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From a Certain Point of View: The Empire Strikes Back

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From a Certain Point of View strikes back! Celebrate the legacy of the groundbreaking Star Wars sequel with this exciting reimagining of the timeless film. On May 21, 1980, Star Wars became a true saga with the release of The Empire Strikes Back. In honor of the fortieth anniversary, forty storytellers recreate an iconic scene from The Empire Strikes Back, through the eyes From a Certain Point of View strikes back! Celebrate the legacy of the groundbreaking Star Wars sequel with this exciting reimagining of the timeless film. On May 21, 1980, Star Wars became a true saga with the release of The Empire Strikes Back. In honor of the fortieth anniversary, forty storytellers recreate an iconic scene from The Empire Strikes Back, through the eyes of a supporting character, from heroes and villains to droids and creatures. From a Certain Point of View features contributions by bestselling authors and trendsetting artists.


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From a Certain Point of View strikes back! Celebrate the legacy of the groundbreaking Star Wars sequel with this exciting reimagining of the timeless film. On May 21, 1980, Star Wars became a true saga with the release of The Empire Strikes Back. In honor of the fortieth anniversary, forty storytellers recreate an iconic scene from The Empire Strikes Back, through the eyes From a Certain Point of View strikes back! Celebrate the legacy of the groundbreaking Star Wars sequel with this exciting reimagining of the timeless film. On May 21, 1980, Star Wars became a true saga with the release of The Empire Strikes Back. In honor of the fortieth anniversary, forty storytellers recreate an iconic scene from The Empire Strikes Back, through the eyes of a supporting character, from heroes and villains to droids and creatures. From a Certain Point of View features contributions by bestselling authors and trendsetting artists.

30 review for From a Certain Point of View: The Empire Strikes Back

  1. 5 out of 5

    Khurram

    To think I almost missed this book, I kept seeing a Certain Point of View and thinking it was the Star Wars (The New Hope) version, days before it came out I realised I realised it was the Empire Strikes Back reciving the FACPOF treatment. Like the first book it is difficult to give an overall rating as there are some stories I enjoyed more then others. I found I really like probobly 35 out of 40 stories so 5 stars it is. Unlike the first book, the stories are not in completely sequential. Some To think I almost missed this book, I kept seeing a Certain Point of View and thinking it was the Star Wars (The New Hope) version, days before it came out I realised I realised it was the Empire Strikes Back reciving the FACPOF treatment. Like the first book it is difficult to give an overall rating as there are some stories I enjoyed more then others. I found I really like probobly 35 out of 40 stories so 5 stars it is. Unlike the first book, the stories are not in completely sequential. Some do overlap so it give a different person's story or perspective on the same event. I must say prefer this to the first book, and I did like in the first few stories a couple of crossover characters. The book will does follow the format of the group of stories based on the battle of Host will be together. Then the search in the asteroid field and so on. I like that they hive both Rebel and Imperial perspective stories. Also fills in the blanks of what the rest of the Rebels were doing while Luke was Jedi Training giving a major side character a well deserved life. Potentially leading into one of the upcoming Star Wars spinoffs series to be released. Though Disney has let me down with bridging book to TV in the past. Though I still have hope. A very enjoyable book and great stories. The book is 549, 561 if you include the acknowledgments pages. 9once again adds depth and great character to build on in the future I hope. Now I am already looking forward to Return of the Jedi FACPOV.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Opal

    Yasss!!! *claps energetically* Disturbance by Mike Chen is my absolute fave!!! I just adored the Whills Strike Back!!! They are so cute and their witty banter is everything!!! I CAN'T WAIT FOR 40 YEARS OF RETURN OF THE JEDI!!! Yasss!!! *claps energetically* Disturbance by Mike Chen is my absolute fave!!! I just adored the Whills Strike Back!!! They are so cute and their witty banter is everything!!! I CAN'T WAIT FOR 40 YEARS OF RETURN OF THE JEDI!!!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Spent waaaaaaaay too long on Hoth. May do a full review later. [3.5 stars]

  4. 5 out of 5

    MissBecka Gee

    3.5 ⭐Rounded up. While I did enjoy the first book more, that in no way means this was disappointing. My favourite stories were: A Good Kiss by: C.B. Lee The Truest Duty by: Christine Golden Wait For It by: Zoraida Córdova Standard Imperial Procedure by: Sarwat Chadda Faith In An Old Friend by: Brittany N. Williams The Witness by: Adam Christopher The Whills Strike Back by: Tom Angleberger 3.5 ⭐Rounded up. While I did enjoy the first book more, that in no way means this was disappointing. My favourite stories were: A Good Kiss by: C.B. Lee The Truest Duty by: Christine Golden Wait For It by: Zoraida Córdova Standard Imperial Procedure by: Sarwat Chadda Faith In An Old Friend by: Brittany N. Williams The Witness by: Adam Christopher The Whills Strike Back by: Tom Angleberger

  5. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    I'll hide my thoughts on specifics stories under a spoiler tag, in general terms I don't think I enjoyed this anthology quite as a much as the first one, it felt like there was a higher proportion of mediocre stories although, as before, there were a few truly excellent standouts. (view spoiler)[ "Eyes of the Empire", B: quality writing, the same technician stumbling upon Luke's X-Wing on Dagobah was a little much. "Hunger", B-: Sympathy for the Wampa? Sometimes a monster should just be a monster, I'll hide my thoughts on specifics stories under a spoiler tag, in general terms I don't think I enjoyed this anthology quite as a much as the first one, it felt like there was a higher proportion of mediocre stories although, as before, there were a few truly excellent standouts. (view spoiler)[ "Eyes of the Empire", B: quality writing, the same technician stumbling upon Luke's X-Wing on Dagobah was a little much. "Hunger", B-: Sympathy for the Wampa? Sometimes a monster should just be a monster, Nnedi Okafor's story notwithstanding. "Ion Control", B+: Bored and terrified Echo Base personnel have a betting pool on Solo making his move on Leia, love it...the insights into the Battle of Hoth were nice, too. "A Good Kiss", C: Some serious network office sitcom vibes from this one. Also, it's "caf", not "coffee." “She Will Keep Them Warm”, B: Was the rebellion’s use of tauntauns really this ethically fraught? “Heroes of the Rebellion”, B: Fly on the wall reportage from Hoth base. Crafted with love and lore. “Rogue Two”, B- : Hoth is cold, we get it. The scene with Leía was nice, though. “Kendal”, B: Great presence of mind for a person being asphyxiated. The timeline doesn’t exactly work either but I can give it a pass for some beautifully written passages. “Against All Odds", B: Alas poor Dak. I knew him, Horatio, a man of infinite misplaced confidence... “Beyond Hope”, C: Trench warfare punctuated by a pep talk. “The Truest Duty”, A: Now we’re talking! Good ole Maximum firepower Veers... “A Naturalist on Hoth”, A+: Unsurprisingly, Green brings it for a story that is both smart and heartfelt. “The Dragon Snake Saves R2”, N/A: Wut? “For the Last Time", A: No pity for Piett. “Rendezvous Point”, A+: Now THAT’s a flyboy story! “The Final Order”, A: Boom. An unexpectedly deep tale. "Amara Kel's Rules for TIE Pilot Survival (Probably)", A-: Fun times flying TIE patrols out and around the Hoth asteroid belt, with unexpectedly sexy results. “The First Lesson”, B: Love me some Yoda, though the verbose reflections on the nature of the Force and meditation were a bit much for me. “Disturbance”, A: Nice to get some details here of both the titular Great Disturbance and also how old Palps spends his time on Coruscant. “This is No Cave”, B: A tough assignment, about as good as could be hoped. “Lord Vader Will See You Now”, A-: Always nice to visit with an old friend. “Vergence”, C-: Overwrought and no new information. “Tooth and Claw”, B: It’s nearly always a family matter, isn’t it? “STET!”, F: This read like something published in a 'Zine circa 1991. I’m sure someone found it as amusing as the writer must have, but that person wasn’t me. “Wait for It”, C: Nice to have the callbacks to The Clone Wars, but not much else happening here. “Standard Imperial Procedure”, B-: Never cross a janitor with a chip on his shoulder. “There is Always Another”, C+: Frustratingly on the verge of greatness but doesn’t quite nail Obi-Wan’s voice for me. “Fake It Til You Make It”, B+: A silly romp 🐰 “But What Does He Eat?”, B+: A fair question! “Beyond the Clouds”, C-: A bit herky jerky for me. “No Time for Poetry”, B-: Look, Beskar! “Bespin Escape”, C: Ugnaught Clan Politics, amirite? “Faith in an Old Friend”, A: Poor Elthree... “Due on Batuu”, B: But what’s in the kriffing camtono??? “Into the Clouds”, B-: Poor little rich girl stuff. “The Witness”, C: What a day to desert! “The Man Who Built Cloud City”, C: Meh. “The Backup Backup Plan”, B: A fun escape story, but only tangentially related to the plot of the film. “Right Hand Man”, B+: Interesting to check in with Luke during such a vulnerable time. (hide spoiler)]

