Hot Best Seller

The Warrior's Path

Availability: Ready to download

When she was a child, the author of When Women Were Warriors happily identified with all the male heroes she read about in stories that began, "Once upon a time, a young man went out to seek his fortune." But she would have been delighted to discover even one story like that with a female protagonist. Since she never did find the story she was looking for all those years a When she was a child, the author of When Women Were Warriors happily identified with all the male heroes she read about in stories that began, "Once upon a time, a young man went out to seek his fortune." But she would have been delighted to discover even one story like that with a female protagonist. Since she never did find the story she was looking for all those years ago, she decided to write it. In Book I of the trilogy, Tamras arrives in Merin's house to begin her apprenticeship as a warrior, but her small stature causes many, including Tamras herself, to doubt that she will ever become a competent swordswoman. To make matters worse, the Lady Merin assigns her the position of companion, little more than a personal servant, to a woman who came to Merin's house, seemingly out of nowhere, the previous winter, and this stranger wants nothing to do with Tamras.


Compare

When she was a child, the author of When Women Were Warriors happily identified with all the male heroes she read about in stories that began, "Once upon a time, a young man went out to seek his fortune." But she would have been delighted to discover even one story like that with a female protagonist. Since she never did find the story she was looking for all those years a When she was a child, the author of When Women Were Warriors happily identified with all the male heroes she read about in stories that began, "Once upon a time, a young man went out to seek his fortune." But she would have been delighted to discover even one story like that with a female protagonist. Since she never did find the story she was looking for all those years ago, she decided to write it. In Book I of the trilogy, Tamras arrives in Merin's house to begin her apprenticeship as a warrior, but her small stature causes many, including Tamras herself, to doubt that she will ever become a competent swordswoman. To make matters worse, the Lady Merin assigns her the position of companion, little more than a personal servant, to a woman who came to Merin's house, seemingly out of nowhere, the previous winter, and this stranger wants nothing to do with Tamras.

30 review for The Warrior's Path

  1. 4 out of 5

    K

    I read this book mostly in challenge of negative reviews I saw on Amazon. Clearly, those people are not from cultures with oral traditions, because Wilson's prose is beautiful and captures those traditions wonderfully. If you have problems with women exploring their sexuality together, you are not mature enough for this trilogy. That's not the point of the story. The point is that women can be all sorts of warriors: some with swords, some with children, and some with both. Weapons are both tangi I read this book mostly in challenge of negative reviews I saw on Amazon. Clearly, those people are not from cultures with oral traditions, because Wilson's prose is beautiful and captures those traditions wonderfully. If you have problems with women exploring their sexuality together, you are not mature enough for this trilogy. That's not the point of the story. The point is that women can be all sorts of warriors: some with swords, some with children, and some with both. Weapons are both tangible [swords, bows, etc.] and intangible [Maara says that the greatest weapon of all is truth in Book II]. It's about a girl who is small in stature, but large of heart. It's about a girl who challenges the world around her. I feel like all women need to read it, but don't stop there! Challenge the men in your life to read a book about women. We've had to read countless books with male heroes, so why can't they read books about female heroes?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Annet Alejandro

    I was expecting epic battles and stories of fierce female warrior legends, but this has none of that. I guess I have just grown used to that formula from other conventional sci fi books. This story is refreshingly calmer with only semi-dramatic events. It is a nice break from the lone prophecized hero destined to save the world from ultimate evil. This is more of how life once might have been in a matriarchial society and the timeless lessons we have forgotten in today's mans world. I am captiva I was expecting epic battles and stories of fierce female warrior legends, but this has none of that. I guess I have just grown used to that formula from other conventional sci fi books. This story is refreshingly calmer with only semi-dramatic events. It is a nice break from the lone prophecized hero destined to save the world from ultimate evil. This is more of how life once might have been in a matriarchial society and the timeless lessons we have forgotten in today's mans world. I am captivated with CW's portrayal of the old world celtic culture, her imagery of their customs and divinity. She paints such a picturesque story of these warrior women and their camraderies. Its a such a simple way of life with so many depths of love and devotion. I also love how she weaved in folklore storytelling into the book. I have always been enthralled with storytelling from elders of all walks of life and even now it still gives me a sense of home. This was a lovely read for me. I do also want to alert readers that this may not be your cup of tea if you are not one of an open mind or open heart. It has a few same sex scenes which is not for the prude of heart. Also, if you are more of a 2 dimensional person rather than a multifaceted person, you will not grasp the true brilliance of this story or its allegories. This has no teen angst Twilight junk.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Lex Kent

