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The Last Days of John Lennon

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The greatest true-crime story in music history, as only James Patterson can tell it.   With the Beatles, John Lennon surpasses his youthful dreams, achieving a level of superstardom that defies classification. “We were the best bloody band there was,” he says. “There was nobody to touch us.” Nobody except the original nowhere man, Mark David Chapman. Chapman once worshipped The greatest true-crime story in music history, as only James Patterson can tell it.   With the Beatles, John Lennon surpasses his youthful dreams, achieving a level of superstardom that defies classification. “We were the best bloody band there was,” he says. “There was nobody to touch us.” Nobody except the original nowhere man, Mark David Chapman. Chapman once worshipped his idols from afar—but now harbors grudges against those, like Lennon, whom he feels betrayed him. He’s convinced Lennon has misled fans with his message of hope and peace. And Chapman’s not staying away any longer.    By the summer of 1980, Lennon is recording new music for the first time in years, energized and ready for it to be “(Just Like) Starting Over.” He can’t wait to show the world what he will do.    Neither can Chapman, who quits his security job and boards a flight to New York, a handgun and bullets stowed in his luggage.    The greatest true-crime story in music history, as only James Patterson can tell it. Enriched by exclusive interviews with Lennon’s friends and associates, including Paul McCartney, The Last Days of John Lennon is the thrilling true story of two men who changed history: One whose indelible songs enliven our world to this day—and the other who ended the beautiful music with five pulls of a trigger.


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The greatest true-crime story in music history, as only James Patterson can tell it.   With the Beatles, John Lennon surpasses his youthful dreams, achieving a level of superstardom that defies classification. “We were the best bloody band there was,” he says. “There was nobody to touch us.” Nobody except the original nowhere man, Mark David Chapman. Chapman once worshipped The greatest true-crime story in music history, as only James Patterson can tell it.   With the Beatles, John Lennon surpasses his youthful dreams, achieving a level of superstardom that defies classification. “We were the best bloody band there was,” he says. “There was nobody to touch us.” Nobody except the original nowhere man, Mark David Chapman. Chapman once worshipped his idols from afar—but now harbors grudges against those, like Lennon, whom he feels betrayed him. He’s convinced Lennon has misled fans with his message of hope and peace. And Chapman’s not staying away any longer.    By the summer of 1980, Lennon is recording new music for the first time in years, energized and ready for it to be “(Just Like) Starting Over.” He can’t wait to show the world what he will do.    Neither can Chapman, who quits his security job and boards a flight to New York, a handgun and bullets stowed in his luggage.    The greatest true-crime story in music history, as only James Patterson can tell it. Enriched by exclusive interviews with Lennon’s friends and associates, including Paul McCartney, The Last Days of John Lennon is the thrilling true story of two men who changed history: One whose indelible songs enliven our world to this day—and the other who ended the beautiful music with five pulls of a trigger.

30 review for The Last Days of John Lennon

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brian

    In this book with a rather misleading title, we find out about John Lennon's involvement with the Beatles as well as his "last days." When I put this book on hold, I had thought that it would have been solely about his final days of his life, but instead, the book starts with the birth of the Beatles and then jumps to Mark Chapman's point of view. The thing that bothered me the most was the dialogue, which clearly was created to give the reader a sense of character development between the Beatle In this book with a rather misleading title, we find out about John Lennon's involvement with the Beatles as well as his "last days." When I put this book on hold, I had thought that it would have been solely about his final days of his life, but instead, the book starts with the birth of the Beatles and then jumps to Mark Chapman's point of view. The thing that bothered me the most was the dialogue, which clearly was created to give the reader a sense of character development between the Beatles, but how could the authors have known what the conversations were that went on between the Beatles and the various people. This was a major strike for this book and I found it to go on a bit too long and be a bit too commercialized.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jill Meyer

