Hot Best Seller

The Book of Rosy: A Mother's Story of Separation at the Border

Availability: Ready to download

Compelling and urgently important, The Book of Rosy is the unforgettable story of one brave mother and her fight to save her family. When Rosayra “Rosy” Pablo Cruz made the agonizing decision to seek asylum in the United States with two of her children, she knew the journey would be arduous, dangerous, and quite possibly deadly. But she had no choice: violence—from gangs, f Compelling and urgently important, The Book of Rosy is the unforgettable story of one brave mother and her fight to save her family. When Rosayra “Rosy” Pablo Cruz made the agonizing decision to seek asylum in the United States with two of her children, she knew the journey would be arduous, dangerous, and quite possibly deadly. But she had no choice: violence—from gangs, from crime, from spiraling chaos—was making daily life hell. Rosy knew her family’s one chance at survival was to flee Guatemala and go north. After a brutal journey that left them dehydrated, exhausted, and nearly starved, Rosy and her two little boys arrived at the Arizona border. Almost immediately they were seized and forcibly separated by government officials under the Department of Homeland Security’s new “zero tolerance” policy. To her horror Rosy discovered that her flight to safety had only just begun. In The Book of Rosy, with an unprecedented level of sharp detail and soulful intimacy, Rosy tells her story, aided by Julie Schwietert Collazo, founder of Immigrant Families Together, the grassroots organization that reunites mothers and children. She reveals the cruelty of the detention facilities, the excruciating pain of feeling her children ripped from her arms, the abiding faith that staved off despair—and the enduring friendship with Julie, which helped her navigate the darkness and the bottomless Orwellian bureaucracy. A gripping account of the human cost of inhumane policies, The Book of Rosy is also a paean to the unbreakable will of people united by true love, a sense of justice, and hope for a better future.


Compare

Compelling and urgently important, The Book of Rosy is the unforgettable story of one brave mother and her fight to save her family. When Rosayra “Rosy” Pablo Cruz made the agonizing decision to seek asylum in the United States with two of her children, she knew the journey would be arduous, dangerous, and quite possibly deadly. But she had no choice: violence—from gangs, f Compelling and urgently important, The Book of Rosy is the unforgettable story of one brave mother and her fight to save her family. When Rosayra “Rosy” Pablo Cruz made the agonizing decision to seek asylum in the United States with two of her children, she knew the journey would be arduous, dangerous, and quite possibly deadly. But she had no choice: violence—from gangs, from crime, from spiraling chaos—was making daily life hell. Rosy knew her family’s one chance at survival was to flee Guatemala and go north. After a brutal journey that left them dehydrated, exhausted, and nearly starved, Rosy and her two little boys arrived at the Arizona border. Almost immediately they were seized and forcibly separated by government officials under the Department of Homeland Security’s new “zero tolerance” policy. To her horror Rosy discovered that her flight to safety had only just begun. In The Book of Rosy, with an unprecedented level of sharp detail and soulful intimacy, Rosy tells her story, aided by Julie Schwietert Collazo, founder of Immigrant Families Together, the grassroots organization that reunites mothers and children. She reveals the cruelty of the detention facilities, the excruciating pain of feeling her children ripped from her arms, the abiding faith that staved off despair—and the enduring friendship with Julie, which helped her navigate the darkness and the bottomless Orwellian bureaucracy. A gripping account of the human cost of inhumane policies, The Book of Rosy is also a paean to the unbreakable will of people united by true love, a sense of justice, and hope for a better future.

30 review for The Book of Rosy: A Mother's Story of Separation at the Border

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lily Herman

    My big question of the hour: Why the fuck haven't more people read this book? What a powerful, difficult, impactful, and unflinching story from Rosayra Pablo Cruz and Julie Schwietert Collazo looking at the incredibly traumatic and painful underbelly of how immigration works in this country and how to look for the helpers in a system that seems so irretrievably broken. As y'all know, I'm usually eye-rolling about how so many books could easily be 100 pages shorter, but this is the rare one where I My big question of the hour: Why the fuck haven't more people read this book? What a powerful, difficult, impactful, and unflinching story from Rosayra Pablo Cruz and Julie Schwietert Collazo looking at the incredibly traumatic and painful underbelly of how immigration works in this country and how to look for the helpers in a system that seems so irretrievably broken. As y'all know, I'm usually eye-rolling about how so many books could easily be 100 pages shorter, but this is the rare one where I wish there were another 100-150 pages to read. Of course, Rosy doesn't owe us every single piece of her life, and I also understand why Schwietert Collazo's perspective was integral to getting full context to what Rosy experienced and the horrendous bureaucratic aspects of the American immigration system. One quick content note (less of a warning than the topics below): There's a lot of writing in here about faith, particularly Christianity (and some short sections about Judaism). Just a heads up to those who may be triggered by religious rhetoric. It's not proselytizing in nature, though. Content warning: Homicide, torture, police brutality, family separation, mentions of suicidal ideation and attempts, mentions of rape

  2. 5 out of 5

    Deb

    This is a true story about a woman, Rosetta Pablo Cruz and the hardships, corruption, and violence that is happening in Guatemala and the difficulties she and others face trying to escape for a better life. It is a current story. These people being separated from their children in detention camps where they are treated inhumane, because of the new law of zero tolerance in effect. Her story and the amazing support that Americans, the Jewish community plus others is amazing. I now have a completel This is a true story about a woman, Rosetta Pablo Cruz and the hardships, corruption, and violence that is happening in Guatemala and the difficulties she and others face trying to escape for a better life. It is a current story. These people being separated from their children in detention camps where they are treated inhumane, because of the new law of zero tolerance in effect. Her story and the amazing support that Americans, the Jewish community plus others is amazing. I now have a completely different outlook into the desperation and determination these people have. I wasn't going to read this book and now I'm happy as I gained some education. I received this book in a giveaway for my honest opinion.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kate Olson