    I would consider putting this in the top 10 of my favorite f/f books I've read. Don't hesitate to read this one!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    There's nothing I value more in what I read or watch than when character development is clearly the priority in the story rather than plot development. For starters, this book doesn't even have an overarching storyline; a part of me kept waiting for a major plot to begin at some point and last until the end of the book, but it didn't, and I was so glad. The focus is completely on the women, of all ages and all their different backgrounds, and the importance of the small storylines lies entirely i There's nothing I value more in what I read or watch than when character development is clearly the priority in the story rather than plot development. For starters, this book doesn't even have an overarching storyline; a part of me kept waiting for a major plot to begin at some point and last until the end of the book, but it didn't, and I was so glad. The focus is completely on the women, of all ages and all their different backgrounds, and the importance of the small storylines lies entirely in how they affect these characters, the dynamics between them, and Tamras’s journey to become a warrior. And she doesn’t need to be the one destined to save her kingdom from all evil or something in order for the story to be interesting. She can learn valuable lessons while just helping watch out for cattle raiders. I had never before read another book with so many kinds of relationships between women, and all of them so well developed. It’s all about friends, mothers and daughters, leaders, mentors and mentees, and lovers. I especially liked Tamras and Maara’s relationship and how both of them consistently contributed to it, as one could often teach the other different things and they would always look out for each other the same way. One last thing: it was so refreshing to see how well Tamras and Maara were able to communicate. I appreciated the break from all the drama and angst caused by the characters’s poor communication skills in other stories. The two of them talk about everything and rarely have trouble being honest with each other about what’s upsetting or confusing them. No misunderstandings are left unclarified, no falling outs left unresolved, and that allowed their relationship to evolve healthily so that Tamras learned to fully trust her warrior as any other companion or apprentice should be able to. Needless to say I’m starting the second book straight away, while already worrying about what I’m going to do when I’m done with this trilogy.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Farah

    I've never heard of Catherine M. Wilson nor When Women Were Warriors so here's the book chain to me reading this book. Lex Kent - Kate Christie - Tere - Kate Christie - Jenna - Kate Christie - Catherine M. Wilson - Lex Kent - F - Carrie - Amazon - Farah - You perhaps? Thank you so much, Somia for sharing the ultimate good news that this book is currently free on Amazon. I. Love. This. So. Very. Much. A 16 year old lead, Tamras daughter of Tamnet. Do not let her size and age fool you - she is one I've never heard of Catherine M. Wilson nor When Women Were Warriors so here's the book chain to me reading this book. Lex Kent - Kate Christie - Tere - Kate Christie - Jenna - Kate Christie - Catherine M. Wilson - Lex Kent - F - Carrie - Amazon - Farah - You perhaps? Thank you so much, Somia for sharing the ultimate good news that this book is currently free on Amazon. I. Love. This. So. Very. Much. A 16 year old lead, Tamras daughter of Tamnet. Do not let her size and age fool you - she is one of the wisest, kindest and most wonderful fictional character I have ever read. I'm in awe of her, she keeps taking a piece of my heart and I've got nothing to offer to the next leads in my next read as I've met my quota for this month. Maara the Warrior, the unwelcomed and misunderstood by everyone in the clan except by the phenomenal young lady up there and me, myself and I, is also a character that you can't help but to fall madly for. It's obvious that she's carrying a lot of pain from her past and Tamras is perfect for her! Strong, Intelligent, Sensible, Independent and not affected by the negative vibes given by the others towards her warrior, Tamras is right there for Maara from the very beginning and they experienced everything incredibly profound together. Get the book, get to know Tamras and Maara, experience their unique and out of this world, strangers - confidants relationship, be a part of their adventures, feel their tears and fears and fall in love with them, just like I did. Lex said this book is in her top 1O list, F had nothing but beautiful things to say about it and Carrie rated it pretty high. Don't trust me, fine. But trust the Emperor, Our Resident Curmudgeon and The Angst Admirer.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    "The Warriors Path” is Book One of the “When Women Were Warriors” trilogy. Wow, just wow. 5* - there, I’ve said it. I’ve always put my rating at the end of a review for some reason, but I don’t want you guessing. 5*. No question. This book flows like a poem. Listening to the characters as they think, and as they interact, is simply magical. Maara, Tamras, Sparrow, The Lady, Gnith, Vintel, Namet….and so many others. I name these few only to have you consider that the book is about people. People w "The Warriors Path” is Book One of the “When Women Were Warriors” trilogy. Wow, just wow. 5* - there, I’ve said it. I’ve always put my rating at the end of a review for some reason, but I don’t want you guessing. 5*. No question. This book flows like a poem. Listening to the characters as they think, and as they interact, is simply magical. Maara, Tamras, Sparrow, The Lady, Gnith, Vintel, Namet….and so many others. I name these few only to have you consider that the book is about people. People who are sometimes happy, sometimes lonely, sometimes fearful, sometimes sexual, sometimes filled with despair. But they are people. Despite the title, this is not an uber-feminist man hating book about womyn. This is a joyful book about people….most of whom happen to be women. And, perhaps, what a difference our own world of rulers and military could be if “once upon a time, when only women were warriors” were more than just a way to begin a story. This is not a book of battles, bravery and death….though it includes all that. This is a book of duty, of belonging, of sharing and caring. Gnith, at one point, tells Tamras: “Listen,” she said. “I’m going to tell you a secret.” She crooked her finger at me, and when I leaned toward her, she whispered, “Every thing in the world can wait but one. Only love can’t wait.” Yet wait it does, as it often does as it grows. The narrator was absolutely perfect….such a balm for me, a lover of audiobooks, after so many bad narrators recently. I messaged the author, Catherine Wilson, asking about plans for audiobooks for the second and third books of the trilogy (it’s been three years since Book One was released on Audible). She shared with me that both she and her producer at Dog Ear Audio have had health and other personal setbacks during the last few years, but they are both currently healthy, back at work, and trying to make plans for bringing books two and three to Audible. This will probably (my estimate) be awhile, and as much as I prefer audiobooks to Kindle, I’m just not sure I can wait to read books two and three. Regardless of your preferred format, get Book One now….did I mention it’s very definitely 5*+?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    I'm not entirely sure how this book landed up in my shopping cart and ultimately on my stack of to-be-read books, but I am so incredibly glad that it did. Catherine M. Wilson is a true storyteller and I believe this story, and the series, will be considered a classic. The story is told through the eyes of Tamras, a young woman entering the house of the Lady of the land in order to follow in her mother's footsteps and become a warrior. She is first presented with the task of being a companion to I'm not entirely sure how this book landed up in my shopping cart and ultimately on my stack of to-be-read books, but I am so incredibly glad that it did. Catherine M. Wilson is a true storyteller and I believe this story, and the series, will be considered a classic. The story is told through the eyes of Tamras, a young woman entering the house of the Lady of the land in order to follow in her mother's footsteps and become a warrior. She is first presented with the task of being a companion to the one warrior no one trusts, likes, or understands. The relationship of warrior and young apprentice that builds between these two women is filled with life lessons every person can learn from. I found myself pondering each chapter and being amazed at how such a simple lesson can apply to my own life. The way I described the story above probably sounds simple, but it truly is not. The way that Catherine M. Wilson is able to create the characters, the setting, the challenges and the world is truly amazing. She has a gift and is sharing that gift on the pages of her book. No reader will be disappointed from reading this story that is for certain.

