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Amy Wu and the Patchwork Dragon

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In this sweet and brightly illustrated picture book, Amy Wu must craft a dragon unlike any other to share with her class at school in this unforgettable follow-up to Amy Wu and the Perfect Bao. Amy loves craft time at school. But when her teacher asks everyone to make their own dragon, Amy feels stuck. Her first dragon has a long, wingless body, stag-like horns, and eagle c In this sweet and brightly illustrated picture book, Amy Wu must craft a dragon unlike any other to share with her class at school in this unforgettable follow-up to Amy Wu and the Perfect Bao. Amy loves craft time at school. But when her teacher asks everyone to make their own dragon, Amy feels stuck. Her first dragon has a long, wingless body, stag-like horns, and eagle claws, but her friends don’t think it’s a real dragon. Then she makes dragons like theirs, but none of them feels quite right...None of them feels like hers. After school, a story from Grandma sparks new inspiration, and Amy rounds up her family to help her. Together, can they make Amy’s perfect dragon?


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In this sweet and brightly illustrated picture book, Amy Wu must craft a dragon unlike any other to share with her class at school in this unforgettable follow-up to Amy Wu and the Perfect Bao. Amy loves craft time at school. But when her teacher asks everyone to make their own dragon, Amy feels stuck. Her first dragon has a long, wingless body, stag-like horns, and eagle c In this sweet and brightly illustrated picture book, Amy Wu must craft a dragon unlike any other to share with her class at school in this unforgettable follow-up to Amy Wu and the Perfect Bao. Amy loves craft time at school. But when her teacher asks everyone to make their own dragon, Amy feels stuck. Her first dragon has a long, wingless body, stag-like horns, and eagle claws, but her friends don’t think it’s a real dragon. Then she makes dragons like theirs, but none of them feels quite right...None of them feels like hers. After school, a story from Grandma sparks new inspiration, and Amy rounds up her family to help her. Together, can they make Amy’s perfect dragon?

30 review for Amy Wu and the Patchwork Dragon

  1. 5 out of 5

    La Coccinelle

    Amy Wu and the Patchwork Dragon is about a little girl who wants to make a dragon... her own way. When Amy's class learns about dragons, their teacher has them create their own. But Amy's doesn't exactly look like all the others, and she ends up not handing one in. Then her grandmother tells her about the dragons from their culture, and Amy knows exactly what she needs to do to make her dragon her own. The story and illustrations are both pretty cute. Like its predecessor, this book adds some cul Amy Wu and the Patchwork Dragon is about a little girl who wants to make a dragon... her own way. When Amy's class learns about dragons, their teacher has them create their own. But Amy's doesn't exactly look like all the others, and she ends up not handing one in. Then her grandmother tells her about the dragons from their culture, and Amy knows exactly what she needs to do to make her dragon her own. The story and illustrations are both pretty cute. Like its predecessor, this book adds some cultural flavour to a story about confidence. There's a small activity in the back of this book, and while it isn't as fun (or tasty) as making bao, it could be fun for kids. I also liked the inclusion of the explanation of the difference between Eastern and Western dragons. Overall, this is a fairly strong picture book. Kids who like dragons will probably enjoy this, even if they're only familiar with the Western type. Quotable moment:

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Amy Wu and the Patchwork Dragon is a children's picture book written by Kat Zhang and illustrated by Charlene Chua. It stars Amy Wu, a little girl, who wants to make the perfect dragon for craft time at school. Zhang's text is simplistic and straightforward. It narrates Amy Wu's doubts about her design of a dragon for craft time and feels dissatisfied of the Western dragon she drew. Accompanied by her classmates Willa and Sam, Amy returns home to Grandma, who tells the trio tales about Asian drag Amy Wu and the Patchwork Dragon is a children's picture book written by Kat Zhang and illustrated by Charlene Chua. It stars Amy Wu, a little girl, who wants to make the perfect dragon for craft time at school. Zhang's text is simplistic and straightforward. It narrates Amy Wu's doubts about her design of a dragon for craft time and feels dissatisfied of the Western dragon she drew. Accompanied by her classmates Willa and Sam, Amy returns home to Grandma, who tells the trio tales about Asian dragons. Chua again brings plenty of colorful spirit with her cartoons, perfectly capturing Amy's fun, creative energy and surrounding her Chinese protagonist with a diverse school community. The premise of the book is rather straightforward. After reading them a story about dragons, Ms. Mary has Amy and her classmates design their own dragons. While her classmates quickly fill the show-and-tell table with winged, pot-bellied dragons fashioned with modeling clay and stamps, Amy struggles. At first she paints a thin, long-bodied dragon inspired by Eastern cultures, but her classmates are confused and challenge the authenticity of her creation since it is a departure from the Western dragons showcased during story time. All in all, Amy Wu and the Patchwork Dragon is a cheerful and bright, this heroine calls for authenticity and representation.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Aolund