    (free review copy via Net Galley) ADD TO YOUR TBR! I normally don’t read ARCs this far in advance, but felt that this June 2020 release deserved my immediate attention. I read it in its entirety over the past 24 hours and it was well worth my time in bumping it up my TBR. Keep your eye out for it in June ~ especially those of you I’ve heard lately begging for a large publisher to hype an #ownvoices story about immigration to the US - so proud of Harper One for snagging this deal! Remember that pre (free review copy via Net Galley) ADD TO YOUR TBR! I normally don’t read ARCs this far in advance, but felt that this June 2020 release deserved my immediate attention. I read it in its entirety over the past 24 hours and it was well worth my time in bumping it up my TBR. Keep your eye out for it in June ~ especially those of you I’ve heard lately begging for a large publisher to hype an #ownvoices story about immigration to the US - so proud of Harper One for snagging this deal! Remember that pre-orders massively help demonstrate what readers care about and that requesting that your library purchase a book counts as a pre-order. Also just marking a book as to-read here helps boost it. As for a full review, I don’t really feel equipped to critically review a story such as this. A story of a woman’s trauma, and the story of the woman who helped her is really just what it is. Can you like or dislike such a thing??? My only criticism is that I wish it were longer.... it felt like we just got the tip of the iceberg here. Also, this is only one story of one woman whose journey had a miraculous turn when she got essentially rescued by IFT. Remember that her story doesn’t represent all who travel to the US from Central America, but her reasons for fleeing are shared by so many. Rosy’s words are in English via translation but I’m excited to hear that this book is being published simultaneously in English and Spanish. I’m excited to read more thoughts about this book when it’s been more widely reviewed.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Basic B's Guide

    After reading American Dirt in December I purposely sought out (with the help of MANY others) #ownvoices experiences with immigration. Back in January I read Tell Me How It Ends by Valeria Luiselli. This book was in essay form and gave us a look inside the experience of undocumented Latin-American children. The Book of Rosy is a mother’s story of separation at the border. Rosayra Pablo Cruz is a mother who decided to seek asylum in the U.S. with two of her children and upon doing so was detained After reading American Dirt in December I purposely sought out (with the help of MANY others) #ownvoices experiences with immigration. Back in January I read Tell Me How It Ends by Valeria Luiselli. This book was in essay form and gave us a look inside the experience of undocumented Latin-American children. The Book of Rosy is a mother’s story of separation at the border. Rosayra Pablo Cruz is a mother who decided to seek asylum in the U.S. with two of her children and upon doing so was detained while her children were sent off elsewhere. The book is divided into a few sections and I really found myself immersed in Rosy’s journey. She made the decision not once but twice to leave a violent life in Guatemala behind with young children and relied heavily on her faith. I don’t talk a lot about my faith on bookstagram and maybe because I feel like it’s a personal journey for us. Nonetheless, I too have felt times in my life where I have given it all up to God and I have seen the light shine through the darkness. Rosy’s constant faith and strength is admirable. While I found Julie Collazo (founder of Immigrant Families Together) sections interesting, I wanted more of Rosy’s story. It felt a little disconnected to drop Julie into the mix. I recommend you take the time to read #ownvoices stories of immigration, including this one. This personal and deeply affecting story is a necessary one.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Moffett

    I’m skeptical when people say something is a quick read, but this really is...it is very hard to put down. What an incredibly heartbreaking look into the lives of families and their separation at the border. My heart broke multiple times throughout. I did enjoy reading about the “helpers” in this book, how humble they are, and how big of an impact they have in the lives of these people searching for a better life.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lexi (Reads and Riesling)

    I have mixed feelings on this one. On the one hand, Rosy lived through the hell that this country unleashed on her when she came to the US seeking asylum and hearing her story in her own words is powerful. On the other hand, there were three chapters written by the woman who founded Immigrant Families Together, Julie Schwietert Collazo. I’m not taking away from everything she has done, but the way these chapters were written—how many times does one need to remind her readers she used to be a soc I have mixed feelings on this one. On the one hand, Rosy lived through the hell that this country unleashed on her when she came to the US seeking asylum and hearing her story in her own words is powerful. On the other hand, there were three chapters written by the woman who founded Immigrant Families Together, Julie Schwietert Collazo. I’m not taking away from everything she has done, but the way these chapters were written—how many times does one need to remind her readers she used to be a social worker???—felt the literary equivalent to photos white college students post of their “mission trip” to Africa. Not only was she far too self-congratulatory, but she hijacked Rosy’s story. I understand that IFT was an essential part of Rosy’s life, but I feel like we could have simply had a short explanation of how the organization came to be and how they help reunite families in an epilogue. Overall, Julie’s chapters felt like they had a hint of white saviorism. By hint, I mean the lid wasn’t fully tightened on the jar when she went to sprinkle some into her chapters. I am not very comfortable giving a star rating for this one, even though I am. I think everyone should read Rosy’s story. I think Julie’s chapters should have been cut or at least heavily edited and while I recommend this book, I would tell others to skip her chapters; they don’t add anything essential and they pull too much focus from Rosy’s words. Thank you to HarperCollins Publishers and NetGalley for access to this title.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Living My Best Book Life

