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And Then There Were None: A Mystery Play in Three Acts

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First presented at St James' Theatre in London on November 17, 1943. The play opened on Broadway at the Broadhurst Theatre in New York City on June 27, 1944. It was directed by Albert deCourville. Ten guilty strangers are trapped on an island. One by one they are accused of murder; one by one they start to die. First presented at St James' Theatre in London on November 17, 1943. The play opened on Broadway at the Broadhurst Theatre in New York City on June 27, 1944. It was directed by Albert deCourville. Ten guilty strangers are trapped on an island. One by one they are accused of murder; one by one they start to die.


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First presented at St James' Theatre in London on November 17, 1943. The play opened on Broadway at the Broadhurst Theatre in New York City on June 27, 1944. It was directed by Albert deCourville. Ten guilty strangers are trapped on an island. One by one they are accused of murder; one by one they start to die. First presented at St James' Theatre in London on November 17, 1943. The play opened on Broadway at the Broadhurst Theatre in New York City on June 27, 1944. It was directed by Albert deCourville. Ten guilty strangers are trapped on an island. One by one they are accused of murder; one by one they start to die.

30 review for And Then There Were None: A Mystery Play in Three Acts

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    And Then There Were None: A Mystery Play in Three Acts, Agatha Christie And Then There Were None is a mystery novel by English writer Agatha Christie, widely considered her masterpiece and described by her as the most difficult of her books to write. It was first published in the United Kingdom by the Collins Crime Club on 6 November 1939, as Ten Little Niggers, after the British blackface song, which serves as a major plot point. The US edition was not released until December 1939; its American And Then There Were None: A Mystery Play in Three Acts, Agatha Christie And Then There Were None is a mystery novel by English writer Agatha Christie, widely considered her masterpiece and described by her as the most difficult of her books to write. It was first published in the United Kingdom by the Collins Crime Club on 6 November 1939, as Ten Little Niggers, after the British blackface song, which serves as a major plot point. The US edition was not released until December 1939; its American reprints and adaptations were all re-titled: And Then There Were None, after the last five words in the nursery rhyme "Ten Little Indians". Ten guilty strangers are trapped on an island. One by one they are accused of murder; one by one they start to die. عنوانهای چاپ شده در ایران: «ده بچه زنگی»؛ «ده بومی کوچک»؛ «ده سیاهپوست کوچولو»؛ «دیگر کسی آنجا باقی نماند، و آنگاه دیگر هیچ»؛ «کسی نماند دیگر»؛ و« سپس هیچ کس نبود»؛ تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و سوم ماه ژوئن سال 1977میلادی عنوان: ده سیاهپوست کوچولو؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: بهمن فرزانه، تهران، کتابهای جیبی، 1345، در 203ص؛ موضوع: داستانهای کارآگاهی از نویسندگان بریتانیایی- سده 20م عنوان: و آنگاه دیگر هیچ؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: بهرا افراسیابی، تهران، سخن، 1372، در 204ص؛ چاپ دوم 1373؛ عنوان: ده سیاهپوست کوچولو؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: محمد قصاع، تهران، آبنوس، 1373، در 271ص؛ چاپ دیگر تهران، صبورا، 1374، شابک 9649175109؛ چاپ دوم 130؛ عنوان: دیگر کسی آنجا باقی نماند؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: پروانه دادبخش، مشهد، جاودان خرد، 1375، در 279ص؛ عنوان: و سپس هیچکس نبود؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: ثریا قیصری، تهران، سمیر، 1375، در 248ص؛ عنوان: ده بچه زنگی؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: خسرو مهربان سمیعی، تهران، هرمس، 1378، در 245ص؛شابک: 9646641733؛ چاپ دوم 1379؛ چاپ سوم 1386، شابک 9789646641730؛ چاپ دیگر تهران، هرمس، چاپ پنجم 1392، چاپ ششم 1393؛ عنوان: ده بومی کوچک؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: ذبیح الله منصوری، تهران، دنیای کتاب، 1384، در 286ص؛ شابک 9643461947؛ عنوان: کسی نماند دیگر؛ نویسنده: آگاتا کریستی؛ مترجم: سپیده حبیبی، تهران، نگارش کتاب الکترونیک، 1394، در 94ص؛ ای.بوک؛ مصور، شابک 9786008075509؛ ده تن، هفت مرد، و سه زن، توسط افرادی به ظاهر گوناگون، فراخوان می‌شوند، تا تعطیلات خود را، در جزیره‌ ای دور افتاده، به نام «جزیره ی زنگی» بگذرانند؛ بعضی از آن‌ها، پیشتر همدیگر را سر موضوعی می‌شناخته‌ اند؛ ولی بیشترشان، پیش از رفتن به جزیره، هیچ‌گاه یکدیگر را ندیده‌ بودند؛ این ده نفر، هر یک به گونه‌ ای، در گذشته ی خود، باعث قتل یک فرد شده‌ اند؛ پس از گذشت مدتی در جزیره، آن‌ها متوجه می‌شوند، که همه، از سوی یک فرد به آنجا فراخوان شده‌ اند؛ فردی که، با اینکه در جزیره نیست، از راز همه ی آن‌ها آگاه است؛ و اوضاع آشفته می‌شود؛ «گاه که این فرد آغاز به کشتن و قتل، تک‌ تک آنها، به روشی عجیب می‌کند، و قربانیان خود را، با اقتباس از یک شعر کودکانه، به نام: ده سرخپوست کوچک، به قتل می‌رساند؛ ...»؛ تاریخ بهنگام رسانی 31/01/1400هجری خورشیدی؛ ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Carol