    When Amy's class does an activity making their own dragons, some of the other kids aren't sure Amy's dragon *is* a dragon, because it doesn't look like the Western-style dragons they're familiar with. Amy tries drawing different dragons at first, but it just doesn't feel right to her. With a little help from her grandma, Amy's friends learn about Eastern dragons, and Amy makes her own patchwork dragon that ends up feeling just right. A wonderful, engaging book perfect for preschoolers and toddle When Amy's class does an activity making their own dragons, some of the other kids aren't sure Amy's dragon *is* a dragon, because it doesn't look like the Western-style dragons they're familiar with. Amy tries drawing different dragons at first, but it just doesn't feel right to her. With a little help from her grandma, Amy's friends learn about Eastern dragons, and Amy makes her own patchwork dragon that ends up feeling just right. A wonderful, engaging book perfect for preschoolers and toddlers about celebrating your own culture as well as cultures different from your own. Informational note about Eastern and Western dragons at the back of the book, as well as an art activity. Themes: Dragons, School, Be Yourself, Grandma Age range: Toddler and preschool

  4. 4 out of 5

    Amy OHanlon

    I love Amy Wu! Kat Zhang and Charlene Wu work wonderfully together to create a fun and dynamic character. Amy, like many kids of Asian descent living in the western world, has to find the balance between the different cultures that help make her who she is. This struggle is played out beautifully when she learns about dragons in class. But to her, dragons look very different. The dissonance between school and home is real, and the way she manages to navigate it in her own way is admirable! Loved I love Amy Wu! Kat Zhang and Charlene Wu work wonderfully together to create a fun and dynamic character. Amy, like many kids of Asian descent living in the western world, has to find the balance between the different cultures that help make her who she is. This struggle is played out beautifully when she learns about dragons in class. But to her, dragons look very different. The dissonance between school and home is real, and the way she manages to navigate it in her own way is admirable! Loved this.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Annamarie Carlson (she, her)

    Amy is excited to design her very own dragon. Her dragon is long and thin with horns like a stag and claws like an eagle. But...her friends are sure that isn't a real dragon. Where are its wings? Its fire? Its scales? Amy tries to make her dragon look more like her classmate's dragons, but it just doesn't feel right. Can she make a dragon that is perfect for her? Amy Wu is back, and I couldn't be more thrilled! While this didn't hold quite as much charm for me as the original, I still love all of Amy is excited to design her very own dragon. Her dragon is long and thin with horns like a stag and claws like an eagle. But...her friends are sure that isn't a real dragon. Where are its wings? Its fire? Its scales? Amy tries to make her dragon look more like her classmate's dragons, but it just doesn't feel right. Can she make a dragon that is perfect for her? Amy Wu is back, and I couldn't be more thrilled! While this didn't hold quite as much charm for me as the original, I still love all of Amy's adventures, and I am thrilled to share this one at storytime. I'm hoping for more!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Molly Cluff (Library!)

    A sweet story about cute little Amy Wu wanting to create the perfect dragon craft for school. Her classmates only seem aware of the kinds of dragons from European traditions, so she introduces them to Eastern dragons, and even manages to juxtapose both ideas into her project at the end! Educational for young children who like dragons to help expand their view.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Barbra

    When craft time at school is to make a dragon Amy she can't quite express herself. None of her dragons feel right or look like the ones the other children have made. At home Amys grandmother tells her all about the dragons of their culture. When she finds a dragon costume in the attic she gets her family to help her make it her own. When craft time at school is to make a dragon Amy she can't quite express herself. None of her dragons feel right or look like the ones the other children have made. At home Amys grandmother tells her all about the dragons of their culture. When she finds a dragon costume in the attic she gets her family to help her make it her own.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stephani

    Now why wouldn’t I love this book?? I loved Amy Wu and the Perfect Bao. The same adorable characters and charming art PLUS dragons? And a giant glittery dragon? I’m hooked. This will make for a fun story time book especially with the bonus dragon activity at the end.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ms Threlkeld

    Utterly delightful celebration of culture and creativity.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Kelley

    A really cute and beautifully illustrated story about dragons, and how Western dragons and Eastern dragons differ.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Thomas Bell

    Loved it!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    Fun little book with lively illustrations and encouragement to be creative.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Pinky

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Amy creates the perfect dragon for her class, one that represents her idea of a dragon the best.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    A fun, engaging read-aloud with my Kindergartner.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Evans

    For: craft/dragon fans; readers looking for a book about family traditions, imagination, and celebrating identity. Possible red flags: extravagant use of glitter; feeling left out/different.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Annese

    Adorable. I'm loving the Amy Wu series! Adorable. I'm loving the Amy Wu series!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    Amy Wu is back! This time she notices that her idea of what a dragon should look like is awfully different from her classmates. She shows everyone how dragons look to her and at the end of the story creates a hybrid of both dragons that celebrates her upbringing, heritage, and friendships. GREAT.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Donald

  19. 5 out of 5

    Susan

  20. 5 out of 5

    Becca

  21. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lisa

  23. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  24. 4 out of 5

    Abhi R.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Gumby

  26. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Katy Punch

  29. 4 out of 5

    Hillary Dillon

  30. 4 out of 5

    Caralen

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