  8. 4 out of 5

    elisa ady

    IT GAAAAAYYYYYY!!!!!! :~) based on the reviews i've read for this book, it can be a bit unnerving bc the pacing is not typical or traditional and conflict within the novel is mostly internal (rather than external, ie violence/action/etc), but as the artist collective Still Eating Oranges so wisely put it in their essay on narrative structure: "The necessity of conflict is preached as a kind of dogma by contemporary writers’ workshops and Internet 'guides' to writing. A plot without conflict is con IT GAAAAAYYYYYY!!!!!! :~) based on the reviews i've read for this book, it can be a bit unnerving bc the pacing is not typical or traditional and conflict within the novel is mostly internal (rather than external, ie violence/action/etc), but as the artist collective Still Eating Oranges so wisely put it in their essay on narrative structure: "The necessity of conflict is preached as a kind of dogma by contemporary writers’ workshops and Internet 'guides' to writing. A plot without conflict is considered dull; some even go so far as to call it impossible. This has influenced not only fiction, but writing in general–arguably even philosophy. Yet, is there any truth to this belief? Does plot necessarily hinge on conflict? No. Such claims are a product of the West’s insularity." not all books need constant conflict to hold your attention, or to be good, and w/ this book in particular, i felt that the story and characters were captivating without relying on constant gore or action. it's a story about journeys, about change, and about growth, and that shows within the plot. if you're looking for an intense read with nonstop gratuitous violence, this ain't for you. however, if you're looking for a story about an unassuming gal coming of age, exploring her sexuality, and learning the ways of the warrior through a fierce internal struggle and natural growth as a result of her environment and those around her, this is the novel for you. i very much enjoyed it and thought that the unusual spiritual elements were gorgeous, as well as the author's ability to create a world in which women are the focal point ― and, i would argue, of more importance than the men.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Arien

    There's something captivating in this book - the language, the tales the girl tells, the traditions of a tribe. It all feels... important, it has substance. The imagery my brain came up with was something I've not felt for a long time while reading a book. And even though it's lacking in other areas like describing the world which is not explained all that much and leaves the readers to fill in the blanks themselves I found it all engaging nonetheless. 4 stars for a solid coming of age story.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    This book tried to be clever, but failed leaving it with a odd vibe; like it's attempting to be poetry, but it's not clever enough and only comes off as a obtuse simpleton, explaining a lot with obscure "this and that." The story itself is decent, although vague; it has no phases, no climax, no tension to speak of. It starts on a monotone pace and keeps going at it through the entire book. It is VERY obviously made with a series in mind, not caring much for the first book only to make sure it's This book tried to be clever, but failed leaving it with a odd vibe; like it's attempting to be poetry, but it's not clever enough and only comes off as a obtuse simpleton, explaining a lot with obscure "this and that." The story itself is decent, although vague; it has no phases, no climax, no tension to speak of. It starts on a monotone pace and keeps going at it through the entire book. It is VERY obviously made with a series in mind, not caring much for the first book only to make sure it's continued on to the next installment, which I will neither recommend nor pick up myself. This book asks so many great questions in the graceful fashion of repeating "why why why why why" until you either go mad or go through the wonderful experience of achieving all natural ear periods. The conversational flow sounds like 5yr old's who still are in desperate need to know the world, unable to make up a thought or reflect and carry a proper conversation. Along with this there is a utter lack of descriptions that leave all imagery up to the reader's mind, which is weird for fantasy, but I didn't mind as the trade of details makes the story move at a (much needed) faster pace. At least the story gets quickly to the point, even if the point is horrendously vague. However, the lack of descriptions takes it's toll as the sex scenes are just bizarre, they're written like a horrible attempt at poetry and not at all a turn on. Couldn't the writer at least attempt descriptions for once? I shudder at one specific attempt that sounded eerily like something my senile grandmother would write. For a book called Warrior's path, there sure isn't a lot of warrior training. Actually, there isn't ANY mention of military training at all. There is no overseen training practice, instead every warrior trains their apprentice/companion, but there really isn't any mention of singular practice either, so I don't know. They just walk around and do nothing all day. Like seriously, they do NOTHING, but sit on their butts, what kind of place is this? Is this some kind of vacation camp??? Which brings me to the point: The military disorganization this book portrays is unrealistic, desertion is not even seen as an issue. There are no rules or expectations for any station or position and the people can pretty much do whatever they want. There is just too much leniency going around to be a military flick. Now that I'm at it, there is actually little explanation for anything and it drove me mad. While it's clear the society is a matriarchy with little mention of men apart from some slight talk of marriage. I still don't understand the dynamic of this society. Are all the women bisexual? Or is it the lack of men that make them seek comfort in each other? There is a men's house, but as said, its hardly mentioned. Lesbianism seems to be approved of, and sort of expected? But so is straight marriage? I have no idea, this confuses me to no end. Lastly and finally. The narrator is not to my liking, she sounds monotone and incredibly careful when she talks, like the next word she utters will get her beaten. I mean honestly, it's an awesome bed story voice - if you want the kids to fall sleep before you've even read the first page. Story is overall, monotone, obtuse and sleep inducing, and unlike the book, my review actually has a start, a middle and an ending, maybe the author can pickup on that.