    And Then There Were None aka Ten Little Indians by Agatha Christie 5★’s This is a new one for me!! I have often said I was the only breathing human on the planet that didn’t like Agatha Christie..so where in the world did those 5 stars come from? I will have to reevaluate my statement to I am the only breathing human on the planet that doesn’t like Agatha Christie…EXCEPT for And Then There Was None A group of ten strangers is invited or hired for a long weekend on Indian Island, a mile off the Devo And Then There Were None aka Ten Little Indians by Agatha Christie 5★’s This is a new one for me!! I have often said I was the only breathing human on the planet that didn’t like Agatha Christie..so where in the world did those 5 stars come from? I will have to reevaluate my statement to I am the only breathing human on the planet that doesn’t like Agatha Christie…EXCEPT for And Then There Was None A group of ten strangers is invited or hired for a long weekend on Indian Island, a mile off the Devon coast. It is somewhat improbable that these ten would all accept such a vague invitation from a host they do not know to a place they have never seen before, but each for his or her own reasons accepts. They include a doctor, a games mistress, a soldier of fortune, a rich playboy, a retired policeman, a judge, a spinster, a retired general and a married couple who are to be the servants. They arrive on a bleak rocky island to a completely modern house with all the amenities. The fires are welcoming, there is an ample supply of food, the servants are impeccable, but their host is absent. In each of the bedrooms, the Ten Little Indians nursery rhyme is posted on a prominent wall. It begins: "Ten Little Indian boys went out to dine… One choked his little self, and then there were nine.--- Drinks are served, and one guest chokes, turns blue and falls over dead. Now the tension begins to build. Fright runs in the hearts of the stranded people as one by one they are picked off…each in accordance with that cursed nursery rhyme. As the number of victims increase, the survivors' suspicions of each other also increase. When the police arrive and find them all dead….the question remains “Who is the murderer? It has to be one of the survivors…but which one? And Then There Were Noneis told in short choppy chapters. The strange thing is that none of the characters are even likable. Christie toys with the idea of a serial killer long before such an animal was even heard of. This is an excellent story, and the author is so far ahead of the reader’s reasoning that you will never guess who the guilty party is. If you do manage to figure out the “who" and the "how" then you have my highest respects.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Shirley Revill

    Absolutely brilliant. Recommended.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Vita Luna

    A great play, very exciting and also funny! I may be a bit biased, since I'm a backstage for it - I read a version with both endings, and not sure which ending I like the most! A great play, very exciting and also funny! I may be a bit biased, since I'm a backstage for it - I read a version with both endings, and not sure which ending I like the most!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Gary

    It really is superb.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Really enjoyed comparing the play to the book, which I read a few years ago. Subtext: *chef's kiss* Character dynamics and relationships: *chef's kiss* Mystery & plot: *chef's kiss* Reading this play and "The Unexpected Guest" have me started on a big Agatha Christie kick! Will be reading more of her work soon and watching theatrical and film adaptations of her works! Really enjoyed comparing the play to the book, which I read a few years ago. Subtext: *chef's kiss* Character dynamics and relationships: *chef's kiss* Mystery & plot: *chef's kiss* Reading this play and "The Unexpected Guest" have me started on a big Agatha Christie kick! Will be reading more of her work soon and watching theatrical and film adaptations of her works!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Fred