  6. 4 out of 5

    Drewthereader20

    Wow what a great collection of short stories!! I will have a detialed review of my rating for all 40 stories that are in here so I will come back later in the week and update this reivew. As of now I would give it a 4/5 stars!(:

  7. 5 out of 5

    Eva B.

    I heard this has Canon Siri Tachi and ahhhhh I NEED IT!! Jedi Apprentice was my catnip as a kid (might do a full-series reread if I'm extremely bored or something) and she was always a favorite! I heard this has Canon Siri Tachi and ahhhhh I NEED IT!! Jedi Apprentice was my catnip as a kid (might do a full-series reread if I'm extremely bored or something) and she was always a favorite!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Wee Lassie

    Excellent, a perfect follow up to the previous book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Leah

    ❐ Overall Rating 3¾| Narration 5 ❐ Star Wars ❐ Anthology ❐ Side Stories from a certain point of view Some were good, a few were really good and some I tuned out completely. I'm glad I rewatched The Empire Strikes Back before starting this...I didn't realize how long it had been since I last watched it. I had forgotten a lot of it. My favorites were: Disturbance by Mike Chen, which was superbly narrated by Sam Whitwer. Darth Sidious/The Emporer/Palpatine...he senses a disturbance in the force. She Wil ❐ Overall Rating 3¾| Narration 5 ❐ Star Wars ❐ Anthology ❐ Side Stories from a certain point of view Some were good, a few were really good and some I tuned out completely. I'm glad I rewatched The Empire Strikes Back before starting this...I didn't realize how long it had been since I last watched it. I had forgotten a lot of it. My favorites were: Disturbance by Mike Chen, which was superbly narrated by Sam Whitwer. Darth Sidious/The Emporer/Palpatine...he senses a disturbance in the force. She Will Keep Them Warm by Delilah S, Dawson, and narrated by January LaVoy...from the head of a Tauntaun. Wait For It by Zoraida Cordova, narrated by John Hamm...Boba Fett! The First Lesson by Jim Zub narrated by Marc Thompson...Yoda! But What Does He Eat by S.A. Chakraborty narrated by Soneela Nankani...seriously what or how does Vader eat??? and of course...loved hearing from L3-37 in... Faith in an Old Friend by Brittany N. Williams, narrated by Soneela Nankani, January LaVoy, and Emily Woo Zeller. ❐ Libby Listen through my Library ❐ Length ➯ 17H 59M

  10. 4 out of 5

    Robin

    this one was better than the short story collection for "a new hope" (might be biased bc "the empire strikes back" is probably my favourite), but including Hank green and letting Mackenzie Lee write Obi-Wan should count as a hate crime this one was better than the short story collection for "a new hope" (might be biased bc "the empire strikes back" is probably my favourite), but including Hank green and letting Mackenzie Lee write Obi-Wan should count as a hate crime

  11. 4 out of 5

    Charlie - A Reading Machine

    Some fantastic stories here but also some pretty average ones. I tell you one thing the Star Wars Universe owes Gary Whitta and his "Rebellions are built on hope" line from Rogue One because every author writing a story about the rebellion uses it. I did enjoy getting to see more behind the scenes stuff in regards to the empire. Vader killing off his Admirals and how it feels to work in that sort of environment, a Tie Fighter pilot who knows she is flying the cheapest product on the market and w Some fantastic stories here but also some pretty average ones. I tell you one thing the Star Wars Universe owes Gary Whitta and his "Rebellions are built on hope" line from Rogue One because every author writing a story about the rebellion uses it. I did enjoy getting to see more behind the scenes stuff in regards to the empire. Vader killing off his Admirals and how it feels to work in that sort of environment, a Tie Fighter pilot who knows she is flying the cheapest product on the market and who ignores her orders to fly straight at the enemy all guns blazing as she knows it will get her killed and the Empire really doesn't give a shit because it has superior numbers. There's a lot to like here especially for fans.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jaime K

