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A Test of Courage

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When a transport ship is abruptly kicked out of hyperspace as part of a galaxy-wide disaster, newly-minted teen Jedi Vernestra Rwoh, a young Padawan, an audacious tech-kid, and the son of an ambassador are stranded on a jungle moon where they must work together to survive both the dangerous terrain and a hidden danger lurking in the shadows….


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When a transport ship is abruptly kicked out of hyperspace as part of a galaxy-wide disaster, newly-minted teen Jedi Vernestra Rwoh, a young Padawan, an audacious tech-kid, and the son of an ambassador are stranded on a jungle moon where they must work together to survive both the dangerous terrain and a hidden danger lurking in the shadows….

30 review for A Test of Courage

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jared Mayes

    A wonderfully enjoyable middle-grade entry in the High Republic publishing program, A Test of Courage chronicles the misadventure of prodigy 16-year-old Jedi Knight Vernestra Rwoh alongside the mischievous Senator’s daughter Avon Starros as their lives are turned upside down by a Nihl attack. We see how grief tempts Jedi Padawan Imri to give into his desire for revenge in a totally believable way, lending the book emotional depth. Plus it develops some cool lightsaber lore with Vernestra’s light A wonderfully enjoyable middle-grade entry in the High Republic publishing program, A Test of Courage chronicles the misadventure of prodigy 16-year-old Jedi Knight Vernestra Rwoh alongside the mischievous Senator’s daughter Avon Starros as their lives are turned upside down by a Nihl attack. We see how grief tempts Jedi Padawan Imri to give into his desire for revenge in a totally believable way, lending the book emotional depth. Plus it develops some cool lightsaber lore with Vernestra’s lightwhip and Avon’s desire to experiment on kyber crystals. As an overachiever, I really identified with Vernestra’s character and can’t wait to see how the series develops her and Avon!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    I am left quite surprised by this book! At first, I didn’t think this would come remotely close to Light of the Jedi in terms of piquing my interest, but I was totally wrong! I read this book in a couple of days, mostly because of how invested I was in the story but also slightly because of the easy-to-read plot, which is expected since it is a middle grade novel. However, the designation of middle grade should not deter anyone from picking up this story, especially if you prefer more focused st I am left quite surprised by this book! At first, I didn’t think this would come remotely close to Light of the Jedi in terms of piquing my interest, but I was totally wrong! I read this book in a couple of days, mostly because of how invested I was in the story but also slightly because of the easy-to-read plot, which is expected since it is a middle grade novel. However, the designation of middle grade should not deter anyone from picking up this story, especially if you prefer more focused stories rather than large-in-scope books like Light of the Jedi is. The character development of the main characters is compelling, with the main Jedi Knight Vernestra Rwoh leading the way and showing her personal growth as a Jedi and as a leader despite her young age. Jedi Padawan Imri Cantaros undergoes a lovely character arc that was a bit unexpected for me in some ways, and I’m quite intrigued by the potential future of this character. Avon Starros is a lovely addition to the High Republic, especially for comic fans, and her personality really shined through the pages and via her eccentric, L3-37-esque droid, J-6. And the last character in this main crew is Honesty Weft, who was my least favorite character of the bunch, but even still he goes through great character growth that is satisfying. Overall, this was an enjoyable read with an interesting and contained plot that still has some consequences for the rest of the High Republic era. I’m excited to read about what happens next with all of these characters, but with Vernestra in particular as she’s really one of the more stand-out Jedi in my eyes so far in the High Republic.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Grace

    As a partisan for the prequel Jedi, I'm interested to see what the High Republic era has to say for itself. This was a pretty good introduction. The idea of a sixteen-year-old full Jedi knight is a little bit odd, but it's Star Wars. We believe in giving teenage girls a scary amount of power. Other than that, this was a good, solid kids' adventure. It had enough philosophy, enough action, and enough emotions to make it all-around enjoyable. As a partisan for the prequel Jedi, I'm interested to see what the High Republic era has to say for itself. This was a pretty good introduction. The idea of a sixteen-year-old full Jedi knight is a little bit odd, but it's Star Wars. We believe in giving teenage girls a scary amount of power. Other than that, this was a good, solid kids' adventure. It had enough philosophy, enough action, and enough emotions to make it all-around enjoyable.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Alexandra Elend Wolf

    Huh, this was a lot better than I was expecting. It also had some pretty badass characters that made the reading all the more enjoyable. I quite liked it. RTC. _______________ Am I reading more Star Wars? Yes, I most definitely am. I mean, I was not kidding when I said I plan to drown in the High Republic. And now I feel even more justified after confirming that it's amazing. However, this will be very different since it is Middle Grade and, therefore, it'll be a lot less intense, I think, but ho Huh, this was a lot better than I was expecting. It also had some pretty badass characters that made the reading all the more enjoyable. I quite liked it. RTC. _______________ Am I reading more Star Wars? Yes, I most definitely am. I mean, I was not kidding when I said I plan to drown in the High Republic. And now I feel even more justified after confirming that it's amazing. However, this will be very different since it is Middle Grade and, therefore, it'll be a lot less intense, I think, but hopefully just as epic.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Siona St Mark

    I’m dnf-ing this one. The lightwhip was cool, but I really only skimmed to get to that part. The writing was just not engaging to me, and I get it’s a middle grade book, but I’ve read MG books before that could hold my interest, this just wasn’t one of them. I will checkout Claudia Gray’s novel to see if I like it (also that one is supposed to feature the carnivorous planet things which seem really cool to me), but I don’t think I’ll pick up everything from the High Republic after all.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andreas

    I realise that I'm not exactly the target audience, but I still found this book to be enjoyable. Had I been younger I'm sure that this would've been a new favourite of mine. It's Star Wars, after all. I realise that I'm not exactly the target audience, but I still found this book to be enjoyable. Had I been younger I'm sure that this would've been a new favourite of mine. It's Star Wars, after all.