  11. 4 out of 5

    lauraღ

    I don't even know how to express how much I loved this book. It had so many things that were important to me. It's low on plot, true enough, and I might have been too generous with my rating, but I can't remember the last time I read a book where I was so completely satisfied with everything and there was pretty much nothing that I disliked. The book thrives on relationships between women, and I loved that above all else. Friendships, romantic relationships, mother/daughter relationship, mentor/a I don't even know how to express how much I loved this book. It had so many things that were important to me. It's low on plot, true enough, and I might have been too generous with my rating, but I can't remember the last time I read a book where I was so completely satisfied with everything and there was pretty much nothing that I disliked. The book thrives on relationships between women, and I loved that above all else. Friendships, romantic relationships, mother/daughter relationship, mentor/apprentice... they all played an important part of the story and I was so happy about that. I absolutely adored Tamras and Maara's relationship, and how they slowly came to trust each other, and learn from each other, and love each other. It was amazing to read, and I loved it all the more because I can't think of the last time I read something where relationships between women were the driving force. It was beautifully written as well, and I loved the worldbuilding and the stories that were woven throughout. My heart genuinely leapt with delight every time a section opened with "In ancient days, when only women were warriors..." It was a lovely and inventive way to tell us more about the world and their folklore and customs. I LOVED this book, and I can't wait to get my hands on the others in the series.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    I reading reviews I have seen a lot made of the fact that this is a book about lesbians, but this is not about sex at all. It is about finding comfort, friendship and strength with other human beings in a time of great hardship. The set up of this book is different and strong and is not salacious or tawdry Set in a time before Christ when tribes are at odds, women take centre stage. When warriors are needed to protect settlements and men are scarce, women take on protective roles; apprentice with I reading reviews I have seen a lot made of the fact that this is a book about lesbians, but this is not about sex at all. It is about finding comfort, friendship and strength with other human beings in a time of great hardship. The set up of this book is different and strong and is not salacious or tawdry Set in a time before Christ when tribes are at odds, women take centre stage. When warriors are needed to protect settlements and men are scarce, women take on protective roles; apprentice with warriors and become fighters themselves.. I liked this story. As the first in a trilogy, it set up some great female characters with believable flaws and strengths. The tone is mythical and epic and I feel would appeal to the Game Of Thrones generation. I found myself rooting for Tamras and Maara pretty much from the outset and without giving too much away was glad the plot was not too predictable. This period of history is not one I have explored much so in a way this was even more refreshing to begin a fiction genre with such a good opener...

  13. 4 out of 5

    Flowerscat

    One of the most beautiful books I have ever read - once picked up it was hard to put down. Real chicken soup for the soul. The author really draws you into the story and it's not hard to imagine yourself being a resident in Merins house. A slow start, but if you persist, you will be richly rewarded.