    - I absolutely love how many of these stories focus on Leia’s work, and how helpful she is. She’s a great leader and person, and this book exemplifies that. - I don’t like how often inappropriate language is used (even ‘ass’ and ‘pissed’--Star Wars should be friendly for all ages). - I’m tickled, from “Ion Control” on, how the Rebels find entertainment (and betting) in Han’s approaches to Leia. And later, it humors me as well that so many on Cloud City didn’t realize Vader was a real person. - It b - I absolutely love how many of these stories focus on Leia’s work, and how helpful she is. She’s a great leader and person, and this book exemplifies that. - I don’t like how often inappropriate language is used (even ‘ass’ and ‘pissed’--Star Wars should be friendly for all ages). - I’m tickled, from “Ion Control” on, how the Rebels find entertainment (and betting) in Han’s approaches to Leia. And later, it humors me as well that so many on Cloud City didn’t realize Vader was a real person. - It bothers me how too many sentients aren’t named by species for maybe the first quarter. So are they all human? Kind of lame. - I feel like the phrase “rebellions are built on hope” is insanely overused. All ratings are out of 5 stars (view spoiler)[ Eyes of the Empire (4.8): Not all Imperials are stiff and proper--because they are people. Maela comes from a world that makes the Viper droids and now she gets to see through their eyes. I LOVE the end! Hunger (4): Awww. The Rebels didn’t think about the homes and lives of the Wampas (and later, the tauntauns) when they invade their lands on Hoth. Ion Control (5): Yay, Toryn Farr! Rieekan also gets in on the betting as mentioned above, hahaha. There is a great mix of humor and then serious, as Imperials find their base on Hoth. A Good Kiss (3.75): This was 3.5 ‘til the end. The present tense grew on me. I find it interesting that self-help books exist. Chase acts like an annoying teenager, but I also get the feeling he’s supposed to be older. He’s like a whining Han: “It’s not my fault!” There is a good theme that we have to accept our strengths, but it still wasn’t too great. She Will Keep Them Warm (4): Very neat POV from a tauntaun and how a hard life can actually mean freedom and satisfaction. Heroes of the Rebellion (4.25): This is a neat story of a reporter (propoganist) named Corwi, who reminds me of Den Dhur in the “Medstar” duology in Legends. Except she’s female. And a human. I think (see note above). At first it seems rushed but then we get into the actual meat of the story, and I like not only learning of her past but also seeing a POV from one of the transports that escapes Hoth. I’d read a more fleshed out story about her! Rogue Two (4.5): Zev! I feel comforted by this. Other than information on Jyn, I feel like this could have been information in another story and/or comic, whether Legends or Canon. I really like the reason as to why there is no Rogue One designation between Leader and Two. Kendal (1.5): Boring story about Ozzel. Against All Odds (2): At first I was excited about Dak. Then I realized it was a weird present tense and a lot of jumping from past to present scenes, from one thing Dak thinks of to another. Beyond Hope (4): INteresting story about an infantry Rebel who wonders at the hope the Rebellion has, and what comes next. The Truest Duty (5): The prose is odd and quite formal, which is fitting for Veers. He thinks of himself as Vader’s dagger, which is also perfect Veers. It’s overall chilling and yet inspiring. A Naturalist on Hoth (4.5): This is slow but beautiful. I love the random information, like on the desert sand slug. Naturalists are essential when trying to find a new place to set base. And FINALLY a non-human is named as such! The Dragonsnake Saves R2 (3): Cute one-shot comic For the Last Time (4): One breath can change so much. And Piett has many of them (as compared to Ozzel, at least). We see how he approaches Vader, which is interesting. Rendezvous Point (5): My biggest issue with this is calling Mon Mothma “Double M.” But…#ThatsSoJansen Being a starfighter pilot is not like the holodramas, and Wedge is learning this first hand. For example, they have to wear maximum absorbancy undergarments. He doesn’t always make jokes, but when he does, Wes is nearby. Yes, we get the Wedge-Wes relationship and see how they bounce off each other (perhaps literally) as they heal from losing friends, including Hobbie (HE DOESN’T SURVIVE??!! I don’t believe it. Harumph). I love the two together though. Instead of Yub-nub, we get Hub Grub and I am tickled and have a lot of warm fuzzies. But there are also sobering times and I love what Jason Fry has done here. The Final Order (2): I am tempted to give it a 2.5 because the end made me cry, but I felt like the writing was too dry for me. It’s how an Imperial sees Vader as the Final Order and then brings to mind a show called “Laser Masters.” Amara Kel’s Rules for the TIE Pilot Survival (Probably) (3.75): This began as a 4.25 but the language/crassness here...well, it’s the worst culprit. I like her rules and how the story swaps between the rules and real time, with Amara being part of the patrol going into the asteroid field. But then we get things like “pissing,” “getting laid,” and “Palpatine’s withered nuts.” Really? The First Lesson (4.75): This is a good Yoda POV. Zub catches the nuances of his mind and language well. Disturbance (4): It’s interesting that during a vision, Palpatine thinks of himself with that name and “the Emperor” in the vision. And through his visions, he learns why Vader is so focused on “the boy.” This is No Cave (4): Interesting exogorth POV. Through him, we get how vast space is; how old even young exogorths are; and their biology, including how mynocks can live in them. But above all, we see their loneliness. Lord Vader Will See You Now (4.5): I wish I reread “A New Dawn” like I told myself to do! Sloane! This is a good retroactive insertion of her in the asteroid field, as well as why bounty hunters were hired. Vergence (3): I like seeing how pure Yoda is, especially compared to the gnarltree. Tooth and Claw (4.5): This is SO Bossk! I don’t know how much was already canon, but this feels classically Legends. The only thing I REALLY didn’t like is the wooden ship and the massive info-dump. STET! (4): This is a neat edited article. And, seeing as I hated DJO’s story in the first installation of this anthology, this was a pleasant surprise. The Great Hyperspace War is mentioned, which I thought was [also] Legends but it only a thing from “The High Republic.” Wait for It (4.5): Fett’s thinking is juvenile at first, though it does improve. I like how much history he and Bossk have, reminding me of the Legends MG series. Standard Imperial Procedure (4): Even Imperials deal with looped holocasts! I really like the notion of Han having the soul of an engineer. It’s a sobering story though of the constant reminders that breaking protocol in the Empire leads to dire, and sometimes life-threatening, consequences. There is Always Another (4.75): Capitalizing Issues regarding “Skywalker family Issues” makes me laugh! I bloody LOVE this one! Siri Tachi and Tru Veld are now canon which is bloody fantastic. Lee gets into Obi-Wan’s head extremely well. Fake it Til You Make it (4): I don’t know if I realized Jaxxon has stories outside of these anthologies. He’s annoying but also full of surprises...as is Cloud City! But What Does He Eat? (4.5): Lando’s celebrity Devaronian chef has to cook for Vader, even though she doesn’t know what he eats. But she will also do her best to ensure her possible last meal is not mediocre, but the absolute best. Beyond the Clouds (3.5): I find the work stoppage aspect quite dull, though do like how a 17-year-old bounty hunter turned out the way she does, and even befriends an Ugnaught, who rents her a room. We get a real sense of the scope of Cloud City, which is neat. No Time for Poetry (2.25): I don’t know how I feel about a humorous Dengar, especially one who calls IG-88 “Iggy.” Bespin Escape (3.5): This is about how an Ugnaught clan escapes. It is well-written, but it didn’t interest me. Faith in An Old Friend (3.5): The Falcon is made up of 3 droid brains that call themselves ‘The Collective.’ It bothered me at first until 3PO’s line of not knowing where the mind learned to speak. The story brings us from after the asteroid field to when Lando & Leia pick Luke from the sky. There are some neat moments with other droids and Lando. Due on Batuu (3): We learn about why Wilrrow was carrying around the ice cream maker. Into the Clouds (4): A woman named Jailyn learns through her stylist that Leia is on Cloud City. At first I thought this would be about the stylist, but it’s about Jai. She’s barely holding her father’s finances together as the old man takes it all for granted. She meets up with her father’s pilot, Dresh; and there are some neat parallels between her and Leia, and then her & Dresh and Leia & Han. The Witness (3.8): A female trooper has an issue with FS-451 (I wonder if the name relates to “Fahrenheit 451”). She apparently witnesses the fight between Luke and Vader which is odd. She reflects on her work with the Empire and how it’s affected her. The Man Who Built Cloud City (3): Some dude thinks he’s king of Cloud City and Lando is his regent. The Backup Backup Plan (4): Mando'a is spoken! After Lando leaves Cloud City, one of his colleagues, Tal, does what she can to get both the Empire and Mining Guild to leave the citizens and mines of Cloud City alone. There are quite a few surprises along the way--not only for the characters, but for the readers as well (IMO). Right-Hand Man (5): Oh cool, the 2-1B that attaches a cybernetic hand to Luke has dealt with lightsaber wounds before. Or, if it hasn’t, the medical droids have a collective databank which is really cool. 2-1B is awesome overall, and I like reading about some of the process that occurred. The Whills Strike Back (4.75): Hilarious commentary on the opening crawl. (hide spoiler)]

  13. 4 out of 5

    Eric Linnell

    I definitely enjoyed this volume more than the New Hope version. I think that may have been that the background characters in Echo Base and Cloud City were more appealing to me. Plus we get multiple Bounty Hunter chapters which was fantastic!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Maggie Lovitt

