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Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics

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Told in vivid graphic novel form by a groundbreaking Eisner-nominated comics creator, the long-overdue biography of the legend who co-created Captain America, Iron Man, Black Panther, the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, and many more superhero favorites. This sweeping, full-color comic book biography tells the complete life story of Jack Kirby, co-creator of some of the most end Told in vivid graphic novel form by a groundbreaking Eisner-nominated comics creator, the long-overdue biography of the legend who co-created Captain America, Iron Man, Black Panther, the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, and many more superhero favorites. This sweeping, full-color comic book biography tells the complete life story of Jack Kirby, co-creator of some of the most enduring superheroes and villains of the twentieth century for Marvel Comics, DC Comics, and more. Critically acclaimed graphic novelist Tom Scioli breathes visual life into Kirby's life story--from his days growing up in New York during the Great Depression and discovering a love for science fiction and cartoons to his time on the frontlines in the European theatre of World War II where he experienced the type of action and adventure he'd later imbue his comic pages with, and on to his world-changing collaborations at Marvel with Stan Lee, where the pair redefined comics as a part of pop culture. Just as every great superhero needs a villain to overcome, Kirby's story also includes his struggles to receive the recognition and compensation that he believed his work deserved. Scioli captures his moves from Marvel to DC and back again, showing how Kirby himself and later his family fought to preserve his artistic legacy. Drawn from an unparalleled imagination and a life as exciting as his comic book tales, Kirby's super-creations have influenced subsequent generations of creatives in the comics field and beyond. Now, readers can experience the life and times of a comics titan through the medium that made him famous.


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Told in vivid graphic novel form by a groundbreaking Eisner-nominated comics creator, the long-overdue biography of the legend who co-created Captain America, Iron Man, Black Panther, the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, and many more superhero favorites. This sweeping, full-color comic book biography tells the complete life story of Jack Kirby, co-creator of some of the most end Told in vivid graphic novel form by a groundbreaking Eisner-nominated comics creator, the long-overdue biography of the legend who co-created Captain America, Iron Man, Black Panther, the Fantastic Four, the X-Men, and many more superhero favorites. This sweeping, full-color comic book biography tells the complete life story of Jack Kirby, co-creator of some of the most enduring superheroes and villains of the twentieth century for Marvel Comics, DC Comics, and more. Critically acclaimed graphic novelist Tom Scioli breathes visual life into Kirby's life story--from his days growing up in New York during the Great Depression and discovering a love for science fiction and cartoons to his time on the frontlines in the European theatre of World War II where he experienced the type of action and adventure he'd later imbue his comic pages with, and on to his world-changing collaborations at Marvel with Stan Lee, where the pair redefined comics as a part of pop culture. Just as every great superhero needs a villain to overcome, Kirby's story also includes his struggles to receive the recognition and compensation that he believed his work deserved. Scioli captures his moves from Marvel to DC and back again, showing how Kirby himself and later his family fought to preserve his artistic legacy. Drawn from an unparalleled imagination and a life as exciting as his comic book tales, Kirby's super-creations have influenced subsequent generations of creatives in the comics field and beyond. Now, readers can experience the life and times of a comics titan through the medium that made him famous.

30 review for Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics is a biography of Jack Kirby by Tom Scioli. When I was a kid, I first discovered Jack Kirby through Who's Who in the DC Universe. Most of the entries I found myself rereading were creations of his, like the OMAC and the New Gods. As reprints became more accessible, I discovered this Kirby guy created most of the Marvel Universe! Anyway, I've been on a Kirby kick lately so I snapped this up. Scioli takes us on a journey through Kirby's life from start Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics is a biography of Jack Kirby by Tom Scioli. When I was a kid, I first discovered Jack Kirby through Who's Who in the DC Universe. Most of the entries I found myself rereading were creations of his, like the OMAC and the New Gods. As reprints became more accessible, I discovered this Kirby guy created most of the Marvel Universe! Anyway, I've been on a Kirby kick lately so I snapped this up. Scioli takes us on a journey through Kirby's life from start to finish, starting with his parents coming to America, through his rough childhood and beyond! Kirby's stints at the various companies are detailed, as is his tour of duty during World War II. Upon his return, Kirby eventually ends up at Marvel Comics during its darkest hour and the rest is history. I knew a lot of snippets but great whacks of the book were new to me. For instance, I didn't know Simon and Kirby sold their company to Charlton when it looked like they were going under. I was aware he worked at the Eisner shop and Harvey but didn't know all the details. I also didn't realize the magnitude of how much of a huckster shitheel Stan Lee was. How many millions (or billions) did Jack get screwed out of over the years? The way Marvel treated Kirby during his time at the company was fucking shameful. DC didn't really know what to do with the goose that laid the golden egg either. Super hero comics probably wouldn't exist in their current form without The King but you'd never know it the way the Big Two treated him for most of his life. This was clearly a labor of love by Tom Scioli. The presentation is gorgeous and his colored-pencil art give the book a unique look and feel, although it's still evocative of The King at times. There are some sad moments, particularly during Kirby's twilight years when he could barely hold a pencil. Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics is a fitting tribute to the King. Five out of five Kirby dots.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Diz