    SECOND READING - 5 STARS: I adored this play even more than the first time. I ravenously gobbled it up in a day (yet again) and it was just another of those wonderful books which widened my appetite for reading to an addictive boundary. Amazing!! :-) FIRST READING: 4.5 stars. I read this whole play in one glorious sitting. I love Agatha Christie’s novels but this is the first play of hers that I have read. Very interesting to see how Christie adapted this from her original book. Lots of fun to read! SECOND READING - 5 STARS: I adored this play even more than the first time. I ravenously gobbled it up in a day (yet again) and it was just another of those wonderful books which widened my appetite for reading to an addictive boundary. Amazing!! :-) FIRST READING: 4.5 stars. I read this whole play in one glorious sitting. I love Agatha Christie’s novels but this is the first play of hers that I have read. Very interesting to see how Christie adapted this from her original book. Lots of fun to read! (Though it did whizz by very quickly.)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Philip

    Brief and direct in narrative style, but a bit too nihilistic for my taste. I usually enjoy novels that deal with deep life questions, such as the questions of justice with which this book interacts, and the setup was promising, but I just didn't like the execution (pun intended). Brief and direct in narrative style, but a bit too nihilistic for my taste. I usually enjoy novels that deal with deep life questions, such as the questions of justice with which this book interacts, and the setup was promising, but I just didn't like the execution (pun intended).

  9. 5 out of 5

    des

    rating: 4.5/5 stars overall, i liked this. i didnt hate the happy ending like i thought i was going to. i prefer the original but the play ending was fine. the only thing i noticed was the change in Vera's character for no good reason. technically, they could have left her character the same and still had the happy ending. (view spoiler)[she could have still killed the kid kind-of on purpose like in the novel, but for some reason in the play she really sells this idea that it was the guy who d rating: 4.5/5 stars overall, i liked this. i didnt hate the happy ending like i thought i was going to. i prefer the original but the play ending was fine. the only thing i noticed was the change in Vera's character for no good reason. technically, they could have left her character the same and still had the happy ending. (view spoiler)[she could have still killed the kid kind-of on purpose like in the novel, but for some reason in the play she really sells this idea that it was the guy who did it? (hide spoiler)] as well as her figuring out the nursery rhyme, among other things i've probably forgotten. but like i said, i still enjoyed the play, including both endings. makes me want to reread the novel :)

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bre (Loc'd Booktician)

    Wow! This book had me hooked from the beginning to the end. If you are looking for a murder mystery get into this book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Arun Singh

    Again brilliant. I liked it that there is different ending than the novel.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Realini