  14. 4 out of 5

    BadassCmd

    This book was the September's Sapphic Book Club read hosted by sapphicbookclub. My first impression was that the writing is definitely very good, but unusual. The book does a few things when it comes to writing that I wouldn't usually like that much, like first person perspective. And the way the story is told doesn't feel like I'm actually 'in' the story, but more like I'm sitting at a camp fire and someone tells me the story of their life. Which is not bad in particular, just very different fro This book was the September's Sapphic Book Club read hosted by sapphicbookclub. My first impression was that the writing is definitely very good, but unusual. The book does a few things when it comes to writing that I wouldn't usually like that much, like first person perspective. And the way the story is told doesn't feel like I'm actually 'in' the story, but more like I'm sitting at a camp fire and someone tells me the story of their life. Which is not bad in particular, just very different from what I’m used to. At first I suspected that only the beginning would be written like that, like a prologue that makes it feel more historic. But then it went on. And to my own surprise, it didn't bother me after all (although I wouldn't want all books I read to be written that way). It gave it a special aesthetic since in this case it's well done. And while the story has a nice flow to it and Tamras is a likable main character, at first the characters also came across a bit faceless to me. The name of the main character is so rarely used that I only really learned it at around 30% of the book. And then she also called her warrior by her title most of the time, which created a distance and respect between them that is necessary for the story, but didn’t help me rooting for them. But that also changed. I ended up being amused to no end by the interactions between Tamras and Maara and especially by Tamras coming to terms with her feelings. (view spoiler)[ Maara shares her cloak at night with another woman and Tamras gets SO JEALOUS but has no idea why it bothers her so much. And I spend the whole chapter muttering over and over again: “Tamras... the answer is GAY ... you gay girl, you in love... That's so funny since it doesn't seem to be a big deal that ladies have sex with ladies in the story... companions together, companions with warriors, and others. And them falling in love is also not uncommon as we see on Sparrow ... But STILL little Tamras is oblivious like that and I kinda love it. (hide spoiler)] A little detail I really liked is the title being a real part of the book: Tamras telling the stories about a time where only women were warriors. And the book title is their own version of 'once upon a time'. My editor heart was a bit taken back that her stories weren't marked in the text as part of the dialogue. BUT that doesn't really matter. The stories are a nice idea and another beautiful detail that just works great for the book. ... I might also just be extra happy that in this verse there was a time where literally all warriors were women. After I finished the book I had to sum up that this first book doesn't have big conflicts and dramatic highs at the end. But I still really enjoyed the book. It just makes me feel like a hypocrite because I’m always the first to shout that a first book in a series needs to be a well rounded standalone story on its own too. But well, you can get away with a lot when you do it that well. And it’s not that it doesn’t have any real ‘ending point’, but it feels more calm/quiet than what I’m used to from books by now. In case anyone has missed that I used the words 'unusual but good' in 300 variations in this review, that's basically what this book is to me. I’ll definitely read the next part of the series as soon as I can.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ron

    (Updated after second reading) “There’s no putting spilled blood back.” More like 3.5 stars. A well-conceived and well-realized epic-style fantasy about a time and place were all (well, most) of the warriors were women. This story follows a young woman on her quest to become a warrior. On the way, she finds value, belonging and love. Not a bad start. “Tell me later,” she said. “Sit down. Let’s just be quiet for a while.” “I need to tell you — ” “Hush,” she said. “You won’t find the truth in so much (Updated after second reading) “There’s no putting spilled blood back.” More like 3.5 stars. A well-conceived and well-realized epic-style fantasy about a time and place were all (well, most) of the warriors were women. This story follows a young woman on her quest to become a warrior. On the way, she finds value, belonging and love. Not a bad start. “Tell me later,” she said. “Sit down. Let’s just be quiet for a while.” “I need to tell you — ” “Hush,” she said. “You won’t find the truth in so much talk.” When I stopped talking, my trapped thoughts flew around like dry leaves in a whirlwind. An iron age culture where all the warriors were women fits modern sensitivities but not historical trends--the Amazons notwithstanding. Not because men are better warriors--though they do tend to have greater upper body strength--but because men are more expendable, even in--especially in small, primitive communities. Child-bearing age women are not. In fact, given the mortality rate of infants and mothers until just 200 years ago, a culture would risk extinction allowing its women to be the sole warriors. Unfortunately, modern times have made women as expendable as men. “In the dark, you can’t see more than a little piece of anything, and most of what you see in the shadows might be things your mind makes up.” “Oh,” I said. She smiled. “Didn’t your mother ever say that things always look better in the morning?” I had to smile too. “Everybody’s mother says that.” “Then it must be true.” The writing and story has a gentle spirit, despite the martial theme. In fact, all the fighting occurs off-stage--as in Shakespeare. Too bad the sex wasn't similarly left under the covers. The multi-page sex scenes seem pornographic and forced relative to the general tone of the story. “How old am I?” “I don’t know, Mother. Very old, I think.” “Once I was like you.” “What lies between, Mother?” “Lunch.” “What?” “Bring me some lunch.” Unlike many multi-volume works Wilson made a pleasing end to this first installment, while leaving plenty of hooks into the continuing story. “Someday I will be a warrior, bird bones and all!” Maara laughed at my anger. “Someday you’ll be what it’s in you to be. It does no good to argue with the gods about it.” A good read. “Do you think I need a mother?” “We all need our mothers.” “Warriors too?” “Warriors too.”

