Hot Best Seller

A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions

Availability: Ready to download

Behind every powerful man is a trained woman, and behind every trained woman is the Society. It started with tea parties and matchmaking, but is now a countrywide secret. Gossips pass messages in recipes, Spinsters train to fight, and women work together to grant safety to abused women and children. The Society is more than oaths—it is sisterhood and purpose. In 1926, seven Behind every powerful man is a trained woman, and behind every trained woman is the Society. It started with tea parties and matchmaking, but is now a countrywide secret. Gossips pass messages in recipes, Spinsters train to fight, and women work together to grant safety to abused women and children. The Society is more than oaths—it is sisterhood and purpose. In 1926, seventeen-year-old Elsie is dropped off in a new city with four other teenage girls. All of them have trained together since childhood to become the Wife of a powerful man. But when they learn that their next target is earmarked to become President, their mission becomes more than just an assignment; this is a chance at the most powerful position in the Society. All they have to do is make one man fall in love with them first.


Compare

Behind every powerful man is a trained woman, and behind every trained woman is the Society. It started with tea parties and matchmaking, but is now a countrywide secret. Gossips pass messages in recipes, Spinsters train to fight, and women work together to grant safety to abused women and children. The Society is more than oaths—it is sisterhood and purpose. In 1926, seven Behind every powerful man is a trained woman, and behind every trained woman is the Society. It started with tea parties and matchmaking, but is now a countrywide secret. Gossips pass messages in recipes, Spinsters train to fight, and women work together to grant safety to abused women and children. The Society is more than oaths—it is sisterhood and purpose. In 1926, seventeen-year-old Elsie is dropped off in a new city with four other teenage girls. All of them have trained together since childhood to become the Wife of a powerful man. But when they learn that their next target is earmarked to become President, their mission becomes more than just an assignment; this is a chance at the most powerful position in the Society. All they have to do is make one man fall in love with them first.

30 review for A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sheena Boekweg

    My grandma was a poet. She was born in 1927, she lived and she died and her poems are all we have left of her. I've written this book for her. I rated it five stars, because I gave her every star I have. My grandma was a poet. She was born in 1927, she lived and she died and her poems are all we have left of her. I've written this book for her. I rated it five stars, because I gave her every star I have.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Delaney

    Read my full review on my blog now! I did honestly debate a bit whether or not I wanted to post this review. In some sense, I feel a bit bad taking the time to so thoroughly single out a book and say "I did not like this, and here's why!" However, I haven't seen that many thorough reviews of this book, and I genuinely think that if you are considering reading it, seeing my opinions might be helpful in making that decision. Also, like, I already wrote most of this for my NetGalley feedback form, Read my full review on my blog now! I did honestly debate a bit whether or not I wanted to post this review. In some sense, I feel a bit bad taking the time to so thoroughly single out a book and say "I did not like this, and here's why!" However, I haven't seen that many thorough reviews of this book, and I genuinely think that if you are considering reading it, seeing my opinions might be helpful in making that decision. Also, like, I already wrote most of this for my NetGalley feedback form, so I might as well. (Okay, that's a bit of a lie, I wrote the first version of this for my feedback form, then revised it twice to actually make it comprehensible.) The thing about A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions is that I really wanted to like it! I first saw it on bookstagram at the beginning of the year, and I thought it looked like a promising YA historical fiction, something I'm always looking for more of. I was interested in the fact that it had a fat protagonist, and I was intrigued by a set-up that presented both sisterhood and a competition between four girls. I wanted to see how it played with the tension between those two things and how what appeared to be a progressive voice would challenge the trope of women competing to win a man. Unfortunately, I don't think A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions lived up to its potential, and I found it to be thoroughly mediocre, if not annoying and boring at times. I even found myself skimming at the end, which I never do. I believe this book is a classic case of an author biting off more than they can chew. Or perhaps a book that would have been great if it had gone through a couple more revisions. The ideas were all there, it just wasn’t put together very well. There were a lot of weaknesses to it, but overall it stemmed from the fact that the writing just wasn't strong enough. I talk in more details in my blog post, but the characterization was lacking, the plot was static, and the political discussions were not nearly nuanced enough (too much #girlboss energy instead of Elsie actually wanting to help others). What A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions really came down to was: it was boring. It should have been interesting, but the writing wasn’t good enough to make it so. The plot needed a major reworking, the prose needed help, and the characterization was sorely lacking. Although some might be able to enjoy it, I can’t say I recommend this book. ----- Pre-review: well. That was a thing that I read. The acknowledgements were quite nice, but unfortunately they might have been the best part of the book. 1.5-2 stars Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for providing me with an advanced reader copy.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Diana Pinguicha

    plus-sized protag AND a secret society for women? COUNT. ME. IN!!!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I’m writing this review through tears. I just finished reading A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions and Elsie’s (the MC) speech at the end gutted me. I’m left with hope, with heartache, and a desire to call my sister and tell her how much I love her. Elsie is a bit brash, a bit selfish, and a bit much. But I absolutely adored the love she has for her friends and for the women she and the Society help in general. With a cast of characters you love (and maybe a couple you love to hate), you’re rooting f I’m writing this review through tears. I just finished reading A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions and Elsie’s (the MC) speech at the end gutted me. I’m left with hope, with heartache, and a desire to call my sister and tell her how much I love her. Elsie is a bit brash, a bit selfish, and a bit much. But I absolutely adored the love she has for her friends and for the women she and the Society help in general. With a cast of characters you love (and maybe a couple you love to hate), you’re rooting for every single one of them to get a happy ending. And maybe the happy ending isn’t what they want, but what they need. I was invested in the story from the first page and fell in love as soon as they described their guns as ‘sleek as a pair of pumps.’ The author has a magnificent way of bringing the feminine and strong into every single sentence, every single paragraph, every single page. I want to thank the author for bringing attention to Asexuality, Chanel, the value of mothers and those who choose a different path—all of us are worthy. As the author said and conveyed through the entirety of the book, “WORTH IS INTRINSIC.” ♥♥ ARC provided by NetGalley in exchange for an honest review ♥♥