    And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie Fascinating crime story, considered to be one of the best This work is rated twice, because I have just read it a second time. Well, not read exactly, but listened to the play adapted from the original. I think I have seen somewhere the information that Agatha Christie is the most translated author or something like that. Then the Mousetrap: - “The Mousetrap opened in the West End of London in 1952, and has been running continuously since then. It has by far And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie Fascinating crime story, considered to be one of the best This work is rated twice, because I have just read it a second time. Well, not read exactly, but listened to the play adapted from the original. I think I have seen somewhere the information that Agatha Christie is the most translated author or something like that. Then the Mousetrap: - “The Mousetrap opened in the West End of London in 1952, and has been running continuously since then. It has by far the longest initial run of any play in history, with its 25,000th performance taking place on 18 November 2012.” As for Then there were none, I have read it as an adolescent and it had a tremendous impact…I could not put it down. To this day I find it fascinating and admirable… - How could anyone come up with such a sophisticated, well thought plot Indeed, I have just read that the author found this the most difficult of her detective or crime stories to write… Critics consider it her masterpiece. The answer to the question- who could do anything similar, in number of victims and the scale of the operation is simple - A psychopath Evidently, I will not engage with anything that could spoil the pleasure of a potential reader of this note. After all, if you know “who dunnit” there is no point in starting a detective story, even if I found in a note on the 80/20 principle that it is recommended that you look to a book, search the conclusion and from 20% of going through it, you get 80% of what the work has to offer, so you can skip the lesser volumes by applying the principle. The plot is Machiavellian. Ten people who have been engaged in awkward situations where others have died are gathered on isolated premises. Part of the interesting theme of the novel is that indeed, justice is blind and guilty parties often escape through the net. I am thinking of the cases that are mentioned by a doctor, outside this circle of suspects, wherein helpers do not give the necessary medicine and death is the result, even if nothing can be proved usually. At least back then. With the modern advances of forensic and other types of investigations, they can find almost anything today. Almost, but not all and the death penalty appears to still be unjust, in the light of DNA tests that prove innocence in some execution cases. Then there is O.J. Simpson and other rich folk who can afford expensive lawyers and escape justice, or so it seems. As a teenager, I have read this for the first time in translation and the title was different, creating later on a confusion for me: - And then there were none is very different from “Ten Little Niggers” - But the original title is something we do not say anymore, for we have fortunately gone a long way There are ten figurines that disappear in the story and there is also a song that is used by the mad killer or vigilante.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I loved this mystery story as a novel, and I really expected the play to be every bit as good as the novel. Agatha Christie wrote both of these works, she streamlined the plot for the play so that it would work better on stage than the dramatizations that people were trying to do of her novel, so it seems like it should have been wonderful. Maybe it's just something you have to see performed, but I didn't care for the play version of this work much at all. Ten murders is a lot to cover in the cou I loved this mystery story as a novel, and I really expected the play to be every bit as good as the novel. Agatha Christie wrote both of these works, she streamlined the plot for the play so that it would work better on stage than the dramatizations that people were trying to do of her novel, so it seems like it should have been wonderful. Maybe it's just something you have to see performed, but I didn't care for the play version of this work much at all. Ten murders is a lot to cover in the course of a three act play. You have to have characters dropping dead constantly, and that really doesn't lead to much build up of suspense, anxiety, or tension, and it doesn't give the reader much time to study the characters or to form pet theories about whodunit. There simply was no time for the reader to get involved, or edgy, because the murders were practically back to back. For me, reading this was like reading a slasher play, and I'm pretty sure that's not the effect Dame Agatha was trying to achieve. Although, what do I know? Maybe she liked slasher stuff just as much as the next Dame.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    Love this play and the ending is a lot happier but I think the book is quite a bit better and does more of what Agatha was going for...I think she tried to appeal to her audience here a bit more.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Book collector