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alissa

    This book is free on Amazon and it's well-written for an indie novel, even well-edited if overlong. I like indie books and I adjust my expectations accordingly, this way I can truly enjoy the stories that manage to surprise me. It’s just partly the case here because I decided not to continue with the series, but I appreciated the editorial effort and the author’s style. It is a simple and linear coming-of-age tale with a few interesting moments and a nice setting. It’s slow-moving and that’s ok b This book is free on Amazon and it's well-written for an indie novel, even well-edited if overlong. I like indie books and I adjust my expectations accordingly, this way I can truly enjoy the stories that manage to surprise me. It’s just partly the case here because I decided not to continue with the series, but I appreciated the editorial effort and the author’s style. It is a simple and linear coming-of-age tale with a few interesting moments and a nice setting. It’s slow-moving and that’s ok because the focus is on the characters’ growth and their everyday lives, it also portrays a F/F romance and I think this is the first time I read a novel with this kind of relationship. While I don't like emphasis on romance in my fantasy (I prefer proper romance novels for that), I'm really starting to like reading about diversity, be it skin and culture or sexual orientation. Anyway it’s a 2.5 star read for me, rounded down because while I knew this was the first installment of a series, the ending is abrupt (fortunately no cliffhanger), and while I understand slice-of-life and everything there is really little plot progress. The characters are nice but not very rounded. Overall, there are good concepts in this book but it wasn't a hit for me.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Darlene

    In ancient days, when womyn* were warriors... Why would womyn be warriors? Who but the life bringers would care? Who but womyn would be cautious about taking the life of a family member of another home. Yes, there are men in the book. They have redeeming ways. But this story is about womyn. In particularly a young teen and her strange warrior. Many subplot lines kept this book moving. There are questions to ponder, such as the difference between a secure upbringing and an orphaned life. The most int In ancient days, when womyn* were warriors... Why would womyn be warriors? Who but the life bringers would care? Who but womyn would be cautious about taking the life of a family member of another home. Yes, there are men in the book. They have redeeming ways. But this story is about womyn. In particularly a young teen and her strange warrior. Many subplot lines kept this book moving. There are questions to ponder, such as the difference between a secure upbringing and an orphaned life. The most interesting thought is about anger and its purpose. Then there is jealousy and love versus friendship. I can't wait till payday so I can get the next book in the series. For those who don't care for series, the first book does a nice stand alone. Nice settling ending. But I love to watch the characters mature and learn as they do. * my spelling not the author's.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Stuart

    As I finished this book I began to wonder if the classic pattern of character building followed by a more action orientated sequel. It is not to say there was no action, just some surprisingly laid back sections where you thought there might be a skirmish at least. As for the sex in this novel that occurred between the characters I thought came across as the "waves lapping on a seashore" variety. Those who want to be shocked or excited should look elsewhere. Hopefully people who come to read thi As I finished this book I began to wonder if the classic pattern of character building followed by a more action orientated sequel. It is not to say there was no action, just some surprisingly laid back sections where you thought there might be a skirmish at least. As for the sex in this novel that occurred between the characters I thought came across as the "waves lapping on a seashore" variety. Those who want to be shocked or excited should look elsewhere. Hopefully people who come to read this book are tolerant and mature enough to realise that there are women involved in same sex relationships and this book deals with that and also it's great strength is it shows the love and affection that binds them. There is also a small element of mystery which I feel will unfold but to dwell on it would lead to a spoiler. I will probably read the sequels to see how the characters fare. Magic is also played down and it intrigues me whether more references to magic will appear along with fantastic creatures.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Susan Hamilton

    First, I need to address the fact that this story is classified as LGBT literature. Don’t let that turn you away because that really is a tiny part of this novel and not the focus of the story. It is a logical progression of this primarily female society, however. This is really a Bildungsroman following the maturation of Tanis, the narrator. The character development is top notch here. Tanis and Maara are fully developed characters that the reader cares about by the end of the book. This is the First, I need to address the fact that this story is classified as LGBT literature. Don’t let that turn you away because that really is a tiny part of this novel and not the focus of the story. It is a logical progression of this primarily female society, however. This is really a Bildungsroman following the maturation of Tanis, the narrator. The character development is top notch here. Tanis and Maara are fully developed characters that the reader cares about by the end of the book. This is the first book in a trilogy. The story is set in a Celtic/ Viking/ Pictish sort of society that is female dominated. All of the women, whether main or supporting characters are strong and capable. Story telling in this society is of the oral tradition, and there is a lot of that throughout this book. It’s quite lovely and believable prose. I really enjoyed this book and plan to continue following the development of Tanis and of Maara.

  20. 5 out of 5

    autumn

    maybe it was just the fact that i read this at an incredibly staggered pace but i couldn't really get into this. there's essentially no plot, which usually i don't care about but LITERALLY like 2 things happen in the whole entire book (and even those are unrelated). it does have pretty writing and gay leads, though!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Liz Bradbury

    This is one of the finest Lesbian Genre books ever.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    This was the September read for Sapphic Book Club. I really, really enjoyed it. The characters were likable, and the world building was very interesting to me. It's sort of a fantasy-adjacent setting, but it's built so naturally that at no point is there just a boring info dump about the setting and culture. Aside from the characters' daily lives painting a good picture of the setting, it's supplemented by a few in-universe fairy tales that Tamras tells -- all beginning with the book title "when This was the September read for Sapphic Book Club. I really, really enjoyed it. The characters were likable, and the world building was very interesting to me. It's sort of a fantasy-adjacent setting, but it's built so naturally that at no point is there just a boring info dump about the setting and culture. Aside from the characters' daily lives painting a good picture of the setting, it's supplemented by a few in-universe fairy tales that Tamras tells -- all beginning with the book title "when women were warriors" as their version of "once upon a time." I really liked Tamras' relationship with both Maara and Sparrow. Both were very different, but still interesting and still very important to Tamras. Her relationship with Sparrow, without getting into too much detail, felt very unique and not the sort of relationship I've read about very often. The book makes wlw relationships very normal, which is something I love in fiction. There's no confusion and stumbling over coming out, it just simply IS. I very much look forward to reading more of this series, and would definitely recommend it to anyone looking for a good female-focused fantasy-type story.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Charles Ferguson

