Hot Best Seller

Wonder and Glory Forever: Awe-Inspiring Lovecraftian Fiction

Availability: Ready to download

Even though he passed over 80 years ago, H. P. Lovecraft maintains a visceral influence over a host of contemporary writers. Inspired by the Master of the Macabre's more optimistic writings, this unique collection spotlights the weird works of nine current horror and fantasy authors, including the award-winning Michael Cisco and Livia Llewellyn plus Victor LaValle, Molly T Even though he passed over 80 years ago, H. P. Lovecraft maintains a visceral influence over a host of contemporary writers. Inspired by the Master of the Macabre's more optimistic writings, this unique collection spotlights the weird works of nine current horror and fantasy authors, including the award-winning Michael Cisco and Livia Llewellyn plus Victor LaValle, Molly Tanzer, and Masahiko Inoue. Also includes Clark Ashton Smith's 1931 "The City of the Singing Flame" and Lovecraft's own "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" as well as an extensive Introduction by leading Lovecraftian scholar Nick Mamatas.


Compare

Even though he passed over 80 years ago, H. P. Lovecraft maintains a visceral influence over a host of contemporary writers. Inspired by the Master of the Macabre's more optimistic writings, this unique collection spotlights the weird works of nine current horror and fantasy authors, including the award-winning Michael Cisco and Livia Llewellyn plus Victor LaValle, Molly T Even though he passed over 80 years ago, H. P. Lovecraft maintains a visceral influence over a host of contemporary writers. Inspired by the Master of the Macabre's more optimistic writings, this unique collection spotlights the weird works of nine current horror and fantasy authors, including the award-winning Michael Cisco and Livia Llewellyn plus Victor LaValle, Molly Tanzer, and Masahiko Inoue. Also includes Clark Ashton Smith's 1931 "The City of the Singing Flame" and Lovecraft's own "The Shadow Over Innsmouth" as well as an extensive Introduction by leading Lovecraftian scholar Nick Mamatas.

36 review for Wonder and Glory Forever: Awe-Inspiring Lovecraftian Fiction

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    If you only have one spot in your TO READ pile this year for a cosmic horror anthology that plays with the Cthulhu Mythos, this is the one. I love this assemblage of deeply Weird stories. I love modern responses to cosmic horror and the Cthulhu mythos. I also love the focus here on the rapture and transcendences contained in both “City of the Singing Flame” by Clark Ashton Smith and “The Shadow Over Innsmouth.” The first has crowds of revelers jumping into the singing flame with religious fervor, If you only have one spot in your TO READ pile this year for a cosmic horror anthology that plays with the Cthulhu Mythos, this is the one. I love this assemblage of deeply Weird stories. I love modern responses to cosmic horror and the Cthulhu mythos. I also love the focus here on the rapture and transcendences contained in both “City of the Singing Flame” by Clark Ashton Smith and “The Shadow Over Innsmouth.” The first has crowds of revelers jumping into the singing flame with religious fervor, and the closure of Innsmouth includes a scene of rapture as our protagonist joyfully joins his newly rediscovered family. “Bright Crown of Joy” by Livia Llewllyn is one of the most beautiful stories about the apocalypse after the creatures from beyond time and space ruin everything before humans can. I will shelve it right next to “Venice Burning” and “We Are Not These Bodies, Strung Between the Stars” by A.C. Wise. I really liked the inclusion of a translation in this book. “Night Voices, Night Journeys” by Masahiko Inoue translated by Edward Lipsett is different from a lot of stuff in the mythos, particularly the inclusion of creepy romance subplots. “Translation” by Michael Cisco is a deeply weird story that explores the dangers of translating an esoteric text from an old death cult. I love the academic closure, as well as the romance that is all too frequently absent from any response to pulp cosmic horror. “Ghost Story” by Victor LaValle is engaging and full of voice, and really makes me want to consume more short fiction from Victor. Continuing with this excellent voice, “Farewell Performance” by Nick Mamatas is a bleak love letter to the spoken word of Brother Theodore. I love the stories of Nadia Bulkin and Laird Barron. “You Will Never Be the Same” by Erica Satifka is an excellent extrapolation of “The Jaunt” and its ilk. I agree that “Weird Tales” by Fred Chappell is probably the best fanfic about Howie out there, and it fits both in amongst his correspondence and his fiction.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Howse