    James Patterson is certainly a prolific writer. He seems to have written about 70 books, either by himself or authored with another writer. He’s written books for adults, children, and teens. I’ve never read a James Patterson book, until I read his latest, “The Last Days of John Lennon”. I mention the sheer number of books Patterson has written because sometimes it’s indicative of a book’s quality. James Patterson mostly writes fiction, but his book about John Lennon is nonfiction. He traces the James Patterson is certainly a prolific writer. He seems to have written about 70 books, either by himself or authored with another writer. He’s written books for adults, children, and teens. I’ve never read a James Patterson book, until I read his latest, “The Last Days of John Lennon”. I mention the sheer number of books Patterson has written because sometimes it’s indicative of a book’s quality. James Patterson mostly writes fiction, but his book about John Lennon is nonfiction. He traces the life - both musically and personally - of Lennon, bringing to the story of his life and death a workmanlike quality. Patterson - and his two collaborators - tell John’s story in relatively calm fashion, leaving the passion to those who mourn Lennon’s death in the streets of New York City and cities around the world. But if Patterson writes about John Lennon’s death, he certainly doesn’t leave out the man who pulled the trigger. Who was Mark David Chapman and what was his beef with John Lennon? James Patterson does a good job at looking at Chapman. This book is well-written enough to keep the reader’s interest.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Gary Moreau

    In 1964, like many American families at the time, dinnertime was family time and distractions like television were not allowed. (Not long before, in 1943, the CEO of IBM, Thomas Watson, famously predicted that there would be a worldwide demand for about five computers and most people agreed with him. Steve Jobs himself was still in junior high.) The only exception to the dinnertime rule was Sunday night when we ate hamburgers and drank homemade milk shakes in the family room while watching the f In 1964, like many American families at the time, dinnertime was family time and distractions like television were not allowed. (Not long before, in 1943, the CEO of IBM, Thomas Watson, famously predicted that there would be a worldwide demand for about five computers and most people agreed with him. Steve Jobs himself was still in junior high.) The only exception to the dinnertime rule was Sunday night when we ate hamburgers and drank homemade milk shakes in the family room while watching the family fare that dominated Sunday night television at the time. So at the age of nine I recall with vivid clarity the night the Beatles walked onto the stage of the Ed Sullivan show to be introduced to America. Their hair was long for the era but neatly trimmed and clean and they actually wore suits with ties. They were professional showmen, for sure, but the real show was the audience – teenage girls, mostly, screaming, crying, jumping up and down, so overtaken with emotion that The Bard himself would have been hard pressed to describe the buzz. What I didn’t appreciate at the time was how young the four lads from Liverpool actually were or how much work and effort they had put into getting where they were. (Decca Records rejected them noting that “Groups of four guitarists are on the way out.”) I also didn’t appreciate how many previous failures they had faced or how many people had played a role in getting them to where they were. (According to the book they were told to ditch the leather and buy the suits and to stop smoking on stage.) They shaped a generation, for sure, but as this book so clearly and concisely points out, they created a bridge between two generations of people and musicians, from Little Richard to Led Zeppelin. And navigating a cultural and generational cusp like that is probably the hardest feat of all when it comes to the world of music and entertainment. Not many artists can pull it off. They had the wind and the sun at their backs, and more than a little serendipity sprinkled on their shoulders, but they clearly had talent and an incredible work ethic. And the one thing I did learn from this book is that while artistry takes creative talent, there is a “science” to it all that only the truly creative can master through a lot of hard work. It is a fascinating personal story, very well written, that I thought did justice to all facets of the story. It’s not a fluff piece. But it’s not a tell-all either. And while some may question giving Mark Chapman any print time at all I think the story would be incomplete without some background. Perhaps the most astonishing aspect of Lennon’s story is how little security he surrounded himself with. That wouldn’t happen today and NYC was a pretty rough place at the time. And that, along with the reality of how many of the musical geniuses of the era knew each other and spent time together, says something about how far we have extended the limitations of fame inherent in fame itself. Even Lennon, I suspect, would be dismayed and disheartened at the life he would be forced to live today just 40 years after his death. All told, a very pleasant and insightful read about a true musical genius.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    The last official words said by John Lennon before he died were, " I'm shot." How awful from a man who had so much to say in his music. Who was the founder of the greatest rock band that ever lived and also genuinely dedicated to changing the world for the better! If there is a single artist who had an effect on the musical, political and social conscience of multiple generations throughout the world, perhaps no one man was more purposefully influential than John Lennon. His music is timeless. T The last official words said by John Lennon before he died were, " I'm shot." How awful from a man who had so much to say in his music. Who was the founder of the greatest rock band that ever lived and also genuinely dedicated to changing the world for the better! If there is a single artist who had an effect on the musical, political and social conscience of multiple generations throughout the world, perhaps no one man was more purposefully influential than John Lennon. His music is timeless. Then along comes this book that gives the reader a unique glimpse into the last days of a cultural icon and creative genius. Most of the book is written as a biography of John and how the Beatles became who they are. The chapters are short but it gives a person time to reflect, digest, and rehash on stories about the Beatles if you grew up in that era. The actually murder reads like a James Patterson crime novel as he doesn't leave out the man who pulled the trigger, David Chapman. There isn't much new in this book I didn't not know before and yet it was hard to put down. Lennon's message and music crossed all national, linguistic, class and age barriers. He brought people together through both discord and harmony...truly a musician's means of expression. Why do bad things happen to good people?