    I'm a big fan of this book. Kirby truly is the King of Comics. Reading this, you can see how influential Kirby was in creating a lot of the characters we love today. One thing that I wasn't aware of was that Kirby had quite a few harrowing war experiences during World War II. Those stories have quite a lot of tension because it's hard to imagine American comics without Kirby's influence. Well worth reading.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Jack Kirby's life, presented as if he were the narrator of a classic Marvel comic -- well, I take that back, with the giant captions, stiff art, and strict six-panel grid, it looks more like a product of Charlton Comics, Marvel's Connecticut competitor. But Kirby's life is big, even if these panels are small. (Oddly, the creator has chosen to depict Kirby with a giant manga head while everyone else in the book is illustrated in a more traditional style.) Based mostly on interviews Kirby gave late Jack Kirby's life, presented as if he were the narrator of a classic Marvel comic -- well, I take that back, with the giant captions, stiff art, and strict six-panel grid, it looks more like a product of Charlton Comics, Marvel's Connecticut competitor. But Kirby's life is big, even if these panels are small. (Oddly, the creator has chosen to depict Kirby with a giant manga head while everyone else in the book is illustrated in a more traditional style.) Based mostly on interviews Kirby gave late in life to fan magazines and books devoted to him, we follow "The King" from his birth in 1917 to his death in 1994. So if you are a Stan Lee fan, prepare to see him thrown under a fleet of buses. Kirby was a grinder, churning out ideas and pages like a machine, often working simultaneously on several projects for multiple publishers. It's sad to see him be worn down and become embittered with the industry that took so much from him while giving little back. Kirby's art could be goofy at times and way too blocky (those giant rectangular fingers reaching off the page!), but it was striking as hell. His writing on the other hand . . . The more control he had over the dialogue and plot, the worse his books became. The cosmic crap of the New Gods/Fourth World and Eternals is just unreadable. I think there's a reason none of these characters (maybe excepting Darkseid) ever became big hits no matter how often DC and Marvel have tried. (And now the movie studios think they can do something with them. Poor saps!) Anyhow, I still respect Kirby as a creator and will not deny the huge impact he had on the industry during his life and beyond. Giant corporations will still be milking his work long after we are all gone.

  4. 4 out of 5

    The Nerd Daily

    Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by David Allen Who deserves credit for the meteoric rise of Marvel Comics? Was it Stan Lee, writer, eventual publisher, and Marvel mascot, a man whom nerds across the globe revere? Or was it artist extraordinaire Jack Kirby, whose contributions went uncredited and underappreciated for decades? Although Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics does not explicitly set out to answer this question, it nevertheless makes a solid argument on behalf Originally published on The Nerd Daily | Review by David Allen Who deserves credit for the meteoric rise of Marvel Comics? Was it Stan Lee, writer, eventual publisher, and Marvel mascot, a man whom nerds across the globe revere? Or was it artist extraordinaire Jack Kirby, whose contributions went uncredited and underappreciated for decades? Although Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics does not explicitly set out to answer this question, it nevertheless makes a solid argument on behalf of Jack Kirby. The 200-page graphic novel sets out to recall the legendary artist’s life from conception to death in the master’s own medium. Read the FULL REVIEW on The Nerd Daily

  5. 4 out of 5

    Oneirosophos

    Must read. By every person in this planet. Right now. Because... image: EDIT: My full review of this masterpiece, in Greek @ Comicdom.gr: https://www.comicdom.gr/2020/08/13/ja... Must read. By every person in this planet. Right now. Because... image: EDIT: My full review of this masterpiece, in Greek @ Comicdom.gr: https://www.comicdom.gr/2020/08/13/ja...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Loved it, a huge leap forward for Scioli, can’t wait to see what he does next.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tony McMillen