    Star Wars celebrates forty years of The Empire Strikes Back with forty stories that bring to life new points of view during a pivotal moment in galactic history.  READ MY FULL REVIEW AT YOUR MONEY GEEK: https://yourmoneygeek.com/review-from... Over the past few years, Star Wars has excelled at ambitious anthologies that bring new tales to the forefront of familiar stories. Greg Rucka tackled the Before Awakening anthology, Star Wars: From a Certain Point of View brought together forty authors to e Star Wars celebrates forty years of The Empire Strikes Back with forty stories that bring to life new points of view during a pivotal moment in galactic history.  READ MY FULL REVIEW AT YOUR MONEY GEEK: https://yourmoneygeek.com/review-from... Over the past few years, Star Wars has excelled at ambitious anthologies that bring new tales to the forefront of familiar stories. Greg Rucka tackled the Before Awakening anthology, Star Wars: From a Certain Point of View brought together forty authors to expand on A New Hope, and The Clone Wars: Stories of Light and Dark gave a deeper insight into eleven individually authored Clone Wars stories.  Now, for the fortieth anniversary of The Empire Strikes Back forty talented authors have been assembled to bring to life Rebels, Imperials, and creatures alike in From a Certain Point of View: The Empire Strikes Back.  The anthology is organized chronologically with The Empire Strikes Back, beginning with a cleverly crafted nod to Dagobah, the high stakes at the Echo Base during the Battle of Hoth, the Empire’s victories and follies, and Cloud City. No stone is left unturned when it comes to these stories. If you have ever wanted to know about the inner thoughts of a Wampa, or to ride along with crash-prone TIE pilots, or if you ever wanted to know if the Whills were aware of Starfleet (yes, that Starfleet) then this is the anthology for you. It is truly difficult to pick just a handful of stories to highlight as the “best” of the anthology, as they are all fantastic glimpses into The Empire Strikes Back. Some feature familiar friends like Wedge Antilles and Jaxxon, while others give life to previously nameless background Rebels, Imperial pilots, and droids. That is where these anthologies are at their strongest. Star Wars fans live for learning the names of new characters and expanding on the already known canon.  Just as your favorite Star Wars movie may not be my favorite Star Wars movie, you are bound to find stories in this anthology that speak to you in ways that my favorites didn’t. Here is a shortlist of the stories that have lingered with me after completion:  Hunger by Mark Oshiro A Good Kiss by C.B. Lee  Rendezvous Point by Jason Fry  Rogue Two by Gary Whitta  Amara Kel’s Rules for TIE Pilot Survival (Probably) by Django Wexler  Stet! by Daniel José Older Wait for It by Zoraida Córdova Like with previous Star Wars anthologies, you are bound to stumble across a story or two that doesn’t match the tone of a Star Wars film, but that is what is so great about anthologies. Where else can you find various forms of storytelling bound into the same volume? You won’t want to miss out on From a Certain Point of View: The Empire Strikes Back.  From a Certain Point of View: The Empire Strikes Back hits shelves November 10th. 

  15. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    I am convinced that there is untapped potential for provocative and exciting literary experiences within the confines of pop genre material like Star Wars. This book doesn't help. A fun concept. Impressive dedication to theme. Not well executed. Two back-to-back stories by Jason Fry and Seth Dickinson stand out as being fun and nicely done. There rest is forgettable. Some day... I am convinced that there is untapped potential for provocative and exciting literary experiences within the confines of pop genre material like Star Wars. This book doesn't help. A fun concept. Impressive dedication to theme. Not well executed. Two back-to-back stories by Jason Fry and Seth Dickinson stand out as being fun and nicely done. There rest is forgettable. Some day...

  16. 5 out of 5

    Tara (Spinatale Reviews)

    The author line-up for this book still blows my mind and it’s been SO much fun to see what some of my favorite authors did with these characters. Plus this short story collection really does an awesome job diving into side characters (including some that I would never have guessed would be included!) and really fleshing out this world. Also, the first half of this book got me through election week, which is really a testament to how excellent some of these authors are at writing short stories. If The author line-up for this book still blows my mind and it’s been SO much fun to see what some of my favorite authors did with these characters. Plus this short story collection really does an awesome job diving into side characters (including some that I would never have guessed would be included!) and really fleshing out this world. Also, the first half of this book got me through election week, which is really a testament to how excellent some of these authors are at writing short stories. If you’re a Star Wars fan or have a Star Wars fan in your life, I’d definitely recommend this collection! *Disclaimer: I received an advance digital copy of this book for free from the publisher. This does not affect my opinion of the book or the content of my review.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Casey the Reader

    Thanks to Del Rey Books for the free advance copy of this book. 📚 This was so fun to read! Lots of authors I already loved, and I discovered a few new-to-me favorites. 📚 These stories are all so nuanced and thoughtful about what life for peripheral characters in the movie might be like. Some we already know, like Wedge Antilles, and some are completely fabricated, like a scientist studying ice slugs on Hoth. 📚 My favorites were the stories from the points of view of animals - I never expected to fe Thanks to Del Rey Books for the free advance copy of this book. 📚 This was so fun to read! Lots of authors I already loved, and I discovered a few new-to-me favorites. 📚 These stories are all so nuanced and thoughtful about what life for peripheral characters in the movie might be like. Some we already know, like Wedge Antilles, and some are completely fabricated, like a scientist studying ice slugs on Hoth. 📚 My favorites were the stories from the points of view of animals - I never expected to feel so much for a tauntaun. 📚 Plus! The wide variety of authors means this collection includes own voices stories for characters of color, women, queer characters, and more. 📚 I do wish some stories had been longer, but this is my perpetual gripe with short story collections. If you're a Star Wars fan, it's worth checking out. Now I need to go rewatch them all!

  18. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Powers

    Star Wars is really dumb and really amazing at the same time and this book perfectly illustrates that by wildly switching from being incredibly good to incredibly stupid every few pages.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ola G

    5.5/10 stars Full review on my blog here. From a Certain Point of View: The Empire Strikes Back is a collection of 40 short stories commissioned for the 40th anniversary of The Empire Strikes Back's memorable debut long long ago. It’s a second such venture, after a collection of stories centered around New Hope met with fans’ enthusiasm and quite solid approval – and we all know what a rowdy and unruly and spoiled bunch SW fans usually are 😉. I haven’t read the first collection, but buoyed by the f 5.5/10 stars Full review on my blog here. From a Certain Point of View: The Empire Strikes Back is a collection of 40 short stories commissioned for the 40th anniversary of The Empire Strikes Back's memorable debut long long ago. It’s a second such venture, after a collection of stories centered around New Hope met with fans’ enthusiasm and quite solid approval – and we all know what a rowdy and unruly and spoiled bunch SW fans usually are 😉. I haven’t read the first collection, but buoyed by the fond recollections of the Anderson’s anthology Tales from the Mos Eisley Cantina and seeing as The Empire Strikes Back remains my favorite SW movie of all times (not that it had any real competition recently), I decided to give this one a chance. There is a solid representation from well-known authors, such as Martha Wells and Django Wexler to Seth Dickinson, Catherynne M. Valente and S.A. Chakraborty, as well as a whole slew of authors completely new to me. This collection, apart from the strong nostalgia factor and a big dose of curiosity topped by healthy mistrust of anything SW-Disney 😉, represented a chance for me to check out some new names and their writing chops. However, as simple listing of the authors and their stories’ titles has taken me nearly 300 words, I decided to review them in a slightly different than usual mode: as with short stories collections, I will give each story a rating – but this time, I will endeavor to describe every story in 5 words or more (well, usually more, as you’ll see). Kiersten White, Eyes of the Empire 6/10 Eye-opening Moment for an Empire Drudge Mark Oshiro, Hunger 3/10 Wampa’s Food Has a Saber! Emily Skrutskie, Ion Control 7/10 All Bets Are Off on Han-Leia Romance C.B. Lee, A Good Kiss 3/10 Everyone Can Be A Hero, aka Not This Again [...] Tom Angleberger, The Whills Strike Back 10/10 Very Short, Very Funny! A few final thoughts on this collection. First of all, the idea of amassing 40 stories for the 40th anniversary, while theoretically pleasing, in this case clearly backfired; a few really solid, highly entertaining and even thought-provoking entries are simply drowning in the sea of mediocrity. Less is more! And it also pertains to the problems with understanding the concept of a short story as opposed to novella, and in some cases results in serious structural issues: some of these stories practically beg to be more fleshed out as we get only a bare-boned sketch of a novella. [...] That said, there are a few very good, well plotted and enjoyable stories, adding to the lore in unexpected, welcome ways. The ultimate stand-outs for me were Dickinson’s The Final Order, a perfectly structured and executed short story packing more suspense into its few pages than the all the rest of the collection, and Angleberger’s The Whills Strike Back, which was sly, self-aware and tongue-in-the-cheek funny. So, as usual with anthologies, From a Certain Point of View: The Empire Strikes Back is a mixed bag of treats and tricks –the majority of the stories is utterly forgettable, but there are some that will stand the test of time. Pick up the good ones if you can! I have received a copy of this novel from the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. My thanks.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Dominic