  5. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    I was hoping for something different I guess. Most of the book is a recap of the Beatles. Not impressed.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    3.5 stars. The title is very misleading because most of this book is about the history of the Beatles and John Lennon's immediate post-Beatles life. If you are interested in those subjects then you will love this book. I was hoping for more about the "last days of John Lennon," and about how and why his murderer was able to pull it off. There was some of that but not much new. That said, this book did transport me back to that day and the immediate aftermath, and the feeling of NYC at that time 3.5 stars. The title is very misleading because most of this book is about the history of the Beatles and John Lennon's immediate post-Beatles life. If you are interested in those subjects then you will love this book. I was hoping for more about the "last days of John Lennon," and about how and why his murderer was able to pull it off. There was some of that but not much new. That said, this book did transport me back to that day and the immediate aftermath, and the feeling of NYC at that time in history, so it was worth the read.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Donna Lewis

    The was an interesting book for me. I grew up loving the Beatles, although John was five years older than me. I listened to their music during my college years in Montana, and of course in my years in Haight Ashbury in the 60s. I moved to New York City, got married and raised my children. I no longer had time to follow Lennon’s music, although I followed his immigration issues. I live several blocks from The Dakota and will always remember the shock of his shooting that awful night. The amazing t The was an interesting book for me. I grew up loving the Beatles, although John was five years older than me. I listened to their music during my college years in Montana, and of course in my years in Haight Ashbury in the 60s. I moved to New York City, got married and raised my children. I no longer had time to follow Lennon’s music, although I followed his immigration issues. I live several blocks from The Dakota and will always remember the shock of his shooting that awful night. The amazing thing about the Beatles was their combined creative genius. At one point they wrote seven songs in seven days. They all had so much talent. But they also had so much success so early in their lives. In fact they really never grew up until they were older, and the group had broken up. John in particular had to navigate his many excesses, drugs, alcohol and fame. It is a surprise to me that his marriage to Yoko and his solo career survived as well as they did, considering Yoko’s reliance on psychics, numerologist, and tarot card readers. We will never know where John could have gone if he had continued his life. It is sad that the United States are known for the proliferation of guns. And, for the continued loss of so many people due to gun violence. My grandson goes to sleep listening to Beatles’ songs.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Linda Mascarenas-Colgan

    John Lennon got me through my teenage years. Having James Patterson write his story was amazing to me. It brought back so many memories of my life. I still love the Beatles and remember the tribute our town had when John was killed. I sang “in My LIfe” to my husband when we were married 13 years ago. If you liked John, you will like this book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Merna

    Giving this 3 stars solely for the fact that I pre-ordered this book hoping it would be (for the most part) days leading to the murder. That was not the case.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sammy Jackson

