying, the reader should walk away with the following concepts: (1) Adams believes that the Bible hold the answers for all of life’s problems. (2) All problems in life are either physical (the realm of the doctor) or spiritual (the realm of the pastor). (3) Adams believes that every believer should be able to assist others in applying the Bible to life’s spiritual challenges. To these ends, the now-aging work is directed. In a very clear and straight-forward manner, the writer lays out methods of dealing with all sorts of challenges. This manual serves as a substantial guide to the pastor, Christian counselor, or even a layman who wishes to be of assistance to those who need help to overcome a vast number of problems.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ivan

    Foundational book for every pastor who by definition is a counselor. Here are a few convictions that were strengthened after reading this book: Confidence in the Bible and Optimism in Counseling. First and foremost, this book makes clear that the Bible is totally sufficient to not simply convert sinners but sanctify saints. The Christian counselor therefore has an unassailable trust in the Bible knowing it records what God has spoken. That confidence in the counselor and optimism in the task then Foundational book for every pastor who by definition is a counselor. Here are a few convictions that were strengthened after reading this book: Confidence in the Bible and Optimism in Counseling. First and foremost, this book makes clear that the Bible is totally sufficient to not simply convert sinners but sanctify saints. The Christian counselor therefore has an unassailable trust in the Bible knowing it records what God has spoken. That confidence in the counselor and optimism in the task then translates into actual specific help for those under our care. We must therefore strive to know the Book in order that the Book might know us, shedding light into our dark hearts so that we can then be the means of reflecting that same light on others’ hearts and lives. Dependence on the Word and the Holy Spirit. There is no possible way a true Christian counselor, who is aware of the grand task before him, to come away and feel adequate in and of himself. The issues at hand in the lives of counselees are too big for him. Jay Adams, perhaps more indirectly than directly, makes clear that it is both a privilege to be the means of sanctification in someone’s life, but it is also true that it is, humanly speaking, impossible to be done in the flesh. The Christian counselor is utterly dependent on the Word of God and on the Spirit who inspired the Scriptures and is now resident within believers, working in them to conform them to the image of Christ. The Need for Biblical Discernment. It is tragic to observe on what passes as “Christian counseling” today within evangelicalism is simply secular theory baptized with “Christian” terminology, sprinkled with various biblical proof-texts. (Of course this is directly tied to one’s confidence in the Word of God. These points are obviously all interconnected.) This reading has once again reminded me of the need to be discerning in an age of much confusion, especially within the professing church. And that discernment stems from knowledge and trust in the Word of God. As I read the book I was, time again, confronted with the realization that much of what I am reading applies to me — to sinful patterns in my life and thinking; to erroneous presuppositions I have easily imbibed; to areas I have been completely ignorant of; etc. Even before class began I had an opportunity to put into practice some things I had been reading; although seemingly insignificant, it was a difficult and trying moment. I read this book during my first semester in seminary. Then and now, I am reminded that these years are not a parenthesis in my sanctification but a determined time God has already begun to use in my pursuit of holiness. I am not to be a theoretician; I am a sinner in need of the same biblical counsel I will strive to offer, if not more so. I am not over and above the Bible as a self-appointed “sanctification guru”; I am a fellow sinner coming under the full weight and authority of the Word of God. And all this again underscores for me the necessity to submit myself to the truths I am learning in my Christian life. In the end, my usefulness in Christian counseling is directly tied to my personal love for and submission to the Word of God in every square inch of my life. Who is adequate for these things? Our adequacy comes from God (2 Cor. 4:5).

  3. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Cooper

    This is a great resource to have! Whether you are pursuing ministry as a Biblical Counselor or simply would like to be a better mentor/disciple-maker, you should read and have this book in your collection. Adams is very direct in his approach and does not sugar-coat the problems that people have. He makes sure that his readers are not left in confusion about the role sin plays in a person's life, both sins committed against the counselee and personal sins . Throughout the book he reminds the This is a great resource to have! Whether you are pursuing ministry as a Biblical Counselor or simply would like to be a better mentor/disciple-maker, you should read and have this book in your collection. Adams is very direct in his approach and does not sugar-coat the problems that people have. He makes sure that his readers are not left in confusion about the role sin plays in a person's life, both sins committed against the counselee and personal sins . Throughout the book he reminds the reader that when you see see sin as it is (rather than calling it an illness) you can then have hope for change. The contrast between Biblical Counseling and secular psychology is consistently displayed. There are examples in every chapter (or almost every chapter) of real life counseling situations that help the reader understand the subject of each chapter and the practical ways in which you can help a personal struggling with different sins. About my rating 5 stars: that does not mean that I think the book is perfect. However, I do not give books 5 stars lightly. Books that I give 5 stars are books that really impacted me, have few flaws in my opinion (the things I disagree with are not major issues or not focused on in the book), and the book is simply written well (a book with good information that is poorly written will not help me much if it cannot hold my attention because it jumps around too much) I recommend purchasing a couple highlighters when going through this book.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Zack