    My favorite Star Wars books as a kid were the “Tales of…” series edited by Kevin J. Anderson. Those books imbued the Galaxy Far, Far Away with the sense that Greedo, Dengar, Bib Fortuna, and the hundreds of minor background characters from the films each had stories of their own. Those books – and the fan hunger for more stories – are a major part of the reason why the Star Wars franchise has been able to grow beyond the Skywalker saga through shows like The Mandalorian. The “From a Certain Point My favorite Star Wars books as a kid were the “Tales of…” series edited by Kevin J. Anderson. Those books imbued the Galaxy Far, Far Away with the sense that Greedo, Dengar, Bib Fortuna, and the hundreds of minor background characters from the films each had stories of their own. Those books – and the fan hunger for more stories – are a major part of the reason why the Star Wars franchise has been able to grow beyond the Skywalker saga through shows like The Mandalorian. The “From a Certain Point of View” books continue that tradition – but in both more expansive and limited ways. The first book, released in 2017, celebrated the 40th anniversary of A New Hope by collecting stories from a variety of science fiction and fantasy authors. As the title suggests, the stories are told from the point of background characters. This latest volume does the same for The Empire Strikes Back. I appreciate the variety of authors invited to participate in the FACPOV books. This volume includes authors like John Jackson Miller, who has been writing Star Wars for decades, and younger authors like R.F. Kuang, who had never written anything for Star Wars. There’s diversity in writing experience, as well as diversity in the race and gender of the authors. Moreover, it seems that Lucasfilm gave these authors considerable creative freedom… freedom that sometimes leads to these stories being very weird. Unlike the earlier “Tales of…” books, most of the stories in FACPOV are fairly limited in scope. With a few exceptions, the stories don’t cover anything beyond the scenes in the film. In essence, most of the stories simply recount what a character was thinking when he/she/it saw the events that transpired on screen. This can sometimes be humorous, such as when Toryn Farr placed bets on Han and Leia’s will-they/won’t-they romance. But the format and limited scope are tricky because they don’t leave much room for character development or plot twists. The best authors used the opportunity to delve deep into the psychology of characters who represent larger ideologies or archetypes in the Star Wars Galaxy. Seth Dickinson’s “The Final Order” – easily my favorite story in FACPOV2 – recounts the final hours of Captain Canonhaus of the Ultimatum, the Star Destroyer destroyed by an asteroid in the film. Through Canonhaus, Dickinson explores the paranoia and moral compromises that permeate totalitarian regimes like Palpatine’s New Order. The story convinced me to check out more of Dickinson’s works (he’s also a political scientist). My other favorite story in FACPOV2 is “Rendezvous Point” by Jason Fry. Like the best of the “Tales of…” books, it manages to give Wedge Antilles an arc and shows him overcoming a new type of challenge. Wedge is tasked with rebuilding Red Squadron after the defeat at Hoth. He has a crisis of confidence, as well as trouble finding good pilots. The best compliment I can give is that Fry’s story reminded me of Michael Stackpole’s “Rogue Squadron” novels from the 1990s. Overall, I don’t think the FACPOV2 stories build out the lore to the same extent as the “Tales of…” books. Admittedly, that might be because the “Tales of…” books came out at the dawn of the Expanded Universe, whereas we had hundreds of novels, comics, video games, and television episodes worth of lore by the 40th anniversary of A New Hope. I’d recommend FACPOV for Star Wars fans interested in seeing how different science fiction authors approach the franchise. FACPOV is a way for new authors to play around in the Galaxy Far, Far Away – and for readers to discover them. [Note: I received this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review]

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Anderson

    Hard to believe it’s already been 3 years since the first From a Certain Point of View randomly showed up in the middle of Star Wars canon and showed that despite many of its failings, Disney (and Del Rey) could still produce decent stories in the franchise. Now the Disney/Del Rey team strikes back (ha! Get it?) with yet another group of 40 short stories, all set in and around the same time and locations of The Empire Strikes Back and the question is, can lightning strike twice and can the Disney Hard to believe it’s already been 3 years since the first From a Certain Point of View randomly showed up in the middle of Star Wars canon and showed that despite many of its failings, Disney (and Del Rey) could still produce decent stories in the franchise. Now the Disney/Del Rey team strikes back (ha! Get it?) with yet another group of 40 short stories, all set in and around the same time and locations of The Empire Strikes Back and the question is, can lightning strike twice and can the Disney/Del Rey duo produce 2 solid Star Wars anthologies in a row? Not quite. While From A Certain POV: ESB is still a good collection of stories, I have to admit that they just didn’t seem to hit as hard or be as memorable as the last batch. In the first collection, I liked something like 30 or 35 of the 40 stories, which is pretty damn impressive for such a big anthology. I myself was surprised at the quantity of shorts I enjoyed. This time around though, that number is something like 20. And of those 20, I can honestly only think of 5 that stand out as being really good. Just like in the last one, I’ll list them: - “Against All Odds”- A great look at Dak “I feel like I can take on the empire myself” Ralter and his infamous run on the AT-ATs as the attacked Echo Base -“Beyond Hope”- Yet another fun story about the Rebel Infantry that stood on the frontlines on Hoth -“The Truest Duty”- Storywise, this one wasn’t insanely great, but Christie Golden’s knack for mixing in the films original dialogue with her own take on the scene was well done. - “Amara Kel’s Rule for TIE Pilot Survival (Probably)”- One of the better stories here. Written from the POV of TIE pilot and explaining just how to survive being so dispensable and replaceable, but done in a modern, contemporary way. I think this particular short is easily amongst the best in the entire collection. - “Fake It til You Make It”- Who would have guessed that seeing the return of perhaps Star Wars legends’ dumbest character of all time, Jaxon Thumperaki, would actually end up being quite enjoyable? I guess it shouldn’t be surprising since this was written by Cavan Scott, who’s proven himself to be as adept at Star Wars as he is with Judge Dredd. I also have 2 honorable mentions this time around: - “Due On Batuu” - Not because this story was especially unique, but, like the story “Bump” in the last anthology, it takes a very minor character and scene and expands on it in such a way as to please fans. - “The Whills Strike Back”- I admit that I didn’t like the first iteration of this back in the first POV but this time, I definitely enjoyed it a second time around. Just as in “Batuu”, Angleberger references some things only die hard Star Wars fans would appreciate, and, as a closing number, it does its job well. I also found 5 stories this time that I really didn’t like: - “Hunger”- A POV tale from the infamous Wampa. This one was more silly than bad, but still, kinda pointless and dumb. - “She Will Keep Them Warm”- This one suffers the same fate as “Hunger” as its now a Taun Taun’s POV story. Even worse, it’s written by Delilah S. Dawson who is way better of an author than this one will have you believe. - “ A Good Kiss”- Just Disney being Disney by shoehorning a gay couple into Star Wars. Maybe if the story had been decent (like the TIE fighter one), I could have found some kind of positive things about it, but the motivations and eventual conclusion just didn’t do it for me -“Kendall”- Meh. Did we really need a story about Admiral Ozzel? Maybe, but probably not done in this particular manner. - “This is No Cave”- Annnnnd back to another animal POV tale. Like the Dionogah story from the first book, this one tries to give some kind of empathy or feeling for the giant space worm that gobbles up the Falcon. Also like the Dionogah story, it’s overwritten and uses way too much exposition to get the point across (and in the spirit of full disclosure, I couldn’t even finish this one). I get that The Empire Strikes Back is widely regarded as the best of all Star Wars films, and, three years on the heals of a previous collection, Empire POV had a lot riding on its shoulders. While I think it’s mostly successful and carries out its purpose of telling the lives and goings on of characters that fell through the cracks of the main plot, I also think this one could have been better with slightly more memorable stories, or at least not like 7 all set on Cloud City. Look, all in all, EmpirePOV is far from terrible, and like I just said, it does it’s job. It’s just that I don’t think it’s quite up to snuff when compared to the first kind. At this point I have zero doubt we will see a Return of the Jedi anthology like this in 2023...as it’s my personal favorite of the original trilogy, I hope Disney and Del Rey can get some slightly more memorable shorts in that one.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Casebeer