    There are too many Agatha Christie books to review individually.  Some which don't fit the following author review will be done as individual reviews but most will have this review added. I'm going to split this into sections. It will cover the main categories of Christie's work. First though I have to say I love Christie's books. Even when one is a poorer story the writing still makes me happy to read it. Christie's ability to craft good characters shines throughout all of her work and it's cha There are too many Agatha Christie books to review individually.  Some which don't fit the following author review will be done as individual reviews but most will have this review added. I'm going to split this into sections. It will cover the main categories of Christie's work. First though I have to say I love Christie's books. Even when one is a poorer story the writing still makes me happy to read it. Christie's ability to craft good characters shines throughout all of her work and it's character that drives the stories. Her plots on the whole are intriguing mysteries. Some work better than others but considering the length of time she wrote for, over 50 years, it's hardly surprising.  One thing I enjoy is the humour. The books have a lightness of touch that brings the quirks out in characters such as Poirot. Her books aren't blood-soaked horror fests but death is still the constant character that sidles throughout picking off victims as required.  I've enjoyed the vast majority of her books. From her detective novels through her short story collections, her plays, her standalone crime/thrillers novels to her biographical books and her "romance" dramas I've found very few I disliked and certainly none I thought were terrible. The rating on the books is an indication of whether I think it's good or decent. You won't find anything under 3 though. Not for me. Ok a bit more about the various groups. Hercule Poirot.  Probably her most famous creation. Poirot is an interesting character.  Fussy, self important,  arrogant at times but brilliant and determined.  The stories are among her best with classics to numerous to mention. Think the murder of roger ackroyd, murder on the orient Express, death on the Nile, evil under the sun, appointment with death and then add many more. The Poirot books are comprised of novels and short story collections. Most I thoroughly enjoyed. The plots are good on the whole and the characters are uniformly well drawn. Poirot's books are international going from England,  France on to the middle east which gives a variety to the stories. One little note here. There are two versions of the novel the big four. One, the first published, has a framing structure that combined what were originally 12 short stories into a novel. This is one of the weaker Poirot books. Written at a trying time for Christie it has more in common with the likes of sax rohmer than her normal material.  A new version, comprising of just the short stories as originally published was printed a few years ago. Its essentially the same book but without the framing material.  It doesn't really mention that though! But that's the publisher not Christie's fault. Back to the books. Several of the later books feature what would now be referred to as cold case stories. Poirot investigates old crimes from the golden age of crime era which of course Christie is undoubtedly expert at. From the first to the surprising final book and bar very few the Poirot books are one of the best detective series in print. Miss Marple There are surprisingly few marple books. 12 novels and 2 short story collections.  The are very good though. Miss marple is an example of the armchair detective.  Although she's not a strict example as she does have stories set both around England and abroad. Its more in the way her character works. She takes in information and her own observations of the suspects then uses her knowledge of people to work it all out. She's a great character and the books are strong ones for me.   As with Poirot some of the the later books are cold cases. Christie's final book, published posthumously was a marple case and one I loved. Tommy & Tuppence beresford Just four novel and a short story collection for these two memorable characters. I enjoyed these books. The lightness of touch, that subtle humour is in evidence in their short run of books. Great fun and great stories.  Short story collections Christie wrote a large amount of short stories. There are 50 odd Poirot stories alone. Miss marple and Tommy and Tuppence also have short story collections.  But there are many more. I like her collections. Books such as the hound of death, the listerdale mystery and the the later collections featuring rarer stories and alternative versions are all of good examples of short story writing. One to look out for though is an American publication.  Due to Christie's wishes a novella, three blind mice is no longer available in print in the UK.  Three blind mice of course is the novella Christie adapted into the record breaking play the mousetrap. Look out for it as it's a favourite story of mine. Both in its original form and the play version.   Other novels There are lots of standalone novels and a few which do feature some recurring characters, such as the detective, battle. Some are brilliant (and then there were none, one of my all time favourite novels) some are good (death comes as the end)  and some are weak. One of the weakest for me is  they came to Baghdad but despite its weaker story I still enjoyed the writing. From the ancient Egyptian setting of death comes as the end, via the creepy pale horse to the more traditional crime novels Christie's general novels are as entertaining as her more famous characters books. By Mary westmacott The six novels published under this name are very good. They are well written,  character dramas. Some have said they are romance but I found them darker than that in places. If you just like crime then don't read them but if you like good characters going through personal dramas then try them. Not my normal genre but I enjoyed them. The plays I enjoy reading scripts,  film, TV and theatre but they aren't to everyone's taste. Christie wrote more plays than people might think. Obviously the mousetrap is the most famous and it is a great story. But there are others that are very good as well. The Poirot plays are good, black coffee being one I enjoyed. Then you have various plays adapted from novels. Often these differ from the novel. And then there were none is a good example.  The play has a different ending and it's good but I personally prefer the novel's ending.  There are plays written for television and theatre that are exclusive to those media. Some plays were actually written before the novel. The recently printed a daughter's a daughter play is very well written and predates the novel by some years. If you like reading plays then Christie wrote some very good ones. The Charles Osborne adaptations (plus one other)  Charles Osborne adapted three of Christie's plays into prose form. Black coffee is a good Poirot story. Then there were two others, spider's web and the rather funny the unexpected guest. I enjoyed the opportunity to read "new" Christie novels and the books are decently written. One thing to note is that Osborne does have to place some vital stage directions into the prose. Now remember that a live audience could see what was happening whereas in prose these stage directions can seem a little clumsy.  There is another adaptation. A novelisation of the first motion picture from 1928 based on an Agatha Christie story. Loosely based on the first Harley quin story it's an interesting if over melodramatic novel by G. Roy McRae called the passing of Mr Quinn. Non-fiction Apart from Christie's very enjoyable autobiography there are only two other non-fiction books. One, come tell me how you live is a humorous account of an archeological dig with her second husband max mallowen. The other is an interesting account of the British empire expedition of 1922. So that's it. A fairly basic overview of a favourite writer. Not just mine but one of my father's favourites as well. A final note on the attitudes and language used. Remember when the books were written.  Attitudes were very different. What was acceptable then has to be looked at in the historical context of the times. The times they are written works in other ways as well. The love story elements are fascinating as authors were restricted in what they could write. So you often get a situation of characters that seem to barely know each getting married at the end of books! Attitudes we find wrong now were accepted blithely and may seem shocking to younger readers. Think of it this way though. If you could take a modern book from 2020 back in time, say to 1920 when the first Christie is published or to the mid 50's people would be shocked and offended at the bad language,  the overt sexuality of characters and at the graphic plots. Many a modern author would have found themselves in court. It's all relative. Agatha Christie is a highly recommended author. Truly the Queen of Crime.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Nicole-Rose