  7. 5 out of 5

    TheGeeksAttic

    Star Wars: A Test of Courage was written by New York Times Bestselling Author, Justina Ireland. This is the second tale within the High Republic Era. A Test of Courage is a young readers book and is published by Disney-Lucasfilm Press. SUMMARY: A few members of the Nihil are at Port Haileap, with a plan to infiltrate the luxury liner ship, the Steady Wing. They want to cause chaos, to instill fear in the republic, and most importantly, to make a name for themselves and impress one of the Tempest Star Wars: A Test of Courage was written by New York Times Bestselling Author, Justina Ireland. This is the second tale within the High Republic Era. A Test of Courage is a young readers book and is published by Disney-Lucasfilm Press. SUMMARY: A few members of the Nihil are at Port Haileap, with a plan to infiltrate the luxury liner ship, the Steady Wing. They want to cause chaos, to instill fear in the republic, and most importantly, to make a name for themselves and impress one of the Tempest Runners, which is one of the leaders in the Nihil. There are many people on the Steady Wing, all headed to the Starlight Beacon's opening ceremony. When the Nihil's plans for the Steady Wing come to fruition, a young group of survivors find themselves alone on a moon, far off from space lanes. The group consists of two young Jedi, the son of the Dalna Ambassador, and another child with the familiar name in the Star Wars comic line, Starros. The group must figure out how to survive on the terrifying moon, and somehow reach out to someone among the stars to rescue them. Will the youth survive? Will the young Jedi stray from their path and give into fear? What more does the Nihil have planned? You'll have to read the book to find out! CHARACTERS: We have a few characters to talk about, I'll mention one character I found a little interesting and another I was annoyed by. Vernestra Rwoh is a green skinned Mirialan. She’ a prodigy within the Jedi Order, passing the Jedi trials at the age of just 15, one of the youngest Jedi Knights around. She’s not too thrilled with her first mission as a Jedi Knight, spending time on the planet Dalna. She’s keeping an eye on an ambassadors daughter, making sure she’s kept safe. She’s good with a lightsaber, but still a little unsure of herself. She’s young for a Knight, and must face some difficult decisions when she’s thrust into an unexpected disaster. Honesty Weft, son of the Dalna Ambassador. Honesty does not want to be on the Steady Wing, he’d much rather find out what vocation would suit him best, he’d like to be a warrior, to join the Dalna military. Even though the planet hasn’t had a full scale war in a century. But, his father wants Honesty with him, to witness diplomacy first hand as they attempt to join the Republic. Honesty is a very emotional young man. Who cry’s about absolutely everything. OVERALL THOUGHTS: This book was fine. It’s a young readers story, and for some reason I find the young reader books pretty tedious. The story isn’t bad at all, it's just very simple and straight forward. The book definitely has a mature theme, with a lot of death and some violent moments. For a kids story, I'd think if it were a film, it would still have to be PG-13. There are some really dark moments. The characters are written well. Honestly, I found only two characters interesting, the others I could have done without. The idea that one of the young Jedi is a prodigy was a bit silly, I think the story would have been more interesting if the cast contained not 1 Padawan, but 2 or maybe even 3. The Nihil didn't seem to intemidating in the book, of course they did a dark deed, but they were just dumb villians, I would say that's most likely due to the targeted age group for the book, then again... the book was packed with death and other dark points. The dialogue was well written. Some of the plot points were really interesting as one of the youth turns toward a darker path. We get a good tease at some of the lore of the Jedi, and their conflict with the Sith. Like I said, the book was fine, it wasn't bad at all, but I wouldn't say it was great. Do I recommend you pick up Star Wars: The High Republic: A Test of Courage? If you are a completest, yes. If you could care less about young reader books, I think you could pass on this one. RATING: I give this novel an B-

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kelvin

    Don’t let the kiddie cover art fool you. This is some quality Star Wars content right here. The Goodreads description does not do this story justice. Disney LucasFilm Press will need to update it and give it the life it deserves. Right off the bat, this book is way better than Light of the Jedi for multiple reasons. 1) The characters are actual people and not emotionless figureheads. 2) The pacing is way way more fluid. 3) The worldbuilding doesn’t feel like padding (e.g. describing the properties o Don’t let the kiddie cover art fool you. This is some quality Star Wars content right here. The Goodreads description does not do this story justice. Disney LucasFilm Press will need to update it and give it the life it deserves. Right off the bat, this book is way better than Light of the Jedi for multiple reasons. 1) The characters are actual people and not emotionless figureheads. 2) The pacing is way way more fluid. 3) The worldbuilding doesn’t feel like padding (e.g. describing the properties of peremacrete in painstaking detail, transparasteel in painstaking detail, starship specifics in painstaking detail). 4) The prose is far more engaging. 5) The story itself is memorable. While I liked Light of the Jedi to an extent, that book felt more like I was reading a graphic novel in word form. The characters in that book felt inconsistent, there was a lot told about them than shown and I had a sense that Soule wasn’t given too much creative freedom when it came to developing characters like Avar Kriss, Bell Zettifar and the Loden Greatstorm. (A noticeable trend amongst Disney canon novels). But in A Test of Courage does everything a great book should do. From the start, I like the energy and style that Justina brings to the table. She captures that sense of adolescent adventure in this book and for a story geared towards a younger reading audience, it isn’t written in that spoon-fed way that most Middle School chapter books tend to be. This book is a Young Adult novel written at Middle-Grade length. This book does introduce an interesting aspect, introducing one of the youngest Jedi Knights in Star Wars canon. I liked the other characters as well. We jump across various POVs throughout the telling, but it isn’t jarring. These POVs are necessary to the story because, without them, we wouldn’t get such a well-rounded story. Each of the characters has a shared goal, but varying degrees and methods of achieving that goal. In essence, it’s a character-driven plot and I am grateful for that approach. All in all, a solid read, above average for Middle Grade I might add. This book is technically the sequel to Light of the Jedi. You don’t need to read that book before diving into this one. I recommend reading this one first before diving into Soule’s novel.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    The second book to be released set in The High Republic era is A Test of Courage by Justina Ireland, the first being Light of the Jedi by Charles Soule. A Test of Courage opens with the targeted destruction of a luxury ship, the Steady Wing, on its way to the opening ceremony for the Starlight Beacon space station. Two members of the Nihil, an organized group of pirates dedicated to instilling fear in the Republic, are responsible. In the aftermath of the destruction, four young individuals are l The second book to be released set in The High Republic era is A Test of Courage by Justina Ireland, the first being Light of the Jedi by Charles Soule. A Test of Courage opens with the targeted destruction of a luxury ship, the Steady Wing, on its way to the opening ceremony for the Starlight Beacon space station. Two members of the Nihil, an organized group of pirates dedicated to instilling fear in the Republic, are responsible. In the aftermath of the destruction, four young individuals are left stranded on a moon far from known space lanes. Among the survivors are newly minted Jedi Knight Vernestra Rwoh, Padawan Imri Cantaros, Honesty Weft, son of the ambassador for the planet Dalna, and Avon Starros, daughter of Senator Ghirra Starros. (The name Starros is likely familiar to readers of Marvel's Star Wars comics, which have featured a character named Sana Starros. Since this story takes place 200 years prior to The Phantom Menace, there's no confirmation there's a relation.) Vernestra, or Vern as she's nicknamed, is young for a Jedi Knight. At just 15 years of age, she is considered a prodigy in the ways of the Force. Avon is a tech wiz, an inventor, and a bit precocious to say the least. She's a challenge for Vern, who is tasked with her safety. Imri's master, Douglas, was killed in Steady Wing‘s destruction. This leaves him feeling unmoored and vulnerable to the temptations of the dark side of the Force. Honesty's father was also killed in the explosion and he's left with anger and feelings of guilt over things unsaid. The four are also accompanied by Avon's droid, J-6. Avon has made certain adjustments to the droid's programming, making it a real character in its own right. As the four try to find their way on the mysterious moon where they've become stranded, they encounter dangers both from the natural world and the two Nihil pirates responsible for the Steady Wing‘s destruction, who also find themselves stranded. A Test of Courage is a middle-grade book aimed at readers between 8-12 years of age, so I'm not the targeted audience. That said, I found it quite enjoyable. The characters are developed nicely, each with a distinct personality and the pros and cons that follow. Imri in particular is troubled by self-doubt, something he experienced while his master was alive and is greatly amplified after his death. Once the pirates are discovered, Imri decides to take the situation into his own hands, and he sees Honesty's anger as a useful tool. Vernestra finds herself having to deal with the aftermath, and bringing Imri back from the precipice of falling into darkness. There are some pretty mature themes found in A Test of Courage, but they're handled responsibly. It didn't feel like things were just tossed into the mix because it's a “kids book” and no one will take it seriously. There's a real plot and the things that happen to the characters do so for actual reasons, and there are valuable lessons to be learned. A Test of Courage by Justina Ireland was released the same day as Light of the Jedi by Charles Soule. While the stories set in The High Republic era are interconnected, you don't need to read everything to follow the story. However, having read Light of the Jedi first, I found A Test of Courage to be complementary. The younger intended audience and adult readers alike will find something to appreciate in this well-crafted tale. Thank you to Disney Lucasfilm Press for providing an uncorrected galley proof for review purposes.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Emma