    The Book of Rosy is an amazing memoir about a mother making the tough decision to leave Guatemala and seek asylum in the United States. Rosayra Pablo Cruz details what lead her to make this decision, the scary journey to the US, and the terrible conditions she and her family faced, and the heartbreak of being torn away from her children. As soon as I began reading, I was captivated. I am from a Hispanic/Latin background and I understand the struggles that so many individuals face when it comes to The Book of Rosy is an amazing memoir about a mother making the tough decision to leave Guatemala and seek asylum in the United States. Rosayra Pablo Cruz details what lead her to make this decision, the scary journey to the US, and the terrible conditions she and her family faced, and the heartbreak of being torn away from her children. As soon as I began reading, I was captivated. I am from a Hispanic/Latin background and I understand the struggles that so many individuals face when it comes to seeking asylum. I felt like Rosy did an amazing job of painting a picture for readers to see not only what lead to her decision but the risks she and so many are willing to take all in the hope of a better and safer life. I could feel so many emotions as I was reading. I felt Rosy's fear, heartache, sadness, faith, and hope. I don't know Rosy personally but I can tell that she is a strong human being. She had to be for herself and her family. Her emotional and physical strength was tested so many times, but she knew God had another plan for her and she put faith in that. Rosy tells her truth and I feel like so many readers will appreciate her strength and feel empathy not only for her but for so many others that have to face such inhumane conditions. This book also brings awareness for those that don't know what happens when someone tries to leave their country for a better life. One of the hardest parts of the book was hearing about the separation between her and her kids. To see how inhumane the people working at these organizations like the Department of Homeland Security are and the lack of empathy they had and have is heartbreaking. To Rosy, I am so sorry that you had to go through that. I am happy that you are reunited. That truly brings a smile to my face. I wish things like this did not have to happen. I give The Book of Rosy 5 stars. It is a poignant memoir that will affect so many because of its brutal honesty. Rosy's decision to seek asylum in the US came with so many tough and scary obstacles but she had a dream for her and her family and she was going to see it through. This is such an inspirationtional story that I could not put down!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mona AlvaradoFrazier

    This book is divided into two sections: Guatemalan refugee, Rosayra Pablo Cruz’s story, and Julie Schwietert Collazo’s journey to creating the non-profit, Immigrant Families Together, which is how she became part of Rosy’s story in the US. This book is a compelling story of why and how Rosayra left Guatemala for asylum in the US: the 2008 murder of her husband, extortions, her own brush with death at the hands of gangs in 2011, and the US detention center where her young son was taken. Rosayra de This book is divided into two sections: Guatemalan refugee, Rosayra Pablo Cruz’s story, and Julie Schwietert Collazo’s journey to creating the non-profit, Immigrant Families Together, which is how she became part of Rosy’s story in the US. This book is a compelling story of why and how Rosayra left Guatemala for asylum in the US: the 2008 murder of her husband, extortions, her own brush with death at the hands of gangs in 2011, and the US detention center where her young son was taken. Rosayra describes the guilt and sorrow she had over leaving her oldest son and her mother. "No one wants to leave the people they love...if they believed that staying would ensure survival...they would never walk through that door, fighting the impulse to look back with the deepest longing a person is capable of feeling. But since they know they are at risk, they put one foot in front of the other...even as they feel that they're being ripped into two jagged-edged pieces that will never fit neatly together again." Julie Collazo's journey to help families is also absorbing, describing the humanity shown by strangers, the obstacles, the coming together of a community like the DUI attorney turned immigration crusader, the volunteers, the rabbi's and synagogues. Thank you to NetGalley for the ARC. Put this on your TBR list. The book debuts in June 2020.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    There are so many things I can say about The Book of Rosy. It was emotional, difficult to read at times and often heartbreaking. But it was honest, an immigration story that wasn’t sugar coated, an important story for everyone but especially Americans. Read this book instead of American Dirt. Read this book if (like me) you initially loved American Dirt but then learned more and are trying to do better. Read this book if you don’t understand why ICE is a problem. Read this book if you actually be There are so many things I can say about The Book of Rosy. It was emotional, difficult to read at times and often heartbreaking. But it was honest, an immigration story that wasn’t sugar coated, an important story for everyone but especially Americans. Read this book instead of American Dirt. Read this book if (like me) you initially loved American Dirt but then learned more and are trying to do better. Read this book if you don’t understand why ICE is a problem. Read this book if you actually believe we need a wall. Read this book if you want to know more about immigration. Read this book because it’s a story different from your own. Just read this book.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Daphyne

    The story of a mother and her two children separated at the border. Rosy is from Guatemala and applies for asylum. She’s separated from her children for over 80 days while she remains in a prison-like detainment center in AZ and her children are put into foster care in NY. It was interesting reading about Rosy’s journey especially considering she’s a devoted Christian. Much of her experience is framed through that lens. The negative to that is that compared to many other immigration memoirs I’ve The story of a mother and her two children separated at the border. Rosy is from Guatemala and applies for asylum. She’s separated from her children for over 80 days while she remains in a prison-like detainment center in AZ and her children are put into foster care in NY. It was interesting reading about Rosy’s journey especially considering she’s a devoted Christian. Much of her experience is framed through that lens. The negative to that is that compared to many other immigration memoirs I’ve read her story seems a bit too “rosy.” Rosy’s first hand account is interrupted in part two by the additional voice of the co-author Julie who is co-founder & director of Immigration Families Together. It is with her input that it starts to make sense that a Guatemalan applying for asylum winds up temporarily living in a rent-free apartment in Manhattan. Julie speaks more to the nonprofit’s operations & adds a vital perspective. Overall a worthwhile read if for no other reason than Rosy’s faith, something rarely mentioned by those vilifying immigrants. For more useful information about the separation of children & parents in detention, I highly recommend “Tell Me How it Ends: An Essay in Forty Questions” by Valeria Luiselli.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Elena L.