    Really fun book. I wasn’t sure what to expect but I liked the layout. The side stories followed the plot so you knew exactly what scene they were at during the stories. The writers did a great job almost making it flow like one writer by referencing parts of other stories and such. I will say I liked the first 30 or so better. The last ones were ok, but the first ones were awesome! I’ll have to get the A New Hope version now!

  23. 5 out of 5

    James

    Overall a stronger (if less tonally-diverse) collection of short stories than the ANH entry. My personal favorite has to be Seth Dickenson's utter deconstruction of the Empire - and by extension, fascism - in his story revolving around the captain of the Star Destroyer what gets smashed by that asteroid. The stories contradict themselves less this time around, which is simultaneously relieving and a bit of a bummer, keeping in mind the mission statement outlined by the title of the collection it Overall a stronger (if less tonally-diverse) collection of short stories than the ANH entry. My personal favorite has to be Seth Dickenson's utter deconstruction of the Empire - and by extension, fascism - in his story revolving around the captain of the Star Destroyer what gets smashed by that asteroid. The stories contradict themselves less this time around, which is simultaneously relieving and a bit of a bummer, keeping in mind the mission statement outlined by the title of the collection itself. Like FACPOV: ANH, there is that annoying trend of writers humanizing the Imperials and making them secret good-guys, but those stories are still few and far between.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Larson

    Wonderful new way to experience a classic story.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Naessens