    A really interesting read

  11. 5 out of 5

    Holly Ramsey

    Not very well written--just a bunch of facts strung together. James Patterson should be embarrassed to have his name on this book (even if he didn't write it)! Not very well written--just a bunch of facts strung together. James Patterson should be embarrassed to have his name on this book (even if he didn't write it)!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    The beginning, the middle and the end of John Lennons life and career. I learned quite a bit about John's personality, work ethic, love life, family, friendships, career and death, that I didn't know before. Granted I'm of a younger generation that wasn't born until the following year after his death but I have a great love for John Lennon and The Beatles due to my mom playing their music constantly when I was young, which I also passed on to my children. This book just cemented my respect and n The beginning, the middle and the end of John Lennons life and career. I learned quite a bit about John's personality, work ethic, love life, family, friendships, career and death, that I didn't know before. Granted I'm of a younger generation that wasn't born until the following year after his death but I have a great love for John Lennon and The Beatles due to my mom playing their music constantly when I was young, which I also passed on to my children. This book just cemented my respect and now deeper knowledge of his life... As well as The Beatles. I would recommend it, not only to John and The Beatles fans but also any fan of music or biographies. My one critique would be that it's fairly obvious that James Patterson didn't write much of this book. The writing is somewhat choppy and doesn't flow as well as it should. I also hated the fact that the book ends SPOILER ALERT!!..... On Mark Chapman's outcome and not on a positive note about John. I felt that was a big mistake.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sue

    What I liked: I enjoyed reading about the formation of the group and John's younger days in Liverpool and his attitudes toward their sudden super stardom. It was also very interesting to read about his life after the breakup of the band. Also there is information from interviews with several popular artists of the time which I found very informative. What I didn't like: There wasn't much new in this book - it was mostly a regurgitation of previous articles over the last 50 years. I also didn't li What I liked: I enjoyed reading about the formation of the group and John's younger days in Liverpool and his attitudes toward their sudden super stardom. It was also very interesting to read about his life after the breakup of the band. Also there is information from interviews with several popular artists of the time which I found very informative. What I didn't like: There wasn't much new in this book - it was mostly a regurgitation of previous articles over the last 50 years. I also didn't like the way that Mark David Chapman (the man who murdered John) was humanized often in a sympathetic way. Plain and simple, he was a killer and there is nothing sympathetic about what he did. Overall, if you are a Beatles fan or a John Lennon fan, this is a great book to read to bring back the memories of the group that changed music during a simpler time in our world.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sally Ewan

    This book covers the same time period of the other Beatles book I recently read by Craig Brown, from the way they met and formed the group through their immense success and break up. However, it is larded with chapters about shooter Mark Chapman's trip to New York to kill Lennon. So you're reading along with a straightforward account of recording a particular album and then suddenly, you're supposedly 'inside the head' of the killer as he talks to a cab driver or prostitute. (Think of Robert DeN This book covers the same time period of the other Beatles book I recently read by Craig Brown, from the way they met and formed the group through their immense success and break up. However, it is larded with chapters about shooter Mark Chapman's trip to New York to kill Lennon. So you're reading along with a straightforward account of recording a particular album and then suddenly, you're supposedly 'inside the head' of the killer as he talks to a cab driver or prostitute. (Think of Robert DeNiro's scenes in Taxi Driver...) I'm guessing the Chapman sections are more indicative of James Patterson's "gripping" writing that has made him famous and rich, but I didn't care for them. They were creepy, as would be expected, but more than that, they were speculative in the extreme. The style and juxtaposition were jarring and more like pop-up YouTube ads. Skip this book; read Craig Brown's "1-2-3-4: The Beatles in Time".

  15. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie Burkhart

    I found this gem at Costco and couldn't resist. I've been a Beatles since since I was 12 in 1980. I've done a lot of reading, and watching a lot of bio-pics about the Beatles. I've always enjoyed the music and I'm always up for learning what motivated them. If anything, there's not a lot of new material out there. That's why Patterson's book intrigued me, as it takes a look at the last days of John Lennon and what motivated his killer. Mind you, there's a heavy dose of John Lennon's background b I found this gem at Costco and couldn't resist. I've been a Beatles since since I was 12 in 1980. I've done a lot of reading, and watching a lot of bio-pics about the Beatles. I've always enjoyed the music and I'm always up for learning what motivated them. If anything, there's not a lot of new material out there. That's why Patterson's book intrigued me, as it takes a look at the last days of John Lennon and what motivated his killer. Mind you, there's a heavy dose of John Lennon's background before you get to his last days, and for me, it was like a refresher. The authors cover John's beginnings, his motivations, his relationships, and how his music evolved. They also look at Chapman's days leading up to his assassination. The writing doesn't delve heavily into Chapman's mindset, but does imply that mental illness is at play. They take an honest assessement of Lennon, his life, and his boating adventures that lead up to his desire to make Double Fantasy. In that regard, I saw a love of the ocean in him, that perhaps he got from his own father. The writing is easy to read and very engaging. It was hard for me to put down the story as I devoured chapter after chapter. It's an interesting look at a part of Lennon's life that isn't examined much; his last years, and changes in his motivations. Lennon starts to 'grow up,' but there's more to do. If you've always enjoyed the Beatles, this is a rags-to-riches, heartwarming, frustrating story of a life that influenced others to embrace peace.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jill Crosby