    [4,5/5 stars] THE BOOK OF ROSY is a heartbreaking yet hopeful story about Rosayra Pablo Cruz, a mother seeking asylum in US with her children. Due to the violent life in Guatemala and in the hope of having a better life in US, the first half of the book follows Rosayra's brutal journey from Guatemala to US. It was painful to read about the sufferings of Rosayra and her family; and also the saddening decisions that she had to make. I was infuriated reading the parts regarding zero-tolerance policy [4,5/5 stars] THE BOOK OF ROSY is a heartbreaking yet hopeful story about Rosayra Pablo Cruz, a mother seeking asylum in US with her children. Due to the violent life in Guatemala and in the hope of having a better life in US, the first half of the book follows Rosayra's brutal journey from Guatemala to US. It was painful to read about the sufferings of Rosayra and her family; and also the saddening decisions that she had to make. I was infuriated reading the parts regarding zero-tolerance policy implemented by the Trump administration at Mexico-US border. While I felt all her helplessness and despair, her strength and faith were inspiring. The second part is about Julie Collazo founding the non-profit Immigrant Families Together and how Collazo and Cruz cross paths. I was immersed in both sections, however I wanted more of Rosy's story. This is an #ownvoices story of immigration that I highly recommend. [ I received a complimentary copy from the publisher in exchange for an honest review ]

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rex

    I recently won this book in a Goodreads giveaway and I also see it is listed in Time magazine as a recommended read for the summer. The timing of the release of this book is excellent and I'm sure the publishers are trying to get it in as many hands as possible. We've been hearing a lot recently about the horrors of the detention facilities - some people call them concentration camps - at American's southern border. This book is the personal story of one woman who encountered those horrors first- I recently won this book in a Goodreads giveaway and I also see it is listed in Time magazine as a recommended read for the summer. The timing of the release of this book is excellent and I'm sure the publishers are trying to get it in as many hands as possible. We've been hearing a lot recently about the horrors of the detention facilities - some people call them concentration camps - at American's southern border. This book is the personal story of one woman who encountered those horrors first-hand - sort of. The woman at the center of this is a refugee from Guatemala named Rosayra Pablo Cruz. She acknowledges she does not speak English, so the first-person narrative must have been written or translated by the co-author, Julie Schwietert Collazo. It is extremely well written. But there are problems. The first part of the book is Rosayra's story - in her own words - but I found it very difficult to follow the chronology as it was related. She actually made two trips to the United States and somehow managed to have four children beforehand. Not all of them made the trip with her either time. But I'm confused as to the fathers involved. The narrative is jumbled. However, when dealing with her incarceration and the forced separation of her children, it's impossible not to feel anger and outrage. Unless you are Rosayra Pablo Cruz. She never mentions President Trump or his administration. She hedges her criticisms the same way he does by including "maybe" or "perhaps" or "it seems" whenever she dares express an opinion. Perhaps she is afraid "they" will come after her and send her back if she says anything negative about ICE or the morally bankrupt people who have created this system, but simultaneously deny its existence. Instead, Rosayra falls into that religious hypocrisy where God has no fault for any other bad things that happen but needs to be thanks profusely for even the smallest benefit. I have to admit it got rather annoying. The book shifts in tone without warning to a narrative by the coauthor, Schwietert Collazo. This was actually a much more interesting read because she, unlike the supposed main focus of the book, didn't pull any punches. She is intimately involved with trying to help migrants settle in this country and work their way through the absurd immigration system. The book is just as much her story as it is Rosayra's, but I doubt a book about an angry, effective, strong activist will sell as well as one about a widowed mother-of-four who is trying to escape poverty, crime and an attempt on her life. Also for some reason, the outcome of the book is described in an Epilogue, although it's kind of important. Again, structurally the book seems flawed to me. Also it ends before we actually know the final outcome of Rosayra's plight - except for a very brief paragraph on yet another tacked-on page at the end. Rather anti-climactic to be honest. I suspect because of the content that this book will be a success. The story is really not over, so people will flock to Pablo Cruz and an icon of overcoming the system. I don't object to this. I just wish the publisher had been able to come up with a more cohesive story.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This book made me mad, cry, sad, and every other emotion possible. No one should go through what they went through. But the mother is not a total victim here. She pissed me off as much as all the people who hurt all those kids. 😡

  14. 4 out of 5

    Nikki Arias

    Thank you NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for an honest review. I’ve said it before and I will say it again. Do yourself a favor and buy this book. It is a good look at what immigration really looks like and how current policy dehumanizes people immigrating to the US. This is the story that should be uplifted and marketed to every outlet. The writing is great, the story is powerful, and it truly evokes emotion out of you. I loved this book. It will be hard to find something that tops this rea Thank you NetGalley for this ARC in exchange for an honest review. I’ve said it before and I will say it again. Do yourself a favor and buy this book. It is a good look at what immigration really looks like and how current policy dehumanizes people immigrating to the US. This is the story that should be uplifted and marketed to every outlet. The writing is great, the story is powerful, and it truly evokes emotion out of you. I loved this book. It will be hard to find something that tops this read in 2020. It is an #OwnVoices book from Rosayra Pablo Cruz and Julie Schwietert Collazo. Rosayra talks about the obstacles related to immigrating from Guatemala and the horrors encountered on the Migrant Highway. Her story is so powerful. I was moved the entire time reading the book. Julie shares how she started a nonprofit that helps reunite mothers with their children after being separated at the border. She also lists several book recommendations at the end of the book as well as different ways to be apart of the solution. I loved this book. Do yourself a favor and preorder this book! There were so many powerful words, but these really made an impact for me. “The border is a precarious place, where the only certainty is that people will continue to cross it, headed north, toward safety and, they hope, a better life for themselves and the people they love.”