    By necessity, this chunky textbook is redundant. But it is very helpful. Despite its by-now advanced age (for its genre), it is amazingly relevant at key points. Especially the chapters on getting started (20), goals and terminal dates (21), how to handle anger (31), and resolving sexual difficulties (35). Adams fulfills his stated aim in this book: to provide a concrete complement to the work he did in Competent to Counsel. The repeated emphases on hope, the possibility of change, and the By necessity, this chunky textbook is redundant. But it is very helpful. Despite its by-now advanced age (for its genre), it is amazingly relevant at key points. Especially the chapters on getting started (20), goals and terminal dates (21), how to handle anger (31), and resolving sexual difficulties (35). Adams fulfills his stated aim in this book: to provide a concrete complement to the work he did in Competent to Counsel. The repeated emphases on hope, the possibility of change, and the importance of Scripture in the counseling enterprise are refreshing. Though much of the basic material of the book is adequately covered in Competent to Counsel, the reuse of the material in this book was helpful. I didn’t appreciate the wholesale quotation of large passages from Competent to Counsel, though. Without having the benefits or qualifications that come with being a specialist in the field, I can hazard the opinion that some of the information is dated, and in need of refreshing or correction. Regardless, the usefulness of the book as a whole (and in most of its parts) compels me to rate it 4/5.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chris Comis

    It was alright. Good old Jay E. Adams and his one-million books on counseling, and counting. I like Adams because he seeks to be as biblically grounded as possible, but still manages to deal with all the secular pop-psychobabble you get from the integrationists, and such. He definitely paved the way for a lot of guys to turn to their bibles for counseling purposes.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Barry

    A great guide for pastors and counselors from the father of the modern biblical guidance movement. Sound advice.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    This book was awesome. It was full of PRACTICAL ideas on how to help people through Christian counseling. So many of these books have become arbitrary tours through common Christian terms without ever getting to the nuts and bolts of how to do anything productive. Lectures about how you should be praying and reading your Bible. The problem isn't that Christians don't know this, it is that they don't know how to do it well, or they (really) don't see the value in it. If the other books are any This book was awesome. It was full of PRACTICAL ideas on how to help people through Christian counseling. So many of these books have become arbitrary tours through common Christian terms without ever getting to the nuts and bolts of how to do anything productive. Lectures about how you should be praying and reading your Bible. The problem isn't that Christians don't know this, it is that they don't know how to do it well, or they (really) don't see the value in it. If the other books are any indication we should simply be shouting the word "GRACE" at people through a megaphone until all their problems are solved. These books dissolve quickly into meaningless platitudes we share with one another. This book, Jay Adams, finally gave some real world things you can have families, and people, do to help themselves and help their situation (God is the ultimate cause of change, but He doesn't tell us to do nothing, He wants us to work). He finally got into the muck of how to help people struggling with anger, fear, sex, guilt, and any number of other topics. Instead of harping at me about how God is in control (which every Christian knows, even when we struggle with it, but is a meaningless trite when your world falls to crap and you need some help). Adams finally gives us some tools to try to help people. He gives us tools to SEE that God is in control. To help us show people HOW God is working. It isn't meaningless talk, but practical application.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Beth Peninger

    Originally I gave this title 4 stars. I am revising my stars to zero. The reason I am doing so is that since reading this title, several things about my faith journey and expression have changed and I no longer subscribe to evangelical ideologies. Additionally, I was trained to be a lay counselor using this bible-based (only) method and I have first-hand experience as a counselor and counselee that this method does more harm than healing, promotes toxicity, enables inequality between women and Originally I gave this title 4 stars. I am revising my stars to zero. The reason I am doing so is that since reading this title, several things about my faith journey and expression have changed and I no longer subscribe to evangelical ideologies. Additionally, I was trained to be a lay counselor using this bible-based (only) method and I have first-hand experience as a counselor and counselee that this method does more harm than healing, promotes toxicity, enables inequality between women and men, and more.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Parker Hilliard

    Excellent Extremely helpful, convicting, and insightful this book is a great start to achieving a basic knowledge of how to biblically counsel, after Competent to Counsels what is biblical counseling. It is old, and could use some updates for sure, but it is very well written and almost entirely applicable to the modern context. Excellent Extremely helpful, convicting, and insightful— this book is a great start to achieving a basic knowledge of how to biblically counsel, after “Competent to Counsel’s” what is biblical counseling. It is old, and could use some updates for sure, but it is very well written and almost entirely applicable to the modern context.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Anita

    A very helpful Christian resource! Highly recommend!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Robert Fonseca Mota