    Arc provided by NetGalley. Ok, I have many thoughts. Let’s preface this review with some quantifying statements. -This is technically a middle-grade book, I don’t often read middle grade and thus don’t have much to say in regards to that aspect of the book. -I am a huge Star Wars fan. I have read several of the books and am well versed in the universe. -Quantifying the previous statement, Jedi are not my favorite element of the Star Wars universe. So this book does have to stand outside of Jedi be Arc provided by NetGalley. Ok, I have many thoughts. Let’s preface this review with some quantifying statements. -This is technically a middle-grade book, I don’t often read middle grade and thus don’t have much to say in regards to that aspect of the book. -I am a huge Star Wars fan. I have read several of the books and am well versed in the universe. -Quantifying the previous statement, Jedi are not my favorite element of the Star Wars universe. So this book does have to stand outside of Jedi being cool. These things being said, let’s start the review. I loved this book. I had such a fun time reading this book. I also got so into it you don’t understand. While reading I was highlighting elements in different colors and making notes. I never do this when reading fiction books, I’ve only ever done it in some nonfiction books, that is how into this book I got. As a Star Wars fan, I was so excited by the setting this new sub-series is covering. The universe outside of the Skywalker saga and the Skywalkers holds so much potential. There is so much potential in this unexplored time in the galaxy. Going back to the intended age range I do believe that this book is in some ways able to transcend the stereotypes of that descriptor. Of the middle grades that I have read after exiting the target age range where you would expect one to read them, one was another Star Wars middle grade. Comparing the two without really comparing them, I feel that this one has a much wider appeal. This book goes into some complex topics and deals with some pretty heavy stuff. There were only a few times when I felt the influence of middle grade seep into the story. I feel like everyone could enjoy this book. Moving on to how much fun as a star wars fan I had spotting references, let’s put that at a 7 and an 8 for those more well versed in different species and planets. This book was also really funny. There were several lines that I had to save because they brought a smile to my face. For those interested in Jedi culture and mentality this book dealt with those topics pretty heavily. With two of the four main characters being force users a significant amount of the conflict present in this book comes as a result of dealing with your place as a Jedi. How you interact with the force and it with you. Jedi codes of conduct and rules are also frequently brought up and referenced. If you didn’t know about Jedi before reading this you definitely know how they operate by the end. We also spent a suspicious amount of time in there talking about kyber crystals. It felt sort of out of place and like it was set up for future plots and events. These events are either going to tie back in with more high republic books or they could just be tying us to things like Rogue One. I feel that one of the reasons I enjoyed this book so much was because of some similar elements it shares with the new Thrawn books. We are in star wars but we are outside of the familiar realm we usually operate in. This gives the story so much more room to roam and it shows at times. I also liked the imped bigger threat that will turn up again at a future date. Thrawn also had these, enemies, in the shadows just outside of the story but sure to impact it significantly. On a final note, let’s talk about some things I wasn’t so jazzed about as no book is without some flaws. There was the bit about the kyber crystals I mentioned earlier but it’s not too big of a deal. The start of the book put me a bit off at first. It felt like we were switching between characters too much and it was hard to get into. There was this promise of excitement just around the corner but the intrigue was just a bit lacking. I also found the ending to be a bit rushed. The resolution to the stranding dilemma comes too easily and closure for the characters doesn’t really happen satisfyingly. I can’t quite put my finger on everything in the ending that put me off but it was there and otherwise, I would have rated the book much higher. I can’t wait to see how more of The High Republic plays out.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nathalie