    Just finished reading Tom Scioli's Jack Kirby biography comic and it's beautiful. The legend of Jack Kirby told in mostly six panel pages and decidedly in pencil not ink; two of the tools the king was most known for. It's inspiring, heartbreaking, hilarious and most importantly superhuman...cosmic. Kirby.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    This graphic biography does a great job at piecing together many interviews Kirby gave over the years into a coherent biography. If you're a newbie Marvel fan who always assumed Stan Lee created everything, this book will set you straight. Kirby, not Lee, was always the creative force behind most of the comic book characters you know and love. Be prepared for Stan to come off as a villain--even as the inspiration for Loki. Writer/artist Tom Scioli, channeling Kirby, makes a credible case that Jac This graphic biography does a great job at piecing together many interviews Kirby gave over the years into a coherent biography. If you're a newbie Marvel fan who always assumed Stan Lee created everything, this book will set you straight. Kirby, not Lee, was always the creative force behind most of the comic book characters you know and love. Be prepared for Stan to come off as a villain--even as the inspiration for Loki. Writer/artist Tom Scioli, channeling Kirby, makes a credible case that Jack deserves some credit for the creation of a couple of characters he's not usually associated with: Spider-Man and Iron Man. His influence can be found in Star Wars, too. It's eye-opening to see how events in Kirby's life became the basis for his stories. For example, his grandfather's feud with a local baron in a small European principality seems like the basis for the origin of Dr. Doom. At certain points, Scioli fudges the timeline. For example, you would think from reading this that Kirby's parody of Lee, Funky Flashman, was a reaction to Stan's claims in "Origins of Marvel Comics". However, Funky Flashman preceded "Origins" by several years. All in all, though, that's a quibble, not a big criticism. This is simply the best attempt at a life of Kirby that's ever been done, and it's well worth your time.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Richard Jackson