    This book is about a Bronze-Age heroine's search for her place in her world and for an understanding of everything she is and can be. Central to her story is her love for someone else, who happens to be a woman. You must make of that what you will. Today I've read the first of this trilogy & have just bought the second. Catherine Wilson, thank you. It reminds me of Le Guin, of Cecelia Holland, and something of Rosemary Sutcliff. It made me feel as I did when I was a child reading authors like thos This book is about a Bronze-Age heroine's search for her place in her world and for an understanding of everything she is and can be. Central to her story is her love for someone else, who happens to be a woman. You must make of that what you will. Today I've read the first of this trilogy & have just bought the second. Catherine Wilson, thank you. It reminds me of Le Guin, of Cecelia Holland, and something of Rosemary Sutcliff. It made me feel as I did when I was a child reading authors like those (except Holland, who I came to later): my adult concerns--I don't mean everyday life, I mean the awareness through which we (or at least I) read with as an adult--melted away. Once again I was in a magical place woven by someone else's words and dreams and labor. It's been many years since I felt that. I very much admire the clarity of style. It's polished but in that Zen-river-stone-worn-smooth way. What I like most is the humanity of the writing. It seems to me that writing about lesbian or gay love is somewhat fraught: it appears incredibly hard to do so without making it the big-T Theme, where the characters are defined by their sexual orientation rather than by their underlying humanity. I understand (or at least I think I do) some of the reasons why that's so in our current culture but the conclusion I've come to is that all humans search for love, honor, and an understanding of our place in existence, and that sexual orientation is just part of our individual expression of that. It was lovely to feel that affirmed in such beautiful writing. If you have a love for Ursula LeGuin or Cecelia Holland, this book is for you.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    Wilson, Catherine M. When Women Were Warriors. Shield Maiden Press, 2008. 0981563619. $14.95. The first in a three volume series, this is the story of sixteen-year-old Tamras, who has come to serve the Lady at Merin house, as have all the daughters of her families for more generations than can be remembered. Tamras hopes to become a warrior like her aunts, but first must be accepted by a warrior as her apprentice. Meanwhile, the Lady has assigned her to be the companion of a warrior who is a str Wilson, Catherine M. When Women Were Warriors. Shield Maiden Press, 2008. 0981563619. $14.95. The first in a three volume series, this is the story of sixteen-year-old Tamras, who has come to serve the Lady at Merin house, as have all the daughters of her families for more generations than can be remembered. Tamras hopes to become a warrior like her aunts, but first must be accepted by a warrior as her apprentice. Meanwhile, the Lady has assigned her to be the companion of a warrior who is a stranger to their community, a brusque woman named Maara (perhaps from the Hebrew for bitterness) who resists any assistance. Tamras persists in quietly making herself useful, and when Maara is badly injured and the healer leaves herbs to ease a less painful death, Tamras takes over and nurses her back to health. Being the companion of an outsider is a lonely position to be in, yet when the Lady asks her to spy on Maara, her sense of honor doesn’t allow her to do so. When Maara’s trustworthiness comes into question, Tamras stands by her, against her community, and offers her own life as surety. Includes references to both mutual and undesired sexual relationships both heterosexual and lesbian in a sensitive way. Recommended for teens and adults.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I got this as an e-book for my Kindle Fire with one of those free downloads, and I'm not going to lie, I got it because I liked the title and the cover. I like the time back then and how people lived, and being a woman myself, the title intrigued me. I have to say that I really did love the simplicity of this book. There weren't any huge raging battles, there wasn't a long lists of characters and it wasn't intense all the time. It was just a good story about growing up, finding your place in lif I got this as an e-book for my Kindle Fire with one of those free downloads, and I'm not going to lie, I got it because I liked the title and the cover. I like the time back then and how people lived, and being a woman myself, the title intrigued me. I have to say that I really did love the simplicity of this book. There weren't any huge raging battles, there wasn't a long lists of characters and it wasn't intense all the time. It was just a good story about growing up, finding your place in life and growing bonds and friendships. Apparently there is kind of a 'thing' with sexuality and the fact that the majority of the characters are women. I don't know if I would really classify any of this sexual, or erotic or whatever. Some of the relationships between the girls/women have some romance between them, but I felt more like these women were enhancing their bonds and friendships, they had to rely on each other for everything and were together all the time and I think these were the things I gravitated towards. I liked that she learned deeper lessons than just how to fight, with patience and how to control and understand emotions. These are all great aspects of the book and I liked it, I will work on getting the next books to read as well.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Renae

    I fell I love with this book. I found myself highlighting more phrases of text in this novel than I have ever before. There are so many, so many (!) lessons of life and of wisdom that Maara shares with Tamras, done in such a beautiful, almost poetic way, that brought such peace and understanding in my own heart. I am so very much looking forward to Book II.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jasmin