  5. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    The premise intrigued me: a society of women who, denied power in their own right, manage to guide events by marrying the "right" men. The society recruits promising women, sorting them into different categories, Mothers, Wives, Gossips and Spinsters, training them to help make society better. What grabbed me most was not the action or the machinations of the Society but that Elsie has second thoughts. Those thoughts include questioning how the Society operates: who are these women to decide what The premise intrigued me: a society of women who, denied power in their own right, manage to guide events by marrying the "right" men. The society recruits promising women, sorting them into different categories, Mothers, Wives, Gossips and Spinsters, training them to help make society better. What grabbed me most was not the action or the machinations of the Society but that Elsie has second thoughts. Those thoughts include questioning how the Society operates: who are these women to decide what is best? or to manipulate the lives of men in such elaborate ways (the dates are hysterical)? Her evolution throughout the book felt real, organically coming with her growing up rather than being something simply added to make the plot move forward. Additional points for realistic representation of gender, sexuality and body image. eARC provided by publisher via Edelweiss.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    Sheena is a fantastic author, and cares deeply for each and every one of her characters! Love to see myself represented in a plus-size MC!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kylie Schachte

    So excited to read this one!!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sarah {The Clever Reader}

    Trigger Warning: Domestic Violence references, child death I was really intrigued with the concept of this book. A secret society of women who worked together to help battered women in the 1920's seemed like a great story line. I thought the beginning started out really well but a little confusing. It took me a bit to understand what was happening and then I wanted to see more missions around the society coming together to help these women. In the end it became a book that didn't hold as much int Trigger Warning: Domestic Violence references, child death I was really intrigued with the concept of this book. A secret society of women who worked together to help battered women in the 1920's seemed like a great story line. I thought the beginning started out really well but a little confusing. It took me a bit to understand what was happening and then I wanted to see more missions around the society coming together to help these women. In the end it became a book that didn't hold as much interest as it did in the beginning and I found myself a bit bored. I didn't enjoy the political aspects of the society trying to find an affluential man a wife to help guide him in his success. I didn't find it realistic that five women would be helping each other win the heart of one man without it getting messier than it did. It seemed that each woman was too cordial and I didn't like that she vowed to help Bea get the guy but then put that aside for her own agenda. I was really encouraged by the appearance of a different man who seemed to be capturing Elsie's heart and really wanted the story to go in that direction. It took a turn that was much more sinister and in the end I don't know what the point of all of it was. No one really ended up happy and even a child was killed in the process. I had high hopes for this one given the concept but it just didn't work out for me.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sacha

    Thanks to NetGalley and Feiwel and Friends for this arc, which I received in exchange for an honest review. I’ll post that review upon publication. Updated 6/1/21 3.5 stars This book has the ingredients for a sure winner in my reading life: diverse characters, solid representation, and some advanced (relatively) ideas about women's roles and opportunities in society. I was immediately sucked in by the first scene and the whole concept of the Sisterhood, but while the early parts of the novel felt Thanks to NetGalley and Feiwel and Friends for this arc, which I received in exchange for an honest review. I’ll post that review upon publication. Updated 6/1/21 3.5 stars This book has the ingredients for a sure winner in my reading life: diverse characters, solid representation, and some advanced (relatively) ideas about women's roles and opportunities in society. I was immediately sucked in by the first scene and the whole concept of the Sisterhood, but while the early parts of the novel felt exciting, as soon as the main mission arrived, the excitement waned a bit. Yes, this mission is a great backdrop for getting to know the characters and their motivations, but in some ways, it felt like a very slow and even creepier version of a dating show at times. The characters are engaging, the concept is gripping, and this is an entertaining read overall, but I hoped for a more exciting series of events. I'll definitely read more from Boekweg.

  10. 4 out of 5

    ella

    ★★☆☆☆ 2/5 first off i just want to say how much i LOVED the casual queer representation. i would have liked to see a w|w character though... unfortunately, this book did not live up to my expectations for it. the plot was kind of all over the place, and there were a lot of loose ends that were never tied up. full review to come. (arc provided by netgallery and Feiwel Friends. all thoughts and opinions are my own)

  11. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Shepard (Between-the-Shelves)