    Lovecraftian anthologies are extremely common, ranging from pulp action to comedy to horror. Wonder and Glory Forever, edited by Nick Mamatas, does something differently. In Mamatas’s words, “I…saw a thematic gap; most Lovecraftian fiction either cultivates dread or attempts some kind of goofy humour, but the stories I tend to prefer instead mine the undercurrent of awe and the sublime in Lovecraft’s own stories. There’s a strong trend in horror fiction and cinema to identify with the monstrous Lovecraftian anthologies are extremely common, ranging from pulp action to comedy to horror. Wonder and Glory Forever, edited by Nick Mamatas, does something differently. In Mamatas’s words, “I…saw a thematic gap; most Lovecraftian fiction either cultivates dread or attempts some kind of goofy humour, but the stories I tend to prefer instead mine the undercurrent of awe and the sublime in Lovecraft’s own stories. There’s a strong trend in horror fiction and cinema to identify with the monstrous as opposed to the human element.” (from an interview with me which can be seen, here. Wonder and Glory Forever, therefore, focuses its stories on the concept of vastation: the malice of the made or revealed cosmos. The idea isn’t to scare, though many stories have eerie elements. It’s aiming for that elastic moment when the mind reaches for and cannot quite hit what is being described. The first story comes from H.P. Lovecraft himself, the novella that Wonder and Glory Forever takes its name from: The Shadow over Innsmouth. While it seems likely that many people reading the book will have read this popular story of his already, Mamatas points out in the epigraph that people will come to Lovecraft from all sorts of angles, and this might well be their first time actually reading his work directly, rather than seeing it second-hand through pop culture. After Lovecraft, our first modern story in Wonder and Glory Forever is Nadia Bulkin’s Seven Minutes in Heaven, the kind of story that starts off reading like completely realistic fiction and just shifts ever-so-slightly several times throughout, until the solid ground you thought you were standing on has vanished. Laird Barron’s Vastation takes a wildly different approach, getting us into the point of view of a superhuman with the ability to manipulate time and space. It is incredibly clever and well-written, with a fantastic point of view and narration. It feels rushed in the best sense of the term, that these images just keep flooding and cannot be stopped, and there is no slowing it. Michael Cisco’s Translation is a stand-out short story, focusing on an attempt to translate an ancient tablet in a language that uses its tenses very differently than we do—and that strange tense usage infects the entire story. It shares DNA with Ted Chiang’s Time of Your Life (the story adapted into Villeneuve’s film Arrival) but is very much its own thing, and retains a more horror-tinged air. Wonder and Glory Forever finishes with Clark Ashton Smith’s The City of Singing Flame. Smith was a contemporary and correspondent with both Lovecraft and Robert E. Howard, the author of Conan, Bran Mak Morn, and plenty more. The three of them often plucked concepts and terms from each other and used them in their own stories. Wonder and Glory Forever has some utterly brilliant short fiction in it. In a subgenre of a subgenre, Lovecraftian fiction can become simple pastiche. But in the hands of authors like these, it excels and shows us vastation. 5/5 Originally reviewed here: https://www.grimdarkmagazine.com/revi...

  3. 4 out of 5

    Denice Langley

    It has been awhile since I last read a Lovecraftian story. I forgot that one of the most defining qualities is the descriptive manner of writing. Everyone of your senses engages thanks to the skillful writing. When describing the town of Innsmouth, you see the "creepy" residents, you smell the fishy order of decay, you hear the waterfalls, you taste the dismal air on your tongue and you feel all of the emotions brought up quickly when you first see the bus....and this is part of that reading exp It has been awhile since I last read a Lovecraftian story. I forgot that one of the most defining qualities is the descriptive manner of writing. Everyone of your senses engages thanks to the skillful writing. When describing the town of Innsmouth, you see the "creepy" residents, you smell the fishy order of decay, you hear the waterfalls, you taste the dismal air on your tongue and you feel all of the emotions brought up quickly when you first see the bus....and this is part of that reading experience in every story. These authors pay tribute to Lovecraft the best way they can, but writing their versions of a story in his very distinctive style. Loved it!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bruce Baugh

    I genuinely cannot recall when I last read an anthology whose stories gave me so many moments of thinking in happy astonishment, "I have never thought of that before. This is like nothing I've yet read." Nick Mamatas has done a superb job bringing together very diverse work that does, just as the subtitle says it should, inspire awe: strange, compelling ideas, images, people, and events, presented in suitably strange and compelling ways. I am profoundly grateful to have had the opportunity to re I genuinely cannot recall when I last read an anthology whose stories gave me so many moments of thinking in happy astonishment, "I have never thought of that before. This is like nothing I've yet read." Nick Mamatas has done a superb job bringing together very diverse work that does, just as the subtitle says it should, inspire awe: strange, compelling ideas, images, people, and events, presented in suitably strange and compelling ways. I am profoundly grateful to have had the opportunity to read these pieces.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jon

    It's an excellent collection, with the stories reprinted from other venues. I think that makes it stronger than most, as the editor's not restricted to what submissions they can get by invitation or supplication. I hadn't read any of these before (except the Lovecraft and the Smith), and that makes it even more pleasing. In short: yay. It's an excellent collection, with the stories reprinted from other venues. I think that makes it stronger than most, as the editor's not restricted to what submissions they can get by invitation or supplication. I hadn't read any of these before (except the Lovecraft and the Smith), and that makes it even more pleasing. In short: yay.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Bill Barnett

  7. 5 out of 5

    draxtor

  8. 5 out of 5

    Michele

  9. 4 out of 5

    Michael Mauge

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lukam

  11. 4 out of 5

    Andreas

  12. 5 out of 5

    SHUiZMZ

  13. 4 out of 5

    Julia

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michael Hicks

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bill Mangione-smith

  16. 5 out of 5

    Leslie

  17. 4 out of 5

    Billy Schultz

  18. 5 out of 5

    Shelby

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  20. 4 out of 5

    jennet wheatstonelllsl

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chazlyn

  22. 4 out of 5

    Krraken

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy Carter

  24. 4 out of 5

    Meagan

  25. 4 out of 5

    bookmunkie

  26. 5 out of 5

    Josh

  27. 4 out of 5

    babimanis

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

  29. 4 out of 5

    ~Geektastic~

  30. 4 out of 5

    Reading Reindeer 2021 On Proxima Centauri

  31. 4 out of 5

    Amie's Book Reviews

  32. 5 out of 5

    Marily

  33. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  34. 5 out of 5

    Darren Payne

  35. 5 out of 5

    Nikki Mason

  36. 4 out of 5

    James Sapienza

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.