    This book was read for Sapphic Book Club, hosted by sapphicliterature. I started this book thinking that it’d be about warriors and there’d be gay stuff. Sure, it really had those things, but it was so different from what I expected. And it was really great? The writing style was beautiful. I could imagine myself listening to this story to be told out loud, and it was wonderful. There were things that could’ve been left out if it wasn’t so fitting for the style of writing. Even though this was a This book was read for Sapphic Book Club, hosted by sapphicliterature. I started this book thinking that it’d be about warriors and there’d be gay stuff. Sure, it really had those things, but it was so different from what I expected. And it was really great? The writing style was beautiful. I could imagine myself listening to this story to be told out loud, and it was wonderful. There were things that could’ve been left out if it wasn’t so fitting for the style of writing. Even though this was a story, it didn’t follow the usual structure of a story, for example there wasn’t an epic, big battle in this book. I can’t help but feel like I would easily complain about obvious things. There were no big plot points and some tales told in the book didn’t seem exactly necessary. This book had several things that don’t usually seem like good ideas to me, but they fitted in the story and the style, so I guess I liked them anyway? So weird. However, while the style was gorgeous, and I enjoyed the book, this wasn’t a perfect read for me. The characters were likable, I didn’t get bored, the world-building was nice. In general, the only real complain I have is the ending. It didn’t seem to wind anything together, it simply ended there? The story didn’t seem complete. This is the first book of the series, but there still should be a structured ending. I was left kind of confused. Confusion might indeed be what I feel towards this book. It’s a beautiful thing, but I don’t actually feel any curiosity towards the later books. I like the characters, but I haven’t become so attached to them that I’d want to read the second book right away. Shame. The story was enjoyable, I can definitely recommend it if you want to read something a bit different about female warriors. Yet, I was a bit unsatisfied with or, perhaps, I was so satisfied that I don’t need anything more? I don’t think it even makes sense.

  28. 4 out of 5

    M. Hollis

    "In ancient days, when only women were warriors, lived a woman who had two daughters..." If you are looking for a good fantasy/adventure book full of women and nice f/f relationships, look no further. This book is definitely The Warrior's Path. It's like the writer looked into my dreams and wrote a book about almost everything I wanted and couldn't find in fantasy stories. I feel out of words to explain how good it was to read this. Sometimes I was in awe of the characterization of all of these wo "In ancient days, when only women were warriors, lived a woman who had two daughters..." If you are looking for a good fantasy/adventure book full of women and nice f/f relationships, look no further. This book is definitely The Warrior's Path. It's like the writer looked into my dreams and wrote a book about almost everything I wanted and couldn't find in fantasy stories. I feel out of words to explain how good it was to read this. Sometimes I was in awe of the characterization of all of these women, then at the beautiful details of the place, and then we would go through spiritual experiences that took my breath away. It explores the change from girl to woman in such an impressive way that it's impossible not to love. There were questionings about friendship, love, sex, and the in between where you don't know how to feel about someone else. All the female characters were fascinating and I loved to hear all of their stories. Tamras is an amazing protagonist. She almost never judges people and, when she does, she is fast to apologize for her privilege and learn from it. Her relationship with Sparrow is sweet and pure, but my heart aches for the love I can see she feels for Maara. What a great development we can see from both Tamras and Maara. I'm so curious to see where they will go from here and I can't wait to read the next books. They have a really deep bond like no other I've read in fiction so far. I can't recommend this book enough.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Flo

    I am still not entirely certain as to what exactly the plot was. And the image I have of the setting, both geographical and historical, is fuzzy and incomplete. That said, I can't wait to pick up the sequel. I gave this a go because it was described as "essentially a Bildungsroman for queer women", and I was not disappointed. Though the plot spans across months, the book itself moves at a comfortable pace. The narrator is wonderfully relatable, the entire story revolves about women and their frie I am still not entirely certain as to what exactly the plot was. And the image I have of the setting, both geographical and historical, is fuzzy and incomplete. That said, I can't wait to pick up the sequel. I gave this a go because it was described as "essentially a Bildungsroman for queer women", and I was not disappointed. Though the plot spans across months, the book itself moves at a comfortable pace. The narrator is wonderfully relatable, the entire story revolves about women and their friendship and their bonds, and it's great. LOVE AND FRIENDSHIP BETWEEN WOMEN. YES. YOU READ THAT RIGHT. Even if you have no interest in fiction or fantasy, this book is worth reading just for the character relationships. Also it's free on kindle! Though the sequel is upward of six quid, so I may have to wait to whoops I bought it Oh well.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Elaine Burnes

    I read this almost three years ago, but reread most of it when I recently bought II and III. Words pretty much fail me. I loved this book (as in all three). I don't want to just repeat what everyone else says. So I'll leave it that this story does for me what I want in a story--sucks me in and won't let me go. I don't even consider myself a particular fan of historical fiction, but I am a fan of a good story. This is one. Do get all the books before you start. Do not wait a couple of years betwe I read this almost three years ago, but reread most of it when I recently bought II and III. Words pretty much fail me. I loved this book (as in all three). I don't want to just repeat what everyone else says. So I'll leave it that this story does for me what I want in a story--sucks me in and won't let me go. I don't even consider myself a particular fan of historical fiction, but I am a fan of a good story. This is one. Do get all the books before you start. Do not wait a couple of years between them!

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.