    Um grande manual para todos que querem ingressar no aconselhamento bíblico. Livro de cabeceira do conselheiro.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Read several times. Great teaching.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Teri Moyer

    A must have for biblical counselors!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Adam Lambdin

    Jay Adams brought on a revolution in Christain counseling with this volume. However, he did have some erroneous viewpoints in regards to the nonusefulness of psychology. There were many responses to this viewpoint and to his hard stance in regards to mental illnesses as only being valid if it contained demonstrable pathology, which is another false claim. So, while it is a great resource and offers a lot of biblical explanations of practical theology, it is wrong on these two points. Mental Jay Adams brought on a revolution in Christain counseling with this volume. However, he did have some erroneous viewpoints in regards to the nonusefulness of psychology. There were many responses to this viewpoint and to his hard stance in regards to mental illnesses as only being valid if it contained demonstrable pathology, which is another false claim. So, while it is a great resource and offers a lot of biblical explanations of practical theology, it is wrong on these two points. Mental illness, while overblown in certainly many ways in modern, American culture, is certainly not legitimated on demonstrable pathology as there are many mental illnesses, like schizophrenia, which are totally legitimate but oftentimes lack clear, detectable damage on a brain scan or definite etiology. And psychology, while offering up mostly false, secular answers to life's problems, does offer helpful analysis of the human problem as well as many practical helps that fall within the category of common grace.

  15. 5 out of 5

    B. Jackson

    This is an excellent resource for anyone that wants to provide good solid counseling advice when people come to you in need of it. I'm posing this statement in generic terms of the counselor involved because, even though this particular work is geared towards the Christian counselor (in a leadership role), the learning often applicable to believers and non-believers alike. I've read this book several times. It's definitely something that I like to revisit at least on a yearly basis. It is easy This is an excellent resource for anyone that wants to provide good solid counseling advice when people come to you in need of it. I'm posing this statement in generic terms of the counselor involved because, even though this particular work is geared towards the Christian counselor (in a leadership role), the learning often applicable to believers and non-believers alike. I've read this book several times. It's definitely something that I like to revisit at least on a yearly basis. It is easy to read and provided good solid biblical references for any of the advice that it gives. For those that are looking to build a library of resources, this is certainly one that I would add to your collection.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn Diamond

    Because this book's edition was dated in 1973, we as a class had a problem with many of the strategies provided for Christian Counseling. The author also came from a Reformed Episcopal Seminary for a traditional Southern Christian class. Even my Professor had a problem with many of the presuptitations and principles. I would not recommend this book to a modern day Seminary. As a reformed Catholic student in a Christian Seminary I manged to pull out a great grade.

  17. 5 out of 5

    zhenhua xiao

    Must read to know the sufficiency of the Bible. Uphold the sufficiency of the Bible, where the wisdom of God is sufficient to solve the root problem of sin. A must read Manuel book for theological student. Affection, emotion, and feelings could be more clarified in the future. Or can quote works of Jonathan Edwards.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bruce

    Another of Adam's classic works. Where Competent to Counsel gave encouragement to give counsel, The Christian Counselor's Manual was the basic "how to." My original copy from the 70's is heavily marked and for a long time was just about all I had as I learned what biblical counseling was and was not.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This is my favorite introduction to Biblical Counseling. It is long, but full of such important foundational theology along with practical approaches to counseling. I don't agree with all of Jay Adams theology - he might not have me practicing biblical counseling formally since I'm not a pastor, but I'll forgive him that and enjoy all the wisdom he has to share about the process!

  20. 4 out of 5

    Emil Bredahl

    Simply a masterpiece that I really have enjoyed reading through. It clarifies so many important aspects of biblical counseling and it should be a must read for counselors. I give this book full support and I want to highly recommend this book

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

    I admire Adam's faith and his desire to stay true to the Bible. I think he over simplifies counseling and rejects methods that might be useful for some people. Tends to see demons around every tree and bush.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Debbie

    Here is a resource for Christian Biblical counselors and those who wish to become Biblical counselors. Much of the material overlaps with Adams' other counseling books, and some of it is identical to what you will read in his other books, but it remains a valuable tool.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Larry Taylor

    all of jay adams' works are biblically, psychologically, and scientifically inept, wrong-headed, filled with bad theology and scientific error; in short, they are terrible.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    0342

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kailey (BooksforMKs)

    This book really focuses on Scripture!

  26. 5 out of 5

    KC McCauley

    This is book is very comprehensive on the theory and practice of biblical (nouthetic) counseling.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alisha

    only read half for school.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Pastor Jamol

    Very informative

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rommel

    to gain wisdom

  30. 5 out of 5

    Paul Jeon

    Somewhat dated but still a helpful reference for pastors to have.

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