    Thanks to NetGalley and Feiwel & Friends for sending me an advanced copy of this to review! I have to say, I was pleasantly surprised going into this. I didn’t know much about it, but I really enjoyed the writing style and the characters. Plus, the world Boekweg has created is intriguing! This is a historical fiction book with a bit of a twist. It feels a little like The Handmaid’s Tale and a little like The Selection. Elsie is a strong main character, sure in her beliefs and confident in her app Thanks to NetGalley and Feiwel & Friends for sending me an advanced copy of this to review! I have to say, I was pleasantly surprised going into this. I didn’t know much about it, but I really enjoyed the writing style and the characters. Plus, the world Boekweg has created is intriguing! This is a historical fiction book with a bit of a twist. It feels a little like The Handmaid’s Tale and a little like The Selection. Elsie is a strong main character, sure in her beliefs and confident in her appearance. There are a lot of great conversations between her and her friends about body acceptance and things like that that really stood out to me. Those elements aren’t included nearly enough in YA books. There is also queer representation that feels effortless. One of Elsie’s friends realizes that she might be asexual, and their discussion about this validates her feelings. The main group of girls are also so supportive of each other, even though they are all competing for the same man. Yes, Elsie slips at times, but they always make up and keep their friendship strong. As someone always looking for these strong friendships in YA, this was probably my favorite aspect of the book. My only complaint might be the pacing of the book. It felt a little uneven throughout, and I wanted a little more breathing room for the ending. Despite this, Boekweg ends on a powerful note (no spoilers), but it made me love Elsie even more. All in all, if you like books like The Selection, this is definitely one that you’ll want to pick up!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Disclosure: I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book which I received from the author. All views expressed are only my honest opinion. This review can also be found in Currant7 Recommends. Rating: 5 out of 5 stars Coming into A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions, I was thrilled to be given a chance to review this book. This book is my first encounter with the author, but I was sure to love it based on the intriguing synopsis - and I was proven correct! The story is from a first-person PO Disclosure: I voluntarily reviewed a complimentary copy of this book which I received from the author. All views expressed are only my honest opinion. This review can also be found in Currant7 Recommends. Rating: 5 out of 5 stars Coming into A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions, I was thrilled to be given a chance to review this book. This book is my first encounter with the author, but I was sure to love it based on the intriguing synopsis - and I was proven correct! The story is from a first-person POV of Elsie Fawcett, as she describes the secret Society of women she is a member of. This Society categorizes women before they reach puberty on their future based on their specific skill-set. It is a very organized association with rules, purpose, and hierarchy. The group aims to influence men through the group's brand of "manipulation" and "involvement." It may sound sinister, but they do this to save and shape the future to a better one while also "rescuing" other women from troubled situations. They help other women "in need" through secret codes and drop-offs, etc. Elsie Fawcett is the main focus in the story and, together with her group of "ladies," is on a mission to pursue an important man that will later shape the country. Based on their training, any of these ladies would support and help their would-be husbands make significant changes in their country. These women are like the "League of Extraordinary Gentlemen" but in the female version and with the women's brand of "extra powers" since females are superhumans and are in a category all on their own. They are silent heroes when they are needed, and voices needed to be heard. This book made me think hard and long with everything. It made me revisit scenes and clues that would have the ending be such. Readers like myself want/need/love books that are more than HEA. **Note: this is still considered a HEA ending but with a unique and satisfying twist. 1.) The Society and Limitations I love the concept of strong women, and the story was spot on with this point. There were many strong women with their skills used for good and a "higher purpose." Although the Society seems the perfect solution to the world, the story dives into the pros and cons of operating in secret, not being able to rise from the shadows of their male targets, partners, etc. Women who solely dedicate themselves to the Society's cause may seem harsh but reading their points of view made sense. The saying "behind a successful man is a strong woman" is a valid saying, with the formation of the Society. 2.) Soft Skills as calculative weapons It is important to note that the author highlights the many great women who had made huge impacts with their involvement behind the scenes. Whether it is to maintain a home, rear an heir, share opinions through "light conversations," or just beside their man stirring them to the "right people," - all of these impact these potentially important men. The world may be a patriarchal world with archaic thoughts, but a woman's guidance of kindness and compassion stirs it to a better and brighter future. 3.) Elsie and the gang I love the interaction of Elsie and the four other "chosen girls" (all but one are her best friends) in the story. Being the wisest and most observant one in the group, Elsie shares it with the readers to help empathize with their different predicaments. They also come from different female representations from a trans, aromantic, and plus-size heroine, to name a few, that ALL rocked the story! Each girl had ways of winning over "the target" while making sure not to succumb to her insecurities. It is also interesting to see that they are close friends, but they also compete against each other. They know each other well enough to use their weaknesses to further their agenda. Who will win in the end? **Each girl's "date location" was a great indicator of their respective personalities. It is pretty varied, from a fancy restaurant to a car garage! 4.) Choices and Accountability Elsie is NOT a perfect character. She is flawed and selfish in her own right. She is intelligent, educated, driven, and overqualified than to be a "wife." Note that there is nothing wrong with being a wife. It has been stated often in the book, but with Elsie knowing deep down, she can be "more." That revelation will be the deciding factor of her deciding ambition vs. feelings. Elsie often had to fight internally to "do the right thing," and there were moments of temptation winning out. She made many bad decisions throughout the book, even if it started with the noblest of intentions, but I was happy with what she decided to do to "turn things around." Her self-sacrificing intentions served a higher purpose, as readers will see in the end. 5.) Leader vs. Follower The ending might not be what a few readers may see coming, but in my case, I was delighted with how the ending was not the typical "happy ending" expected from Elsie. I firmly believed that Elsie wrote her story considering all her facets:- the good, the bad, and even the ugly. Elsie grew in the story that made her relatable - to anyone's hopes, dreams, and ambitions. She knew she needed to sacrifice now to see the future of women better. She had enough of being in anyone's shadows. In summary, A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions is a literary gem! This fascinating book offers more than just reading for entertainment. It will thought-provoking impossibilities, shape minds about advocacies and women empowerment. Elsie's thoughts and opinions moved me like how a motivational speaker can do. Interestingly, it is with Elsie's epic speech, in the end, that tips this book into a higher level of literary status! This book will engross you from start to finish AND make you want to be the best version of yourselves to push through pursue your passion and advocacies publicly. This book is a highly recommended read for readers who want inspiration, empowerment as it sets them up for unlimited opportunities.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Kait Goodwin ★Kait Plus Books★

    I'm not crying, you're crying. Full review available here! Thank you so much to Turn the Page Tours, Macmillan, and Edelweiss for this review copy! I'm not crying, you're crying. Full review available here! Thank you so much to Turn the Page Tours, Macmillan, and Edelweiss for this review copy!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Rawson Hill

    Read an early version and CAN'T WAIT for the final! Read an early version and CAN'T WAIT for the final!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Julie - One Book More

    This is such a unique and interesting story about women, sisterhood, and knowing one’s worth. A secret sisterhood of women who use marriage to influence government and society, the Society recruits and trains women, sorting them into different roles that suit their temperament and talent. This story focuses on Elsie, who is competing with three other members of the Society to win the heart of a future president. There’s a lot to love about this book, including the beautiful writing, the immersive This is such a unique and interesting story about women, sisterhood, and knowing one’s worth. A secret sisterhood of women who use marriage to influence government and society, the Society recruits and trains women, sorting them into different roles that suit their temperament and talent. This story focuses on Elsie, who is competing with three other members of the Society to win the heart of a future president. There’s a lot to love about this book, including the beautiful writing, the immersive story, the fascinating time period, and the strong themes of female empowerment and self-acceptance. The author’s writing style is wonderful, and I found myself highlighting many powerful and thought-provoking lines from the book. The writing pulls you in right from the start with an interesting story and an alternate world where women have more influence than expected. I love the way that women are depicted throughout the story and the strong messages about self-worth and acceptance. Elsie and her friends are all shapes and sizes and colors and sexualities, and I love the diverse representation. Elsie and her friend, for example, are both plus-size, and they are both comfortable in their own skin. In a society that glamorizes thin women, it’s refreshing to see plus-size women loving the way they look. They see the beauty in and embrace their bodies, looks, intellect, and skill. I love all of the body and sexuality positivity! There are several touching moments where the women discuss their feelings about their bodies and sexualities, and their unflappable support of each other is one of my favorite parts of the novel. America has a habit of missing out on brilliance because it doesn’t look the way it expects. The story takes place in an alternate 1926 America, and women have a bit of behind-the-scenes power in the country. However, this understated influence is not enough for Elsie, who hates that she will never be considered an equal to and as important as her brother just because of her gender. Elsie wants change, and she wants the same opportunities that men have. I love Elsie’s growth throughout the story as she realizes her own worth, takes control of her future, and tries to invoke change. She is a strong woman who wants more than what the patriarchal society offers. Elsie has a strong bond with two of the other women who are trying to win over the future president, which creates some competition. They don’t always act in each other’s best interests, and that causes a lot of friction. These well-rounded and dynamically developed women are not without faults, yet ultimately they share a strong connection. I also like that they each want different things for their lives. They are all on a journey of self-discovery, which could lead their lives in very different but equally significant directions. And that is the heart of the book – the idea that everyone is important. Everyone has worth. Elsie, in particular, makes some mistakes and acts selfishly. She lets her ambition take precedence over her friendships, and she is sometimes guided by her passion and heart instead of her head. There are several times when she is lucky that she has understanding and forgiving friends. When Elsie starts to question the Society and her role in it, things change. Though she likes the mission of protecting and empowering women, she sees new ways to achieve her goals, which changes her relationships with her friends and family. It wasn’t hard to keep secrets when no one finds your words worth reading. Interspersed throughout the novel are poems written by Elsie. I love the inclusion of these poems and feel like they deepened my understanding of her character. Through her poetry, you see her truth – her fears, her scars, and her desires. Elsie is a gifted writer, another skill that would be commended if she were a man, but is sadly glossed over since she is a woman. On paper, Elsie is free with her thoughts, as she knows her words will never be discovered. In addition to the great characters and messages, this a unique story with a fascinating secret society, spies, two budding romances, secrets, lies, manipulations, betrayals, treacherous plots, and more. But above all, this story is about sisterhood, empowerment, fighting for what you believe in, and the message that everyone has worth. I’m so thankful to Sheena Boekweg, Turn the Page Tours, and the publisher for a copy of the book in exchange for my honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Elyse (ElyseReadsandSpeaks)