    … … … … WHAT?! Let me preface this by saying that And Then There Were None is, so far, one of my least favourite Christie novels. I felt like the potential was absolutely amazing, but the follow-through was really disappointing. It was pretty bad, but it could have been really bad. It could have been this bad. Without revealing anything, I'll just say that the ending was completely changed. I've read the reason as to why Christie thought the ending needed to be changed, but I don’t buy it. Wh … … … … WHAT?! Let me preface this by saying that And Then There Were None is, so far, one of my least favourite Christie novels. I felt like the potential was absolutely amazing, but the follow-through was really disappointing. It was pretty bad, but it could have been really bad. It could have been this bad. Without revealing anything, I'll just say that the ending was completely changed. I've read the reason as to why Christie thought the ending needed to be changed, but I don’t buy it. Why would one feel that theatre can't be as disturbing as a work of prose? Must we discuss the Greeks? I don't like writing about spoilers in my reviews, but this time it's fairly necessary: (view spoiler)[ Alterations that I can't for the life of me understand: - If Christie wanted Vera and Philip to survive and get married, why did she take all the emotion away in the scene when Vera "shoots" Philip? That scene was so romantically emotional in the novel, and instead it was changed to "You did it!" "No you did it!" *BANG* I don't understand. If anything needed to be changed, you should have laid the romance on thicker. Not scraped it off. - OK, but did the bullet actually penetrate Philip? If it didn't, why did he collapse to the ground? If it did, why wasn't he bleeding out in that last scene? I… I need answers. - The last stage direction (takes rope and puts his head in noose too) is confusing as hell. I was sure this implied that the play ended in them both committing suicide. I finished the play thinking that Philip was Unknown because he shot Wargrave (Two Little Indian rhyme), and made Vera hang herself (One Little Indian rhyme). Now that I think of it, that would have been more interesting. - And surprise! Philip and Vera are actually completely innocent of the initial accusations. I know Philip totally confessed, but he was lying! He really did everything he could to save that native tribe! Mhhm… (hide spoiler)]

  17. 4 out of 5

    Meghan

    I enjoyed this radio version. I kept looking at my phone expecting to see the actors as if I was streaming the movie. But it was very clear who was who, which isn’t always as clear in these kind of dramatizations. It’s less a whodunnit as more an unfolding of murder. It’s actually more like modern true crime shows than a typical AC mystery. I think AC liked to mixed it up. You can only write so many Poirot stories before you wish he’d retire, I would imagine. I think it’s important to remember tha I enjoyed this radio version. I kept looking at my phone expecting to see the actors as if I was streaming the movie. But it was very clear who was who, which isn’t always as clear in these kind of dramatizations. It’s less a whodunnit as more an unfolding of murder. It’s actually more like modern true crime shows than a typical AC mystery. I think AC liked to mixed it up. You can only write so many Poirot stories before you wish he’d retire, I would imagine. I think it’s important to remember that the original story was Ten Little N*ggers and then Ten Little Indians. Neither are okay and I’m okay with the switch to soldiers because it does nothing to change the heart of the story. But neither should we whitewash the blatant racism that existed, because while it doesn’t alter the murder mystery, it still changes the story by making everyone in it not complicit racists. Casual racism is still racism.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Keith Moser

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I was in this play about a decade ago as first-to-die, young Marston (and double cast as boatman Fred Narracott). I wanted to reread it before auditioning for it again tomorrow. I think maybe there’s a chance to be Lombard, Blore, or Armstrong... I guess we’ll see what the director thinks! Anyway, I’ve always meant to read more Agatha Christie—this is an interesting adaptation (with a happy ending featuring two accused innocents outlasting the murderer and getting their happy ending. I’d be curio I was in this play about a decade ago as first-to-die, young Marston (and double cast as boatman Fred Narracott). I wanted to reread it before auditioning for it again tomorrow. I think maybe there’s a chance to be Lombard, Blore, or Armstrong... I guess we’ll see what the director thinks! Anyway, I’ve always meant to read more Agatha Christie—this is an interesting adaptation (with a happy ending featuring two accused innocents outlasting the murderer and getting their happy ending. I’d be curious to read the original novel to see how much changed & how many clues are in the story pointing toward the real killer (assuming that wasn’t also a change in the adaptation).