    Very much a novel geared towards children or young teens (the character of Avon especially just screams "junior novel character"), but it was alright. There's a few characters and references that refer to Light of the Jedi, but I wouldn't say this is a necessary read if you're interested in consuming the new canon. It's a nice little adventure but can pretty much be skipped. Very much a novel geared towards children or young teens (the character of Avon especially just screams "junior novel character"), but it was alright. There's a few characters and references that refer to Light of the Jedi, but I wouldn't say this is a necessary read if you're interested in consuming the new canon. It's a nice little adventure but can pretty much be skipped.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Eleanor (bookishcourtier)

    I really enjoyed this book! This is one of the first books in the new High Republic era of Star Wars and whilst this did only offer quite a limited view of the new world, it has definitely made me excited to continue. My favourite character was Vernestra, she was very cool. I cannot wait to explore this era in more detail.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paul

    It is possible to simply adore the characters in a book, but be totally turned off by the plot? That’s exactly how I felt about this book. Vernestra, a fifteen-year-old Jedi who is tasked with watching over Avon Starros, a trouble-making young aspiring inventor and J-8, her wacky droid. They are well-crafted and form the core of the story… and it is these young , strong characters that kept me reading. The basic plot: A new space station called Starlight Beacon is about to be dedicated. It will b It is possible to simply adore the characters in a book, but be totally turned off by the plot? That’s exactly how I felt about this book. Vernestra, a fifteen-year-old Jedi who is tasked with watching over Avon Starros, a trouble-making young aspiring inventor and J-8, her wacky droid. They are well-crafted and form the core of the story… and it is these young , strong characters that kept me reading. The basic plot: A new space station called Starlight Beacon is about to be dedicated. It will become a key communication and supply relay between Coruscant and the Outer Rim. Thousands are on their way to the big party! The characters in A Test of Courage are on a luxury liner headed for the big event… but on their way a series of explosions rips the vessel apart and a spare maintenance ship enables them to escape the wreckage. They find themselves floating in deep space until a habitable moon is located. Is it deserted? Will the mystery be solved… My biggest beef with this book is that I never felt a connection to this new High Republic. Some distinct things are mentioned, but none of the reveal I was expecting. I wanted to see and hear The Time of the Jedi… only to ultimately get a lost-on-a-deserted-planet plot. As I said above, the characters were great… each flashback and interaction gave me better insight into their lives and personalities, but I never saw they connect to the new whole. I’ll try not to pan this one too much because I think Ireland’s writing is damn good… Read it for a decently fun adventure and some good characters… a book which I think will be a delight for new readers of the SW Universe. For all my reviews: https://paulspicks.blog

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ted

    According to the author I should not read this book. Had high expectations of The High Republic. Already crashing and burning when an author of one of the books tells you it is not for you. Keep up the BRILLIANT work Justina!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    **I received an advance review copy from Del Rey. Thank you to Del Rey for sending me a copy of the book to read and review! As I have sat down to write this review twice now, I have found myself a little speechless and unsure how to talk about this book. It's not because I didn't like it, because I loved it, and it's not because it didn't challenge me, because it did. It was a truly wonderful book and I don't know how to put it all into words, but I'm going to give it a shot! A TEST OF COURAGE i **I received an advance review copy from Del Rey. Thank you to Del Rey for sending me a copy of the book to read and review! As I have sat down to write this review twice now, I have found myself a little speechless and unsure how to talk about this book. It's not because I didn't like it, because I loved it, and it's not because it didn't challenge me, because it did. It was a truly wonderful book and I don't know how to put it all into words, but I'm going to give it a shot! A TEST OF COURAGE is the first middle grade entry into Star Wars' new large publishing initiative The High Republic. Set in a time 200 years before The Phantom Menace, A TEST OF COURAGE follows young Jedi Knight Vernestra Rwoh on her first assignment alone. Tasked with guarding Avon Starros. a senator's daughter as they travel to the Starlight Beacon, Vernestra feels that this mission is more babysitting than anything else. But when the ship they are travelling on is blown up by a mysterious enemy, Vernestra, Avon, nanny droid J-6, son of an ambassador Honesty Weft, and Jedi Padawan Imri Cantaros are the only survivors. Together, they have to navigate their grief and devastation, a moon with a hostile climate, and the mysterious enemy set on destroying them all. This story is a test of courage indeed. The shining star of this book is its characters. Each of them has a really wonderful backstory and way of dealing with their experience that allows for really dynamic interactions and discussion of difficult topics. While I could focus in on Honesty's kindheartedness, Imri's passion, or Vernestra's uncertainty for her place, the standout character in this story is Avon Starros. Daughter of a senator, Avon has been isolated from peers her age from most of her life, rather spending it with books and holos, becoming a bit of an inventor and tinkerer. She's funny, smart, and really has a curious eye. She is a wonderful addition to the Star Wars universe and I hope we get to see so much more of her throughout the High Republic over her lifetime. A TEST OF COURAGE deals with loss and grief with grace. One thing that's often missing in Star Wars is the recognition of the magnitude of loss, and letting characters be in those emotions for any time at all. We get hints of it throughout the movies, but it's certainly not as exciting and punchy as the action. A book is a format which allows these conversations to soar. The grief discussed in this book doesn't bog it down or make the book particularly sad, but it allows for a middle grade audience to explore this difficult topic within a fantastical setting. The relationship that most exemplifies this is between Avon and Honestly. Honesty's father is one of the people who died on the ship, and Avon bases herself and worldview more in logic and math. Honesty is struggling and sad, and Avon is doing her best, but not empathizing with Honesty on his level. Both of their interpretations of the situation are valid, and in knowing Honesty, Avon is able to understand a new point of view and see grief up close. Her character keeps it light, all the while growing, and allowing the reader to grow as well. While this book is a fairly quick read, one thing that slowed me down a little was how long it seemed to take to get to the adventure. Even as I write that, though, I recognize that I wouldn't want the book to be structured differently, because the slower time spent in the first half was exactly what allowed the emotions to come to the fore. I would be interested in listening to the audio of the book to see if that changes for me. All in all, this is a fantastic entry into The High Republic and Star Wars canon. I feel that many adult readers skip the middle grade titles, but I hope that trend will end here. A TEST OF COURAGE tells an important, timely story about grappling with devastating loss, persevering through new challenges, and what it means to be exactly where you need to be. It is a wonderful book that I hope all Star Wars fans pick up, no matter what age.