  15. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    "The Book of Rosy" tells the harrowing true story of Rosayra Pablo Cruz, who flees Guatemala with her two sons to seek asylum in the United States only to be separated from her children at the border and incarcerated by ICE. Told through two parallel stories - Rosy's and that of Julie Schwietert Collazo, who created a group called Immigrant Families Together (IFT) - we see firsthand how two mothers' lives become intertwined due to pain and trauma and how together they overcome it. The sections of "The Book of Rosy" tells the harrowing true story of Rosayra Pablo Cruz, who flees Guatemala with her two sons to seek asylum in the United States only to be separated from her children at the border and incarcerated by ICE. Told through two parallel stories - Rosy's and that of Julie Schwietert Collazo, who created a group called Immigrant Families Together (IFT) - we see firsthand how two mothers' lives become intertwined due to pain and trauma and how together they overcome it. The sections of the memoir written by Rosy explain her background growing up poverty-stricken in the increasingly dangerous country of Guatemala. She and her family endure the unthinkable and yet she still finds the strength and resilience to hope for something better for her children. Her writing is visceral - I was especially moved by this description of the dangerous journey to cross the border: "My heart breaks when I think about all the losses that have occurred along the Migrant Highway, each story that will be remembered only by the person who suffered it. If these losses were identified by tombstones, the whole highway would be lined by an unbroken chain of marble or humble markers. 'Here lies a woman's virginity.' 'Rest in eternal peace, stillborn infant.' 'RIP HOPE.' The memorials of pain would be so poignant that you'd have to look away." Once in the United States, Rosy recounts her detainment and separation from her children. She had crossed the border once before, prior to the implementation of the Trump zero-tolerance policies, and the contrast to the treatment she received then is stark and eye-opening. It is clear that the for-profit detention center she is sent to is more focused on making money and depriving people of their rights and dignity than anything else and it's heartbreaking that we allow this mistreatment of anyone, but especially women and children. While she is incarcerated in Arizona, Rosy's sons are sent to live in foster care hundreds of miles away in New York and with no family in the U.S. or money to hire to a lawyer or pay her $12,000 bail, her future looks bleak. Enter Julie, a Brooklyn mother and former social worker who is married to a Cuban immigrant and appalled by the Trump policies on separating families at the border. She decides one night she wants to do something about the situation and raises money to bail out one of the mothers in Rosy's detention center, helping to reunite her with her children and guide her through the asylum process. What seemed like a one-off idea is so successful that soon IFT is formed to help more mothers. Julie and her team of extremely effective volunteers tap into the collective outrage over the horrible treatment of these families by the administration and eventually Rosy's story comes to their attention via the attorney they work with, José Orochena, and she is bailed out and flown to New York to her sons. That would seem like it should be the happy ending but it's not. Both Rosy and Julie continue to recount the generosity of New Yorkers who provided shelter, clothing and other forms of support to the family as they acclimate to their new lives. They share how hard it was for Rosy and the boys to find a semblance of normalcy again, even with the benefit of therapy. And Rosy's asylum petition, and those for her boys, must still be resolved, an arduous and expensive process which would determine whether they could stay in the United States or be forced to return to Guatemala. This is a quick read - I finished it in a day - and worth every second. No matter where you land on the political spectrum, you should read this book to understand more about why people illegally cross into this country, what they risk to do so and how inhumanely they are treated if they get caught. You may be appalled by what people sacrifice to seek asylum and what they must endure at the hands of our government, but you'll also find hope in the kindness and dedication of people like Julie and all of those who reach out to help these families who want nothing more than to give their children a chance. One last note - I read this book as the protests over George Floyd's murder were unfolding all over the country. While "The Book of Rosy" is about immigration, there were several passages that felt so relevant to all of the unrest, especially this one from a Rosh Hashanah sermon Rosy and Julie attended (both are Christian but a temple in Brooklyn was instrumental in helping Rosy once she was released): "'The barrage of things coming at us all at once is not going to let up soon,' Rabbi Kolin said. 'That is both the nature of life as well as this historical moment in which we are living. But in our own hands,' she continued, 'is the healing of our souls, our homes, and our world." It is clear from Rosy's story that making our world a better place is truly "in our hands" - "normal" people are the ones who stepped up and changed her life: a former DUI attorney with no immigration experience, a mother of three in Brooklyn who mobilized her friends, a congregation in Brooklyn who saw echoes of what their ancestors endured and wanted to help. If I take one thing from this book, it's that each one of us can make a difference and have no excuse not to try. Thank you to NetGalley, Harper Collins and the authors for an advanced copy of this book in exchange for my unbiased review.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Morgan Haas

    words cannot strongly convey my thoughts & emotions towards this book. it is raw, it is powerful and it is something everyone who has been blessed/lucky enough to be born in the United States needs to read, no matter your political standing. this is not a politically based read, but rather a an astounding memoir filled with hope, love & the unrelenting goodness of others. a must read!!!!!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Jenkinson

    Today is World Refugee Day and this memoir is precisely why we need this day to raise awareness. This book is a harrowing, first hand account of a Guatemalan mother forced seek asylum with two of her young sons. The violence, the danger, and lack of resources at home left her little choice but to set out on a dangerous journey to seek refuge in the US - only be detained and to have her young sons ripped from her arms at a detention center in Arizona. I don’t review memoirs in the same way I review Today is World Refugee Day and this memoir is precisely why we need this day to raise awareness. This book is a harrowing, first hand account of a Guatemalan mother forced seek asylum with two of her young sons. The violence, the danger, and lack of resources at home left her little choice but to set out on a dangerous journey to seek refuge in the US - only be detained and to have her young sons ripped from her arms at a detention center in Arizona. I don’t review memoirs in the same way I review other books. But the writing in this book paints a very clear picture of the life Rosy fled, the reasons for seeking asylum, and her subsequent, and quite honestly, inhumane experience in my own country. This is a must read #ownvoices memoir. Thank you to @netgalley for the gifted ebook in exchange for my honest review and also @harperonebooks for the finished copy.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kymm