    Well researched comic book biography on Jack Kirby. Covering Kirby's entire life, it goes into detail on what a creative force he was. The book is also a great showcase for the case for creator's rights when they create things for companies and receive almost no credit or compensation.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Jack "the King" Kirby was unarguably the most influential artist in comics and certainly one of the most influential creators in general. He was also one of the first artists whose work left an impression on me when I was a kid reading comics off the spinner rack and old copies that I got from friends and family. Issues of Captain America, the Demon, Forever People, etc. with Jack's artwork were great fun to read and still hold up to most artists working in comics today. He was groundbreaking in Jack "the King" Kirby was unarguably the most influential artist in comics and certainly one of the most influential creators in general. He was also one of the first artists whose work left an impression on me when I was a kid reading comics off the spinner rack and old copies that I got from friends and family. Issues of Captain America, the Demon, Forever People, etc. with Jack's artwork were great fun to read and still hold up to most artists working in comics today. He was groundbreaking in a way few people who aren't comics fans understand. Which is why this book was, on balance, a disappointment. The artist/author, Tom Scioli, bills himself as being "known for his unconventional drawing style, dense page layouts, and imaginative writing." That may be true but there's little evidence of it in this volume. The writing is stilted with poor pacing. There are points in the narrative where it's difficult to tell what's going on because there's no clear "scene change." Scioli's editor did him no favors by not having him tighten up his storytelling. Which brings us to the art. Kirby was the most original artist of his generation and inspired the majority of pros who would come after him. His work was imaginative and dynamic in ways that set it apart from everything that came before it (which isn't to say Jack had no inspirations himself; he did but he took what was appealing to him and made it his own). In a graphic novel biography of the most influential comics artist in history we get page after page of six panel layouts with linework that's pedestrian and stiff. It's the antithesis of Kirby's style. The book is a decent biography, though, giving a narrative of the highpoints of Kirby's life from his point of view. The first person narrative is a literary device, which Scioli points out, derived from the use of many interviews Kirby gave. It should also clue the reader in to the fact that this isn't what one would call a non-biased presentation of facts (something which some reviewers seem to have missed). But it's still great to see Kirby get his due and be able to have his version of history told. The book also does a decent job of letting Jack's personality show through in the narrative, the good and the bad. Whether this was deliberate or not I don't know. Kirby fans break down into two large groups: hagiographers for whom Jack could do no wrong and for whom even the slightest criticism is tantamount to heresy, and people who think the Kirby was, in fact, human and therefore not perfect. Scioli seems to be in the second camp but I've met Kirby fans who think even the man's imperfections were virtues so I can't say for sure. All in all the book is a decent introduction to Kirby and I hope it motivates people to get out and read and appreciate Jack's actual work.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Long live the King. I cried like a baby. I always thought that Stan must have sold his soul to the devil and screwed the devil in the process. This book reinforces that sentiment. I never thought that I could love someone I have never met be it as a fan of their work and them as a person but Jack Kirby is that person.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics is a biographical graphic novel written and illustrated by Tom Scioli. It is an unauthorized graphic biography of the comic-book artist Jack Kirby. Jacob "Kirby" Kurtzberg was an American comic book artist, writer and editor, widely regarded as one of the medium's major innovators and one of its most prolific and influential creators. Told from the point of view of Kirby, the biography also acts as a history of the comics industry, from early strips Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics is a biographical graphic novel written and illustrated by Tom Scioli. It is an unauthorized graphic biography of the comic-book artist Jack Kirby. Jacob "Kirby" Kurtzberg was an American comic book artist, writer and editor, widely regarded as one of the medium's major innovators and one of its most prolific and influential creators. Told from the point of view of Kirby, the biography also acts as a history of the comics industry, from early strips to the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Beginning with Kirby’s hardscrabble upbringing in Manhattan’s Lower East Side, Scioli extensively documents the artist’s career and personal life through a chummy and casual first-person narrative. Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics is written and constructed extremely well. It is far from perfect, but it comes rather close. Scioli recreates many of Kirby's panels from superhero, war, crime, and romance comics, while his pompadour-adorned, wide-eyed figure of Kirby seems to pop from the page among a more realistically drawn supporting cast, just as his own heroes stood out as larger than life. All in all, Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics is a fast-paced celebration of an under heralded legend within the comic-book industry.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    Jack Kirby is a well-known name to any comics fan to have ever looked back at the beginnings of the genre. He helped give us Captain America, and worked on a host of other major, major titles – especially in his post-war, second, never-to-run-smooth collab with Stan Lee. In fact that makes the bulk of this book up – hit title after hit title, strong character after strong character, and always a Stan Lee to take the credit. In fact I just typed that name as 'Stab Lee' – I didn't know laptops cou Jack Kirby is a well-known name to any comics fan to have ever looked back at the beginnings of the genre. He helped give us Captain America, and worked on a host of other major, major titles – especially in his post-war, second, never-to-run-smooth collab with Stan Lee. In fact that makes the bulk of this book up – hit title after hit title, strong character after strong character, and always a Stan Lee to take the credit. In fact I just typed that name as 'Stab Lee' – I didn't know laptops could create their own Freudian slips, but the verb there is certainly on point. If this were the autobiography its first-person narrative implies, it would be quite a committedly revealing one, showing Jack's youthful violence and wannabe gangster years. But it certainly isn't an autobiography, and what we get is actually quite a dry, wordy approach – the details and facts get pulled from the official story and just plonked down quite coldly at first, so I wondered if I was missing some pages here and there, or at least a frame or two of context for what I was seeing. But we soon see the lad succumbing to the funnies, first the monotone yucks pages and then the full-colour action books and comics. And lo and behold there he is, soon drawing them, and soon writing them as well, even if the narrative jumps continue. Timely is just allowed to be rebranded as Marvel off-screen without any say-so, for one, and this isn't newbie-friendly in that regard. One moment he's getting a foot in the door at DC, the next page sorting Marvel contracts. I'm sure that wasn't far from the truth, but it's not always clear that we get as much edification on these matters as we need. Also, the visual style is a little bit funny. The general design of the book, with a tint to the page to make it look antique, and colouring to suggest a similar period derivation (would that the look transformed from Golden Age through Silver to now), seems to be both fast and loose with some things, yet concerned with lightboxing the people we meet, so that their faces – even Kirby's own youthful mug – look unreal. The whole 'traced' look might again be part of the intent, but it doesn't look that great. And when we're into the main gist of things all the book is is monologue voice-over, at great length, with accompanying visual samples of the pics he's drawing at the time. It's cut-and-paste heaven – yet must have been a pig to produce all those reproductions at a certain artist's-POV angle. (And what's with the eye-liner, and generally making Kirby look like the Kid Galahad character from Hero Wars??!!) On the whole it's another book that's a little frustrating, in looking at a frustrating time. I'm sure there are books about how the creators of Superman got stiffed, Grant Morrison's history of comics was 400pp of "creators are stiffed and BTW I'm a f**king genius" – and this book was a lot of people dumping on creatives, alongside Kirby pretending that even nearing his sixth decade he was down with the kids and a flawless master at his trade. Without any evidence, I'm not sure he would have bigged himself up in such a way, but whether that's Kirby or Scioli it's not that fun to read, partly as everyone else living through that time has had the same story to tell. So in the finish, this isn't ideal for the novitiate, nor a fresh novelty for those in the know. It does have a compelling narrative drive when Kirby's pen flows, but – in line with the moral of the piece – that glory doesn't last. Three and a half stars.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    Tom Scioli may have just put out the best book of his career with Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics. This biography is loaded with the details and the relationships Kirby had while working in the comic industry before becoming the big business that it is today. It is rather heartbreaking so be reminded how badly the man who played a major role in creating Iron Man, The Fantastic Four, New Gods, Thor, and many many others, was treated by his colleagues and friends. The characters I Tom Scioli may have just put out the best book of his career with Jack Kirby: The Epic Life of the King of Comics. This biography is loaded with the details and the relationships Kirby had while working in the comic industry before becoming the big business that it is today. It is rather heartbreaking so be reminded how badly the man who played a major role in creating Iron Man, The Fantastic Four, New Gods, Thor, and many many others, was treated by his colleagues and friends. The characters I grew up loving, and now have the opportunity to watch my kids grow up enjoying also, were all thanks to Kirby either directly or indirectly. This true life story, as told by Scioli and as gathered by interviews and word-of-mouth, is painfully long overdue. I have no doubt that if the man were still alive today he’d be thanking Mr Scioli for doing him the service that he spent a lifetime just barely missing out on. The only constructive feedback I’d give for this graphic novel is that there are no story breaks. No “chapters” giving the reader a moment to pause and reflect. It’s possible that this was intentional to reflect the breakneck speed that Kirby was known for while alive as he was notoriously known for “burning the midnight oil” all in the name for, and for the sake of.. comics.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bryce Kopp