  16. 4 out of 5

    sassyspines

    "Death. Destruction. Desolation." This book definitely portrays a variety of emotions to the reader. This book has humor, lessons, hurt, and questioning one's self. The story follows two young Jedis Vernestra and Imri, a senator's daughter Avon and her droid J-6, and a Dalnan ambassador's son Honesty. If you have read The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer and loved Iko, you will love reading about Jay-Six. "Perhaps the people who had actually suffered got to make decisions sometimes." Our "Death. Destruction. Desolation." This book definitely portrays a variety of emotions to the reader. This book has humor, lessons, hurt, and questioning one's self. The story follows two young Jedis Vernestra and Imri, a senator's daughter Avon and her droid J-6, and a Dalnan ambassador's son Honesty. If you have read The Lunar Chronicles by Marissa Meyer and loved Iko, you will love reading about Jay-Six. "Perhaps the people who had actually suffered got to make decisions sometimes." Our main characters are thrown into action when the ship they are on, the Steady Wing, starts to fail. They wind up on a moon and have to survive and find a way off. All of the characters are dealing with the events from the Steady Wing, and a few of them begin to contemplate what that they've been told. Will someone be swayed to join the Dark Side? Or will they feel the force's call and stay on their path as a Jedi? While on the moon, they face various challenges from survival to atmospheric changes. Will they survive the moon and make it back home? "Don't always be in a hurry to be the first one out of the gate. Sometimes the first of the herd is just quickest to the slaughter." I loved Avon's character and reading about her growth throughout the story. Seeing how much her mother cares about her was nice to read because parents in Young Adult and Middle-Grade books are depicted very differently. I loved seeing how Avon and J-6 interacted with one another and the protectiveness he felt for Avon. I do wish we had a longer book to learn more about Honesty and Imri and their stories. Since this is a shorter book, we get a glimpse into the lives of our characters. However, we are left wanting to know more. Also, I would have loved to read more about Vernestra and her journey to a Jedi Knight. Trigger & Content Warnings: Death, kidnapped, loss of a loved one I was fortunate to read an arc of this. All quotes are from an uncorrected advance reader copy.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    A Test of Courage was a fun and short adventure set in the High Republic Era. Is it worth reading? For kids trying to get into Star Wars, absolutely. For an adult or teen, not so much. Is it necessary? No but, the characters are interesting and will most likely carry over to other High Republic content so it was good to know where everyone starts out. The production quality, like in all Star Wars audiobooks is top notch quality. While this wasn't geared towards me I wanted to check it out and I' A Test of Courage was a fun and short adventure set in the High Republic Era. Is it worth reading? For kids trying to get into Star Wars, absolutely. For an adult or teen, not so much. Is it necessary? No but, the characters are interesting and will most likely carry over to other High Republic content so it was good to know where everyone starts out. The production quality, like in all Star Wars audiobooks is top notch quality. While this wasn't geared towards me I wanted to check it out and I'm happy that I did. Going forward though I'll just stick to the Adult and YA books set in the High Republic as that's where the big story moments are going to happen. Overall thoughts: While this was a fun read set in the High Republic, I'm not the audience for this book. I'll be happy to recommend this to parents trying to get there kids into reading and Star Wars.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kai Charles(Fiction State Of Mind)

    The High Republic is here! In this middle grade story we meet young Jedi Knight Vernestra Rwoh who is joining a delegation of Jedi Masters, diplomats and padawans to celebrate the activation of Starlight Beacon. This book is in alignment with the events of Light of the Jedi but what is great about the HR universe so far is that you can read this book without reading Light of the Jedi. Though the reader is very quickly introduced to some representatives of the Nihl the main leads of this book are i The High Republic is here! In this middle grade story we meet young Jedi Knight Vernestra Rwoh who is joining a delegation of Jedi Masters, diplomats and padawans to celebrate the activation of Starlight Beacon. This book is in alignment with the events of Light of the Jedi but what is great about the HR universe so far is that you can read this book without reading Light of the Jedi. Though the reader is very quickly introduced to some representatives of the Nihl the main leads of this book are in the dark of the events that unfold. When bombs explode on the the ship heading to the beacon a group of children/teens make their way to an escape pod and find themselves the last survivors. Venestra and Avon shine in this novel. Their personalities are very different but they both quickly realize the benefits of collaboration. I also enjoyed that Ireland doesn't shy away from exploring the emotions of loss as the son of a diplomat and a Jedi padawan deal with the death of their Father and Jedi Master. Add a sassy robot and adventures on a small planet with deadly acid rain and you get a fast paced and satisfying adventure. It's been recently announced that we will see more of these characters in the future and I'm really excited for it. Especially Avon Starros.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Timothy

    Another great book that has kicked off the High Republic era of Star Wars! I’ve always loved the Jedi, ever since I was a kid in the 80’s. Even though this book is geared towards young readers, I found it to include a great little story filled with some very solid Jedi philosophy that weaves well into established Star Wars lore. The little insights and conversations about the mysterious Nature of the force, about the light and dark side of the force are just as important in the fictional world of Another great book that has kicked off the High Republic era of Star Wars! I’ve always loved the Jedi, ever since I was a kid in the 80’s. Even though this book is geared towards young readers, I found it to include a great little story filled with some very solid Jedi philosophy that weaves well into established Star Wars lore. The little insights and conversations about the mysterious Nature of the force, about the light and dark side of the force are just as important in the fictional world of Star Wars as it is in the real world. For what this book aims to be, my expectations were exceeded, and I very much encourage any other adult readers who are interested in the High Republic era to pick it up and give it a read.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Mario

    This is simply one of the best middle grade books I've read in ages, part of the initial round of novels for the multimedia project The High Republic, it follows the adventures of a group of teenagers who have found themselves in the middle of a chaotic situation, after the great disaster in Hetzal (again, reading Light of the Jedi before this one is highly recommended). Marooned in an uninhabited planet with a peculiar (and dangerous) ecosystem, they must survive and face a more experienced enem This is simply one of the best middle grade books I've read in ages, part of the initial round of novels for the multimedia project The High Republic, it follows the adventures of a group of teenagers who have found themselves in the middle of a chaotic situation, after the great disaster in Hetzal (again, reading Light of the Jedi before this one is highly recommended). Marooned in an uninhabited planet with a peculiar (and dangerous) ecosystem, they must survive and face a more experienced enemy, but the real test, and what makes this book a gem, is confronting the greatest enemy, themselves. I won't say more but the pull of the Dark Side via fear, anger, etc. is treated exactly as it should be, and taking in consideration all the current political landscape, it feels greatly relevant. Do not skip this one merely because it's middle grade, it really is good. Very good.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Terry