    Arrrrgggghhhh SO MUCH POTENTIAL. This book had so. Much. Potential. Unfortunately, it was rushed, not fully hashed out, and it really fumbled what could have been something great. That being said, I'm still going with 3 stars because there were parts of this that I really did love and I really thought the author was onto something good here. So let's start with the good: the idea that there are women in a secret society that are trained to be wives of important men is fantastic. Even the little d Arrrrgggghhhh SO MUCH POTENTIAL. This book had so. Much. Potential. Unfortunately, it was rushed, not fully hashed out, and it really fumbled what could have been something great. That being said, I'm still going with 3 stars because there were parts of this that I really did love and I really thought the author was onto something good here. So let's start with the good: the idea that there are women in a secret society that are trained to be wives of important men is fantastic. Even the little details of naming each type of kiss after a fruit so that they could tell secret notes through recipes was genius. Did the recipe call for peach or strawberry? Was there a Dash of vanilla with a capital D to let you know that the message is urgent and requires immediate attention? Oh my gosh I loved that stuff so much. Really, I thought it was laying the groundwork for something amazing. I also really liked that each girl got a "turn" before the mark would decide who the frontrunner would be. It made this little society seem more structured and civil than just having a bunch of girls throwing themselves at someone who was earmarked to be important. Last, there's a lot of different rep in here - from Mira trying to figure out if she's aromantic to (I think) Iris being trans. I write "I think" because I don't think it was explicitly stated, or if it was, then I missed it. But she states at one point how her thoughts and goals were once listened to and given some weight, but that dropped off once she transitioned and they didn't see her as anything but a pretty face. Guys. So much good stuff in here. It pains me that I'm giving this 3 stars. Why? First and foremost, the insta-love between Elsie & Patch. Honestly, I can usually be a little lenient with insta-love in YA because it's just the genre that calls for it, but this was over the top even for me. They spend one night flirting and kissing and suddenly Elsie is "his girl" and he's drawing pictures of her and stabbing out her eyes. What. Elsie also keeps measuring up her lack of spark with Andrew to her sparks with Patch. Dude. The guy drew a picture of you and marked out your eyes when he saw you talking to another guy. Move along. Also, everything was VERY rushed. There's a big climactic part that happens which I won't go into for spoilers sake, but it seemed to have little to no catalyst for such a drastic action and it all happened so suddenly. It was just jarring and solidified for me that the entire pacing of the book needed work. This is a much longer review than I usually leave for 3 star books. I just want it to be known that this was something that could have been so great, but it really fell short. However, I definitely think I'd try another book from this author in the future.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Julie Anna

    ⭐⭐⭐.25 A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions takes place in 1926 and follows Elsie, who is dropped off in a city with four other girls. They have all been trained together by The Society to become wives of powerful men. But when they find out their next target is earmarked for Presidency, they have a chance to become the most powerful woman in The Society. A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions has been on my TBR for a while, so I’m happy I finally got to read it as part of the Turn the Page Bookstagram tour ⭐⭐⭐.25 A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions takes place in 1926 and follows Elsie, who is dropped off in a city with four other girls. They have all been trained together by The Society to become wives of powerful men. But when they find out their next target is earmarked for Presidency, they have a chance to become the most powerful woman in The Society. A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions has been on my TBR for a while, so I’m happy I finally got to read it as part of the Turn the Page Bookstagram tour. I wasn’t sure what to expect from such a unique concept for a historical fiction novel, and while the synopsis led me to different expectations, I enjoyed what this book turned out to be and all of the messages shared along the way. At first, I was expecting a competitive aspect to this book. But it didn’t turn out to be that way for the most part and I really liked that. Instead, there was a lot of focus on the Society’s values and the importance of women having a voice and being able to contribute their own opinions and that having an impact. I also really liked the conversations between the characters in the book. In a time where women were recently given the right to vote, but still had many more limitations, there were a lot of really nuanced discussions about women’s roles in society and all of the different ways women can strive to make a difference in these communities. I also really liked how these conversations were intersectional in nature – I think it’s important to demonstrate that these conversations did happen throughout history and that they are present in historical fiction novels. The one thing that I really grappled with while reading A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions was the pacing. After the main mission was revealed, I felt like things really slowed down in the middle before they make a sharp turn and pick up at the end. And while I found that the middle of the book is where a lot of the book’s themes come in, I do wish that it moved in the same way that the beginning did. Regardless, A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions was a great read overall and it’s reminded me to read more YA historical fiction again! I’m looking forward to seeing what Boekweg publishes in the future. CW: (view spoiler)[Body shaming, death of a child (hide spoiler)] You can find more of my reviews here: www.julieannasbooks.com 🖤