    Jack Kirby is arguably one of, if not THE most important figure in the history of comic books. Without Jack Kirby and his creations, comics just wouldn’t be what they are today. Jack Kirby influenced generations of artists and many of them went on to be some of the biggest names in the industry. I know Jack Kirby is one of my biggest heroes, and so it was nice to be able to pick up a comic and read about the king himself. This was everything and more I could want from a Jack Kirby comic. From st Jack Kirby is arguably one of, if not THE most important figure in the history of comic books. Without Jack Kirby and his creations, comics just wouldn’t be what they are today. Jack Kirby influenced generations of artists and many of them went on to be some of the biggest names in the industry. I know Jack Kirby is one of my biggest heroes, and so it was nice to be able to pick up a comic and read about the king himself. This was everything and more I could want from a Jack Kirby comic. From stories about his life (told from interviews that Jack gave) to some of the struggles (and trust me there are plenty of those) that Jack and his family had with getting Jack the proper credit that he deserved for the characters that Jack poured his whole heart into. I can not recommend this book enough especially if you are a fan of Jack Kirby or comics history. Tom Scioli found himself a new fan. I look forward to checking out his other work.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Fohl

    Graphic biographies are difficult to do. The artwork is great. I like how Jack Kirby is drawn in a more cartoonish way, to demonstrate how different he Is from the rest of the world. Kirby said “if you want to understand me look at my characters.” So it makes sense to draw him like a comic book character. (I also love how well the art work ages the character) This just isn’t a great biography. I was expecting more insight into his creative process, or his impact on society, or an overarching narr Graphic biographies are difficult to do. The artwork is great. I like how Jack Kirby is drawn in a more cartoonish way, to demonstrate how different he Is from the rest of the world. Kirby said “if you want to understand me look at my characters.” So it makes sense to draw him like a comic book character. (I also love how well the art work ages the character) This just isn’t a great biography. I was expecting more insight into his creative process, or his impact on society, or an overarching narrative discovered in his life.(bullies or inspiration vs ripping off) This book focuses too heavily on the comic book industry history. Some of the anecdotes are unforgettable, and were well serviced by visuals. Stan Lee looks like a big piece of crap in this book. The World War Two stories were amazing. What I learned: The coast guard used horses in WW2. A “spider man” Halloween costume existed a decade before the comic book character. Jack Kirby created the Black Panther. At first he called him “The coal tiger!”