    This is a great kids adventure. The characters are a bit young for me but I'm sure my kids would love the age group and their abilities. Also the struggle of knowing ones place in the galaxy when surrounded by what you think is greatness. This is a great kids adventure. The characters are a bit young for me but I'm sure my kids would love the age group and their abilities. Also the struggle of knowing ones place in the galaxy when surrounded by what you think is greatness.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lance Shadow

    My excitement for the high republic continues as I blasted through the next novel in the High Republic publishing project, Justina Ireland's A Test of Courage! While Charles Soule's Light of the Jedi won't go down among my favorite star wars novels even when just accounting for Canon, I immediately fell in love with the High Republic era, it quickly got me invested in this interconnected multimedia story, and I am interested in seeing more of the plethora of characters that it introduced. So wit My excitement for the high republic continues as I blasted through the next novel in the High Republic publishing project, Justina Ireland's A Test of Courage! While Charles Soule's Light of the Jedi won't go down among my favorite star wars novels even when just accounting for Canon, I immediately fell in love with the High Republic era, it quickly got me invested in this interconnected multimedia story, and I am interested in seeing more of the plethora of characters that it introduced. So with that in mind, I am incredibly ecstatic to say that I actually liked Justina Ireland's "A Test of Courage" even more. Especially when I just sit back and consider that I'm an adult male who is 25 years old and a hardcore star wars fan. There's plenty that I can criticize or nitpick but at the end of the day, this is a childrens' novel- and I honestly don't want to complain, because between this and Light of the Jedi, A Test of Courage is the one that I connected with more closely. THE STORY: Taking place concurrently with the events of Light of the Jedi, the magnificent Starlight Beacon is about to be launched. Newly minted Jedi knight Vernestra Rwoh has been given her first mission as a knight- to escort Avon Starros, the rambunctious daughter of a senator, to the station in time for the dedication ceremony. The ship also includes a delegation from Dalna lead by Ambassador Weft. But when the ship they are traveling on runs into trouble, Vernestra and Avon find themselves stranded on an unforgiving jungle moon with a padawan named Imri Cantaros, and the ambassador's son Honesty Weft. The four children must work together to survive the hostile environment while dealing with heavy emotional trauma. THE BAD: I could find plenty to nitpick as a hardcore star wars fan and a critical adult, but honestly, there's only one problem that I would say is really worth complaining about- in that the opening is really slow. The prologue to the book already indicates that something is going to go wrong (as does any basic summary you could probably get on a cover or a review), but the inciting incident that jumpstarts the plot doesn't happen until about a fifth of the way in. So even though the first 5 chapters don't feel like filler because they are setting up the characters, it does feel a little slow. I could also nitpick the characterization a little in that they don't all have well defined character arcs, but honestly, I don't really want to. I am not in the target audience for this book- its a junior novel. And for that audience, this book does exactly what it needs to do. You could also nitpick that the two villains are stereotypical, but I can forgive it because they only show up a couple of times and they are more of an obstacle rather than an adversary. THE GOOD: I actually intend to listen to this novel again-given that I was able to get all the way through on just one shift at work, I think I'll give it another go tomorrow. I really enjoyed this one and would like to see if I can find more to like and/or if the problems I had before are not as big of a deal. Starting off with the best part, the plot. It's pretty mature and intense for a children's book, and adults will find all the classic star wars themes about what it means to be a jedi and the dangers of the dark side. And honestly, after how exhausting it was to follow everything that was going on in Light of the Jedi, I loved experiencing a smaller scale, character driven story with a much tighter focus. Once Justina Ireland finishes setting up all the characters in those slower opening chapters, this book kicks into high gear, and never lets up. I found the story to be more and more engaging as the plot advanced and these rowdy children had to figure out how to work as a team. After the first five chapters, the focus is squarely on our core group of characters: Vernestra "Vern" Rwoh, Imri Cantaros, Honesty Weft, Avon Starros, and Starros' droid J-6. All of these characters were memorable and I loved how they played off each other. Imri is my favorite- he was quite relateable and had the most well-defined character arc of the group. The other characters work well too- young girls are going to have a blast with badass jedi Vernestra and the resourceful and spunky Avon, while Imri and Honesty work wonderfully as role models for young boys, flipping entrenched gender stereotypes on their heads. I could care less about anybody who accuses this book of having an SJW agenda (in fact, that "criticism" that often is hurled at modern media is absolute bull crap)- this is a JUNIOR NOVEL- and I think it's incredibly valuable for boys to learn early on that its ok to be sad or scared in front of other people and they don't have to bottle up their emotions. Additionally, it is always great to have more characters for young girls to look up to and show them that they can be badass and that they can be smart and resourceful. Ok, rant over. let's get back to the characters themselves. I love how Ireland writes Imri, Avon, and Honesty like they are actually kids. Vernestra is a prodigy at only 16 and already acts like an adult, but 1) it grounds this premise within the rules of the Star Wars universe, so ok, and 2) I've encountered the 3 solo spawn operating at about the same level in the New Jedi Order, so having a conveniently uber talented 16 year old jedi kid in Star Wars is nothing new. It doesn't bother me. Otherwise, Vernestra pretty much pulled the same trick that Avar Kriss did in Light of the Jedi: for most of the book I found her to be the least interesting character in the group, but she had enough of a character arc in the end and she won me over. Her final scene in particular was effective. I hope to see more of her in later High Republic entries- and given that the ending teased some future potential story threads, it doesn't seem like Vernestra's story is done. When it comes to the worldbuilding, A Test of Courage will be familiar for those who read Light of the Jedi, except for one component- a reminder that the jedi of this timeframe are still fallible sentient beings. The focus for the jedi in that novel was to show how the order was focused on humility and heroically serving the people of the galaxy. You didn't really see any of them come into conflict with the dark side. A Test of Courage is a reminder that the jedi of the High Republic are still jedi, and they still grapple with the same conflicts that jedi of other eras do- the pull of the dark side, the power of strong negative emotions, and how it is important to know oneself and not be consumed. SPECIAL SECTION: THE AUDIO: The narration for the audiobook version was done by Keeler Lee (I'm not sure I got the spelling right- if somebody knows how to spell it correctly, please tell me). I thought she was fine, but not particularly great. The voices she did for the four kids was great, but perhaps I should have given more time following the phenomenal performance by Marc Thompson for Light of the Jedi. That man is next to impossible to beat for audiobook narration (the only individual performance I found better was Daniel Davis' narration for Darth Plagueis). So even though Lee's work on A Test of Courage wasn't bad, it's hard not to compare with Marc Thompson. Regardless, it was serviceable enough that I can listen to her read this book again, because I want to give A Test of Courage another go. THE CONCLUSION: Final rating is 4.5 stars, rounded up because of how much I personally connected with it and taking into account that this is a book for kids; most of my misgivings are coming from the perspective of a more critical adult that is probably wanting something that this book was clearly not going for. This is another win for lucasfilm and Disney's High Republic project. I already adore this era and will never get enough when it comes to stories being told in it. This is the first experience I had with Justina Ireland and her Star Wars work, and I will look forward to what else she does in the High Republic and elsewhere. But for now, A Test of Courage was MY kind of Star Wars story- a tightly focused plot revolving around a group of tangible characters going through relateable problems; and it was well done, especially considering the target audience. As part of the high republic project, how does it fit in? It stands on its own perfectly well, and an excellent introduction to this era for younger star wars fans (below age 13) who may get overwhelmed by how much Light of the Jedi requires readers to keep track of. It offers far less depth than Light of the Jedi when it comes to what the era is like and who the main villains are, but it offers enough information that I could have read this first and not have felt lost. That said, while I don't think Light of the Jedi is required reading before A Test of Courage, I would definitely recommend reading it first, so those trying to keep with with every detail going into this to be caught up on the lore and wider narrative- that background knowledge will be rewarding. That wraps it up for the books in the High Republic for now. The next novel will be Into the Dark by the one and only Claudia Grey- so it's probably going to be good. Until then, I'll be giving A Test of Courage at least one more listen, because I don't know how else to get my point across- I really enjoyed this book. It really spoke to me, and while I love me some worldbuilding and big epic plots in Star Wars, I want more stories like this, be it high republic or otherwise.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Vera

    Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for giving me the opportunity to read an ARC of this book! It was...fine. It's about a group of kids, including a Jedi Knight, a padawan, and two other kids who escape from their exploding ship and land on a nearby moon. They figure out who blew up their ship (not a spoiler since the prologue sets up who blows up the ship explicitly) and it all ties up well. Most of the book is spent talking about the various characters' feelings about what happened to the Thank you to the publisher and NetGalley for giving me the opportunity to read an ARC of this book! It was...fine. It's about a group of kids, including a Jedi Knight, a padawan, and two other kids who escape from their exploding ship and land on a nearby moon. They figure out who blew up their ship (not a spoiler since the prologue sets up who blows up the ship explicitly) and it all ties up well. Most of the book is spent talking about the various characters' feelings about what happened to them and about their relationships with people who were aboard the exploded ship. In other words, nothing much happens in the book, and the characters aren't interesting enough for me to care particularly about all of their angst. This is yet another very mediocre Disney Star Wars book. With each new series, I keep thinking that something mindblowing is going to happen, and it never does. The High Republic doesn't excite me in the way that the non-Disney canon Old Republic did, and I feel like Disney just can't manage to make a Star Wars book with new characters that I really care about. The writing style in this book was good, since Justina Ireland is a good writer, but good writing is not enough to make a book interesting. Unfortunately, this one was a miss for me.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jerome Azbell

    A safe title that, on its own, would provide little to set it apart among the pile of juvenile science fiction or even among Star Wars titles for that audience. It may prove an integral piece of the new High Republic line, though, which hints from this title show may still have promise. Hundreds of years before the Skywalker Saga, the Republic is in talks to add Dalna to its numbers. When a ship carrying Dalnan ambassadors is destroyed, the survivors (naturally including a Jedi and a Padawan) ar A safe title that, on its own, would provide little to set it apart among the pile of juvenile science fiction or even among Star Wars titles for that audience. It may prove an integral piece of the new High Republic line, though, which hints from this title show may still have promise. Hundreds of years before the Skywalker Saga, the Republic is in talks to add Dalna to its numbers. When a ship carrying Dalnan ambassadors is destroyed, the survivors (naturally including a Jedi and a Padawan) are in a fight for their own survival. This book tries to serve both as a character-driven and an action-driven story. While each character is unique and fleshed out, Star Wars continues its streak of droids being the most interesting characters. I found myself wanting to know more about each character individually (except, unfortunately, the one whose internal struggles form the novel's climactic tension) and wouldn't mind seeing more of each of them. The third act of the book moves to a more action-focused direction. This pull of a longer survival story moving directly into an action sequence seems a little forced but will be welcomed by readers who get this far. The epilogue reaches out to what I assume will be the main arc of the High Republic storyline, for which I will reserve my judgment due to insufficient evidence. Overall, this is a perfectly enjoyable title that will appeal to the existing Star Wars fan who is on board with Disney's methods.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sean Humphrey

    Great Tease A great start to a new era of Star Wars stories. This was a short read, but left me wanting to know more about what's going on. I'm looking forward to reading Light of the Jedi and am hoping that the rest of this event is as good or better than this story! Great Tease A great start to a new era of Star Wars stories. This was a short read, but left me wanting to know more about what's going on. I'm looking forward to reading Light of the Jedi and am hoping that the rest of this event is as good or better than this story!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Lori

    I received an ARC from Baker & Taylor! I highly recommend this book, especially if your family likes Star Wars. I will add this title to our library collection. However, you don't have to know that much about Star Wars to enjoy the story. I was most impressed with the dialogue and the character development. It was natural and it did not seem forced. Well done, Justina Ireland! :) I received an ARC from Baker & Taylor! I highly recommend this book, especially if your family likes Star Wars. I will add this title to our library collection. However, you don't have to know that much about Star Wars to enjoy the story. I was most impressed with the dialogue and the character development. It was natural and it did not seem forced. Well done, Justina Ireland! :)