  18. 5 out of 5

    Celia McMahon

    Huge thanks to the publisher and Turn the Page Tours for the chance to be on this book tour! This has to be one of the most intriguing premises for a book, and I am so happy I got to read it. This book focuses on Elsie as she and her four society sisters go on a mission to woe the future president of the United States in the 1920s. Elsie is a plus-sized ball of energy, wit, and sass. Let's not forget ambition ;D She finds out a lot about herself as she attempts to gain the heart of Andrew Shaw. S Huge thanks to the publisher and Turn the Page Tours for the chance to be on this book tour! This has to be one of the most intriguing premises for a book, and I am so happy I got to read it. This book focuses on Elsie as she and her four society sisters go on a mission to woe the future president of the United States in the 1920s. Elsie is a plus-sized ball of energy, wit, and sass. Let's not forget ambition ;D She finds out a lot about herself as she attempts to gain the heart of Andrew Shaw. She wants to win and she wants to gain favor in the society, but she also sees the flaws in the system that put their men on pedestals while the women succeed in the shadows. Through her efforts to thwart the other girls, she discovers that she wants for herself than being the wife of a powerful man. She herself wants that power too. I adored the representation of this book and the themes of body positivity and feminism. But there's also a discussion of accepting women who want to be mothers and wives and how that is OK to want just as it's OK for others not to want that sort of life. Elsie is not a perfect character, and she slips and falls often, but in the end, she finds out who she really is and what she wants in life and her journey is beautiful. The plot is well-paced with enough intrigue and action to keep me hooked. There are some hard-hitting themes and one particular that will make you ugly cry. This is a diamond of a book that left me wanting more. It's only been a day since I finished and I keep ruminating back to some of the scenes that inspired me. I cannot wait for this book to arrive in my hands. I hope you all love it too!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Thindbooks

    *this e-arc was sent to me by the publisher to give an honest review in return* This book was not it for me. It’s about four girls who are a part of a society and have been trained to get proposed by the next 18 year old president. When I first read the summary, I thought it was very unique and gave me a little of The Selection vibe. When I started reading the book, I was into the book but then it went down hill for me. The story went a little boring and also a little childish. I felt that the wo *this e-arc was sent to me by the publisher to give an honest review in return* This book was not it for me. It’s about four girls who are a part of a society and have been trained to get proposed by the next 18 year old president. When I first read the summary, I thought it was very unique and gave me a little of The Selection vibe. When I started reading the book, I was into the book but then it went down hill for me. The story went a little boring and also a little childish. I felt that the world building didn’t make sense and was a little confusing. The plot structure wasn’t well structured as I felt the story was messy with not good pacing. I didn’t really enjoy the characters in this book and didn’t feel attached to them. The main character is Elsie who I felt acted as a child but also mature at the same time. She didn’t have a great character development in this book and I didn’t care much for her character. The side characters were a little enjoyable but in some points they were described as 12 year olds so I was a little confused. The romance in this book is practically the girls flirting with the next “president”. For the ending, I didn’t pay attention to it as much as the story got boring. Sadly the book was just disappointing for me and I didn’t enjoy it the way I was hoping to. I think some people will enjoy this book and if it does seem that you want to read it, you should! Don’t let this review get to you!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Doleski

    Can't wait! Can't wait!

  21. 4 out of 5

    BookTrib.com

    Ambition sows conflict ... and this book pulls no punches. Read our full review here: https://booktrib.com/2021/06/16/a-sis... Ambition sows conflict ... and this book pulls no punches. Read our full review here: https://booktrib.com/2021/06/16/a-sis...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Craftshley

    Elsie and her friends, Mina and Bea, are tapped by a secret society of women to be the wives of powerful men in history. Every woman in the society is chosen and assigned a role, whether it be Wives or Gossips or Spinsters. Each and every woman is trained so they can best influence men towards paths of their choosing. They root out men who will become powerful and follow them, setting up interactions with pretty women who will eventually become their wives. They also help women in trouble, who a Elsie and her friends, Mina and Bea, are tapped by a secret society of women to be the wives of powerful men in history. Every woman in the society is chosen and assigned a role, whether it be Wives or Gossips or Spinsters. Each and every woman is trained so they can best influence men towards paths of their choosing. They root out men who will become powerful and follow them, setting up interactions with pretty women who will eventually become their wives. They also help women in trouble, who are in abusive situations or otherwise need help. Elsie and her friends are assigned to a Priority One, Andrew. Such a high priority means he is tapped to one day become president. And so becoming his wife is the highest honor. Only, Elsie isn’t so sure being the wife of a powerful man is enough for her. She has dreams, too, and wants to make a name for herself, not to be the nameless woman behind a powerful man. Elsie and her friends are powerful in their own right, assured of their beauty and their skills. Elsie and Bea are both fat and they are still judged as beautiful, despite that. It’s mentioned as a contentious part in the beginning, and there are a few digs from Greta, one of their fellow society girls, but their size is quickly left behind in favor of their other skills and beauty. Elsie herself is a great lover of literature, and writes her own poetry. She understands the value of words and how to use them to her advantage. Mina is the skinny one, a mechanic. And Bea loves baking and is poor. That is what they are reduced to. Bea especially is reduced to her ability to bake, the way into Andrew’s heart, apparently, living up to the age old adage. I don’t like how Elsie vacillated between wanting her own power and then went on to try and charm Andrew, betraying her friends and throwing them under the bus in the process. They always forgive her, anyway, all too easily. And she claims to not even want Andrew at all, that there aren’t any sparks between them because she’s hung up on Patch, a boy she met once and immediately sprouted feelings for. Then she goes out and tries to get Andrew, interrupting the planned meetups between Andrew and the other girls, every single time. I just couldn’t pin down her motive there. It felt incredibly selfish of her to try and be the center of attention, to claim that she would win his heart then say that she didn’t want him and wanted one of her friends to get him instead. This goes back and forth all the way through til almost the end, when there’s a pretty big twist and some heartbreak. Maybe she was just trying to seek her own power but didn’t know how, so she latched onto the only thing she’d been trained to do: a powerful man is the only way she’ll ever have a voice of her own. Everything moved so fast. It only took about a week, probably less, for the main part of the story to take place. Again, unbelievable for me. I refuse to believe in love at first sight. I refuse to believe that someone can see someone else and instantly fall for them, going so far as to put their livelihood on the line so they can be together. It just throws me straight out of the story. It also didn’t definably put the story in any particular year. The current events were only alluded to and I had to look up the summary to see when the story is supposed to be set. The society is one made up of women but the titles, such as Matron, Spinster, Gossip, and Wife, remind me all too strongly of the dystopian world of the Handmaid’s Tale. It rubbed me the wrong way from the beginning, especially once I read what the women are supposed to do and when they are assigned their roles. They are assigned their roles at a young age, meaning they are determined whether they are going to be a wife to a powerful man, or the mother to powerful men when they aren’t even fully women themselves. Elsie begins to realize that she wants to be more than that but even then she works within the structure of the society to get what she wants. There are a lot of loose ends and many possibilities, as well as an unexpected tragedy that was used to move things along. Patch is introduced and I thought there would be some real chemistry there, making Elsie choose between Patch, Andrew, and her own autonomy. And there is a struggle here but it didn’t feel genuine or like how I expected it to. I expected the Matrons to pull Elsie from the mission, to intervene, to stop her from going off task. Or to pull her entirely. But, no. They are all too understanding, as are Elsie’s friends of her betrayal. There is an attempt at representation, a lot of name dropping of queer identities. But all the main characters are white. There is mention of a previous match that was a black woman, so why couldn’t there have been a black woman in this case? Is it because Andrew was supposed to be a future president and they couldn’t have a black woman marry a president? I mean, I guess it’s the 1920s so that would be out of the question for the time period. But there aren’t many other black people in the story, either, not as fleshed out characters. They could have had their Spinster, and friend, Iris, be a black woman. She’s trans, which is wonderful, but they could have upped the rep instead of explaining it away with a weak throwaway line. This book had a lot of potential. I love the cover and the body positivity, as well as the casual queer inclusion. I don’t really like how dystopian the society is, or how they let themselves be in the shadows of powerful men, as if that’s the only thing they can be even though powerful women have existed throughout history way before the 1920s. They set women up for lives they might not be fit for, ignoring their potential in other areas because women can’t do that. It’s a bizarrely sexist thing for a feminist society to participate in. Despite how easy it was for me to be drawn into this book, in retrospect, there was more that bothered me than I enjoyed. The premise had a lot of potential but Elsie and her wavering loyalties to her friends, as well as incomplete plot lines, really drew me out of the story.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Samantha Hastings