    First of all thank you to Harper Collins publishing and Netgalley for this ARC of The Book of Rosy. When I read the description of this one I knew it was one I had to read! Rosayra Pablo Cruz is a mother who had to face the ultimate decision to flee her homeland of Guatemala because of fear for herself and her children. She'd already been shot twice by gangs and her sons were being threatened. This was a daily occurrence in her life. After making the brutal decision to flee, the book describes h First of all thank you to Harper Collins publishing and Netgalley for this ARC of The Book of Rosy. When I read the description of this one I knew it was one I had to read! Rosayra Pablo Cruz is a mother who had to face the ultimate decision to flee her homeland of Guatemala because of fear for herself and her children. She'd already been shot twice by gangs and her sons were being threatened. This was a daily occurrence in her life. After making the brutal decision to flee, the book describes her long, arduous journey North. The hardships, the danger and the questions that arose were almost too much to bear. Upon reaching the border in Phoenix her and her sons are immediately separated. The book describes her first hand accounts of what that separation did to her and her sons. The sometimes brutal treatment her and other detainees suffered was almost too much for me to read. She had no idea where her sons were, if they were okay and who was helping them in her absence. The second half of the book goes into the laborious hoops she had to jump through to be allowed in this country. Thank God for all those who have stepped up to the plate to help these mothers and families. Without their help Rosy never would have made it. No matter which side of the fence, or should I say wall you're on this barbaric policy of separating families at the border is wrong! I don't want this to be a political statement, but it's all we hear about in Southern CA where I live, which is less than 100 miles from the border. I live in an area where immigrants make up a large portion of the population and without them our economy would definitely suffer. These barbaric policies set up through the Trump administration have got to stop. The Jews who helped Rosy in the book have compared this to what they went through during the Holocaust and I definitely see the similarities. The US is targeting one specific race and trying to eliminate them from the US, where if we remember is made up almost entirely of immigrants. After all unless you're an American Indian your ancestors were immigrants. Okay, I'll get off my soapbox now. The book was real, important and quite timely. For those who haven't been paying attention or live outside of the US this is a wonderful depiction of what can and does happen when one group of people are being targeted and what that does to these individual families. It's upsetting at times, powerful at others and throughout the book I kept finding myself enthralled by the human spirit. I found myself trying to imagine what I would do or how I would react if this were to happen to me. I couldn't even imagine! I think everyone, especially in the US should read this book when it comes out in June 2020. I couldn't put it down. The author, who is the actual mother in the book, did an excellent job of telling what is really happening and did so with grace and dignity. I definitely will be thinking of this one for a long time to come. Happy Reading!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Stansel

    The powerful memoir of Rosy, a Guatemalan mother of 4 who tells the story of her life in Guatemala with her four children and the events leading to her bringing her two boys to the US, where we is separated by them due to the Trump zero-tolerance program. Separated for 81 days in deplorable conditions, we learn what brought her to risk a crossing, what her life was like in her home country and then the work of the group IFT (Immigrant Families Together). IFT, founded by Julie, a former social wo The powerful memoir of Rosy, a Guatemalan mother of 4 who tells the story of her life in Guatemala with her four children and the events leading to her bringing her two boys to the US, where we is separated by them due to the Trump zero-tolerance program. Separated for 81 days in deplorable conditions, we learn what brought her to risk a crossing, what her life was like in her home country and then the work of the group IFT (Immigrant Families Together). IFT, founded by Julie, a former social worker whose husband was a refugee from Cuba, has sought and paid the bond on the relief of mothers separated from their children and then continue to support them as the families seek formal asylum. Rosy and Julie put a face to this policy and urge action. Rosy's faith and the humanity of the Americans who step up to help give faith. Full disclosure - I received a copy of this book from Net galley and the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bajidc

    Firsthand accounts of immigrants arriving to this country are available (“American on Purpose” is so funny; “97 Orchard Street” is delicious; “Becoming Dr. Q” is fascinating) but none show the current obstacles, the overwhelming fear and flight, or the mechanics that go behind detention and release as this one does. If it is this painful to read about it, imagine how traumatic it was to experience it, live through it, retell it. The book is narrated by two women: Rosayra Pablo Cruz who fled the Firsthand accounts of immigrants arriving to this country are available (“American on Purpose” is so funny; “97 Orchard Street” is delicious; “Becoming Dr. Q” is fascinating) but none show the current obstacles, the overwhelming fear and flight, or the mechanics that go behind detention and release as this one does. If it is this painful to read about it, imagine how traumatic it was to experience it, live through it, retell it. The book is narrated by two women: Rosayra Pablo Cruz who fled the threat of death in Guatemala with her two boys and Julie Schwietert Collazo who formed the Immigrant Families Together organization that assisted Rosy and many others to reunite with their children after separation. Rosy’s tale is harrowing and told with immediacy that draws you in and lays bare the conditions that cause someone to leave their families and homes for safety and the conditions they suffer when they arrive. She makes it clear that wasn’t enough for her to have sheer determination or desire for a better life - she could not have survived but for her strength of faith and the kindness of strangers and dedication of volunteers. Julie’s account dives into the nitty gritty of how to motivate and organize and get real results. It seemed like a “wild idea” but by vocalizing and promoting it, these people raised funds to release some of the mothers, bring the families together, and support them financially, emotionally, and spiritually beyond the initial release from detention. My family was fortunate enough to have the means to help several Bosnian families seeking asylum in the US when I was a kid: money, clothing, housing, job opportunities, and respect. We continue to donate resources today and can attest that it does make a difference in these people’s lives. Highly recommend this book for readers looking to empathize and learn more about asylum and push back against the current regime’s immigration policies in meaningful ways. Not every story ends in success (especially not high living and mushroom hunting in NYC) but more will if more help. If you are in the DMV, check out CAIR Coalition. And while I’m plugging local folks, learn more about asylum on asylumist.com. Superb blurb: Those of us who are immigrants live in an in-between space. We belong neither there, where we came from, nor here, where we find ourselves now. And yet, we belong to both. We are from one place, now living in another. We walk with each foot in a separate world, a circumstance that requires considerable skill. No matter how long we live in our adopted country, and no matter how warmly we are embraced and how comfortable we are, we will always be aware that we are of some other place, that we were forged in conditions that are hard, if not impossible, for our new friends to understand, and that we are growing and evolving in a place that is difficult, if not impossible, for our blood families to know or comprehend. This is especially true for asylum seekers, who are in total limbo. Our cases aren’t yet resolved. Decisions about our futures have not yet been rendered. We want to start building lives here—we have started building lives here—but we do so tentatively, both yearning and afraid to strengthen and solidify friendships and connections, lest we be torn from them suddenly. We put down our fragile roots, allowing them to settle in the soil, aware that they could be ripped up at any time. We open our hearts to others but feel ourselves holding back a bit.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Natalie (readswithnatalieb)