    Three stars is a stretch for this series of pasted- together stories about the creation and life of the Beatles, their break-up and solo careers, and the murder of the their founder by the hand of a paranoid schizophrenic, but the Beatles aren’t one of my top-10 all-time favorite bands and before reading this book, I knew NOTHING about them. I appreciated the background info, interspersed with a 2-page chapter on Mark Chapman’s actions outside the Dakota on Dec 6-8, 1980, but the actual “last da Three stars is a stretch for this series of pasted- together stories about the creation and life of the Beatles, their break-up and solo careers, and the murder of the their founder by the hand of a paranoid schizophrenic, but the Beatles aren’t one of my top-10 all-time favorite bands and before reading this book, I knew NOTHING about them. I appreciated the background info, interspersed with a 2-page chapter on Mark Chapman’s actions outside the Dakota on Dec 6-8, 1980, but the actual “last days” were glossed over for the most part, and the planned Murder itself took up only about 40 of the 340 pages of narrative text. I guess I was looking for more depth and detail, and instead received a Beatles’ information press packet. Generically informative, but that’s about it

  17. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    3.5. The title was a total misnomer. It was NOT about the last days of John Lennon's life, it was about every breath the man ever took from before he formed The Beatles until his final breath. It was all well and good and it was written in Patterson's very quick-paced, short chapters so it's easy to read. But I wondered, did it cover any new ground? Also, it felt unfinished, since we now have 30 plus years to learn about Chapman, and more recently his parole hearings. Why not take it all the way 3.5. The title was a total misnomer. It was NOT about the last days of John Lennon's life, it was about every breath the man ever took from before he formed The Beatles until his final breath. It was all well and good and it was written in Patterson's very quick-paced, short chapters so it's easy to read. But I wondered, did it cover any new ground? Also, it felt unfinished, since we now have 30 plus years to learn about Chapman, and more recently his parole hearings. Why not take it all the way up to the present? Anyway, fairly enjoyable, learned a lot, and all the lyrics had songs playing in my head the whole time. Going to go dig out some old CDs now...

  18. 4 out of 5

    Richard West

    Have you ever gotten a book and started reading it with high expectations, only to be let down, wishing you had waited until it hit the bargain table at Barnes & Noble? This is one of those books. "The last days of John Lennon...." indicates it's going to be an in-depth and insightful look into just that - the last days of the celebrated musician. If one is take the "last days" part literally, John Lennon's "last days" began in 1957 when he met Paul McCartney and they took the first steps towards Have you ever gotten a book and started reading it with high expectations, only to be let down, wishing you had waited until it hit the bargain table at Barnes & Noble? This is one of those books. "The last days of John Lennon...." indicates it's going to be an in-depth and insightful look into just that - the last days of the celebrated musician. If one is take the "last days" part literally, John Lennon's "last days" began in 1957 when he met Paul McCartney and they took the first steps towards forming what would later become The Beatles. Roughly, the first approximately 300 pages is a re-hash of the Beatles story which has been covered in greater and better detail in many other books. Interspersed between these chapters, there will be one detailing the movements of Mark David Chapman, then it's back to The Beatles Story again. Only in the last 150 or so pages, do we really get into the "last days" of John Lennon. Even then, most of the information has been covered elsewhere in other books. To say this book was disappointing is putting it mildly and the only reason for the 3 star rating is because of the photographs! Save your money. Wait until it's on the Barnes & Noble bargain table at $3.98.