    Using their feminine wiles and roles, a secret sisterhood founded by Abigail Adams helps rescue abused women and controls politics through wives. A group of friends are given the opportunity to attract a future president, priority one level. Elsie is determined to marry Andrew Shaw so that she can make her parents proud and be in politics. But when her fancy is caught by another, she must decide if her ambitions or her heart will lead. And if she even wants to be a wife... Despite morally gray ch Using their feminine wiles and roles, a secret sisterhood founded by Abigail Adams helps rescue abused women and controls politics through wives. A group of friends are given the opportunity to attract a future president, priority one level. Elsie is determined to marry Andrew Shaw so that she can make her parents proud and be in politics. But when her fancy is caught by another, she must decide if her ambitions or her heart will lead. And if she even wants to be a wife... Despite morally gray choices, Elsie is a likeable, plus-sized character who is secure in her intelligence and her curves. There is positive queer rep and plenty of awesome feminism. A great read-a-like to SPEAK EASY, SPEAK LOVE by McKelle George.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Behind every successful man, there is a strong woman. This adage has been floating around for generations, but what if there was more to it than that? Sheena Boekweg’s A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions explores just that, in an alternative historical fiction that will knock your socks off. The Society has been molding women to shape the world through their influence on men since the days of Abigail Adams. As Mothers, Wives, Spinsters, and Gossips, they try and make the world safer for all women. T Behind every successful man, there is a strong woman. This adage has been floating around for generations, but what if there was more to it than that? Sheena Boekweg’s A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions explores just that, in an alternative historical fiction that will knock your socks off. The Society has been molding women to shape the world through their influence on men since the days of Abigail Adams. As Mothers, Wives, Spinsters, and Gossips, they try and make the world safer for all women. They help women escape dangerous situations, they guide powerful men to good and right decisions, and they do it all in secret. Elsie joined the Society as a child, chosen to be a Wife and trained up to not only make a man fall in love with her, but to discreetly lead him in all of his decisions. Her dearest friends, Bea and Mira, are trained up in this same fashion, as is their frenemy, Greta. When they’re all selected to compete for a Priority One in the summer of 1926, to win the heart of a future President, their friendship is challenged in new and dangerous ways. To be a First Lady- that’s one of the highest positions in the Society, a real way to make a lasting difference in the world. All they have to do is make one man fall in love with them. Elsie’s world is well constructed and believable, a 1926 unlike anything we’ve seen. As Prohibition reigns, Elsie and her friends set out to change the world as a Wife. But complications arise- a dashing rumrunner, ambition for more, and a yearning for an acknowledged identity all collide in unanticipated ways. There was so much to love about this novel. The grand era, the well developed spy network, the tapestry of all women- trans women, women of color, unmarried women, asexual women- all working together to make the world a safer place for women inside and outside the Society alike. It’s a dream world, yet even it is complicated. But the representation of all types of women, and it’s presentation as normal and not a plot point– that is something that makes my heart soar. This novel is inclusive and beautiful in myriad ways, and it’s all presented as standard. The representation in this novel is absolutely incredible. In addition to the variety of women listed above, there are also all shapes and sizes of women. Elsie is plus sized, as is her dear friend Bea. They are beautiful and comfortable with their size. Much like in our own present day society, it is the outside world that is left uncomfortable with their curves. Though there are a few moments of self-doubt after particularly hurtful moments, their self-love shines through most of all. It’s uplifting and encouraging to see larger main characters, when their size is not a plot point but just a fact of who they are. The diverse cast is all intricately developed, making the characters feel real and causing the reader to want to befriend all of them. Their relationships to one another, their flaws, their ability to love on another- all of these components combine to create this entirely believable sisterhood, where they can be competing and helping one another at the same time. The plot is well paced and thoroughly enjoyable. There are moments of intensity in the plot, and I’ll include a trigger warning well down below, as it does contain a spoiler. This is an iceberg book, so be prepared for a deep dive. There is more here than meets the eye. It is thought provoking, enchanting, and there’s a fair chance it’ll make you cry. It’s one of those novels that once you close the cover, your mind keeps drifting back to it, ruminating over plot points and how it made you feel. It truly gave me all the feels, in a way I won’t soon be forgetting. It’s the kind of book that stays with you, and it definitely has re-readability. A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions will be available on June 1, 2021. Thank you to Net Galley, Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group, and Feiwel & Friends for this advanced copy so that I could write this review. The trigger warning below includes a spoiler. Please proceed with caution. . . . . . . . . . . Trigger Warning: This novel contains a child’s death.