    A collection of 40 short stories taking place around the events of Star Wars Episode V : The Empire Strikes Back. Some stories are good and deserve a 4-star rating whereas a few are average and worth a 2-star rating at best. Some stories involve secondary characters and follow closely the action of the film while others are about characters you have never heard of. But contrary to From a Certain Point of View, there is no inconsistency between the stories. The ones I enjoyed the most are the ones A collection of 40 short stories taking place around the events of Star Wars Episode V : The Empire Strikes Back. Some stories are good and deserve a 4-star rating whereas a few are average and worth a 2-star rating at best. Some stories involve secondary characters and follow closely the action of the film while others are about characters you have never heard of. But contrary to From a Certain Point of View, there is no inconsistency between the stories. The ones I enjoyed the most are the ones that expand the lore or give more background to secondary characters like Wedge Antilles or Empire Admirals. My favourite stories are : Kendal, Rendezvous point, AMARA KEL’S rules for TIE PILOT survival (probably), Disturbance, There is always another, No time for poetry, Faith in an old friend. Below are short notes I took after reading each story for my own further reference. Eyes of the Empire : not good, not bad, not interesting. Hunger : about the Wampa that attacked Luke Skywalker on Hoth. We learn nothing new. Ion Control : a ion canon operator. A good kiss : first short story where I actually cared about what happens to the main character who (thinks he) is a loser. * She will keep them warm : simply moving because we knows how that poor tautaun is goint to end. Heroes of the Rebellion : about a journalist who struggles to find time to interview Leia, Luke or Han in Echo Base. Not intesresting, it adds nothing to the already known facts. Rogue Two : provides a bit of background on Rogue Squadron and on Zev a.k.a. Rogue 2. But the author manages to contradict himself in the same paragraph... ** Kendal : the last moments and thoughts of Admiral Ozzel as Darth Vader chokes him. The most well-written so far. * Against All Odds : readers learn some background information about Dak Ralter, Luke's gunner on Hoth. Beyond Hope : not good, not bad, not interesting. * The Truest Duty : it focuses on another Admiral, Veers, his loyalty to Lord Vader and the attack he led on the surface of Hoth. Christie Golden proves again she is one of the best Star Wars writers currently. A Naturalist on Hoth : another plain, ordinary short story about a random guy from the Rebellion, an ecologist who falls in love with the ecosystem of Hoth and makes up his mind to stay on the planet. THE DRAGONSNAKE SAVES R2 : a 1-page comic that explains that contrary to what we believe while watching ESB, the creature in the swamp of Dagobah, a Dragonsanke, did not try to eat Artoo but instead saved him from drowning. Witty. * For the last time : told through the point of view of Admiral Piett, it deals with the unstable equilibrium between, fear, power and pity, as Piett witness the human condition of Darth Vader. ** Rendezvous point : finally a short story with characters we cared for. It's about Wedge Antilles and Wes Janson reforming Red Squadron after the battle of Hoth, in the absence of Luke, with the best available pilots then can find (most of them are inexperienced at flying a starfighter) and their first mission. The Final Order : A dialogue between Commander Cannonhaus and Captain Tian, Cannonhaus' doubts about the politics of the Empire. I find the writing a bit confusing at times. ** AMARA KEL’S RULES FOR TIE PILOT SURVIVAL (PROBABLY) : a sort of counterpart to "Rendezvous point". The title says it all. Engaging. * The First Lesson : When Yoda meets Luke Skywalker on Dagobah. Short but very good. ** Disturbance : the moment where Emperor Palpatine finds out that Anakin Skywalker had a son and Darth Vader has been searching for him while withholding this information. * This is no cave : the lonely life of the exogorth (i.e. the space-worm) that lives in the asteroid field. Lord Vader will see you now : short-story with Rae Sloane who will be a key figure after the battle of Endor and the creation of the First Order. * Vergence : interesting story narrated by the entity that haunts the dark cave near Yoda's hut on Dagobah. Tooth and Claw : it focuses on Bossk, a bounty hunter whose nemesis is Chewbacca. Not bad, but a bit pointless considering the ending (it's like nothing has happened). STET! : bad. Wait for it: it doesn't bring much backgreound or development, but pleasant to read. * Standard Imperial Procedure : one of the most engaging short stories, even if it onvolves low-tech engineers on a Star Destroyer. ** There is always another : told by Obiwan's ghost when he appeared to Luke and Yoda and Dagobah. His brooding over Anakin's fate, how he could have raised him and trained him differently, how Luke is as relentless and stubborn as his father. One of the best stories. Fake it till you make it : uninteresting. * But what does he eat : a story around Lando's cook on Cloud City tasked with preparing refreshments for Vader&co. This raises an interersting question indeed : when and how does Vader eat ? Beyond the Clouds : lame and dull. And another homosexual love interest. They don't have heterosexual or inter-species love affairs in this galaxy, do they ? ** No time for poetry : short-stroy involving the two bounty hunters Dengar and droid IG-88. Well-paced, engaging, it's also intersting as it offers IG-88's thoughts and opinion on living creatures like Dengar which are limited compared to the articiial intellignece of droid. * Bespin Escape : follows a group of Ugnaughts who try to escape Cloud City on Bespin. The good writing makes up for the possible lack of interest/stakes. ** Faith in an old friend : told from the point of view of the Millenium Collective, the trio of droids, including L3-37, that are the electronic brain of the Millenium Falcon. Again, another story that proves the thoughts and ideas of droids can be more interesting than sentient beings' ones. Due on Baatu : neither bad nor good. Into the clouds : ouch that one was bad, almost Harlequin-style. * The Witness : about a female stormtrooper who finally makes up her mind to desert the Empire ranks after Han Solo's been frozen in carbonite, and unwillingly witness the duel between Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker while trying to escape Cloud City. The Man who built Cloud City : well-written, unfortunately I did not find it interesting as I could not care for what could happen to the main protagonist, a king and former ruler of Cloud City before Lando Calrissian. The backup backup plan : meh. And another lesbian couple, you got to be kidding me. And who did not see the twist coming at the end ? * Right-Hand Man : a dialogue between medical droid 2-1B and Luke Skywalker who is at first reluctant to accept his cybernetic right-hand. * The Whills strike back : same as in From a Certain Point of View, a Whill tris to write the scrolling text at the beginning of ESB, but another Whill keeps interrupting him with his remarks. Funny. P.S. : One thing that I found weird (statistically) is that all of the love stories/romances were same-sex couples.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    For the longest time, until Rogue One: A Star Wars Story came and now shares that no. 1 spot, it was The Empire Strikes Back that was my absolute favorite Star Wars movie. So when I heard news about this book, I was pretty excited. And let me say that it was a lot of fun to read this side-by-side with the movie’s novelization by Donald F. Glut! There are some great gems in this collection. A few took me by pleasant surprise. But there are also some that I thought were a waste of time, and then th For the longest time, until Rogue One: A Star Wars Story came and now shares that no. 1 spot, it was The Empire Strikes Back that was my absolute favorite Star Wars movie. So when I heard news about this book, I was pretty excited. And let me say that it was a lot of fun to read this side-by-side with the movie’s novelization by Donald F. Glut! There are some great gems in this collection. A few took me by pleasant surprise. But there are also some that I thought were a waste of time, and then there are a few which I personally think should have been scrapped. But everyone’s tastes are different, so maybe the ones I didn’t like are someone else’s favorites and vice versa. Overall, when it comes to the rating of this book as a whole, I decided to add up what I gave each story and divide that by the total. Below is each short story rated individually, and some have mini-reviews. I also included some quotes that I really liked. Eye of the Empire by Kiersten White Rating: ★★★★ (4.25 stars) A good story to start off this collection with. Hunger by Mark Oshiro Rating: ★ (1 star) Ion Control by Emily Skrutskie Rating: ★★★ (3 stars) A Good Kiss by C. B. Lee Rating: (0 stars) I found this character too annoying, and I didn’t have the patience to put up with his self-pity party so dnf’d this one. She Will Keep Them Warm by Delilah S. Dawson Rating: ★★ (1.5 stars) Heroes of the Rebellion by Amy Ratcliffe Rating: ★★★★ (4.25 stars) Rogue Two by Gary Whitta Rating: ★★★★★ (5 stars) – a favorite The first one on my favorites list from this short story collection. I loved the background on Rogue Two squadron, and I was so happy that Jyn and Cassian were both mentioned! On top of that, I just loved learning how Rogue Two got their name and that the Rogue One designation’s forever retired with honor. Quote: “[Luke] had heard the story—as everyone had—of the heroic sacrifice made by Jyn Erso, Cassian Andor, and dozens of other valiant rebels in stealing the closely guarded Imperial plans that revealed the Death Star’s critical hidden flaw and giving the Alliance a fighting chance at survival. … The specific Rogue One designation that Erso and her crew had given themselves was to be forever retired with honor in the annals of rebel heroism.” Kendal by Charles Yu Rating: ★★★★★ (5 stars) – a favorite I ended up bumping this one up a star because I couldn’t stop thinking about it after I finished it. It’s even been added to my favorite short stories list now. Against All Odds by R. F. Kuang Rating: ★★★★★ (5 stars) Beyond Hope by Michael Moreci Rating: ★★★ (3 stars) The Truest Duty by Christie Golden Rating: ★★★★★ (5 stars) – a favorite QUOTES: “A terrifying symbol of the power of the Empire, [the Death Star] was the darling of the late Grand Moff Wilhuff Tarkin.” “[Veers] had admitted them both, but he had privately wondered if the moff might, one day, meet his death at Lord Vader’s hands. The question was moot, as in the end, it was Tarkin’s own overweening arrogance that had doomed him and everyone who had the misfortune to be on the Death Star.” A Naturalist on Hoth by Hank Green Rating: ★★ (2 stars) The Dragonsnake Saves R2 by Katie Cook Rating: ★★★ (3 stars) A cute little comic. For the Last Time by Beth Revis Rating: ★★★★★ (5 stars) – a favorite Rendezvous Point by Jason Fry Rating: ★★★★★ (5 stars) – a favorite The Final Order by Seth Dickinson Rating: ★★★ (3 stars) Amara Kel’s Rules for TIE Pilot Survival (Probably) by Django Wexler Rating: ★ (1 star) The First Lesson by Jim Zub Rating: ★★★ (3 stars) Disturbance by Mike Chen Rating: ★★★★★ (5 stars) – a favorite This Is No Cave by Catherynne M. Valente Rating: ★★ (2 stars) Lord Vader Will See You Now by John Jackson Miller Rating: ★★★★★ (5 stars) – a favorite Vergence by Tracy Deonn Rating: ★★★ (3 stars) Tooth and Claw by Michael Kogge Rating: ★★★★★ (5 stars) – a favorite I’m surprised this one is a favorite. I was not expecting to care about Bossk’s story. At all. I didn’t care for his story in Tales of the Bounty Hunters Legends book. I figured, when I saw his silhouette when I got to this chapter, this short story wasn’t going to be good. In fact, I’d love to see Bossk and other characters featured in this story to return. Say, pick it up where it left off and make it into a lengthy book. Maybe? I just really want to see more of this story and the characters, and to know what happens between Bossk and Chainbreaker. STET! by Daniel José Older Rating: (0 stars) Very disappointed with this one. After Tales of the Bounty Hunters, I was looking forward to the short story of Zuckuss and 4-LOM. Unfortunately, this story was a complete mess and I don’t understand what the point of it was. Wait for It by Zoraida Córdova Rating: ★★★★★ (5 stars) – a favorite If you know me, it shouldn’t surprise you that this is a favorite because two words: Boba Fett. QUOTE: “He taught his anger to aim, to speak, to be the scream that he would never finish. Because every target was and would always be the Jedi who got away—the man who murdered his father.” Standard Imperial Procedure by Sarwat Chadda Rating: ★★★★★ (5 stars) – a favorite There Is Always Another by Mackenzi Lee Rating: ★★★★ (4 stars) Fake It Till You Make It by Cavan Scott Rating: ★★★★ (4 stars) But What Does He Eat? by S. A. Chakraborty Rating: ★★★ (2.75 stars) Beyond the Clouds by Lilliam Rivera Rating: ★ (1 star) No Time for Poetry by Austin Walker Rating: ★★★★★ (5 stars) – a favorite I did not expected to love this story about IG-88 and Dengar. Bespin Escape by Martha Wells Rating: ★★ (2.25 stars) Faith in an Old Friend by Brittany N. Williams Rating: ★★★★ (3.75 stars) I thought this one was pretty good, but a bit confusing since in Solo: A Star Wars Story it made it sound like L3’s existence was no longer there due to having merged and becoming something else entirely with the Millennium Falcon. Due on Batuu by Rob Hart Rating: ★ (1 star) Into the Clouds by Karen Strong Rating: ★ (1 star) These two are just cheap knockoffs of Han and Leia. The Witness by Adam Christopher Rating: ★★★ (3.25 stars) I thought Deena witnessing the duel and partial exchange between Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker to be a bit much. The Man Who Built Cloud City by Alexander Freed Rating: ★★★ (3 stars) The Backup Backup Plan by Anne Toole Rating: (0 stars) Got bored a third of the way through and decided to skip it altogether. Right-Hand Man by Lydia Kang Rating: ★★★★★ (5 stars) – a favorite Aaand that’s a new favorite droid added to the list. The Whills Strike Back by Tom Angleberger Rating: ★★★★ (4 stars)