    Short synopsis: When Rosayra “Rosy” Pablo Cruz made the agonizing decision to seek asylum in the United States with two of her children, she knew the journey would be arduous, dangerous, and quite possibly deadly.  What I liked: This book is divided into two sections; Rosy’s story and Julie Schwietert Collazo’s journey to creating the non-profit, Immigrant Families Together, which is how she became involved with Rosy’s story. What I learned: The importance of immigration stories. While I’ve read a Short synopsis: When Rosayra “Rosy” Pablo Cruz made the agonizing decision to seek asylum in the United States with two of her children, she knew the journey would be arduous, dangerous, and quite possibly deadly.  What I liked: This book is divided into two sections; Rosy’s story and Julie Schwietert Collazo’s journey to creating the non-profit, Immigrant Families Together, which is how she became involved with Rosy’s story. What I learned: The importance of immigration stories. While I’ve read about violence in Guatemala and the horrors at the border, this painted a clear and personal picture in why Rosy fled her violent home country and the truth in how people are mistreated at the borders. Quotes that stuck with me: Julie was getting a cashier’s check to help release three women at the Border and she says, “$47,000 that’s what the government says how much these lives are worth.” I immediately felt complete and utter sadness to think someone’s life had that little of a price tag. In Rosy’s words at the end of the book, she says, “we want to share your American dream” which is something I’ve been thinking about since I finished the book. People come to America for the dream that is offered because it’s attainable while in other countries it’s not. Giving someone the ability to go for their dream doesn’t take away from someone else’s.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Amanda

    I generally stay out of politics because I hate how ugly and judgmental and mean it makes people on both sides of the aisle. So, that being said, I don’t know much about the controversy that surrounds the political issues of illegal immigration. This book was very eye opening and educational for me. I always had an awareness of the situations that drive people to make the dangerous journey across the border but hearing these personal stories and experiences really humanized it for me. I especial I generally stay out of politics because I hate how ugly and judgmental and mean it makes people on both sides of the aisle. So, that being said, I don’t know much about the controversy that surrounds the political issues of illegal immigration. This book was very eye opening and educational for me. I always had an awareness of the situations that drive people to make the dangerous journey across the border but hearing these personal stories and experiences really humanized it for me. I especially appreciated the list of practical ways people can get involved that were shared at the end. I am inspired to check out the organization Welcome Blanket to work on quilting something for a family that arrives to the US in the future. Rosy’s steadfast faith in God, and her determination to use her experiences to grow in her faith, is amazing. She clearly loves her children and I admire her for making tough decisions to provide anything she possibly could for them. My heart goes out to her and I pray only the best for her family and for all the people who helped her along the way. May God bless them all greatly!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sara Komo

    2020: This is an incredible #ownvoices account of a mother whose children were separated from her when she crossed the border into the United States from Mexico. This is the book you should be reading instead of American Dirt. In case you missed it in 2018, for about two months worth of time, the Trump Administration separated children from their families once they arrived on the US side of the border. This was meant to deter future immigrants from attempting to cross the border. The Administrat 2020: This is an incredible #ownvoices account of a mother whose children were separated from her when she crossed the border into the United States from Mexico. This is the book you should be reading instead of American Dirt. In case you missed it in 2018, for about two months worth of time, the Trump Administration separated children from their families once they arrived on the US side of the border. This was meant to deter future immigrants from attempting to cross the border. The Administration did not make a plan for how to reunite these families, and, as of this review, there are still 545 children that have NOT been reunited. AN ATROCITY AND A HORRIBLE STAIN ON AMERICAN HISTORY. Rosayra Pablo Cruz was one of these mothers who crossed the border during this time. She had no knowledge of the new system, and had started her journey before the new policy was in place. If she had arrived at the border just ten days before she did, her children would not have been separated from her. This book is essential reading if you want to understand how policies like this can destroy people's lives and futures. I listened to an interview with the two authors, and co-author Julie Schwietert Collazo voiced that the original book proposal was meant to be an account of Immigrant Families Together, the non-profit that she founded and runs. Her work is admirable and inspiring, and I wish there was more about it in the book. It provides a valuable insight into how the bond and legal system works in the US. However, I totally respect and appreciate her centering of Pablo Cruz in the story, as she deserves to be. A small warning: Pablo Cruz is a woman of strong faith, and some of her passages can get very heavily religious. This did not detract from the story at all, but it is a very strong presence throughout the book. I wish her and her family nothing but the absolute best, and I for one, am proud that she is well on her way to become a fellow American citizen. "Aprendí caminando" I learned by walking