  25. 5 out of 5

    S.

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. The word is suffragists. Suffragists, suffragists, suffragists. I've pointed this out in other book reviews and conversations--a disturbing number of people make this mistake. In the U. S., the term "suffragette" was derogatory--ridicule from misogynists. In the U. K., the only suffragists who embraced the term were radical militant 20th century suffragists. This book takes place in the U. S. (I placed this up front because... dot dot dot while it's great that this book acknowledges suffragists, The word is suffragists. Suffragists, suffragists, suffragists. I've pointed this out in other book reviews and conversations--a disturbing number of people make this mistake. In the U. S., the term "suffragette" was derogatory--ridicule from misogynists. In the U. K., the only suffragists who embraced the term were radical militant 20th century suffragists. This book takes place in the U. S. (I placed this up front because... dot dot dot while it's great that this book acknowledges suffragists, people need to stop calling them by a term that was a condescending and misogynistic insult for most suffragists.) (And Goodreads or stupid phone, why did the above sentence have a big gap that I filled in with "dot dot dot" because I didn't want to keep it?) Anyway.... The cover art is beautiful! It quickly becomes obvious why the protagonist on the cover holds a piece of paper: the Secret Society has spies and passes nessages. Jeepers! A protagonist who's not neurotypical and is stout, a diverse cast--I love it! I really like that Abigail Adams founded the Society. I'm in a feminist Facebook group called Abigail Adams Brigade. Page 4: People who say, "Don't be so sensitive," or "You're too sensitive!" aren't worth my time. It strangely doesn't occur to them that they're too insensitive, a red flag. I initially thought it not a good sign that a character says that only 4 pages in. I'm not saying it's triggering exactly, but... maybe it's mildly triggering. As if the first time isn't enough, this narcissist says, "You three can't always be so sensitive about everything." Red flag #2. I wouldn't give her any more chances. Page 32: And the narcissist is fatphobic. Typical. On the bright side, the author has a grasp of psychology (a serious concern of mine on page 4), and this mean girl isn't meant to be liked and admired by the reader. The protagonist, Elsie, doesn't mistake her for a friend. Whew. (I probably shouldn't have worried, since this is a book published in 2021 and written by a successful author. It's not... a conversational at a form of torture called a family reunion.) Page 41: "The car hit a bump, and Bea and I jostled into each other." Then we wrapped our arms around each other in a passionate embrace, because despite all this striving to be behind a great man, we secretly reject compulsory heterosexuality. Page 57: And... fortunately, this doesn't appear to be a compulsory heterosexuality world, after all. And Iris is trans. I'm so glad. Shortly after I began reading the book, I felt critical of the Society because it doesn't truly empower women. It keeps women... behind powerful men. These young women aren't trained to become president or a lawyer, for instance; they're trained to be the spouse of said president or lawyer. It's kind of cringey. The Spinsters are awesome, but then the role "Wife" is especially cringey and conjures the wives in The Handmaid's Tale. Fortunately, we soon learn that the protagonist does question this society and its collaboration with patriarchy. As a child, Elsie had dreams of becoming president of the U. S. She wants to be grateful to the society... but wishes she could be more important, not just the spouse of a great man but instead... a great woman. This is the biggest theme in the book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Liza | The Inharmonious Heroine

    My rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ (4 stars) “A rebellion so quiet we’d left no room for a response.” A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions imagines a reality where behind every important decision in history stood the Society: a secret group of women working in the shadows to influence to political leaders of the world to make the right decision and move society into a better, more progressive future. Enter Elsie, she’s been trained all her life to be the Wife to one of these influential men. But she can’t help ha My rating: ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ (4 stars) “A rebellion so quiet we’d left no room for a response.” A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions imagines a reality where behind every important decision in history stood the Society: a secret group of women working in the shadows to influence to political leaders of the world to make the right decision and move society into a better, more progressive future. Enter Elsie, she’s been trained all her life to be the Wife to one of these influential men. But she can’t help having ambitions of her own. Ones that would mean stepping away from the shadows and into the limelight herself. But when she finds out her most recent target is intended to become the next POTUS, she can’t help contemplating what a marriage to him might do for her status, not just in the Society, but on a grander scale. First, though, she has to make him fall in love with her. “I would fight for a future that was as big as my ambitions.” I was so excited to read A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions when I first heard about it. The premise immediately struck me, and really made me sit up and take notice. A secret society of influential women guiding the progression of civilization for the better by marrying and raising powerful men? Sign me up! Elsie herself was such a great character to explore this world through too. She was smart, ambitious and driven in her own right. A big part of her storyline focused on her internal battle between doing what she was told to do and what she wanted for herself. She’d been trained to demonstrate all the things that made an ideal woman: soft, caring, nurturing, demure – and that’s exactly what people saw when they looked at her. But inside she was hiding an untenable storm of change and progress. And she had to decide if she ought to unleash it, or keep it tethered forever. I love how she questioned the Society itself and challenged whether making progress by not stepping on any toes was ever truly enough. Real progress is confrontational, it’s uncomfortable, and Elsie understood that. This book was as enthralling as it was inspirational. I adored the atmosphere and historical setting. All the women in it were really enjoyable, interesting, and unique. I loved how in the end even the least likeable of them showed they could be redeemed, and band together for the greater good and womanhood alike. 💪💥 “Maybe the point of life was to make the right people angry. Then at least you knew you’ve stood for something.” Thank you to Turn the Page Tours and the publisher, Feiwel & Friends/Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group, for providing me with an e-ARC of this book via NetGalley. All thoughts are my own. Blog | Twitter | Instagram | Bloglovin'