  27. 4 out of 5

    Liberty

    Actual average rating: 3.07 Stars. Trying to review anthologies is always hard. I never fully know how I feel about the book as a collection and have trouble picking out the most important things to talk about. Firstly, this is a collection of stories told during the time of The Empire Strikes Back from the perspective of background characters. Secondly, as you can tell these stories are written by really well loved and well known authors. The authors are the reason I picked this one up in the fi Actual average rating: 3.07 Stars. Trying to review anthologies is always hard. I never fully know how I feel about the book as a collection and have trouble picking out the most important things to talk about. Firstly, this is a collection of stories told during the time of The Empire Strikes Back from the perspective of background characters. Secondly, as you can tell these stories are written by really well loved and well known authors. The authors are the reason I picked this one up in the first place because, while I love Star Wars, I’m not the biggest Star Wars fans. Also, I say that now to shoo any gatekeepers for this series. Yes, I’m not a true fan. Moving on. I’ve seen these movies multiple times so I know roughly the plots for all of the movies, but I still somehow managed to get a little lost in the timeline while reading these stories. It doesn’t help that some of the stories are happening around the same events so while you have a Rebel running errands in the tunnels around Hoth, you also have the comms director dealing with their job. So, it some times can get a little muddled. I think this is a good collection of stories, but struggled with how some of the stories are relevant to the plot of the movie. But maybe that was the point for a couple of these stories. Maybe they’re not meant to have a bigger impact in the overall picture and are just there to show how other can be effected by the Empire’s decisions. I had a couple of stories I loved so much. I feel like I enjoyed the author’s writing style and what they chose to write about as well. There were a couple of pilot stories that had my heart racing. I loved them. I also really enjoyed that we didn’t just get stories from the Rebel side of things. We also got quite a few stories from people who are really just cogs in the Empire and it was great. I had a lot of fun reading a couple of these stories every day. Favorite Stories: 1. Rendezvous Point by Jason Fry--4.5 Stars. 2. Amara Kel’s Rules for TIE Pilot Survival (Probably) by Django Wexler--4.25 Stars. Least Favorite Stories: 1. This is No Cave by Catherine M. Valente--1.25 Stars. 2. Disturbance by Mike Chen--2.0 Stars. 3. Vergence by Tracy Deonn--2.0 Stars.

  28. 5 out of 5

    RumBelle

    Overall, this was an enjoyable collection of Star Wars stories, though I liked the first From a Certain Point of View Better, for several reasons. Firstly over 100 pages of this book were stories that took place on Hoth. After awhile, this got really dull and boring. Some of the stories were interesting, but many had repetitive themes and ideas. Secondly, there was a real shortage of stories from Dagobah, which really surprised me. That whole part of the film shaped Luke into the Jedi he would b Overall, this was an enjoyable collection of Star Wars stories, though I liked the first From a Certain Point of View Better, for several reasons. Firstly over 100 pages of this book were stories that took place on Hoth. After awhile, this got really dull and boring. Some of the stories were interesting, but many had repetitive themes and ideas. Secondly, there was a real shortage of stories from Dagobah, which really surprised me. That whole part of the film shaped Luke into the Jedi he would be, and while I know these stories are from the points of view of secondary characters, it was a little disappointing to only see one story. I suppose it was because the only characters we saw in the film on Dagobah were Luke and Yoda, who do not fall into the category of secondary. I find it hard to believe though, that something else couldn't have been written. That story though, Vergence, was possibly my favorite in the whole book. Without giving too much away, it was told from the point of view of the malevolent presence who made the Dark Side cave what it was. It was a dark, thoughtful, yet ultimately revelatory story. Extremely creative, it grabbed you from the beginning and didn't let go. I hope, at some point, they do another one of these collections centered on Return of the Jedi.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Christina Busche

    The first book in this series was intricately tied to A New Hope, scene-by-scene almost. Some stories were better than others of course, but the whole thing flowed and almost every story enhanced the original film by adding a different perspective or deepening the readers' understanding of a particular scene. By contrast, this one is a mess. Multiple stories have connections to the film so tenuous as to be their own thing entirely (e.g. the story of a Bespin girl dreaming of becoming a bounty hu The first book in this series was intricately tied to A New Hope, scene-by-scene almost. Some stories were better than others of course, but the whole thing flowed and almost every story enhanced the original film by adding a different perspective or deepening the readers' understanding of a particular scene. By contrast, this one is a mess. Multiple stories have connections to the film so tenuous as to be their own thing entirely (e.g. the story of a Bespin girl dreaming of becoming a bounty hunter is well and good, but only if she ties into something that happened in the film. Not just "she saw her idol, Boba Fett, across the room"). The first 250-300 pages were on Hoth, repeatedly rewinding to around the same point in the film (Battle of Hoth) to give another person's story, which lost all momentum and got monotonous. That said, there were a couple stand-out perspectives offered--the wampa that attacked Luke, the tauntaun that Han rode, the mysterious, sentient cave on Dagobah, the space slug in the asteroid field, the Millennium Falcon's computer, the medical droid that replaced Luke's hand, and perhaps a few others. But the unnecessary, rather uninteresting tangents weigh the whole thing down, making it 2.5 stars in my book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Roslyn K

    I just love this series so much! They epitomize what I find most fun about the Star Wars expanded universe: every random background character has a name and a atory of their own. I will say, however that this collection felt weaker than the New Hope collection. There are characters missing that I had really hoped to hear from (no Lobot? no stormtrooper who blasted 3P0? no Lando or Chewie (I know technically they're main characters but I feel like an exception could have been made)? the Ugnaught I just love this series so much! They epitomize what I find most fun about the Star Wars expanded universe: every random background character has a name and a atory of their own. I will say, however that this collection felt weaker than the New Hope collection. There are characters missing that I had really hoped to hear from (no Lobot? no stormtrooper who blasted 3P0? no Lando or Chewie (I know technically they're main characters but I feel like an exception could have been made)? the Ugnaught POV didn't include the scene where Chewie finds 3P0?) as well as characters added who didn't even have a cameo in the film. I know that it was probably harder to come up with 40 POVs that don't overlap too much considering how much of the movie is spent with our main characters in isolated situations (Dagobah, stuck on the Falcon) but this collection just felt like it stretched more than the first one and it wasn't to the benefit of the collection as a whole. Still largely enjoyable but not a knock your socks off amazing experience the way the first one was.

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