  19. 4 out of 5

    P. Hogentoren

    Extremely disappointing. The title says the last days of John Lennon however the books first takes you down memory lane of the youth of John Lennon and the beginning/end of the Beatles and his years with Yoko. Only at the end of the book it will give you SOME insight of the last days. I am a huge Beatle- and solo Beatle fan so for me there were not much new facts. Next to this the writing is just so incredible simple. I understand that it is not literature definitely not the new Hemingway but th Extremely disappointing. The title says the last days of John Lennon however the books first takes you down memory lane of the youth of John Lennon and the beginning/end of the Beatles and his years with Yoko. Only at the end of the book it will give you SOME insight of the last days. I am a huge Beatle- and solo Beatle fan so for me there were not much new facts. Next to this the writing is just so incredible simple. I understand that it is not literature definitely not the new Hemingway but the short paragraphs, the more naming facts than take you in the story etc. was just for me too much. This was my first James Patterson and believe me it will be my last. Don’t waist your money on it.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cynthia

    “Remember, this is just a football game, no matter who wins or loses,” Cosell began before breaking the news. “An unspeakable tragedy confirmed to us by ABC News in New York City. John Lennon, outside of his apartment building on the West Side of New York City. The most famous perhaps, of all of the Beatles, shot twice in the back, rushed to Roosevelt Hospital. Dead on arrival.” Howard Cosell Struggling with a rating. The book is well-written and I felt a lot about the experiences I went through “Remember, this is just a football game, no matter who wins or loses,” Cosell began before breaking the news. “An unspeakable tragedy confirmed to us by ABC News in New York City. John Lennon, outside of his apartment building on the West Side of New York City. The most famous perhaps, of all of the Beatles, shot twice in the back, rushed to Roosevelt Hospital. Dead on arrival.” Howard Cosell Struggling with a rating. The book is well-written and I felt a lot about the experiences I went through during the actual event, but the title is less than accurate. Sure, Patterson does a little to chronicle the thoughts of Mark David Chapman and the goings on of John Lennon those last few days, but mostly this is an historical look at both John Lennon and the Beatles and Yoko Ono. It was good, written well, just not what I had expected from the title.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Hughes

    It was a great history of the Beatles, but there was not much about Mark David Chapman and his crime. I was sort of disappointed as it wasn't exactly what I thought it would be. However, it was nice to read the bit about the Beatles rise to fame. It was a great history of the Beatles, but there was not much about Mark David Chapman and his crime. I was sort of disappointed as it wasn't exactly what I thought it would be. However, it was nice to read the bit about the Beatles rise to fame.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    Disgusting. Never thought Patterson could sink lower, but to exploit this story with a specious novel is subterranean.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michele

    I loved this book. Having grown up knowing the Beatles and John Lennon’s name, but not knowing much of the history, this was an excellent intro into their rise to fame and breakup.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chris Schreck

    What a great read it gives great insight to all that happens before and up to the gruesome crime

  25. 5 out of 5

    Robin Brink

    a lot I didn't know. a lot I didn't know.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Crystal

    I really enjoyed this book. I learned a lot! I had to abandon the Audiobook - the narrator was trying WAY too hard to do all of the accents - so I recommend avoiding the audio version.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Roman

    I am disappointed. This book is a digest of facts well known amongst not even The Beatles fans — why this book was named "The Last Days of John Lennon"? I suppose this is just a marketing trick which misleads readers, that's all. I am disappointed. This book is a digest of facts well known amongst not even The Beatles fans — why this book was named "The Last Days of John Lennon"? I suppose this is just a marketing trick which misleads readers, that's all.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jutta

    Quick read. A history of the Beatles, post Beatles and John Lennon‘s last days. Tragic ending to someone who had still a whole lifetime left to give, Imagine if he lived.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gary S

    Disappointed....pieces of his life thrown together...not what the title suggested...could have been done in less than a hundred of pages...I don’t even call this writing...again very disappointed!!!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Joan Nehls

    Apparently the last days of John Lennon began when he was with the Beatles? Very misleading title. I didn’t feel like much if this book was centered around the death of this legend.

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