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brandi

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. [1.5 Stars] Look, I think the main message here is (for the most part) good. I just think the execution really botched this whole experience. This book still needs a lot more revisions and editing. To start off, I think that the representation of different ethnicities, sexual identities, and body types was decent, but not casual. Every time there was a poc character (which there were really only black characters, no other ethnicities were present) it felt like the author was patting herself on the [1.5 Stars] Look, I think the main message here is (for the most part) good. I just think the execution really botched this whole experience. This book still needs a lot more revisions and editing. To start off, I think that the representation of different ethnicities, sexual identities, and body types was decent, but not casual. Every time there was a poc character (which there were really only black characters, no other ethnicities were present) it felt like the author was patting herself on the back. Like "look here, I've added representation and it's good". But no poc character was fleshed out or really on-page at all, and all the main characters were white. The author only gave a lame one-sentence excuse for this and moved on. Also, the Society as a whole is very undeveloped. How do they know that 18-year-old Andrew will be President? How is the Society so pervasive and all women seem to know about it, yet they still stay in the shadows? I had to suspend my disbelief a lot about that whole thing. The book pushes the idea of sisterhood and friendship a lot but Elsie is a horrendous friend. I can see how Boekweg was trying to show Elsie's ambition, but she continuously sabotages her friends with zero consequences. Even when she knows that her friend, Bea, genuinely wants Andrew and that she doesn't, Elsie still swoops in and messes stuff up?? It was so bizarre and everyone just kept forgiving her for it. Either she shouldn't have been doing that or there should have been more discussion around what had happened. Speaking of bizarre, what even was that Patch storyline? I hated it the whole time and it was never explained. Who was he working for? What was he taking notes/photos etc for? Why did we need this instalove side-plot just for her to forget he even exists by the end? Why did he burn a house down? The questions go on and on and on. Furthermore, the writing was clunky, the atmosphere was nonexistent, the characters were underdeveloped, and the author inserted pages of forced monologue that took away from the story. I think there's a lot of potential here but, as it stands, it really dropped the ball.

  28. 5 out of 5

    nihaarika

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. 3.75 stars rounded up to 4 Thanks to Turn The Page Tours, Netgalley and the publisher for the e-ARC! I like the concept of secret societies, so I was instantly pulled in by 'A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions'. And have you seen that cover?? It's so freaking gorgeous and I could keep on staring at it for hours. The story starts off strong, with four girls, our main character, Elsie, and her friends/sisters, Mira, Bea and Greta. from the secret society. Sheena Boekweg's writing style was lovely; it w 3.75 stars rounded up to 4 Thanks to Turn The Page Tours, Netgalley and the publisher for the e-ARC! I like the concept of secret societies, so I was instantly pulled in by 'A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions'. And have you seen that cover?? It's so freaking gorgeous and I could keep on staring at it for hours. The story starts off strong, with four girls, our main character, Elsie, and her friends/sisters, Mira, Bea and Greta. from the secret society. Sheena Boekweg's writing style was lovely; it was beautiful and flowy, yet not to descriptive. Because of this, I was able to finish this book in one sitting. The first half of the story starts off great and builds up to the mission assigned to the four girls, make the boy (who is marked to be the future president of the United States) fall in love with them. Unfortunately, the buildup eventually falls flat because various other plot threads start to pop up that remained unresolved. And I found it a little hard to like Elsie after the first half, because while she was talking about not wanting to hurt her friends, when she goes around and does that. But I did come to like her by the time the ending came about. Even with all the unresolved plot threads, I enjoyed the ending and how Elsie came to find her own voice, outside the confines of the secret society. All in all, A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions was a good read, though I wish the plot had been developed a lot more. Nevertheless, if you're looking for something you can get through quickly, I'd recommend picking up this book!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Katie Bogdan

    3.5 stars Honestly I feel like I experienced this book in two parts. During the first half, I couldn't help but feel disappointed about how little I was getting about the background of the secret society and our main character, Elsie. For the first hundred pages or so, I felt like Elsie was barely involved in the story despite being the narrator. So much was focused on describing what the other girls were doing and because of that, there was this disconnect between me and the story. And then, abou 3.5 stars Honestly I feel like I experienced this book in two parts. During the first half, I couldn't help but feel disappointed about how little I was getting about the background of the secret society and our main character, Elsie. For the first hundred pages or so, I felt like Elsie was barely involved in the story despite being the narrator. So much was focused on describing what the other girls were doing and because of that, there was this disconnect between me and the story. And then, about halfway through the novel, something clicked. I don't know if it was the action picking up or me just getting more into the story, but I really started to get a sense of who Elsie was as a character and as a woman. I was much more impressed with the second half of this book and how it depicted Elsie discovering that there is more than one way to fight for women. Going into this book, I thought that it had so much going for it and to some extent, I still think that after reading it. However, I wish that the stakes, the role of the secret society, and the characters had been made just a little more sharp from the outset. It is hard to receive social commentary when you are still stuck on the elements of worldbuilding. Thank you to NetGalley and Feiwel & Friends for an ARC of this book in exchange for a fair and honest review!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    CW: Anxiety, panic attacks, fire, child death, grief Thank you to Turn the Pages Tours and Fierce Reads for providing me an eARC in exchange of my honest opinion. The concept of this book was the first thing that attracted me to it. A decades-old secret society of women who influenced powerful men into their bidding and protected abused women and children? Count me in. Then I discovered the main character was fat, and amen to that because we need more fat MCs in fat-positive books. A Sisterhood o CW: Anxiety, panic attacks, fire, child death, grief Thank you to Turn the Pages Tours and Fierce Reads for providing me an eARC in exchange of my honest opinion. The concept of this book was the first thing that attracted me to it. A decades-old secret society of women who influenced powerful men into their bidding and protected abused women and children? Count me in. Then I discovered the main character was fat, and amen to that because we need more fat MCs in fat-positive books. A Sisterhood of Secret Ambitions was a good read that I really enjoyed, though it fell a bit flat during the middle, when it should have picked up. The beginning was eye-catching and it kept you wondering what was going to happen next, but in the middle you could easily lose interest. The ending was great, though I was left a little bit confused. The character I connected the most with was Elsie. She was unapologetically herself, a bit selfish and determined. I also loved Bea, Mira and Iris, and even Greta. The cast, both main and secondary, was diverse (in race, sexuality and gender)and I’m so happy the author didn’t fall back on the belief that there cannot be a lot of diversity because it’s a historical setting. Overall, this was an enjoyable read and I recommend it if you are looking for more fat positive books with cunning ladies and secret societies.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.