  19. 5 out of 5

    Malcolm

    The play is a pretty faithful adaptation of the novel with only a few minor exceptions. Exception the First: The action of the piece has been altered to support a box set style, where everything the audience sees happens in one room. Exception the Second: The ending. I understand Christie's reason for changing the ending but as scripted here, it just doesn't work. The killer's cold and calculating presence is reduced to that of a cackling madman to support the ending. The love subplot is rather fo The play is a pretty faithful adaptation of the novel with only a few minor exceptions. Exception the First: The action of the piece has been altered to support a box set style, where everything the audience sees happens in one room. Exception the Second: The ending. I understand Christie's reason for changing the ending but as scripted here, it just doesn't work. The killer's cold and calculating presence is reduced to that of a cackling madman to support the ending. The love subplot is rather forced. It just weakens the entire piece. Which is to say that 95% of it is stellar but that last 5% really brings down the whole.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Holland Rhoads

    I read this for my capstone project in school as I have to write an artist's critic paper on some of Agatha Christie's work. WOW AM I IMPRESSED!!! I found the entire story not only easy to read, but very well thought out and gripping. Overall I really enjoyed it and definitely recommend it as a quick but highly enjoyable read. I read this for my capstone project in school as I have to write an artist's critic paper on some of Agatha Christie's work. WOW AM I IMPRESSED!!! I found the entire story not only easy to read, but very well thought out and gripping. Overall I really enjoyed it and definitely recommend it as a quick but highly enjoyable read.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Heather Peace

    Review I loved this book. Christie is excellent at building suspense. Unfortunately, I am uncomfortable discussing this book with my students because some inappropriate words were used. (Note: The words were commonly used in Christie's time, but are inappropriate in our modern world.) However, I highly recommend this title for its drama and mystery. Review I loved this book. Christie is excellent at building suspense. Unfortunately, I am uncomfortable discussing this book with my students because some inappropriate words were used. (Note: The words were commonly used in Christie's time, but are inappropriate in our modern world.) However, I highly recommend this title for its drama and mystery.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    Definitely one of her best as far as figuring out the solution. Some of the threads of the story get a bit oversimplified at parts but that could be due to it being a play rather than a true novel. As always, one of the most fascinating aspects is the dissection of people's psyche. So many murders for so many different reasons. A classic. Definitely one of her best as far as figuring out the solution. Some of the threads of the story get a bit oversimplified at parts but that could be due to it being a play rather than a true novel. As always, one of the most fascinating aspects is the dissection of people's psyche. So many murders for so many different reasons. A classic.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Norma Smith

    A short but good mystery to read. Ten people are invited to a isolated Island to take part in a game of murder. You see these people are all strangers and are guilty of some form of a crime and trying to keep it hidden from each other. But you see someone knows their secrets and is playing a children's poem called Ten Little Indians. See if you can pick out the killer before it's too late. A short but good mystery to read. Ten people are invited to a isolated Island to take part in a game of murder. You see these people are all strangers and are guilty of some form of a crime and trying to keep it hidden from each other. But you see someone knows their secrets and is playing a children's poem called Ten Little Indians. See if you can pick out the killer before it's too late.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Shanna Wright

    Such a great thriller. Full of interesting characters and the plot is so intriguing...really does keep you guessing. I love Agatha Christie but had read these mysteries since I was a girl reading with my grandmother. I loved revising this favorite.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris Kenyon

    I love Agatha Christie and this is one of my favorite stories of hers. Four stars for the wonderful adaptation to a stage play, but minus one star for ending it like the movie instead of like the novel.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ann Ekse

    Disappointing. Very poor proofreading. Continuous typos made reading and attempting to decipher what the author actually said was aggravating in the extreme. Poor way to treat Ms Christie’s clever books.

  27. 4 out of 5

    sheilla

    Eventho with different aspect of story (w/o detective role) BUT! what I love was how the author brings us into the scene, I really could imagine how the vibe, how the thrill moment, how the beach overthere! its like we really into the story! love the beginning and ending✨

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jack Farrar

    This is a great book. It is written as a play so it started out being a little difficult to read but I got into it very easily!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lynda

    I did not find this interesting, like a lot of other readers. I guess it just wasn't my type of mystery. Maybe in its day... I did not find this interesting, like a lot of other readers. I guess it just wasn't my type of mystery. Maybe in its day...

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    This is a full cast presentation of an Agatha Christie novel. It was fun!

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