  24. 4 out of 5

    HollyLovesBooks

    Thank you to #Netgalley #HarperCollinsPublishers #HarperOne for the early review copy of this book. I have read American Dirt and given all the controversy surrounding that book's release, I felt as though reading an #ownvoices story of immigration from Mexico or in this case, Central America, would be a good counter-balance. A sort of check to my response to AD and the issues raised. Personally, although there are some similarities in the topics, this is a more personal story in my opinion than A Thank you to #Netgalley #HarperCollinsPublishers #HarperOne for the early review copy of this book. I have read American Dirt and given all the controversy surrounding that book's release, I felt as though reading an #ownvoices story of immigration from Mexico or in this case, Central America, would be a good counter-balance. A sort of check to my response to AD and the issues raised. Personally, although there are some similarities in the topics, this is a more personal story in my opinion than AD. I appreciated the chapters told from Rosayra"s perspective. These detailed the reasons for needing to flee Guatemala and the experiences she and her children faced in this process. She emphasizes the fact that no one chooses to flee their home country lightly. This is a difficult and courageous choice for those in need of protection for themselves and their children. Then to be met at the border, first by compassionate men and women doing the job of Border Patrol and then the second time, by the opposite response. Her faith is inspiring and I hope continues to grow. Julie's contribution of telling the story from an activist side of the picture and how she and others were able to quickly put this community of helpers in place is also an interesting and inspiring part of this book. The vast network that Julie was able to put together is impressive. There are also websites and other information at the end of the book that tells readers how they can help if they are interested. Thank you to both of these women for the powerful voices and this truly incredible story.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bonnye Reed

    I received a free electronic copy of this memoir from Netgalley, Rosayra Pablo Cruz, and publisher HarperCollins - Harper One. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me. I have read this memoir of my own volition, and this review reflects my honest opinion of this work. I heartily encourage friends and family to read The Book of Rosy. This is an honest look into the policy of separation of families at the border being experienced by those refugees seeking political asylum in the United St I received a free electronic copy of this memoir from Netgalley, Rosayra Pablo Cruz, and publisher HarperCollins - Harper One. Thank you all for sharing your hard work with me. I have read this memoir of my own volition, and this review reflects my honest opinion of this work. I heartily encourage friends and family to read The Book of Rosy. This is an honest look into the policy of separation of families at the border being experienced by those refugees seeking political asylum in the United States. Many of us live just an hour to two from the border. This is happening at our back door. I personally live just one hour from the international bridge at El Paso, Texas – Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua (El Paso-Juarez). We border locals do what we can - there are baskets at the exits to our local grocery stores for non-perishable food donations to this cause, and most of the thrift stores in this area would let you donate a box of solidly packed assorted clothing for $10. Of course, the Corona Virus has us currently shut-in and nothing is being recycled anywhere - and this problem of asylum seekers being separated and jailed has not shut down even during the pandemic. New Mexico has International bridges at Antelope Wells, New Mexico – El Berrendo; Chihuahua; Columbus, New Mexico – Palomas, Chihuahua; and Santa Teresa, New Mexico – San Jerónimo, Chihuahua. California has six border crossing areas and Texas and Arizona have many crossing areas so you can see that this is not a casual problem for us southwesterners, even in the best of times. At this moment there are still many children removed from their families years ago who are 'lost' in the details. I cannot imagine how that could happen, but it has been and is still a problem. For-Profit containment areas for these mothers and fathers are poorly run and inhumane for the most part and in many the virus is rampant. There is no such thing as social distancing in a prison environment. For example, my New Mexico county of Otero has as of today just 8 cases of the virus, with two deaths. Our jails, however, have 79 confirmed cases at the county prison and 66 at the ICE processing center on the Texas border as of Friday, May 22. We live in a world filled with refugees rampant on all continents. As a world, we have to learn how to settle these problems before they happen. I don't have the solution but a little reinspection of the works of Mandela and Gandhi come to mind as a pattern to emulate. Please, read this book. Rosayra is only one of many abused by this system. And VOTE! Study your options well, and be first in line at the polls this fall. We do have a voice, at least in spirit, so do what you can, where you are, to bring humanity back to governments around the world. pub date June 2, 2020 Reviewed at Goodreads and Netgalley on May 23, 2020. Reviewed on June 3, 2020, at AmazonSmile, Barnes&Noble, BookBub, Kobo, and GooglePlay.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Onceinabluemoon

    Gut wrenching story of trying to survive rather than thrive, I was so tense listening to her story I felt like I was doing isometrics the entire time. Loved those who stepped into to guide and assist, the ending was a cliff hanger that had me stop dead what I was doing and google her outcome. We need change this fall, please vote to stop the carnage to our country on every front, we need to work towards helping all, not creating walls of strife...

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gisselle Diaz (gissellereads)

    Rating: Read NOW! My Thoughts: The book is divided into two sections, Rosy’s story and Julie’s efforts in creating a non-profit (Immigrant families together) which is how she met Rosy and helped her reunite with her sons. I wanted more of Rosy’s side of the story but it was fascinating to learn about all that Julie does with her non-profit. I think it is so important for us to read these #ownvoices experiences with immigration. In this book you get to see the difficult decision Rosy had to make in Rating: Read NOW! My Thoughts: The book is divided into two sections, Rosy’s story and Julie’s efforts in creating a non-profit (Immigrant families together) which is how she met Rosy and helped her reunite with her sons. I wanted more of Rosy’s side of the story but it was fascinating to learn about all that Julie does with her non-profit. I think it is so important for us to read these #ownvoices experiences with immigration. In this book you get to see the difficult decision Rosy had to make in hopes for a better life for her family and the struggles immigrants face in the journey. I felt lots of emotions while reading this book! This was my book club’s pick last month and we had a great discussion. We were lucky to have the opportunity to virtually chat with the authors. We discussed their writing process, what they are up to now, and the work of Immigrant families together. I’m grateful for Rosayra and Julie for sharing their story with the world.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Steph Poillucci

    Listened on audio. An important story everyone should read. I definitely need to learn more about immigration to this country after reading this

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    *Ugly Cry GIF*

  30. 5 out of 5

    Katie LaMarre

    500 stars. This book helped me to understand the harrowing journey immigrants, especially mothers and children, have when seeking asylum in the US, especially during Trumps zero-tolerance policy. A great quick read, despite taking me almost a month 😅

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.