  17. 4 out of 5

    Tommy Grooms

    Tom Scioli has created a stunning tribute to the life of Jack Kirby. Kirby forged a fascinating and seminal path through American comics history, and in a singular respect his story is a tragic one, as he was consistently swindled out of appropriate credit and compensation for his font of creativity, talent, and labor. Scioli’s storytelling ability is attested to by the fact that I read this in essentially one sitting, and I loved such subtleties as the art style changing to match the time perio Tom Scioli has created a stunning tribute to the life of Jack Kirby. Kirby forged a fascinating and seminal path through American comics history, and in a singular respect his story is a tragic one, as he was consistently swindled out of appropriate credit and compensation for his font of creativity, talent, and labor. Scioli’s storytelling ability is attested to by the fact that I read this in essentially one sitting, and I loved such subtleties as the art style changing to match the time periods the book passes through. This is a must-read for any fan of comics.

  18. 4 out of 5

    James

    The storytelling is a little all over the place. I get the appeal in knowing all the facts on Jack and his career, but the brief, rarely-occurring perspectives from other characters in the first-person, facts that have no bearing on the story at hand, and strictly 6-panel page layout makes it all a little hard to tolerate. The last page made me tear up, though, and I'm a fan of the man and his work. May Stan Lee ponder for an eternity on his sins. It's a mixed-bag that should be perfectly happy The storytelling is a little all over the place. I get the appeal in knowing all the facts on Jack and his career, but the brief, rarely-occurring perspectives from other characters in the first-person, facts that have no bearing on the story at hand, and strictly 6-panel page layout makes it all a little hard to tolerate. The last page made me tear up, though, and I'm a fan of the man and his work. May Stan Lee ponder for an eternity on his sins. It's a mixed-bag that should be perfectly happy with three stars.

  19. 5 out of 5

    David Turko

    wow what a story. The book takes you on a journey through Kirby's life from beginning to end. Scioli's writing and art in this book is incredible. There were times I felt like Jack Kirby was actually talking to me through the book. It's heartbreaking, hilarious, inspiring, and epic. An essential read for comic book fans.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tony

    Read this on the King’s birthday and it’s a lovely overview of the man’s story, contributions and of how he often was mistreated by the medium he breathed so much life into. My only nitpicks would be the odd chibi way Jack himself isn’t drawn - especially weird when he’s next to characters draw realistically - and the way the book essentially skims his life events, often one even per panel.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Swartz

    Well done. Interesting. Fair to all parties concerned (based on my incredibly limited knowledge). Learned the same thing I learn over and over again. Nobody has it easy, there is no such thing as a “dream job” and “hell is other people.”

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    Loved the story it told, hated the pacing. This book would've benefitted fron chapters or some kind of passage of time shown to the reader. The author also likes to make assumptions you know about certain things already and this book is only to expand on what you know.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Chim

    A real love letter to jack Kirby's life and his imaginations.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Brian Stewart

    Good historical background on Kirby, many details were very new to me. I didn't realize how deep the feud between him and Stan Lee was, but I can understand it.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Brady Dale

    I know it's stupid but one of the things that impresses me most about Kirby is that he could draw like all hell but he could also kick your ass.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jefferson

    Although the artwork is a little on the rough side, this is a must-read for anyone interested in the history of American comics. Jack Kirby's influence and impact just cannot be overstated.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Cal

    A must read for fans of the Marvel movies who aren't comic book fans.

  28. 5 out of 5

    El Neo

    I'm truly astonished at how much The King was abused within the industry. He deserved much better for his many contributions and helping to reinvigorate the industry. Long live The King.

  29. 5 out of 5

    David Macpherson

    I don't know if I completely love the artistic decisions, but I thought it was a good, concise telling of Kirby's life. I liked it, but I am just not sure of some of the way the art was done.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Andréa

    Note: I accessed a digital review copy of this book through Edelweiss.

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