  27. 5 out of 5

    Zakri Edwards

    Review for NetGallery ARC "A Test of Courage" written by Justina Ireland was written for middle readers, ages 8-12, and it is set in the High Republic Era of the Star Wars Universe immediately after the events of "The Great Disaster" around 200 years before the "The Phantom Menace." The story follows newly knighted Vernestra Rwoh and her companions (Honesty, a Delnan ambassador's son; Avon Starros, a Republic Senator's daughter; J-6, Avon's droid; and Jedi Padawan Imri) as they learn to trust one Review for NetGallery ARC "A Test of Courage" written by Justina Ireland was written for middle readers, ages 8-12, and it is set in the High Republic Era of the Star Wars Universe immediately after the events of "The Great Disaster" around 200 years before the "The Phantom Menace." The story follows newly knighted Vernestra Rwoh and her companions (Honesty, a Delnan ambassador's son; Avon Starros, a Republic Senator's daughter; J-6, Avon's droid; and Jedi Padawan Imri) as they learn to trust one another and struggle to survive when their ship is destroyed by Nihil pirates. Although the author does a good job of attempting to show the struggles of teenage kids stranded on a moon, the story as a whole falls flat in its emotional believability. Vernestra, a Jedi prodigy who has excelled in all of her previous training, seems to lack the emotional maturity of a fully knighted Jedi, yet she is the de-facto leader of the group solely because she is the oldest and "most experienced." This creates many problems as the others in the group find it difficult to follow her lead and, instead, proceed with their own agendas. Her lack of maturity leaves the reader wondering what in the world the Jedi Order was thinking when they deemed her worthy of passing the trials. Overall, despite the absence of an emotional connection with the audience, the book was a fun read. It did not provide more than a soft introduction to the High Republic, its Jedi, and their struggles with the Nihil during the fallout from The Great Disaster. For Star Wars fans looking to get into this new era, it is a forgettable must read, but for the casual observer who is mildly interested in Star Wars, it is a hard pass.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shireen Hakim

    A great adventure. Middle grade readers will enjoy Jedi heroes of their age. Thank you for the e ARC Disney Lucasfilm and NetGalley!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Caleb Bollenbacher

    Excited to see where the High Republic goes; great start!

  30. 4 out of 5

    G.H. Roberts

    What Was The Point?! So I came into this series with an open mind. I wanted this to be good. On the heels of the success of the Mandalorian, and the call from fans for a more old school take on Star Wars, and adjustments prior to release reported by the media it seemed as if we would get a better effort in this new undertaking. However this work is a lockstep example of the Kathleen Kennedy agenda and, in hearing the author's dismissive response to fan criticism, exactly what we feared. Like this What Was The Point?! So I came into this series with an open mind. I wanted this to be good. On the heels of the success of the Mandalorian, and the call from fans for a more old school take on Star Wars, and adjustments prior to release reported by the media it seemed as if we would get a better effort in this new undertaking. However this work is a lockstep example of the Kathleen Kennedy agenda and, in hearing the author's dismissive response to fan criticism, exactly what we feared. Like this or you suck. I didn't and here's why... (Spoilers ahead) So we meet our protagonist who is a female Jedi prodigy who made Jedi Knight at the ripe old age of fifteen. (Anakin Skywalker was in his twenties when he became a knight so that's how strong SHE is). The author goes on and on about how powerful she is and how proud she is to be a Jedi but then states that she is not arrogant or prideful so she's proud but humble. My issues with this character, beyond the obvious disregard for the lore, is how she is portrayed. The author seemed to want to avoid comparisons to Rey Palpatine but fell into the same trap of giving her character half-hearted doubts and hesitations only to immediately thrust conflict on her that she resolves with a Master's skill so there's no merit to any misgivings that she has. Then we meet the plucky sidekick who is also a prodigy but with science and engineering. She is a young girl who is bright, inquisitive to a fault with an insatiable appetite for knowledge and a cool mischievous streak. I liked her immediately but then the author screwed her all up. She. Is. A. Child. And she should react to the events around her as a child should. She doesn't. She acts like a grizzled veteran. The throw away lines about her hands shaking or her trying to project confidence in her voice are erased by her actions. The author tried to explain her cool competence away by blaming it on her love of logic (who is she, Spock?!). But there is no level of logic-love that can quell instinct when horrible things are happening. That's it for the girls, let's talk about the boys. They suck. We meet a male Padawan who is the opposite of our lead and only two years younger than her. He is the slow kid in class and full of doubt and fear and is absolutely nothing without the love and attention of his Master. His lightsaber doesn't even work right. He does have skills that our lead does not but he can only use them with her help or if the plot demands it. He is portrayed as being envious of the lead and her presence makes him feel inferior. The moment you meet him you know why he is there and where he will end up. The other is a diplomat's son who is a preteen who has been training formally to be a warrior for some time but is somehow not physically or mentally fit. He was meant to be a leader but ends up a follower of everyone including the young girl. He is also crushed with doubt and a lack of confidence. So the girls are prodigious and excellent and the boys are barely passable. Even the young girl's bodyguard droid is a sassy confident female. But that's not what makes this book so bad... There are no character arcs In this story. The lead is still super-awesome at the end. During the story she witnesses the Padawan suffer a brief fall to the Dark Side. It would make sense that she takes a step back for self-measurement and realizes that her age could leave her vulnerable to something similar so she should take time to build on her skills with experience. NOPE! She takes on the Padawan as her apprentice. They're only two years apart and he just tried to kill her! Really?! The Padawan learns nothing but he wasn't there to learn only to make the lead look good and to become her apprentice. In the end he still doubts and fears and is nothing without his new Master. The young girl is equally bereft of change and her lack of growth makes the least sense. On reading we learn that she suffered a severe trauma prior to the story as a result of her reckless behavior and she still doesn't change. In fact she makes a horrendously bad decision stealing a broken lightsaber sure that "science will thank her". The diplomat's son just chooses to honor his father, something that was never in question at any point in the story. I understand that this was just a YA style work for children but even they deserve a quality story and it was clearly sacrificed for the agenda. The plot was so weak boiling down to "HERE SHE IS, BASK IN HER GREATNESS!" The females are strong because we say so and the males around them are either dead or incompetent. And the predictability. 16 pages in I knew who was going to die and where everyone would end up. I was right about everything save for one point because there were no character arcs. In the end, this is a story driven by a progressive agenda where none of the characters progress. Throw in a weak predictable plot and you have nothing of value. Do better Lucasfilm. Male or female we want good stories!

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